Spring 2014 Special Topics/Opportunities - Ursinus College

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14 déc. 2013 (il y a 3 années et 7 mois)

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Spring 2014 Special Topics/Opportunities


Art and Art History Department

ART
20
8
.A

Art, Science, and the Environment



The course will introduce artists, artworks, and interdisciplinary projects that engage the biological sciences and the conte
mporary movement
BioArt, which includes works generated in a lab atmosphere. The course will also introduce contemporary artworks t
hat engage ecology, site
specificity, and the environment. Class discussion and critique will play key roles throughout the semester and will be infor
med by weekly
readings and image
-
based lectures. Through these formats the class will consider the value o
f cross
-
pollination between these disciplines and
students will explore these themes through a range of studio exercises in two and three dimensional materials. During the sec
ond half of the
semester students will have the opportunity to develop an in
-
dept
h studio project based on their particular interest
s with regard to course content
.
Four semester hours
. Art materials fee. (A.)


ART

209
.A
/MCS 209
.A

Documentary Photography



This course introduces students to the concepts of visual documentation, social documentary work, photojournalism, and ethics

within in
photography.
Through the study of historical and contemporary movements students pursue an understanding of the distinctions between
Photojournalism, Documentary, and Fine Art Photography, and explore areas where the three intersect.
Students are required to conduct of
f
-
campus fieldwork, collecting digital still images to create visual narratives on a range of issues.

Creative work will culminate with the completion
of a larger self
-
published project. In
-
class critique will be at the core of the image
-
making process as
will a constant practice of looking at the
work of established photographers.
Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.

Digital cam
era required.

(A)


ART 250
.A

Art Crime: Thefts, Frauds, and Forgeries



This course examines social,
historical, political, and cultural implications of art crime, such as tomb raiding in Tuscany, auctioning of ancient
Khmer temple statuary, and forging paintings by Abstract Expressionists like Robert Motherwell. No prerequisite.
Four semester hours
. (A,
H.)


ART 3
0
8.A
Art, Science, and the Environment



The course will introduce artists, artworks, and interdisciplinary projects that engage the biological sciences and the conte
mporary movement
BioArt, which includes works generated in a lab atmosphere.

The course will also introduce contemporary artworks that engage ecology, site
specificity, and the environment. Class discussion and critique will play key roles throughout the semester and will be infor
med by weekly
readings and image
-
based lectures. Th
rough these formats the class will consider the value of cross
-
pollination between these disciplines and
students will explore these themes through a range of studio exercises in two and three dimensional materials. During the sec
ond half of the
semester s
tudents will have the opportunity to develop an in
-
depth studio project based on their particular interests with regard to course content.

Expectations will be higher for students who enroll at the 300 level.

Prerequisite: One introductory studio art cours
e or permission of instructor.
Four semester hours
. Art materials fee. (A.)


Biology Department

BIO 350.A Pathogens, Pandemics, and Preparedness



Pandemics


the worldwide spread of infectious disea
ses


have claimed millions of lives just in the last century, let alone over the course of
recorded history. Even today, pandemic infectious diseases like influenza, SARS, and multidrug
-
resistant tuberculosis threaten the health and
lives of people aroun
d the globe. The microbes that cause them


the pathogens


are an airline flight away from almost any spot on the planet.
Are we ready for the next outbreak? This course will examine the pathogens responsible for pandemic diseases, the methods th
at epid
emiologists
use to track their spread, and the social, economic, political and other civic influences that shape our current state of pre
paredness against
outbreaks of diseases we may not even have a name for yet. The course will also prepare students for

key roles in hosting and participating in a
conference sponsored by Ursinus College and the Institute on Science for Global Policy to take place on campus on April 11
-
12, 2014. This
course fulfills the Integrative distribution requirement for biology maj
ors
.
Three hours per week.
N
o laboratory, but in addition to the scheduled
class meetings, students must also attend arranged meetings outside of class, including the conference dates of April 11
-
12, 2014.

Four semester
hours.

BIO 350.B Contemporary Topics in Biology


A survey of selected topics in biology. Specific topics will vary based on student interest, but may include: development an
d aging, the di
gestive
system and nutrition, reproduction, HIV, DNA biology and technology, human population and conservation, and the senses. This

course fulfills
the Integrative distribution requirement for biology majors
.
Three hours per week.
N
o laboratory
.

Four se
mester hours
.


BIO 350.C Drug Discovery in the Post Genomic Era

This course will be taught by Dr. Michael Schaber who is a senior research scientist at GlaxoSmithKline in Collegeville. The

complete process
of drug discovery will be covered from identifying target molecules, initial discovery and screening, detection p
latforms, assays, profiling,
efficacy studies, and phase 1
-
3 trials. Challenges and responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies, including economics, intellectual property,
ethics and regulatory affairs will also be part of this course. Case studies will

be presented on select drugs and students will have the opportunity
to work on a personal project, dealing with one drug, for the entire semester. Like other biology courses the personal proje
ct culminates with a
written report and an oral presentation a
nd there will be three exams during the semester. Highly recommended for pre
-
medical students and
students seeking biomedical graduate study, as well as for students with an interest in working in industry, particularly the

pharmaceutical
industry. This c
ourse fulfills the Molecular/Cellular distribution requirement for biology majors
.
Three hours per week.
N
o laboratory
.
Four
semester hours
.

