INDIVIDUALISED CURRICULUM FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

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23 févr. 2014 (il y a 3 années et 3 mois)

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GRIFFITH UNIVERSITY

Faculty of Education

School of Cognition, Language and Special Education


MASTER OF SPECIAL EDUCATION

INDIVIDUALISED CURRI
CULUM FOR
STUDENTS WITH SPECIA
L NEEDS

7212CLS

Course Outline



Convenor: Dr Wendi Beamish

Phone: 07
-
387 55636

Fa
x: 07
-
387 55965

Email: W.Beamish@ griffith.edu.au

©
Griffith University, 1999

Revised 2005/1


No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including

photo
-
copying, recording, or by any
information storage and retrieval system, without prior written permission.


These materials may only be distributed to students enrolled in this program.





iii

Contents


Page


Introduction

................................
................................
................................
...........

1

About me, Wendi Beamish

................................
................................
.........

1

Contact information

................................
................................
....................

2

About you

................................
................................
................................
...

2

About the course

................................
................................
........................

2

Group tutorials

................................
................................
................................
......

3

Teleconferences

................................
................................
................................
....

3

On
-
line material and communication tools

................................
.........................

4

Course details

................................
................................
................................
.......

4

Relationship of course to other courses in the program

.............................

4

Suggested study commitment

................................
................................
....

4

Course rationale

................................
................................
.........................

5

Gener
ic skills development

................................
................................
.........

5

Course content

................................
................................
................................
......

6

Course presentation

................................
................................
.............................

6

Prescribed textbook

................................
................................
....................

6

Supplementary texts for those new to the area

................................
..........

7

Resource booklet
................................
................................
........................

7

Valuable texts

................................
................................
.............................

7

Readings

................................
................................
................................
....

9

Key journals

................................
................................
................................

9

WWW resources

................................
................................
......................

10

Assessment

................................
................................
................................
.........

11

Assessment items

................................
................................
....................

11

Assessment rationale

................................
................................
...............

11

Awarding of grades

................................
................................
...................

11

Assessment details

................................
................................
.............................

13

Assignment

................................
................................
...............................

13

Activities

................................
................................
................................
...

18

Submitting assignments

................................
................................
...........

20

iv

Assignment extensions

................................
................................
.............

20

Professional practice

................................
................................
..........................

21

Course goals

................................
................................
............................

21

Course requirements

................................
................................
................

21

Suggested professional practice schedule

................................
......................

22

Suggested study schedule

................................
................................
.................

23

Electronic library resources and how to access them

................................
....

24

Forms

................................
................................
................................
...................

31

Griffith University Insurance Provisions

................................
....................

33

Professional Practice/Experience Proposal

................................
..............

35

Parent Consent Form

................................
................................
...............

43

Professional Practice Log, 7212CLS

................................
........................

45

Activity 2, 7212CLS

................................
................................
..................

47

7212CLS Assignment Evaluation Sheet

................................
...................

49

7212CLS Activities Evaluation Sheet

................................
.......................

51

Module 1 Evaluation Sheet

................................
................................
.......

53

Module 2 Evaluation Sheet

................................
................................
.......

55

Module 3 Evaluation Sheet

................................
................................
.......

57

Module 4 Evaluation Sheet

................................
................................
.......

59

Overall Course
Evaluation Sheet

................................
.............................

61



7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

1

Introduction

Welcome to

7212CLS
, Individualised

Curriculum for Students with Special
Needs.

I believe you will find this course both worthwhile and challenging. It is
designed to assist you in your day
-
to
-
day work with special needs students
generally.

About me, Wendi Beamish

I am a special educator with a strong background in intellectual disability and
multiple impairment. While I taught regular infants (Grade 1) for the first two
years of my career,

most of my teaching experience has been with young
children with significant disabilities, both in the classroom and within early
childhood intervention programs. I worked for a lengthy time as an educational
consultant with Education Queensland and Ende
avour Foundation. Since 1991, I
have been employed as a lecturer at Griffith University in special education.

My research interests are clearly within the area of best educational practice. I
will be sharing some of my local research findings with you in
Module 3 when we
focus on individual education plans (IEPs). I also have considerable interest and
expertise in individualised programming. Some of you may be aware of my old
publication in this area.

Rees, W. (1986).
Developing individualised education p
rograms.

Brisbane:
Division of Special Education, Department of Education, Queensland.

Also, my more recent work has been incorporated in the following Departmental
material:

Intellectual Impairment Services. (1993).
Individual education plan resource
pac
kage.

Brisbane: Department of Education, Queensland.

Department of Education, Queensland. (1998).
Individual education plans for
students with disabilities.

Brisbane: Government Printer.

I see support as an important part of my role as your course convenor
. Please
contact me when you need assistance or wish to discuss any course
-
related
matters.
Group tutorials/teleconferences and
web
-
based communication tools
(noticeboard and discussion forums)

support this course. Individual phone, fax,
and/or email con
tacts also are encouraged. With any communication, please
leave your name, telephone number, and the nature of your inquiry
. This
information will help me to respond to your query as promptly as possible.

Your individual consultation time (phone
-
in time)

this semester are:

Tuesday afternoons 4.00 pm.
-

5.30 pm. 1 March
-

31 May, 2005

I wish you well in your study this semester, and look forward to working with you.


2

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

Contact information

My contact particulars are detailed below
.

Phone number:

Office (07) 387 55636

Fax number:

(07) 387 55965

Email:

W.Beamish@griffith.edu.au

Location:

Room 3.07 in Education Building (M06), Mt Gravatt Campus

Address:

School of Cognition, Language, and Special Education

Griffith University Nath
an QLD 4111

About you

Studies using distance education mode can be quite impersonal. Before you get
too involved with the course, it would be appreciated if you could forward a short
‘blurb’ about yourself (a half page). Perhaps this could be sent wit
h your
Professional Practice Proposal Form or the Assignment.

About the course

The initial writing of
Individualised

Curriculum for Students with Special Needs

was a team effort. Both Sandy Grove and Bev de Smidt from Education
Queensland assisted me in

the documentation of Modules 1 and 4 respectively.
Since that time, Bev de Smidt has given ongoing feedback in relation to the total
course and been a regular marker for some assessment items. I also would like
to thank colleagues and past postgraduates

who have contributed valuable
programming material to the
Resource Booklet.

7212CLS course materials include:



this Course Outline,



a Study Guide,



a Text (Lewis & Doorlag, 2003),



a Book of Readings,



a Resource Booklet.

Please note that the Study Guide cont
ains evaluation forms at the end of each
module. I strongly believe that curriculum must be responsive to learner needs
and therefore would appreciate your feedback on material and assessment items
as you progress through this semester. I view data colle
ction, monitoring, and
evaluation as a critical part of any teaching and learning process, whether it be
an individualised program for a student with special needs or a group of tertiary
students completing a Master of Special Education program. Your refl
ections
throughout the semester will be used to revise this course so it remains a vital
and manageable unit of study within this degree.

Remember that learning is a cooperative experience. Feel welcome to contact
me regarding any queries and concerns ass
ociated with this course.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

3

Group tutorials

Three afternoon tutorials will be held across the semester at Mt Gravatt campus.
These tutorials offer you the chance to discuss concerns, issues, and ideas
about your study and assignments with fellow students a
nd myself.

