Town of Frannie Annual Drinking Water Quality Report January 2012- December 31, 2012

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1


Town of Frannie

2012

CCR…distribute by July 1, 2013

Town of Frannie

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

January 2012
-

December 31, 2012


Public Information Available

We are pleased to provide you with our annual Water Quality Report. We would like
everyone who uses water from our system to have access to this report.
Those in our community
who live

in apartments, trailer courts, etc. may not have received notificatio
n of this report
because they do not receive a bill from us. If you know of someone who is a non
-
bill paying
customer, we would ask that you share your copy of the report with them. Additional copies are
available at Town Hall. The purpose of this repor
t is to inform you about the quality of water
and services that we deliver to you. Our goal is to provide you with a constant supply of safe
and dependable drinking water.


If you have questions about this report or concern
ing your water utility, contact
Town
Hall
,
325 Cedar Street, phone 307
-
664
-
2323
. You may attend any of our regular meetings,
which are held the first Monday of each month at 7:00 p.m. at the Town Hall. You may also
contact C
raig Barsnes
s

of Shoshone Municipal Pipeline at
307
-
527
-
6492.

Shoshone Municipal
Pipeline meetings are held the second Monday of each month at 10:00 a.m. at the water
treatment plant, 50 Agua Via, Cody, Wyoming.

You may visit
www.shoshonemunicipalpipeline.org

for more information of Shoshone Municipal Pipeline.


A source water assessment has been done by Shoshone Municipal Pipeline and is
available online
at:

http://deq.state.wy.us/wqd/www/SWP%20WHP/Data/Reports/Shoshone%20Municipal%20Pipeline%20Summary.pdf

o
r a copy is available for viewing at Town Hall.


Water Quality

Water supplied to Frannie residents has been of higher quality than i
s required by the
Safe Drinking
Water Standards. We are pleased to report that there were no violations of the
drinking wat
er requirements.


The Town of Frannie and Shoshone Municipal Pipeline routinely monitor for
contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The attached table
shows the results of our monitorin
g for the period January 1, 2012 to D
ecember 31, 2012
. All
drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small
amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that
the water poses a health risk. More informa
tion about contaminants and potential health effects
can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline
at 1
-
800
-
426
-
4791.


Source of Water

We purchase our water from Shoshone Municipal Pipeline. SMP draws water f
rom the
Buffalo Bill Reservoir and processes it at a large water treatment plant located near Cody,
Wyoming using conventional treatment processes of coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation,
filtration and disinfection. This plant and pipeline provide dr
inking water to several
communities and much of the rural area in the Northern Big Horn Basin. There are many tests
performed on the water, both before and after it is treated, to monitor the quality.

2


Town of Frannie

2012

CCR…distribute by July 1, 2013


The sources of our drinking water include rivers, lak
es, streams, ponds, reservoirs and
springs. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it can dissolve
naturally
-
occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive materials. The water can also pick
up substances such as: (1)
Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may
come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agriculture operations and wildlife (2)
Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally
-
occurring or result from
ur
ban run
-
off, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or
farming (3) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from agriculture, urban storm water
runoff, and residential uses (4) Organic chemical contaminants, which ca
n come from industrial
processes, gas stations, urban storm water runoff and septic systems (5) Radioactive
contaminants, which can be naturally
-
occurring or the result of oil and gas production and
mining activities.


In order to ensure that tap water is
safe to drink, EPA establishes regulations that limit the
amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug
Administration establishes limits for contaminants in bottled water.


Special Information Available

Some
people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general
population. Immune
-
compromised persons such as person with cancer undergoing
chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other
immune
disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk for infections. These
people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC
guidelines are appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptospori
dium and other
microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline 1
-
800
-
426
-
4791.

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for
pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water
is primarily from materials and
components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Town of Frannie is
responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials
used in plumbing components. When your w
ater has been sitting for several hours, you can
minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before
using the water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in drinking water, you
may wish to h
ave you water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and
steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at
http://www.epa.gov/safewater.lead
.


Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs)

MCL’s a
re set at very stringent levels. To experience possible health effects described
for many regulated contaminants, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the
MCL level for a lifetime to have a one in a million chance of having the desc
ribed health effect.