Business and Economics Department

BE

005
.A

Is there a Moral Basis for a Free Market System?


Two books will be
read on the moral principles that are implied in a free market society. One book will argue that a free market is a better s
ystem
in meeting the needs of the poor, in allowing upward mobility and equity, and in addressing some of the arguments that govern
ment is a
necessary provider of services. The other book will examine some of the common claims against the free market made by libera
ls. The readings
are a starting point for discussion. No background in economics is necessary.


One hour per week.


One

semester hour.



Classics Department


LAT 307
.A

Latin Myth in Poetry

Mythology provided inspiration to Rome's poets, and those poets, in turn, composed the most eloquent and elaborate versions o
f ancient myths
that survive. We will examine the ways p
oets such as Ovid, Catullus, and Horace treated the material and found new and personal ways to retell
stories so familiar in the ancient world.

RELS 309.A Revolts and Rabbis, Scrolls and Sects: The History of Jews and Judaism in Antiquity

Mark Twain once wrote about Jewish history that "The Persians rose, filled the planet with sound and splendor, then faded to
dream
-
stuff and
passed away; the Greeks and Romans followed and made a vast noise, and they were gone...The Jew saw them all, survi
ved them all." This
course will trace exactly this time span of Jewish history (6th century BCE to 5th century CE) and explain how the Jewish peo
ple survived (and
even thrived!) despite being continually ruled by foreign empires. As we shall see, their sur
vival was partly due to their transformation of the
religion of the Bible into rabbinic Judaism, the dominant form of Judaism until the 19th century. Our course of study will in
clude this period's
many religious developments such as the appearance of diffe
rent "sects"
-

Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, the Dead Sea sect, and early Christians.
Attention will also be paid to the Jewish engagement with Greco
-
Roman culture and the resulting literary inventions, such as Hellenistic Jewish
writings, and political de
velopments, such as the Maccabean rebellion and the Hasmonean dynasty; the rise of Herod under Roman rule; and the
two revolts against Rome. This course will, therefore, give students both an introduction to Judaism as well as a broad surve
y of ancient Nea
r
Eastern history. Three hours per week
. Four semester hours.

(H)

This course will satisfy one requirement for a major related course in the
Classics Department.

RELS 309.B Sex, Society, and Religion in the Classical World

An exploration of the relati
onship between sexuality and religion in Greek and Roman antiquity, including the transformation of sexual attitudes
with the rise of early Christianity. Through a study of both historical sources and modern theoretical texts (including Miche
l Foucault’s
f
amous

History of Sexuality
), we will learn how radically different Greek and Roman views on sex and gender were from our own, but also how
our own ideas about sexuality have been shaped by ancient traditions and debates. Topics may include homosexuality, p
rostitution, celibacy,
marriage, gender, and the social and religious significance of the body. Primary texts to be considered may include Plato’s

Symposium
,
Aristophanes’

Lysistrata
, Ovid’s

Art of Love
, and the acts of the Christian martyrs. Three hours p
er week.
Four semester hours.

(H)

This course
will satisfy one requirement for a major related course in the Classics Department.

East Asian Studies Department


EAS 299.A/FS 250.A
Japanese Film



An approach to Japanese films, from silents

to anime, in their social and historical context, with particular attention to how they address the
questions: “What is Japan, and what does it mean to be Japanese?” Topics include gender and sexual politics, class
-
based realities and
aspirations, the le
gacy of the Pacific War, criminal and youth subcultures, the ethical dimension of the samurai, social justice, and dystopian
visions of the future. Among the directors to be studied are Ozu Yasujiro, Kurosawa Akira, Mizoguchi Kenji, Oshima Nagisa, K
itano
Takeshi,
and Miyazaki Hayao. Films include “Seven Samurai,” “Godzilla,” and “Akira.” The course is taught in English, and all films
have English
subtitles. No prerequisites. Required screenings are held on Mondays at 7 pm. This course fulfills the “G”

(Global Study) requirement for the
college core curriculum, and fulfills the national/regional cinema requirement for the Film Studies minor. For screenings,
all students must
register for FS250S.A. Four hours per week.
Four semester hours.

(G., H.)


Education Department


EDUC 446.A
Technology as Educator

This course will look at the ways in which technology shapes, or
educates
, who we are as humans.


We will turn to works in philosophy,
sociology, literature and film in order to reflect upon what technology is and what it means for us as humans to interact wit
h technology. While
we will look at technology as an educative force
in human life in general, we will also look at practical applications of technology in schooling in
order to assess its current use in educational institutions. In addition, we will analyze and experiment with our own relatio
nship to technology,
exploring
ways in which our use of technology affects our sense of self, our relationships with others, and our learning experiences. T
his course is
especially appropriate for students of
education, American Studies, philosophy, sociology, media & communications, an
d computer
science.


EDUC 210 is recommended but not required as a pre
-
requisite.
This is a “D” course.
Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.

English Department



ENGL 104
W
.A

J.R.R. Tolkien and His Sources


In this class we will read
The Hobbit

and as much of
The Lord of the Rings

as we can, along with a number of the medieval works J.R.R. Tolkien
used to create his masterpiece. Be prepared for lively discussion of the interrelationships among the sources, the literatur
e and the films! We will

also work on improving student writing through in
-
class and out
-
of

class essays. Open to first and second year students only.