Tutorials:
Room 3.13 (outside my office), Education Building (M06).

Dates and times

Group tutorial 1

Tuesday 1 March

4.15 pm.
-

5.30 pm.

Group tutorial 2

Tuesday 22 March

4.15 pm.
-

5.30 pm.

Group tutorial 3

Tuesday 10 May

4.15 pm.
-

5.30 pm.

Preparation

To get maximum benefit from each session, jot down the following beforehand:



queries about the assignment or activities,



concerns or queries about any aspect of the course.

Teleconferences

Three teleconferences are offered for postgraduates

no
t residing in the greater
Brisbane metropolitan area
. These teleconferences will provide you with the
opportunity to discuss concerns and issues about your study and assignments
with fellow students and myself.

Dates and times

Teleconference 1

Tuesday 1 M
arch

6.30 pm.
-

7.30 pm.

Teleconference 2

Tuesday 22 March

6.30 pm.
-

7.30 pm.

Teleconference 3

Tuesday 10 May

6.30 pm.
-

7.30 pm.

Registration

To register, complete the Teleconference Registration form provided within the
Administative Forms booklet an
d return it
Off Campus & Assignment Handling
(OC&AHS)
. If you are unable to participate in the teleconference, it is
recommended that you request an audio copy of the session. Please post tape
(90 minutes) directly to OC&AHS.

Preparation

To get maximum be
nefit from each session, jot down the following beforehand:



queries about the assignment or activities,



concerns or queries about any aspect of the course.

4

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

On
-
line material and communication tools

This course has a web
-
based component, which not only pres
ents an electronic
form of this Course Outline but also provides two on
-
line communication tools: a
noticeboard and an interactive forum. The noticeboard provides me with
opportunity to post course updates. This display should be checked after each
tutoria
l/teleconference. The interactive forums provide opportunity for
postgraduates to communicate with each other (and me) in an ongoing manner.
The 7212CLS web page is on the Griffith website and can be accessed through
Learning@Griffith.

Course details

This
course addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of adapting and
developing relevant curriculum for learners who have a disability, learning
difficulties, and/or are considered potentially gifted. It enables teachers entering
this initial study in s
pecial education to become not only familiar with current
research in the area but also to develop an applied knowledge of the process of
individualised educational planning for students with special needs. These
students may attend either an early childh
ood, primary, secondary, or special
school setting. The course includes
a 50 hour school
-
based professional
practice component

in a setting approved by the university.

Faculty:

Education

Course code:

7212CLS

Course name:

Individualised Curriculum for S
tudents with Special Needs

Credit point value:

10 CP

Level:

7000

Semester:

1


Relationship of course to other courses in the program

This course is a core course for postgraduate students completing the
Intellectual Impairment and Autistic Spectrum Dis
order Strands of Master of
Special Education. It is a prerequisite to the curriculum courses 7192CLS,
Curriculum for Students with Intellectual Impairment

and 7195CLS,
Curriculum
for Students with Autistic Spectrum Disorder
. 7212CLS is also open to
postgr
aduates in other stands. It is linked to the noncore course 7214CLS,
Consultation and Collaboration in Special Education
.

Suggested study commitment

Postgraduates of average ability and unfamiliar with the IEP process should plan
to spend an average of app
roximately ten hours per week on this course to
complete it satisfactorily.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

5

Course rationale

Many students with special needs require a curriculum that has been uniquely
tailored to their abilities, interests, and needs in order to promote development
and

competence. This course examines the principles, processes, and
strategies for adapting and developing curriculum and learning contexts in order
to meet the specific needs of individual students who have a disability,
learning
difficulties,

and/or are co
nsidered potentially gifted.

This course enables practicing teachers to gain an understanding of best
practice in curriculum design for students with identified special needs while
becoming competent in these practices through practical application at the

classroom level. Particular emphasis is placed on the individual education
planning (IEP) process.

The central question for this course is:

What set of principles and practices will help practitioners determine curriculum
content for a student with spec
ial needs and how can individualised planning be
effectively operationalised at the classroom level?

Generic skills development

This course provides opportunity to develop and refine many core skills and
competencies that strongly contribute to the ideals
of the Griffith Graduate.
Practical application of the IEP process requires the employment of sound
oral
communication

and
interpersonal

skills,
teamwork
, and
problem solving and
decision making

skills. The reporting of outcomes from this process, together

with the examination of curriculum adaptations and the delineation of a future
action plan, requires high
-
level
analysis and critical evaluation,

written
communication, self
-
reflection
, and

self
-
management
. On the completion of this
course, postgraduates
should be more able to work effectively in team situations
to individualise the curriculum for students with special needs. P
rofessional
effectiveness, therefore,
should be boosted.














6

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

Course content

The objectives for postgraduates completing thi
s course are:

i.

to develop a conceptual framework for understanding the process of
individualised educational planning and its relationship to curriculum
development for students with special needs;

ii.

to display competence in the design of an IEP that has been

referenced to an
individual student with special needs attending either an early childhood,
primary, secondary, or special school setting;

iii.

to develop a personal style and approach to individualising curriculum for
students with special needs.

These object
ives will be met through the exploration of
four modules
. The first
module provides a general introduction to curriculum to students with special
needs. The second module examines curriculum adaptations.
The third module
details the IEP process in a compre
hensive manner.
The final module presents a
range of strategies for consideration in future action planning. See Table 1 for
the content of each module.

Table 1: 7212CLS Course Content by Modules

Module

Content

Module 1:

Introduction to curriculum
for spe
cial needs students



Concepts of curriculum



Curriculum traditions and current educational reform
in special education



Curriculum characteristics for special needs
students

Module 2:

Individualising curriculum
for special needs students



The scope of adaptat
ions



The adaptation process

Module 3:

The IEP Process model



Basic concepts



Phase 1
-

Information Gathering



Phase 2
-

IEP Meeting



Phase 3
-

Design of IEP and associated programs



Phases 4 & 5
-

Implementation & evaluation of IEP

Module 4:

Strategies that s
upport
effective IEP practice



Research findings and IEP practice



Strategies for teachers new to the IEP process


Course presentation

Prescribed textbook

One textbook is essential for this course. It can be purchased through the Mt
Gravatt Co
-
op bookshop,
phone (07) 387 55798.

Lewis, R.B., & Doorlag, D.H. (2003).
Teaching special students in general
education classrooms
(6
th

ed.). Columbus, OH: Merrill.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

7

Supplementary texts for those new to the area

Several texts support topics across this course. These boo
ks are available from
the Mt Gravatt Library and can be purchased through the Mt Gravatt Co
-
op
bookshop, phone (07) 387 55798.

Friend, M., & Bursuck, W. (2003).
Including students with special needs: A
practical guide for classroom teachers

(3
rd

ed.). Bost
on, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Hunt, N., & Marshall, K. (2005).
Exceptional children and youth: An introduction
to special education

(5
th

ed.). New York: Houghton Mifflin.

Janney, R., & Snell, M. (2000). Modifying schoolwork in
Teachers’ guide to
inclusive practic
es

(Series). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

If you are new to the area of special education and have little knowledge of the
IEP practices used in Queensland, you may find the 1998 Education Queensland
IEP booklet helpful in completing the assignment for
this course.