As you can see from the table, our system had no violations. We are proud that your
drinking water has met or been of higher quality than the Federal and State requirements.


As you can see by the table
s
, our system had no Maximum
Contaminate Level violations.



3


Town of Frannie

2012

CCR…distribute by July 1, 2013

Some of our data in the tables is more than 1 year old since certain chemical contaminants are
monitored less than once a year. Our sampling frequency complies with EPA drinking water
regulations.




Town of Frannie



Treated Water Quality 2012




MICROBIOLOGICAL CONTAMINANTS


Contaminant

Unit of
Measurement

Range of
Detection

Level
Detected

MCL

MCLG


Likely source of
contamination

Total
Coliform
Bacteria

Positive or
Negative

0

No

Presence in 5%
of monthly
samples

0

Naturally present
in the environment

Turbidity

NTU

0.03
-
0.0
7

0.07

NTU

No sample >1

95% < 0.3

n/a

Soil runoff


INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS


Contaminant

Unit of
Measurement

Range of
Detection

Level
Detected

MCL

MCLG


Likely source of
contamination

Copper

(
2010
)

ppm



90
th

percentile
was 0.
06. No
sites exceeded
the action
level.

Action
Level 1.3

1.3

Corrosion of
household plumbing
systems; erosion of
natural deposits;
leaching from wood
preservatives

Lead


( 2010
)

ppm


90
th

percentile
was 0.002.
No sites
exceeded the
action level.

Action
Level
0.015

0

Corrosion of
household plumbing
systems; erosion of
natural deposits

Nitrate

ppm

0.04

0.04

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer
use; leaching from
septic tanks; sewage;
erosion of n
atural
deposits






DISINFECTION BY
-
PRODUCTS


Parameter

Unit of
Measurement

Range
Detection

Level
Detected

MRDL

MRDLG

Likely Source of
Contamination

Sodium

ppm

17

17

n/a

n/a

By
-
product of
drinking water
disinfection

4


Town of Frannie

2012

CCR…distribute by July 1, 2013

Total Trihalomethanes

ppb

19.0
-
25.0

21.0

(RAA)

80

n/a

By
-
product of
drinking water
disinfection

Total Haloacetic Acids

ppb

17.0
-
22.0

19.3

(RAA)

60

n/a

By
-
product of
drinking water
disinfection


Testing is now required for Haloacetic Acids so the results are in the above chart.
These results must be reported
because monitoring for them is required and they were detected, but they have no MCLs, ALs nor TTs.


SECONDARY STANDARDS AND UNREGULATED CONTAMINANTS
















Definitions:



Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG):

The le
vel of a contaminant in drinking

water
below which there is no known or expected health risk. MCLGs allow a margin of safety.



Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL):

The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in
drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available
treatment technology.



Maximum residual disinfectant level goal (MRDLG):

The level of a drinking water disinfec
tant
below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect benefits of the
use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.



Maximum residual disinfectant level (MRDL):

The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in
drinki
ng water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for
control of microbial contaminants.



Action level (AL):

The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or
other requirements which a water sy
stem must follow.



Treatment technique (TT):

A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in
drinking water.



Turbidity:

The measure of the cloudiness of water. It is used to indicate water quality and
filtration effectiveness.



Nephlom
etric Turbidity Unit (NTU):

measurement of turbidity in drinking water



Ppm:

parts per million



Ppb:

parts per billion



#/100 L:

number of organisms per 100 liters of water



Mg/L:

milligrams per liter

Parameters

Unit of
Measurement

Range of
Detection

Level
Detected
(averages)

Chlorine

ppm

0.25
-
1.16

0.86

pH

pH

7.54
-
8.54

7.93

Total dissolved solids

ppm

79
-
102

90

Iron

ppm

0.01
-
0.03

0.03

Calcium

ppm

36
-
44

42

Hardness

ppm

44
-
61

51

Total alkalinity as
CaCO3

ppm

46
-
64

56

Sulfate

ppm

13

13

Giardia

#/100L

0

0

Cryptosporidium

#/100L

0

0