Three hours per

week.

Four semester hours
.

(H)


ENGL 209C.A
Memoir Writing


If reality television makes anything clear
(???), it may be that we have a hunger to witness experience at close range. That, even in this
postmodern age, we crave connections to living that is “real”

or seems so.


Memoir writing is the literary parallel, a wildly popular form that
draws on persona
l, non
-
fictional content. Memoir writing today embraces all who have witnessed something that seems noteworthy:


prison,
suburban middle school, physical pain, waitressing, losses and gains.


Consider this course a chance to explore your personal terrain t
hrough
writing approaches drawn from poetry, fiction, non
-
fiction, and journalism.


Long and short writing assignments, workshops, discussion,
research, and possibly off
-
campus investigations are standard features. Requirements:


Respect for the

personal w
riting of others and a

strong
writing work ethic.

Three hours per week
. Four semester hours.


ENGL 230.A
Tale/Play/Epic


This class follows the emergence and early masterpieces of literature in English with attention to contemporary parallels. O
ur g
eneral focus is on
three types of storytelling

tales, plays, and epics

and on the formal qualities of narrative that define English literature even today. We will
read the sex farce of Chaucer as the antecedent of contemporary romantic comedies and the pe
rformance
-
oriented verse of
Beowulf

as the poetic
heritage of gangster rap. We will find in Milton’s
Paradise Lost

and in the lurid tragedy of the early modern revenge play a pattern for how we
organize our lives today around heroic individualism and fantasies of justice. Considering the social, religious, and politi
cal contexts that form
and inform early English lit
erature, we will develop a sense of the function of literary narrative as a reflection, and critique, of culture.

Three
hours per
week
.


Four semester hours.
(H) Meets the former ENGL 291requirement for majors finishing under the former curriculum
requir
ements.


ENGL 230.B
Modern Short Fiction in America and Britain


Through tracing the development of the short story (and an occasional novella), this course will focus on the major movements

in literary history
in the last two hundred years.


The nine
teenth
-
century

flourishing of Romanticism and Realism will lead us to the tales of Poe and Hawthorne,
and then to the more everyday realism of James, Hardy, and Jewett.


Moving into the twentieth century, we will give special emphasis to
Modernism, the gr
eat era of the short story as practiced by Joyce and Lawrence, Faulkner and Hemingway, Woolf and Mansfield.


Lastly, we’ll
consider postmodernism through the early experimentation of Nabokov, the metafiction of Barth and Coover, and the works of mo
re
conte
mporary writers such as David Foster Wallace.


Three hours
week
.

Four semester hours.
(H)

Note: For students completing the English
major under the old curriculum, this course can substitute for either ENGL292 or ENGL293.


ENGL 240.A
Songs and Poems


Today the term “lyric poetry” is used to refer to almost any short poem, but originally the term meant poems that were meant
to be sung. In this
class we will look at and listen to a large variety of short lyric poetry, from the earliest lyrics in English

to contemporary songs. We will
concentrate on songs that are (or could be) poems, and poems that are (or could be) songs.
Three hours per
week.

Four semester hours
.
(H)


ENGL

310.A

Sexual Transgression: Fallen Women in 19th Century Novels


Sexual rules in the nineteenth century were very different for men and women. In this course we will compare the portrayals

of women who
have sex before marriage, and the portrayals of their male partners. Along the way, we will consider the cultural bas
es for differing attitudes,
looking at marriage and inheritance laws, and how those shift over the century. Most of the novels we read will be British, l
ikely including
Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Gaskell's Ruth, Eliot's The Mill on the Floss, and defini
tely Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Based on the
preferences of students in the class, we may also compare these to novels in other cultures, such as Wharton's Summer (Americ
an), Flaubert's
Madame Bovary (French), or Tolstoy's Anna Karenina (Russian).

The course will conclude with the postmodern novel The French Lieutenant's
Woman, which offers parallel plots of sexual transgression in Victorian and modern times. Three hours per week.
Three hours per week
. Four
semester hours

(H)

Prerequisites: ENGL
290W and at least one other English course between 220 and 250. Satisfies the major requirement for a
post
-
1800 colloquium.


ENGL

320
.A

Renaissance Tragedy


This class pairs selected Shakespeare tragedies with the work of other playwrights from the s
ame period to offer a snapshot of the genre Philip
Sidney said "maketh kings fear to be tyrants.” And what is it about tragedy that keeps kings in line? Incest and adultery?

Scheming machiavels
and disaffected soldiers? Bloody, gory, gleefully plotted

revenge? We will work our way through the period’s greatest hits, from
The Duchess of
Malfi

and
Richard III

to
The Jew of Malta
,
The Changeling
, and
‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore
, together with a handful of secondary reading to help
sketch out some context and some central themes. Grades are based on two short papers, a group project, and a final research

paper.
Three hours

per week
. Four semester hours.
(H)

Prerequisites: ENGL

290W and at least one other English course between 220 and 250. Satisfies the major
requirement for a pre
-
1800 colloquium.