Department of Education, Queensland. (1998).
Individual education plans for
students with disabilities.

Brisbane, Australia: Government Printer.

The booklet can be purchased through the Mt Gravatt Co
-
op bookshop. Note
that a substantial amount

of this book is available on the web.

http://education.qld.gov.au/curriculum/learning/students/disabilities/practice/ieps/i
ep6.html

Resource bookl
et

A resource booklet containing programming formats and examples has been
developed as a companion to Module 3 within the course. This material should
assist in completing work associated with the assignment, and is not meant to be
prescriptive in any wa
y.

Valuable texts

The following texts are recommended for additional reading associated with this
course. All texts are available from the Mt Gravatt Library.

The purchase of
these texts is not intended.

Ashman, A., & Elkins, J. (Eds.). (2005).
Educating

children with diverse abilities
(2
nd

ed.). New York: Prentice
-
Hall.

Choate, J.S. (2000).
Successful inclusive teaching: Proven ways to detect and
correct special needs

(3
rd

ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Council for Exceptional Children. (1999).
IEP tea
m guide
. Reston, VA: Author.

Culatta, R., Tompkins, J., & Werts, M. (2003).
Fundamentals of special
education: What every teacher needs to know
(2
nd

ed.)
.

Columbus, OH:
Merrill.

Deutsch Smith, D. (1998).
Introduction to special education: Teaching in an ag
e
of challenge
(3
rd

ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

8

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

Downing, J.E. (2002).
Including students with severe and multiple disabilities in
typical classrooms: Practical strategies for teachers
(2
nd

ed.). Baltimore, MD:
Paul H. Brookes.

Foreman, P. (Ed.). (2005
).
Inclusion in action
. Southbank, Victoria: Thomson.

Giangreco, M. (Ed.). (1997).
Quick
-
guides to inclusion: Ideas for educating
students with disabilities
. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

Giangreco, M. (Ed.). (1998).
Quick
-
guides to inclusion 2: Ideas fo
r educating
students with disabilities
. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

Giangreco, M. (Ed.). (2002).
Quick
-
guides to inclusion 3: Ideas for educating
students with disabilities
. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

Giangreco, M., Cloninger, C., & Iverson, V. (1
998).
Choosing options and
accommodations for children: A guide to educational planning for students
with disabilities

(2
nd

ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

Halvorsen, A., & Neary, T. (2001).
Building inclusive schools: Tools and
strategies for succes
s
. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Hardman, M., Drew, C., & Egan, M.W. (1999).
Human exceptionality: Society,
school, and family
(6
th

ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Janzen, J.E. (2003).
Understanding the nature of autism: A practical guide
(2
nd

ed.). San Anto
nio: Therapy Skill Builders.

Kennedy, C.H., & Horn, E.M. (2004).
Including students with severe disabilities
.
Boston, MA: Pearson.

Mastropieri, M., & Scruggs, T. (2000).
The inclusive classroom: Strategies for
effective instruction
. Columbus, OH: Merrill.

Olson, J., & Platt, J. (2004
). Teaching children and adolescents with special
needs
(4
th

ed.).
Columbus, OH: Merrill.

Peterson, J., & Hittie, M. (2003).
Inclusive teaching: Creating effective schools for
all learners
. Boston, MA: Pearson.

Ryndak, D.L., & A
lper, S. (2003).
Curriculum and instruction for students with
significant disabilities in inclusive settings
(2
nd

ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn &
Bacon.

Salend, S. (2005).
Creating inclusive classrooms: Effective and reflective
practices

for all students

(5
th

ed
.). Columbus, OH: Merrill.

Smith, T., Polloway, E., Patton, J., & Dowdy, C. (2004).
Teaching students with
special needs in inclusive settings

(4
th

ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Taylor, G.R. (2002).
Strategies for developing personalized programs for
in
dividuals with disabilities
. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press.

Thousand, J.S., Villa, R.A., & Nevin, A.I. (2002).
Creativity and collaborative
learning: The practical guide to empowering students, teachers, and families
(2
nd

ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Br
ookes.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

9

Turnbull, A., Turnbull, H.R., Shank, M., & Leal, D. (2002).

Exceptional lives:
Special education in today’s schools
(3
rd

ed.). Columbus, OH: Merrill.

Vaughn, S., Bos, C., & Schumm, J. (2003).
Teaching exceptional, diverse, and
at
-
risk students in th
e general education classroom

(3
rd

ed.). Boston, MA:
Allyn & Bacon.

Wehmeyer, M.L. (2002).
Teaching students with mental retardation: Providing
access to the general curriculum
. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes.

Westling, D., & Fox, L. (2004).
Teaching stude
nts with severe disabilities
(3
rd

ed.)
.

Columbus, OH: Merrill.

Westwood, P. (2003).
Commonsense methods for children with special needs:
Strategies for the regular classroom
(4
th

ed.)
.

London: Routledge Falmer.

Wood, J. (1998).
Adapting instruction to acco
mmodate students in inclusive
settings
(3
rd

ed.). New York: Macmillan.

Readings

Three types of readings are presented in course material: essential, on
-
line, and
optional. Essential readings are provided in your Book of Readings (hard copy),
and are consid
ered fundamental to this course. On
-
line readings are digital, web
-
based materials (access via a link on the 7212CLS website under Resources or
directly through GriffLink Library web catalogue using the course code). On
-
line
readings supplement important a
spects of the course. Optional readings are
suggested for postgraduates who wish to examine a particular issue in more
detail. Optional readings can be accessed through the library.

Key journals

Several journals provide key articles for this course. The ma
jority of these
journals can be accessed electronically. See the section
Electronic Library
Resources and How to Access Them
for more information.



American Journal on Mental Retardation,



Education and Training in Mental Retardation & Developmental Disabili
ties,



Educational Leadership,



Exceptional Children,



Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities,



Focus on Exceptional Children,



Intervention in School and Clinic,



Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders,



Journal of Special Education,



Resear
ch and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities,



Remedial and Special Education,



Special Education Perspectives,



Teaching Exceptional Children.

10

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

WWW resources

Specific websites for APA referencing style

(required for this course)



http://www.apastyle.org/index.html



http://www.apa.org/journals/webref.html



http://www.apastyle.org/elecref.html



http://www.wooster.edu/psychology/apa
-
crib.html

General Special Education websites



Council for Exceptional Children

http://www.cec.sped.org/



Education
Queensland (IEP information)

http://education.qld.gov.au/curriculum/learning/students/disabilities/practice/ie
ps/iep6.html



New Zealand Ministry o
f Education (IEP guidelines)

http://www.minedu.govt.nz/index.cfm?layout=document&documentid=7359&d
ata=1



British Columbia Ministry of Education, Special Education (I
EP information)

http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/specialed/iepssn/



Ontario Ministry of Education. (IEP standards)

http://
www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/elemsec/speced/iep/iep.html



Queensland Studies Authority

http://www.qsa.qld.edu.au/



US Department of Education. (IEP guide)


http://www.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/iepguide/index.html



Useful website for programming

http://lessonplanz.com/



Useful website for teacher
-
made materials

http://www.dotolearn.com/index.htm

Introductory Powerpoint presentations on 7212CLS web site



Style (course assessment items).



Module 1

-

IEPs: An introduction.



Module 2

-

Curriculum adaptations: An Introduction,

-

Intellectual Impairment and C
urriculum Adaptations,

-

ASD and Curriculum Adaptations.



Module 3

-

IEPs: An introduction,

-

IEP process: Information
-
gathering phase,

-

IEP process: IEP meeting phase,

-

IEP process: Design phase,

-

IEP process: Implementation and evaluation phases.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

11

Asse
ssment

Assessment items

Assessment for the course will be on the basis of:

Assignment


................................
................................
.......................

60%


completed in association with professional practice in a school and
submitted on 3 May.

Activities


................................
................................
.......................

40%


completed in association with professional practice in a sc
hool and
submitted on 7 June.

Assessment rationale

The assignment:

In order to be competent practitioners in the area of special needs,
postgraduates need to acquire a basic understanding of the IEP process and
demonstrate ability to develop an IEP (within

a team context) for a particular
learner with special needs. This assignment is integral to Module 3.

The activities:

The 2 activities will provide postgraduate students with the opportunity to
document, analyse, and reflect on the processes, strategies,

and issues
associated with individualising the curriculum within a local school setting. The
first activity (related to Module 2) will assess knowledge and understanding of
curriculum adaptations. The second activity (related to Module 4) will assess
und
erstanding of the IEP process and recommended practice.

Awarding of grades

The university criteria for the awarding of grades are applied through specified
criteria to all written work within this course (see Table 2). Specified criteria and
standards for
each assessment item are detailed on evaluation sheets toward
the back of this Course Outline.

Table 2: 7212CLS Criteria for the Awarding of Grades

Grade

University Criteria

Course Criteria


High

Distinction

(HD)


Complete and comprehensive
understanding
of the course
content; genuine mastery of
relevant skills; demonstration
of an extremely high level of
interpretive and analytical
ability and intellectual
initiative; and achievement of
all major and minor objectives
of the course.

Evidence of fine
-
graine
d understandings,
extended reading, and complete mastery
of skills related to the IEP process. A
fully elaborated critical analysis of
curriculum adaptations, together with
sophisticated self reflection. Extremely
high levels of coherence in both content
a
nd structure of text; advanced
knowledge of academic conventions. All
course objectives achieved.


12

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University



Distinction

(D)


Very high level of understanding
of the course content;
development of relevant skills
to a very high level;
demonstration of a very hig
h
level of interpretive and
analytical ability and
intellectual initiative; and
achievement of all major and
minor objectives of the
course.

Evidence of keen understandings, additional
reading, and mastery of skills related to
the IEP process. An elaborat
ed critical
analysis of curriculum adaptations,
together with skilled self reflection. Very
high levels of coherence in both content
and structure of text; very high
knowledge of academic conventions. All
course objectives achieved.


Credit

(C )


High lev
el of understanding of
course content; development
of relevant skills to a high
level; demonstration of a high
level of interpretive and
analytical ability and
achievement of all major
objectives of the course;
some minor objectives not
fully achieved.

Ev
idence of very good understandings, a
breadth of essential and optional course
reading, and competent skill
development related to the IEP process.
Sound analysis of curriculum
adaptations, together with pertinent self
reflection. High levels of coherence
in
both content and structure of text; sound
knowledge of academic conventions.
Major objectives achieved.


Pass

(P)


Adequate understanding of most
of the basic course content;
partial development of
relevant skills; adequate
interpretive and analytical

ability and achievement of all
major objectives of the
course; some minor
objectives not achieved.

Evidence of effective understandings,
breadth of essential reading, and
adequate skill development related to
the IEP process. Sufficient analysis of
curri
culum adaptations, together with
some basic self reflection. Satisfactory
levels of coherence in both content and
structure of text; effective knowledge of
academic conventions. Major objectives
achieved.


Pass

Conceded

(PC)


Limited performance indicati
ng
partial understanding of basic
course content; partial
development of relevant skills;
some evidence of interpretive
and analytical ability;
achievement of most major
objectives of the course;
failure to achieve some minor
objectives.

Evidence of effect
ive understandings, a
breadth of essential reading, and an
almost satisfactory mastery of skills
related to the IEP process. Limited
analysis of curriculum adaptations,
together with some basic self reflection.
Satisfactory levels of coherence in both
cont
ent and structure of text; limited
knowledge of academic conventions.
Most major objectives achieved.


Fail

(F)


Inadequate understanding of the
basic course content; failure
to develop relevant skills;
insufficient evidence of
interpretive and analytical

ability; and failure to achieve
some or all major and minor
objectives of the course.

Evidence of inadequate understandings,
limited reading, and a failure to develop
basic skills related to the IEP process.
Superficial analysis of curriculum
adaptations,

together with poor self
reflection. Inadequate levels of
coherence in both content and structure
of text; poor knowledge of academic
conventions. Failure to achieve some or
all major objectives of the course.

Fail, No

Submission

(FNS)

Did not present any

work for
assessment, to be counted as
failure.


Withdrawal

with failure

(WF)

Cancelled enrolment in the course
after the final date for
withdrawal without failure



7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

13

Assessment details

Assignment

Topic: The development of an IEP for a student with speci
al needs

Posting Date:

Tuesday 3 May

Weighting:

60%

Length:

3500 words

The task

This assignment is linked to Module 3 and requires theory on IEPs to be linked
with IEP practice. An integrated report should be presented, combining both
theory and practice.

The assignment will involve developing an IEP for one student with special needs
attending either an early childhood, primary, secondary, or special school setting.
IEP development concerns
only steps 1
-
7 of the IEP process model

detailed in
Module 3 (see

Figure 3.1). The report should draw on findings and refelctions in
the IEP log (see details on page that follows). The IEP needs be based on the
objectives
-
based model of instruction featured in the Study Guide.

Working within a team that includes the cla
ssroom teacher, parents/caregivers,
the student with special needs (where possible) and other significant
stakeholders, the postgraduate is required to coordinate (or strongly support the
coordination of) activities related to the information gathering and

IEP meeting
phases, and the document of the plan. The IEP must be the outcome of
completing an IEP meeting that uses information gathered across the team.

When reporting on IEP development, specific practices and procedures (used in
completing this task)
need to be referenced to current literature and a rationale
as to why certain practices and procedures were chosen should be argued.
Critical reflection on actual practice is also required.

The assignment should consist of one report with a number of appen
dices. The
excerpt on the next page illustrates the process for integrating theoretical and
practical components.

a.

The report should:



detail the actual process (across the Information Gathering, IEP Meeting
and Design phases) employed to develop the IEP a
nd provide rationale
for the specific practices and procedures used therein;



summarise the outcomes of each phase;



reflect on what was done and how practice could be improved in the
future;



reference all aspects to the literature;



contain the actual IEP de
veloped.

14

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

b.

The appendices, in the main, should contain other material developed (e.g.,
student catalogue, meeting notes, and raw data). Appendices provide
supplementary information to that in the main body of the report. The log (see
below) is to be include
d as the first appendix in the report.

c.

Please note.



A table of contents for the report is required (see draft that follows).



Tables may be useful ways of presenting summaries of large amounts of
information in main body of report.



Any IEP format can be use
d. Examples of IEPs and other associated
materials are included in the
Resource Booklet, 7212CLS
and the
booklet,
Individual education plans for students with disabilities
.