ENGL 325
.A

Black Arts Movement


Born in the mid
-
1960s amidst pressure for political, social, and economic changes, the Black Arts Movement is an African
-
American cultural
force driven by the peculiar and exceptional history of black people in the U.S. Its founders and proponents advanced

a vision of art as a change
agent, enabling expressions of power and blackness, resistance to oppression, and community
-
building. In ENGL 325, students will study the
context, theory, and literary products of the Black Arts Movement; they will also resea
rch its influences and its reverberations today. Fulfills the
“D” requirement.
Three hours per week
. Four semester hours
. (D, H)

Prerequisites:
ENGL 290W and one other English course between 220 and
250.

Satisfies the major requirement for a post
-
1800 co
lloquium.


ENGL 444
.A

Game
-
Changing Texts in the Study of American Literature


This seminar will focus on major texts in American literature, some of the debates they have inspired, and the way that such
debates have affected
the field of American literary studies. Students will engage in these debates through a variety of approaches
, including traditional critical writing,
writing for the public (blogs and position papers), and oral presentations, among others. For each part of the course, we wil
l pair a classic
American text with a game
-
changing work of literary criticism and explor
e the results. Pairings are likely to include: Twain,
The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn
and Jonathan Arac,
Huckleberry Finn as Idol and Target
; Fitzgerald’s
The Great Gatsby
and Walter Benn Michael’s
Our
America: Nativism, Modernism, Pluralism
; Henry Jame
s’s “The Beast in the Jungle” and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s
Epistemology of the Closet
;
and George Schuyler’s
Black No More
with Ken Warren’s
What Was African American Literature?
This course will require a 15
-
20
-
page
research paper, multiply revised, as wel
l as a substantial oral presentation presented to both faculty and students within the English Department.
Open to English and American Studies w/ literature concentration majors with senior standing only.
Three hours per week
. Four semester hours.

(H)


Environmental Studies Department


ENV 350.A The Science of Fracking

The relatively recent development of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing collectively termed “fracking
” has allowed rapid and expansive
exploitation of oil and natural gas resources in shale basins across the United States (e.g., Texas, Colorado, North Dakota,
and
Pennsylvania).


The process involves pumping great volumes of water mixed with chemicals and
proppants (sand) underground at high pressure
to create fractures allowing oil or natural gas to flow to wells for collection.


In this course we will look at the geologic origins and characteristics
of shale basins in general with a focus on the Marcellus

Shale of Pennsylvania.


We will review the many steps involved in shale oil or natural
gas development: mineral leasing, seismic surveys, road and well pad construction, drilling, hydraulic fracturing, production
, transportation of the
product to markets,

and their ultimate use.


We will investigate impacts to land, air, water, ecosystems and wildlife, and people resulting from this
industrial activity.


To enhance our understanding of this complex issue, students will complete individual and collaborative

research
projects.


As we stand at the dawn of the “Shale Gas Era” it’s important for all of us to become more aware of the costs and benefits of

tapping
this unconventional energy source in our own backyard and beyond.

Three hours per week.
Four semes
ter hours.

Exercise and Sport Science Department



ESS

210
.A

Advanced Conditioning


This course is designed as a continuation of ESS 220


Critical Components of Conditioning. The course will expand upon and explore
previously studied components of
conditioning such as flexibility, muscular strength and endurance, cardiovascular fitness, and advanced training
with special emphasis placed upon variations in program design and implementation for various populations (age
-
related, gender, athlete vs. non
-
athlete demands). The course will also examine nutrition and supplementation as it pertains to conditioning. Students will
also explore other
areas of interest such as fitness center design, safety/organization, and motivational techniques.

Prerequisit
es


ESS 100 and ESS 220
. Three
hours per week.
Two semester hours.



Film Studies

FS
250.A
/EAS 299.A
Japanese Film



An approach to Japanese films, from silents

to anime, in their social and historical context, with particular attention to how they address the
questions: “What is Japan, and what does it mean to be Japanese?” Topics include gender and sexual politics, class
-
based realities and
aspirations, the le
gacy of the Pacific War, criminal and youth subcultures, the ethical dimension of the samurai, social justice, and dystopian
visions of the future. Among the directors to be studied are Ozu Yasujiro, Kurosawa Akira, Mizoguchi Kenji, Oshima Nagisa, K
itano
Takeshi,
and Miyazaki Hayao. Films include “Seven Samurai,” “Godzilla,” and “Akira.” The course is taught in English, and all films
have English
subtitles. No prerequisites. Required screenings are held on Mondays at 7 pm. This course fulfills the “G”

(Global Study) requirement for the
college core curriculum, and fulfills the national/regional cinema requirement for the Film Studies minor. For screenings,
all students must
register for FS250S.A. Four hours per week.
Four semester hours.

(G., H.)


FS 252
.A

African American Film

This course studies the contributions of African Americans to Hollywood and independent film from the silent era to the prese
nt. We will
examine the work of prominent African American filmmakers and performers, along wit
h popular film cycles including black
-
cast musicals of
the 1930s and 1940s, Blaxploitation films of the 1970s, and ghetto action films of the 1990s. While we will mainly concern ou
rselves with films
made by African American filmmakers, we will also conside
r white Hollywood’s productions of blackness, questioning the notion of positive and
negative representations of race, and analyzing the intersections between race, gender, class, and sexuality.

No prerequisites. Fulfills the “D”
requirement. Must also s
ign up for evening screenings (FS252S.A).

Four semester hours.