The report should be presented using a minimum font of 11 point and with
text set a
t 1.5 line spacing. Pages should be stapled together.



APA style of referencing is recommended (see websites and powerpoint
presentation provided).



Tear
-
out assignment information page, parent consent form, and
evaluation sheet should accompany the report.

Excerpt from an assignment

2.1.2

Parent preparation

Jeff’s parents had been involved in the IEP process for three years. They were very aware
of the need for their input into Jeff’s education and appeared comfortable with the
process. School staff confirme
d that Mr and Mrs Laverty were articulate, and that both
parents came to school meetings and functions. These parents clearly saw the IEP as a
“communication vehicle between parents and school personnel” and a process in which
parents “participate to joint
ly decide what the child’s needs are” and “what the anticipated
outcomes will be” (Banbury, 1987, p. 43).

The school had a flier
You and Your Child’s Individual Educational Plan

that was sent
home before the team commenced gathering material related to Jef
f’s student needs
assessment. See Appendix C for a copy of this material.

IEP log

In this course, reflection is recognised as a learning tool, and two types of
reflection are encouraged: reflection
-
in
-
action and reflection
-
on
-
action (Atkins &
Murphy, 1993)
. Postgraduates, therefore, are expected to keep a professional
practice log to document understandings used in action across steps 1
-
7 of the
IEP process model and subsequently elaborate on these reflections in
assignment reporting.

It is suggested that t
he log contain brief running notes or dot points in three
areas: (a) tasks undertaken (e.g., team discussions, direct work with student), (b)
outcomes and/or findings (e.g., concerning student needs assessment,
meetings), and (c) reflections (e.g., on post
graduates actual practice, links
between the literature and practice). The log can be hand written or typed and
should be
between 5

15 pages

in length. A
suggested log format

is included in
this Course Outline. Please feel free to modify this form in any w
ay. While the log
is a personal tool for tracing happenings and understandings across the IEP
process, it is
assessed as part of the analytic/reflective component of the report
.
Please include as the
first appendix in the assignment.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

15

Reflections are though
tful analyses, interpretations, associations, and beliefs.
They provide a vehicle for linking theory with practice and are integral to personal
theory construction. The 5Rs Writing Scale (
Bain, Ballantyne, Mills, & Lester,
2002)
is provided to assist with
reflective activity
.
This local scale enables
reflections to be categorised according to 5 types or components (see Table 3).
It has proven to be an effective tool in improving the reflective writing of
developing special educators at Griffith.

Table 3:
Fr
amework (
Bain, Ballantyne, Mills, & Lester, 2002, p. 13)

Scale Component

Definition

Reporting

A descriptive account of a situation, incident, or issue

Responding

An emotional or personal response to the situation, incident, or issue

Relating

Drawing on
relationship between current personal or theoretical
understandings and the situation, incident, or issue

Reasoning

An exploration, interrogation or explanation of the situation, incident,
or issue

Reconstructing

Drawing a conclusion and developing a fut
ure action plan based upon
a reasoned understanding of the situation, incident, or issue


Digitised readings on reflection

Atkins, S., & Murphy, K. (1993). Reflection: A review of the literature.
Journal of
Advanced Nursing, 18
, 1188
-
1192.

Hole, S., & McE
ntee, G. (1999). Reflection is at the heart of practice.
Educational
Leadership, 56
(8), 34
-
37.

Texts on reflection

Bain, J.D., Ballantyne, R., Mills, C., Lester, N.C. (2002).
Reflecting on practice:
Student teachers’ perspectives.

Flaxton, Queensland, Aust
ralia: Post
Pressed.

Bella, N. (2004).
Reflective analysis of student work: Improving teaching through
collaboration.

Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Campoy, R. (2005).
Case study analysis in the classroom: Becoming a reflective
teacher.

Thousand Oaks, CA
: Sage.

Distad, L.S., &, Brownstein, J.C. (2004).
Talking teaching: Implementing
reflective practice in groups
. Lanham, MD: ScarecrowEducation.

Farrell, T. (2004).
Reflective practice in action: 80 reflection breaks for busy
teachers.

Thousand Oaks, CA: Co
rwin Press.

Russell, T., & Munby, H. (Eds.). (1992).
Teachers and teaching: From classroom
to reflection
. London: Falmer Press.

Schön, D. (1988).
Educating the reflective practitioner
. San Francisco, CA:
Jossey
-
Bass.

16

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

5Rs Reflective Writing Scale (Bain et

al., 2002, pp. 14
-
15)

Component 1. Reporting

The journal entry or reports

what

happened or
what
the issue or incident involves.

Level 1

A minimal description of the incident of issue is given
.

Level 2

A broad description of the incident of issue is giv
en, with limited elaboration of
potentially significant details
.

Level 3

The description provides sufficient detail to allow readers to draw their own
conclusions about the incident or issue
.

Component 2. Responding

The journal entry

responds
to the inc
ident or issue by making observations, expressing feelings,
or asking questions.

Level 1

The entry draws attention to significant aspects of the incident of issue or expresses
the
writer

s feelings in relation to the incident or issue.

Level 2

As for le
vel 1 but the entry also makes a judgment
regarding the incident or issue,

for example, “the lesson was pathetic”, “the lesson went well”.

Level 3

As for level 1 or 2 but in addition the entry poses a question of identifies a problem.

Component
3
. R
ela
ting

The journal entry

relates

or makes a
connection

between the incident or issue and the writer’s
own skills, experience, learning, or understanding.

Level 1

The
incident or issue is related to:

-

The writers own strengths, weaknesses or personal learni
ng, or to

-

Professional matters (pedagogy, curriculum, assessment, etc), or to

-

Future practice.

Level 2

As for level 1 but the entry
includes a superficial rationale for or limited discussion of
the connection.

Level 3

As for level 2 but the rationale

or discussion is expanded to include an insight or
understanding arising from the connections made.

Component
4
. R
easoning

The journal entry
highlights in detail

significant factors underlying the incident or issue
and
shows why

they are important to an

understanding of the incident or issue.

Level 1

At least one relevant factor underlying the incident or issue is analysed in detail, giving
consideration to such matters as:

-

Why it is important in the circumstances

-

How it impacted on the situation

-

What questions this raises for future teaching.

Level 2

At for level 1 but the discussion considers or compares possible alternative explanations
and/or considers the reasons for, or possible implications of, the conclusion.

Level 3

As for level 2 but th
e discussion incorporates insights from a different perspective, for
example, a personal perspective, a student perspective, a learning perspective,

a theoretical perspective.

Component
5
. R
econstructing

The understanding developed through reasoning (co
mponent 4) is used to
reframe
or
reconstruct
future practice or professional understanding.

Level 1

The
discussion leads to a conclusion or a plan for future action, based on a reasoned
understanding of the incident or issue.

Level 2

As for level 1 but t
he discussion also considers the reasons for, or

possible implications of, the conclusion or plan.

Level 3

As for level 2 but the discussion also considers the possible impacts of different
circumstances, e.g.,

‘What would happen if ..... ?’ ‘Under what
conditions would the plan not work?’

Level
4

As for level 3 but the new understanding is integrated with the writers’ personal approach
to or theory of teaching.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

17

Draft Table of Contents and List of Appendices

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.0

Introduction






p.

2.0

Information Gathering Phase




p.


2.1

IEP Team: Formation and Preparation


2.2

Needs Assessment


2.3

Reflection on phase

3.0

IEP Meeting Phase





p.


3.1

Team Preparation for Meeting


3.2

Meeting Progression and Outcomes


3.3

Reflection on phase

4.0

Design Phase






p.


4.1

Baseline Data collection in Selected Areas


4.2

Document Plan (IEP)


4.3

Reflection on phase

5.0

IEP Document






p.

6.0

Conclusion






p.

References







p.

Appendices







p.


LIST OF APPENDICES

Appendix A

Log






p.

Appe
ndix B

IEP Team Preparation




p.

Appendix C

Previous IEP





p.

Appendix D

Staff Survey





p.

Appendix E

Student Interest Inventory



p.

Appendix F

Anecdotal Notes




p.

Appendix G

Handwriting Samples




p.

Appendix H

Student Catalogue




p.

Appendix I

S
tudent Needs Assessment Summary


p.

Appendix J

IEP Meeting Agenda




p.

Appendix K

Meeting Notes





p.

Appendix L

Participant Feedback




p.

Appendix M

Baseline Data





p.


Evaluation criteria: assignment

a.

Understanding of the topic

................................
................................
.....

/ 10

b.

Level of analys
es, reflections, and links between theory & practice

.......

/ 20

c.

Synthesis of ideas and structure of report; referencing

..........................

/ 10

d.

Skills related to developing the IEP

................................
........................

/ 20

18

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

Activities

Posting Date:

Tuesday 7 July

Weighting:

40%

The overall task

These 2 activities are

to be completed in association with Professional Practice in
schools. Activities may be completed at more that one school site. All activities
require links to be made between theory and practice. It is recommended that
these activities be placed in 2
distinct sections within a folder for marking. The
tear
-
out assignment information and evaluation sheets should be placed at the
beginning of the folder.

Activity 1: Curriculum adaptations (20%)

Curriculum adaptations are discussed in Module 2. This activ
ity requires the
gathering and analysis of information about
two curriculum adaptations

in use at
a local school/s. Referencing to relevant literature is required. Information can be
documented in note form and should be no more than 1000 words per
adaptat
ion.

Each adaptation should be identified in relation to a particular student group
(gifted and talented, learning difficulties, autistic spectrum disorder, physical,
intellectual, hearing, or vision impairment). Both adaptations may relate to the
same st
udent group or one adaptation may relate to one student group and the
other to a different student group.

One adaptation should focus on the learning environment: socio
-
emotional,
behavioural, or physical according to Wood (1998). The other adaptation shou
ld
focus on the teaching/learning process: curriculum content, teaching techniques,
equipment and materials, or evaluation according to Wood (1998).

Each adaptation should be
described

and accompanied by a brief
rationale

as to
why it was necessary. Person
al
reflection

on the effectiveness of the adaptation
(i.e., evaluation) is also required. Photographs and/or line diagrams may be
valuable to include.

Information for this activity should be gathered through:



discussion with the school community (staff inc
luding advisory visiting
teachers, parents, and students),



observation and reflection on practice.

Evaluation criteria: Curriculum adaptations

a.

Selection of adaptations

................................
................................
........

/ 2.5

b.

Specificity of description; referencing

................................
.....................

/ 10

c.

Level of analyses, reflections, and l
inks between theory & practice

......

/ 7.5


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

19

Activity 2: Personal future action plan (20%)

This activity requires the development of a personal future action plan for the
next eighteen months. The six steps outlined below are intended to provide a
framework for
completing this task. Although
a suggested format

Future Action
Planning Form
is
included

in this Course Outline, it is not compulsory to use it.
Note, however, that it is necessary to document each of the six steps in your
plan. The suggested A4 form is
intended to be photocopied onto A3 paper.


Step 1.

List

5 best or recommended practices

in which you would like to
increase competency.

From the listings of best practice concerning

IEP programming and
essential teaching procedures in the special needs a
rea

(see, for example,
Beamish, 1992; Cannon et al., 1992; Fox & Williams, 1991; Meyer, 1994 in
Modules 3 and 4), select five practices that you consider to be high priority
areas for competency building in relation to your present and/or anticipated
teach
ing position. All practices must be associated in some way with

individualising the curriculum.

State each practice in full and reference.

Step 2.

Determine where you are now.

Consider your present practices in relation to each of the 5 selected
practic
es. Mark an X on the imaginary continuum in the column
Where am
I now?

to indicate your present position
.

Step 3.

Identify and analyse driving and restraining forces.

In your current or anticipated position, identify and analyse the driving and
restrain
ing forces in relation to each selected practice. D
riving forces are
forces that will assist you in achieving better practice; restraining forces
are forces that resist change and set up barriers to achievement. Select
forces relevant to your situation and

reference to the literature wherever
possible.

Step 4.


Determine how hard/easy it would be to improve current practices.

Given the analyses in Step 3, mark an X on the imaginary continuum in the

column
How hard/easy would this be to improve?

to indicat
e your decision.

Step 5.

Write a short statement of intent.

In the column
What am I going to do?
write a short statement outlining the
positive action you’ll take to achieve better practice in the next 18 months.
Reference to the literature wherever pos
sible.

Step 6.

Establish a timeline.

In the column
By when?

indicate the date/s for this actioning.

Evaluation criteria: Personal future action plan

a.

Selection of recommended practices

................................
....................

/ 2.5

b.

Level of analyses and quality of intent statements

................................
.

/ 10

c.

Links
between theory & practice

................................
...........................

/ 7.5

20

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

Submitting assignments

All assignments should be posted or delivered in person to
Off Campus &
Assignment Handling (OC&AHS)

on the date specified for each assignment.
Every effort will be made to return assignments submitt
ed on their ‘posting date’
within a period of four weeks, with appropriate comments and feedback.
Assignments submitted after the posting date will be graded and returned, but
detailed comments may not be possible due to other work demands. It is highly
unlikely that late first assignments will be returned prior to the posting of the
activities.

All assignment and work submitted for marking must have a correctly completed
Assignment Information Sheet and an Evaluation Sheet attached to the front.
They sh
ould be posted to
Off Campus & Assignment Handling (OC&AHS)
,
Griffith University Qld 4111.

Assignments may also be delivered in person to
Mt
Gravatt Campus Library

or placed in a box marked OC&AHS, which is located
outside Student Administration, Educatio
n Building.

Records relating to assignment turnaround are kept at OC&AHS so that
enquiries can be made about the receipt and return of assignments. When
assignments are addressed or delivered directly to a
course convenor
, no official
record can be kept o
f such submissions.

All students are required to keep
a copy of all assignments or work sheets

submitted in case the original goes astray for any reason.

Assignment extensions

Requests for extensions of time for the submission of assignments should be
made

by email or in writing
to the course convenor at least 5 days before the due
date. Appropriate supporting documentation (e.g., Doctor’s certificate) should be
attached.
Extensions will not be granted automatically
.

Students will receive no more than a
Pas
s mark

for material with a
non or very
late extension
.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

21

Professional practice

Course goals

Professional practice associated with this course is aimed at postgraduates:

1.

developing an applied knowledge of the IEP process.