FS 305
.A

Film Theory and Criticism


“What is cinema?” This is a question that we all think we can answer, and yet the more we consider it, the more complex it se
ems. In the early
20
th

century, what we now know as “cinema” was called everything from “living pictures” to “illustrated vaudeville.” We find ourse
lves in a
similar state of confusion every time we encounter new technologies for making and viewing the movies. For example, does

the widespread
diffusion of the smart phone change what “cinema” can, or should, mean? The course asks how the artistic aspirations of filmm
akers intersect
with the commercial goals of industries and the social needs of discrete communities to create a me
dium that is distinct from the others and yet
capable of change. To do so, we trace the major models in film theory in order to discover the influence of film on the way w
e think,
communicate, and make art. With backgrounds in psychology, art, history, the
ater, literature, and music, the figures studied in the course
demonstrate why the cinema is, and remains, an interdisciplinary pursuit.
Prerequisite: FS 101. Must also sign up for evening screenings (FS
305S.A). Four semester hours.


History Department

HIST 421W
.A


Equality in America: The Pursuit of an Ideal


Popular narratives of United States history often revolve around people who pursued and realized the American Dream. Such acc
ounts detail, for
example, how colonists overcame their subjec
tion to the British Crown to create a democratic nation, enslaved Africans acquired freedom and
citizenship after the Civil War, (white) women fought for and obtained voting rights, and immigrant groups from every corner
of the world
struggled for inclusiv
eness and financial stability. This course will examine that narrative. More specifically, it will use some of the major
political movements of the 19th and 20th centuries to determine what various individuals and groups were actually pursuing wh
en they to
ok
public stands for equal rights. In doing so, we will question whether and how factors such as class, gender, race, sexuality,

political affiliations,
regional origins, and religious beliefs shaped what “equality” and “rights” meant, and how such factors

influenced people’s interpretations of and
stakes in those concepts. This is a writing
-
intensive seminar course requiring research in primary sources and approximately 30 pages of formal
writing. Prerequisites: HIST
-
200W or equivalent; third or fourth
-
y
ear status. Three hours per week.
Four semester hours. (H.)


Interdivisional Studies

IDS 110
.B Food and Society

Food is life. It is unavoidable and necessary. And yet, we so often misunderstand it, and rarely give it the attention it des
erves. Food is also
complicated: it is personal and individual and yet also corporate and industrial. It requires attention at all
scales: individual, community, national,
international, global. Food is also interdisciplinary: it can (if we let it) demand that we think about geography, biology, c
hemistry, economics,
ethics, psychology, sociology, and art (among others)! Entire societi
es have developed and collapsed on the basis of their relationship to food,
and yet our relationship with food can be as simple as eating breakfast. This introductory social science course provides an
overview of the
relationships between people and food,
by looking at a host of issues and cases that illustrate how we think (or don’t think carefully enough)
about the food system: what we eat, grow, process, engineer, market, and buy (or sell). Possible topics include:



the geography of food and culture;



the

tension between the globalized/industrial and localized/sustainable food systems;



psychology, food choice, and the marketing of food;



the politics of consumer choice;



food choice and public health;



food and social change; and



the geopolitics of food.


Thi
s course has no prerequisites and fulfills the social science requirement of the college core. Because of the way course enro
llments are being
administered, most students attempting to enroll in this course will be waitlisted. The first 16 people on the wa
itlist will subsequently be enrolled,
so we ask that you please be patient as we process the waitlist.
Three hours per week.
Four semester hours
.

Common Intellectual Experience

CIE 300.A
What is Love?

Is this love?


How do I know?


Is love an expansive feeling that one self
-
sufficient person feels for another, or is it a need that drives an
incomplete person to seek someone to make him whole?


Is love fairly reasonable, so that we can inquire into whom
we should love, or is it
fundamentally mysterious and spontaneous, offering itself only to people who know reason’s limits?


Is loving another human being an end in
itself, or is it part of a bigger pursuit, of communion with God, or of happiness, or of im
mortality? In this seminar, students will investigate these
and related questions with a view to developing a provisional understanding of what love is.


Readings from ancient, modern, and contemporary
sources may include Plato’s Symposium, Austen’s Pride
and Prejudice, C.S. Lewis’s The Four Loves, Freud’s Three Essays on Sexuality, Allan
Bloom’s Love and Friendship, and Beth Bailey’s From Front Porch to Back Seat: Courtship in Twentieth Century America.


We will consider a
variety of approaches, psychologi
cal/evolutionary, historical, literary, political, and philosophical to our question.

This course fulfills the H
distribution requirement and counts

for politics or philosophy elective credit. It is open to anyone who has completed CIE100 and 200. In the
s
pirit of CIE, it is meant to draw students from across divisions.

Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.


Mathematics and Computer Science Department

Computer Science


CS
472
.A

Mobile Application D
evelopment


This project
-
oriented course examines the principles of mobile application design and development. Students will learn application develop
ment
on the Android and/or iOS platform. Topics will include memory management; user interface design; user interface
building; input methods; data
handling; network techniques and URL loading; and, finally, specifics such as GPS and motion sensing. Students are expected t
o work on a
project that produces a professional
-
quality mobile application.
Prerequisite: CS174 o
r permission of the instruction
.
This course does NOT
fulfill the requirement for a capstone experience in the major.