2.

identifying salient curriculum adapt
ations for particular students with special
needs.

3.

formulating a personal future action plan for competence building in the area
of individualised programming.

Course requirements

To successfully complete the Professional Practice requirements of this cour
se
the following
minimum

conditions and/or opportunities must be available to the
postgraduate student (PS):

1.

PS should be able to devote the equivalent of 5 hours per week for a period
of 10 weeks during the semester. This time is to be spent at one or mo
re
school sites discussing and analysing curriculum practice as well as
developing an IEP for an identified special needs student.
Most of this time is

not spent working directly in a class
.

2.

PS should have access (
formally approved by the host school Prin
cipal and
the student’s parents/caregivers
) to a student with an identified special need
attending an early childhood or primary or secondary or special school
setting.

3.

The PS can work with a student in his/her present class. However, if the PS
is working

outside his/her own classroom, the class teacher of the identified
special needs student must agree to provide access to his/her classroom and
the identified student for 10 weeks to the PS; to act as colleague and mentor
to the PS; and to collaborate with

the PS in the development of the IEP.

4.

All PS

must
post

the completed 3
-
page
Professional Practice Proposal
to the

Professional Practice Unit
by the end of

Week Three

for approval. This
proposal will be confirmed by fax to the PS by the end of Week Four.
PS
should commence work in schools prior to confirmation.

5.

Parent Consent Form
should be

included with assignment

(at front of work,
before the Table of Contents).

Should you require any further information, please contact:

Lauretta Roebuck:

Tel: 07 387 55
915

Email:

L.Roebuck@ griffith.edu.au

Professional Practice Unit

Faculty of Education (Mt Gravatt Campus)

Griffith University

Nathan Qld 4111

22

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

Suggested professional practice schedule

Wk

Begin

PP
Episode

Suggested Tasks

seek out school/s in which

to complete PP period prior to the commencement of university

1

Feb 28

1



identify student & negotiate arrangements re IEP;



if necessary, orientation to school and to classroom with IEP
student.

2

Mar 7

2



complete University paperwork re PP placement;



if

necessary, build relationship with IEP student, class, & teacher;



discuss current curriculum developments and IEP process in action
at school with staff.

3

Mar 14

3



gather information re IEP student (e.g., data available, sources) &
team (e.g., roles, re
sponsibilities, IEP knowledge);



observe IEP student across key learning areas;



if necessary, assist in classroom becoming familiar with student,
classroom dynamics, & organisation;



discuss potential curriculum adaptations with staff (Activity 1);



arrange
some form of parent contact.

4

Mar 21

4



observe/work with student re needs assessment;



meet with team & discuss IEP process and progress to date;



discuss draft IEP meeting preparers with team.





5

Apr 4

5



complete needs assessment;



organise IEP meeti
ng;



prepare IEP meeting agenda;



prepare team for IEP meeting.

6

Apr 11

6



coordinate IEP meeting;



provide IEP meeting follow
-
up documentation;



collect baseline data in priority areas for goal setting.

7

Apr 18

7



discuss draft IEP with team;



collect addit
ional baseline data if necessary.

8

Apr 25

8



share completed IEP with team;



provide school with original copy of IEP document;



initiate information gathering re Activity 1.

9

May 2

9



discuss associated teaching programs re IEP student with team.



continue

information gathering re Activity 1.

10

May 9

10



finalise information gathering for Activity 1;



discuss Activity 2 with teacher and other school staff.

11

May 16


12

May 23


13

May 30




7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

23

Suggested study schedule

Wk

Begin

Module

Topic

Specific Tasks


1

Feb 28

Mar 1

1

3

1: Concepts of curriculum

1: Basic Concepts (skim)

Prof Prac Episode 1 & log

Discuss Prof Prac Forms

Tute/Teleconference 1

2

Mar 7

1

2: Curriculum traditions & current


educational reform

3: Curriculum characteristics

Prof Prac Ep
isode 2 & log

Complete Prof Prac Forms

3

Mar 14

2

1:Key concepts re adaptations

Prof Prac Episode 3 & log

Send Prof Prac Forms

Discuss Activity 1

4

Mar 21

Mar 22

2

2:
Adaptations in inclusive settings

Prof Prac Episode 4 & log

Begin Assignment report

Tut
e/Teleconference 2






5

Apr 4

3

1: Basic concepts

2: Information gathering phase

Prof Prac Episode 5 & log

Continue Assignment report

6

Apr 11


3

2: Information gathering phase

3: IEP meeting phase

Prof Prac Episode 6 & log

Continue Assignment report

7

Apr 18

3

4: Design phase

Readings

Prof Prac Episode 7 & log

Continue Assignment report

8

Apr 25

3

Readings

Prof Prac Episode 8 & log

Commence Activity 1

Continue Assignment report

9

May 2

May 3

3

5: Implementation and Evaluation


phases

Prof Prac E
pisode 9 & log

Post Assignment

10

May 9

May 10

4

1: Research findings and IEP practice

2: Strategies for teachers new to the


IEP process

Prof Prac Episode 10

Cotinue Activity 1

Commence Activity 2

Tute/Teleconference 2

11

May 1666

4

Readings

Continu
e Activities 1 & 2


12

May 23

3 & 4

Additional readings

Continue Activities 1 & 2


13

May 30

3 & 4

Additional readings

Complete Activities


14

June 7



Post Activities


Hurrah!



24

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

Electronic library resources and how to access them

As part of your stu
dy, you need to be using the Griffith University electronic
journal collection to assist you with the assignments and for your own research of
relevant topics.

The Division of Information Services (INS) aims to help you make the best use of
the University’
s online services. In addition to thousands of print and audiovisual
resources, approximately 400 databases and 11,000 electronic journals are
available to Griffith University students. Here’s how you can access your library
resources anywhere, anytime:

On

campus access

The University provides access to common use computing facilities through
Learning Centres and Computer Laboratories. In these centres Internet, email,
Learning @GU, word processing, software, the library catalogue and databases
are provided
. The library catalogue and databases are also accessible via the
computers in the library.

Off campus access

Off campus you have two options for computing access:

1.

The GU@home service provides undergraduate and postgraduate
coursework students who live in
the Brisbane or Gold Coast areas access to
restricted library resources and their Internet quota via a direct modem
connection to the University. Charges apply. Further information is available
at:
http://www.
gu.edu.au/guathome/

2.

If you have your own Internet Service Provider, you can still access restricted
library resources but you need to first install the VLINK software from the
VLINK web page. Further information is available at:
http://www.gu.edu.au/vlink/

The library catalogue and databases

The library has developed a one
-
stop gateway to all its resources via an
Electronic Resources page (
http://www.gu.edu.au/i
ns/collections/electronic/
).
From here you can access the library catalogue, called GriffLink and the
databases, via the Directory of Computer Databases link.You can also access
GriffLink (
h
ttp://www.griffith.edu.au/grifflink
) and the Directory of Computer
Databases (
http://www.griffith.edu.au/ins/collections/databases/compdir/
)
directly.