Three hours per week
. Four semester hours.

Mathematics

MATH 452
.A

Analytics Math Methods


This course examines mathematical and modeling processes used in “Analytics” to identify, analyze, interpret, predict, and pr
esent results, so as
to transfer quantitative information into decisions, with a focus on business and economics settings. The goal

is to provide a strong conceptual
understanding of analytics methodology and the role it plays to gain valuable knowledge and guide decision making. Analytics
software, actual
examples in business settings and "Problem
-
Scenario Approach" will be used to f
oster applied learning and understanding of the mathematical
concepts. Topics will include a selection from quantitative analysis; decision analysis/making; risk and sensitivity analysis
; game theory, time
series and forecasting; linear programing; distrib
ution and network models; inventory models; optimization; scheduling; simulation; probability
distributions; and Markov processes. The mathematical and statistical basis for decision
-
making will be reviewed.
Prerequisite: MATH105 or
111, and one from BE22
0, MATH141, MATH442 or permission of the instructor
. Three hours per week
. F
our
semester

hours.

Media and Communication Studies Department

MCS 209
.A
/ART

209
.A

Documentary Photography



This course introduces students to the concepts of visual documentation, social documentary work, photojournalism, and ethics

within in
photography.
Through the study of historical and contemporary movements students pursue an understanding of the distinct
ions between
Photojournalism, Documentary, and Fine Art Photography, and explore areas where the three intersect.
Students are required to conduct off
-
campus fieldwork, collecting digital still images to create visual narratives on a range of issues.

Creat
ive work will culminate with the completion
of a larger self
-
published project. In
-
class critique will be at the core of the image
-
making process as will a constant practice of looking at the
work of established photographers.
Three hours per week.
Four se
mester hours.

Digital cam
era required.

(A)

MCS 275.B
Sports Journalism


This course introduces students to the fundamentals of sports journalism. Students will write athlete profiles, sports featur
es, and game coverage,
and will
learn to turn stories on tight deadlines. Students will also learn multimedia skills geared toward publishing sports content
on multiple
platforms. No prior journalism experience needed.

Three hours per week.
Four semester hours
.



MCS
307
.A
Conflict
and Communication


Taking a communication perspective, this course examines conflict in American society and considers alternative strategies of

conflict resolution.
Students are introduced to theories about the nature and kinds of conflict as well as obst
acles to managing conflicts. They learn to map and
analyze real life conflict situations in interpersonal, inter
-
group, and organizational contexts, developing skills and examining models for
negotiation and conflict resolution.

Three hours per week.
Four

semester hours.


Modern Language Department

French


FREN 440
.A
/441
.A

Rebels, Villains and Criminals in French and Francophone Literature

Rebels, villains and criminals (men and women) have always fascinated our imagination and inspired writers as those character
s raise
fundamental issues about the nature of bad and evil, and about the transgression of societal rules. We will explore the di
fferent representations of
rebels, villains and criminals across the centuries and in different cultural contexts. Some questions we will ask: When does

a rebel become a
criminal? Is a criminal always a “monster”? Are female rebels or criminals represente
d differently because of their gender? What role do
violence and sexuality play in those texts? Here are a few of the texts we will read:
Les Liaisons dangereuses

by Choderlos de Laclos ,
Thérése
Desqueyroux

by François Mauriac ,

Au commencement étai
t la mer

by Algerian author Maïssa Bey

and more. Open to Junior and Senior or by
permission of the instructor.

Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.

German


GER 314.A German Cinema

Students in German Cinema will view, discuss and write analytical papers on films from the early silent era and the Weimar Re
public through the
New Wave and the present day.

Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.



Spanish


SPAN 440W.A
Racial
Discourses in Argentina and Cuba

This course will explore the role of racial discourses in the shaping of Argentina and Cuba as modern nations and in the cons
titution of their
national identities. We will examine racial discourses as manifested in major fo
rms of cultural production including foundational novels, essays,
performance, state propaganda, and contemporary literature and visual art. Each of these texts will be accompanied by critica
l readings or
theoretical readings on race. The course focuses on

key periods of nation
-
building, such as the nationalism of the late 19th century and the
populist/revolutionary regimes of the mid
-
20th century. By focusing on Argentina and Cuba, two cases with vastly dissimilar histories (Argentina
was among the first t
o gain independence from Spain while Cuba was the last; the majority of the Argentine population is of European descent
while Cuba has a large population of African descent), the course aims to think both specifically and comparatively about the

production

of race
and national identity in modern Latin America.

Prerequisites: SPAN 251, 252, senior status or permission of the instructor.

Three hours per
week
. Four semester hours.

Neuroscience Department

NEUR

350
.A

/ PSYC

495
.A

Neurodiversity

and the Autism Spectrum

How does neuroscience apply to civil rights?

This course will familiarize students with neurodiversity, a civil rights type movement asserting that
atypical brain development is part of normal human variation, in the context of the

autism spectrum. Readings will incorporate first
-
hand
accounts of the autism spectrum with cutting
-
edge research on differences between autistic and neurotypical (i.e., non
-
autistic) individuals in
behavior, brain structure, and brain function. We will ex
plore topics such as speech and language, face processing, theory of mind, intelligence,
and mirror neurons. Students are encouraged to be open
-
minded about differences among people, as this course will challenge commonly
-
held
assumptions about persons on
the autism spectrum.