Databases are to
ols that enable you to search for articles on specific topics
published in journals (also known as periodicals or magazines). These
databases are different to the library catalogue and while they operate in similar
ways, databases and library catalogues s
erve different purposes.
The library
catalogue will tell you the titles of books contained in the library or the journals
that the library subscribes to. The databases on the other hand, will advise you of
the many articles published in those journals and
provide you with publication
details and sometimes the full
-
text of the article. So while the library catalogue
will indicate if a particular journal is held, it does not list its contents. If you want
journal articles on a specific topic or by a particula
r author you need to search a
relevant database.


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

25

From the Directory of Computer Databases, you can select several options
including databases by title, or subject.

Key Education Databases

1.

Informit databases

Informit Search provides access to over 70 ab
stract and 3 full
-
text Australian
databases. You can search individual or multiple databases including:



AEI (Australian Education Index)


(abstract version)



AEI (Australian Education Index)


A+Education (partial full
-
text version)



Ausport (Australian Sp
ort database)



DELTA
-
Database on English Language Teaching for Adults in
Australasia




APAFT
-

Australian Public Affairs


Full Text


Australian Education Index (AEI)

is an index to material at all levels of
education and related fields including educatio
nal research, teacher education,
curriculum, educational psychology and sociology. Source documents are
journal articles, books, book chapters, research reports, theses, conference
papers and newspaper articles. Articles and reports by Australian authors

or
about Australian education published in overseas sources are also included.

2.

OVID databases

Ovid provides a platform to search across single or multiple databases and
electronic journal collections including:



ERIC



SportDiscus



PsycINFO



PsycArticles



Socio
logical Abstracts/ Sociofile



Wilson Art Abstracts

ERIC

is an international database covering all aspects of education at the
primary, secondary and post
-
secondary levels. ERIC indexes two types of
publications


journal articles (EJ) and digests (ED). The

ERIC database can be
searched on either the OVID or ProQuest interfaces. The full
-
text of Eric digests
from 1992 onwards can also be accessed via Ovid or ProQuest. For journal
articles (EJ), the journal availability should be checked in the library cata
logue.

3.

ProQuest Education Journals

ProQuest Education Journals is an index to over 600 education journals.
Content is primarily US based. Full
-
text coverage is available for about half of
journals indexed and varies between titles with some going back t
o 1988. Full
-
text articles are available in a range of formats with many including both the text
and graphics. You can search ProQuest Education Journals individually or
choose the Select Multiple Databases option to search across several
databases. Dat
abases of relevance include:

26

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University



Academic Research Library



Career and Technical Education



ERIC



ProQuest Arts



ProQuest Humanities



ProQuest Psychology Journals



ProQuest Social Science Journals

4.

Web of Knowledge

The Web of Knowledge service provides an integrated
search interface to a
range of database products with its primary content being those available in the
Web of Science
. In addition you can search the multidisciplinary
Current
Contents Connect

database. Databases can be searched individually or as a
group

and there are links between the databases so, for instance, you can
search in the Current
Contents Connect (CC) database, retrieve an article and
then link to the Web of Science to determine which articles the CC article has
cited or conversely, which art
icles have

cited the CC article.

4.1

Web of Science

The Web of Science is a multidisciplinary journal index offering web access to
Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index
and

Science
Citation Index Expanded.
It provides access to ov
er one and a half million
articles in 8,500 research journals and is updated weekly
.

You can perform a topic search in a citation index. However, one of the major
differences in this type of database is that you can look up a reference to a work
that you
know, to find other journal articles that have cited it. You are able to
examine a document’s cited reference list and also identify the number of times
the article has been cited. Citation data enables researchers to keep up to date
with developments in

their research fields by identifying researchers with similar
interests and determining who is citing their own research publications.

Links are provided to access the full
-
text of articles where Griffith University has
a subscription to the electronic ve
rsion of the journal in which the article was
published.

4.2

Current Contents Connect

Current Contents Connect includes Table of Content and citation data for the
journal articles published in over 7,500 of the world's leading scientific and
scholarly jour
nals plus some 2,000 books and 4,000 expertly evaluated web
sites. The database is divided into seven sub
-
databases, which may be searched
individually or collectively. The databases are Agriculture, Biology &
Environmental Science; Arts & Humanities; Cli
nical medicine; Engineering,
Computing &Technology; Life Sciences; Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences,
and Social & Behavioural Sciences.

Current Contents Connect permits both searching and browsing of journal
contents. You can browse the Table of Conte
nts of journals by the journal title or
the Current Contents Edition (eg. Social & Behavioral Sciences or Arts &
Humanities).


7212CLS Co
urse Outline Griffith University

27

5.

ScienceDirect

In addition to science, ScienceDirect includes many excellent journals from the
fields of education, linguistics, ps
ychology and sociology. Students have full
-
text
access to the complete database of 5.8 million articles across 2,000 peer
-
reviewed journals, dating back to 1995, with indexing dating back even further.
No need to register or login


just use the “Search”
button.

6.

SwetsWise

SwetsWise is a service which currently provides access to the tables of contents
and article abstracts of approximately 16,000 electronic journals from about
5,000 publishers. Full
-
text access is also available to the electronic journals
to
which the Griffith University has a current subscription. Currently over 3,800 are
available for full
-
text access.

SwetsWise covers most subject areas, including education, social sciences,
language, geography/history and science and technology. At th
e initial
SwetsWise screen, select the
“Login via IP authentification”

link. You can
search the SwetsWise database by selecting the “Search Articles” option. You
can limit your search just to “full text subscriptions” if you choose to. If you
require a
list of journals in a particular subject area, select the “Publications”
option. From here, select “full text subscriptions” at the “show” box, then your
subject at the “LCC category”.

7.

Other Useful Education Databases



Physical Education Index



Expanded Ac
ademic ASAP (full
-
text multidisciplinary)



AustStats (Australian statistics)



Austlit: Australian Literature Gateway



International Index to Music Periodicals



Department of Education Manual (Queensland)



Vocational Education and Training Database (VOCED)




8
.

Education Queensland



Education Queensland’s AccessED's 'AccessClub' gives schools and other
education organisations access to information services, specialist education
collections and various online curriculum databases. The 'AccessClub Basic'
gives
access to four packages: 'Professional Collection', 'Professional
Exchange', 'Curriculum Collection' and 'Curriculum Exchange'.


Professional Exchange: provides a range of electronic information resources and
services for educators, including: customised
professional topic links to books,
journal articles and websites. Topics covered include school management,
teaching practice, student issues, IT issues and skills and educational trends.


Curriculum Exchange: a digital resource centre offering a range of

information
services for teachers, including: collections of electronic resources; reviews of
educational materials; curriculum initiatives; reference databases; teacher
discussion lists; practical tips for unit and lesson planning and electronic
classroo
m strategies and online units for primary curriculum and secondary
28

7212CLS Course Outline Griffith University

students. Sections include Hot Topics, Rich Task Resources and Productive
Pedagogy Resources.


Access to many of the resources available in the Curriculum Exchange and
Professional Exchang
e modules of AccessClub is ID and password controlled.
Resources that have restricted access are identified by a lock symbol.

Access
to these resources is only

available to students and staff of Griffith University. A
link to the AccessClub username and password and to the AccessClub web site
is found in the library catalogue. Perform a Title Search for AccessClub Basic,
select the Full Record and then the Cli
ck here to Access link for the current
username and password.


Professional Collection: AccessED's catalogue of their collection of more than
40,000 items covering professional topics relating to management, educational