Three hours per week
. Four semester hours.

Philosophy and Religious Studies Department

Philosophy


PHIL 309.A


Queer Philosophy

Queer Philosophy
--

or Queer Theory as it is better known
--

grew out of Feminist and Gay/Lesbian Studies' challenges to the notion of gender as
part of the essential self. Going beyond earlier focuses on the concepts of "natural" and "unnatural" sexual ac
ts and behavior, queer theory
considers any kind of sexual activity or identity that falls into normative and deviant categories. It values mismatches of s
ex, gender, and desire.
It brings in from the margins cross
-
dressing, gender ambiguity, and trans
-
gen
der body alternations. It takes seriously the notion of identity as a
constellation of multiple and unstable positions. It debunks the notion of stable sexes, genders and sexualities. In addition

to reading major works
of Queer Theory (e.g. Judith Butler,
Lauren Berlant, Michel Foucault and Dean Spade), we will look into literature, art, popular culture and
journalism. This class presumes no background in philosophy or queer

or feminist studies. All who are willing to explore are welcome. Three
hours per we
ek.
Four semester hours
. (H)


PHIL
309.B

Beauvoir and Beyond: Philosophy and Sexual Difference.



“But if I wish to define myself,” writes Simone de Beauvoir, “I must first of all say: ‘I am a woman’; on this truth must be

based all


further

discussion.” With this declaration

and the publication of _The Second Sex_ in 1953

the question of “woman” becomes a proper topic
of philosophical investigation, as Beauvoir demystifies the “eternal feminine” and lays bare the structural relationship of t
he categories


of masculine and feminine and how they function to construct woman as Other. In the wake of Beauvoir, other feminist thinkers

take up many


of her questions, but abandon her existentialist presuppositions. In this course, we will examine a

set of twentieth century texts that


insist on taking woman, gender, and sexual difference seriously as philosophical categories. The first third of the course
will focus on


readings from the new unabridged English edition of The Second Sex.Then we w
ill consider so
-
called “French feminism” after Beauvoir, a


designation that includes figures as diverse as Julia Kristeva, Luce Irigaray, Hélène Cixous, Catherine Clément, Monique Wit
tig, and


Michèle Le Doueff. These thinkers di
verge in a variety of w
ays from

Beauvoir’s approach. But they continue to insist on the necessity of


confronting the question of sexual difference and the category of woman, with recourse to psychoanalytic and deconstructive
strategies


as well as the theorization and perfor
mance of distinctly feminine writing. Topics to be addressed include the place of women in


philosophy; essentialism, strategic and otherwise; critical responses to Freud’s analysis of female sexuality; the possibili
ty of theorizing


multiple subjects
rather than a single ostensibly universal subject; and the relationship of sexual difference to other kinds of difference,
including race, class, and sexual orientation. Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.


PHIL 309.C

What Really Matters in Li
fe?

Are you curious about what makes for a good life?


Everyone wants to be happy, but the pursuit of happiness may be illusory if not guided by
critical thinking.


In this course, we will think together about what goods and ends ought to be pursued to liv
e an intellectually and morally
satisfying life.


We will explore questions like:


is it really possible for one to be happy without cultivating a concern for the well
-
being of
others?


Can legitimate self
-
interest co
-
exist with the ethical life?


Is fame
really something for which we should strive?


What are the marks of a
life lived with authenticity? We will struggle with these questions and students will be also asked to think about and reflec
t on such matters in
their own lives.

Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.

(H)

PHIL 344.A Lying and Self
-
Defense

Lying and self
-
defense are two topics of intense debate in contemporary ethics.


We take each up independently in the two halves of this
seminar.


(1) Does lying require the intent to cause a
false belief, or the successful causing of a false belief, or both?


What if the person speaking
incorrectly believes what she says is true?


Can one lie without making an assertion?


Is lying different from deception?


Readings include
Thomas Carson’s
Lyi
ng and Deception: Theory and Practice
.


(2) Most believe it is morally permissible to harm another person, and sometimes
even kill, in self
-
defense


at least when facing a villainous aggressor.


But what about an innocent aggressor, or an innocent threat?


Are the
moral rules for self
-
defense different in the context of war?


Readings include Jeff McMahan’s
Killing in War
.

Three hours per week.
Four
semester hours
.

Religious Studies



RELS
309.A


Revolts and Rabbis, Scrolls and Sects: The History of
Jews

and Judaism in Antiquity


Mark Twain once wrote about Jewish history that "The Persians rose, filled the planet with sound and splendor, then faded to

dream
-
stuff and
passed away; the Greeks and Romans followed and made a vast noise, and they were g
one...The Jew saw them all, survived them all." This
course will trace exactly this time span of Jewish history (6th century BCE to 5th century CE) and explain how the Jewish pe
ople survived (and
even thrived!) despite being continually ruled by foreign
empires. As we shall see, their survival was partly due to their transformation of


the religion of the Bible into rabbinic Judaism, the dominant form of Judaism until the 19th century. Our course of study wil
l include this


period's many religious devel
opments such as the appearance of different "sects"
-

Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, the Dead Sea sect,


and early Christians. Attention will also be paid to the Jewish engagement with Greco
-
Roman culture and the resulting literary


inventions, such as
Hellenistic Jewish writings, and political developments, such as the Maccabean rebellion and the Hasmonean


dynasty; the rise of Herod under Roman rule; and the two revolts against Rome. This course will, therefore, give students bo
th an


introduction

to Judaism as well as a broad survey of ancient Near Eastern history.

Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.

This

course will satisfy one requirement for a major related course in the Classics Department.


RELS 309.B Sex, Society, and Religion

in the Classical World

An exploration of the relationship between sexuality and religion in Greek and Roman antiquity, including the transformation
of sexual attitudes
with the rise of early Christianity.

Through a study of both historical sources and modern theoretical texts (including Michel Foucault’s
famous

History of Sexuality
), we will learn how radically different Greek and Roman views on sex and gender were from our own, but also how
our own ideas
about sexuality have been shaped by ancient traditions and debates. Topics may include homosexuality, prostitution, celibacy,

marriage, gender, and the social and religious significance of the body. Primary texts to be considered may include Plato’s

Sympos
ium
,
Aristophanes’

Lysistrata
, Ovid’s

Art of Love
, and the acts of the Christian martyrs. Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.

(H)

This course
will satisfy one requirement for a major related course in the Classics Department.

Politics and Internati
onal Relations Department

International Relations


IR 400W.A International Political Economy


An examination of the multilateral economic structures that have arisen in the past 50 years.

From Bretton Woods to Doha international
institutions and organizations dedicated to economic issues have increasingly become an integral part of international relati
ons. This course will
examine the who's, why's, and how's of interaction between the st
ate and world bank, IMF, IFC, WTO, OECD and more. Three hours per week.
Four semester hours.


Politics


POL 299.A Readings in Spanish

A Spanish language study of
Sinsajo
, the third book in the
Juegos del Hambre

trilogy, which has been translated from English to Spanish. This
class will meet for 50 minutes each week at times arranged among those registered and the professor. All aspects of this cla
ss will be in Spanish.
The goal of this class is to give studen
ts the opportunity to read and discuss in the Spanish language.
One semester hour.

POL 299.B Negotiation

The course will examine different negotiation techniques which can be used in situations involving two parties as well as mul
tiple parties to the
negotiation. Several practice exercises will be utilized
.
One hour per week.
One semester hour.

POL 399.A Government and Politics of Spain

This class will study the groups, institutions, and political forces active in Spanish politics today. The cou
rse will also include coverage of key
historical events which formed modern Spain, the relationships between the central and regional governments of Spain, and the

relationship
between Spain and the European Union.
Four semester hours.


POL 399
.
B

American Dispute Resolution

American Dispute Resolution is comparative and contrastive in nature. Virtually all business and personal disputes in the U.S
. today are resolved
utilizing one of four formats. Negotiation is self
-
directed by the parties wi
thout third party involvement. Mediation is non
-
binding use of a third
party mediator. Arbitration is primarily binding use of a third party arbitrator. Litigation employs the adversarial system o
f determination and
uses a neutral third party, either a jur
y or a judge. The course will trace the development of the adversarial system in the United States and the
subsequent development of the three alternative dispute resolution mechanisms and the theories underlying all four methods. T
his course is
highly rec
ommended for those intending to attend law school. It is also recommended for all others who will be in business or personal
situations
calling for dispute resolution.

Four semester hours.

Psychology Department

PSYC 495
.A
/NEUR 350
.A

Neurodiversity

and the Autism Spectrum

How does neuroscience apply to civil rights?

This course will familiarize students with neurodiversity, a civil rights type movement asserting that
atypical brain development is part of normal human variation, in the context of the

autism spectrum. Readings will incorporate first
-
hand
accounts of the autism spectrum with cutting
-
edge research on differences between autistic and neurotypical (i.e., non
-
autistic) individuals in
behavior, brain structure, and brain function. We will ex
plore topics such as speech and language, face processing, theory of mind, intelligence,
and mirror neurons. Students are encouraged to be open
-
minded about differences among people, as this course will challenge commonly
-
held
assumptions about persons on
the autism spectrum.

Three hours per week
. Four semester hours.

Theater and Dance Department

Dance


DANC 350.A Interdisciplinary Collaboration Seminar

Students of all majors are welcome to register for the Interdisciplinary Collaboration Seminar. This course will examine the

theory and practice
of various collaboration techniques used in the art of contemporary performance making. The course will inclu
de seminar discussion as well as a
great deal of group project work geared toward experimenting with various collaboration techniques. Potential discipline con
tributions from
students for project work could include dance, theater, music, creative writing,

visual art, mixed media and technology, as well as representation
from forms that could include a base for artistic experimentation such as scientific or mathematical theory, historical, soci
ological or
environmental study. This course is recommended fo
r students of sophomore standing or above. It fulfills the core art requirement and will
culminate in a public performance
. Four semester hours.



DANC 350
.B
Dance Pedagogy: Methods of Teaching Dance

The course is designed to provide methods for the

instruction of a variety of dance genres and styles, with particular emphasis on modern
dance.


The course will focus on several dance education settings/populations: dance studios, K
-
12 public education, private school education,
after school programs,
and community arts center programs.


The course format will enable students to develop theoretical and somatic
knowledge in dance as well as provide practical lesson planning and classroom teaching experiences.
Four semester hours. (A.)

November 21
, 2013