power point presentation - City of Lawrence

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21 févr. 2014 (il y a 3 années et 3 mois)

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Clinton Lake
Sedimentation

Earl Lewis

Kansas Water Office


History of Clinton Lake


Multipurpose operation
-

November 30,
1977


Authorized by Flood Control Act of 1962


Water supply storage included at request
of State of Kansas under 1958 Water
Supply Act
-

89,200 AF


U.S. Fish & Wildlife requested storage for
low flow augmentation
-

21,200 AF

Sediment Allocation



Original 100 year sediment allocation 28,500
AF, or 285 AF/year


Sediment allocation


19,000 AF
-

conservation pool


9,500
-

flood control pool


1991 Corps survey showed 296 Af/yr loss in
conservation pool


Virtually no loss in flood pool

Yield Analysis


Water Marketing Act requires that Kansas
Water Office be able to deliver water
through a drought having a 2% chance of
recurrence in any one year



By regulation, defined as a repeat of the
1952
-
1957 drought period

Yield Analysis


Major factors in yield analysis


Inflow


Evaporation


Sedimentation (storage available)


Downstream senior water right holders


Low flow releases

2004 Yield Analysis

10
12
14
16
18
20
1990
2000
2010
2020
2030
2040
2050
Million Gallons per Day
Yield
Contracts
Water Quality


Kansas Biological Survey report that
indicates flats developed by siltation
causing additional algae blooms and water
quality concerns.



During low flow periods decomposition of
the algae blooms cause taste and odor
problems.

Potential Ways to

Deal with Sediment


Reduce sediment load coming into lake


Raise conservation pool level to offset
uneven sediment distribution


Dredge sediment in lake

Clinton Lake Watershed

Watershed Restoration and
Protection Strategy


Developed by a committee of local stakeholders,
sponsored by the Kaw Valley Heritage Alliance



City of Lawrence, county conservation districts,
the Natural Resources and Conservation Service,
K
-
State Extension, Health and Environment, and
the Biological Survey



Recommendations to reduce sediment and
associated pollution from both agricultural and
urban sources

Watershed Restoration and
Protection Strategy


Current activity is development of a plan to
identify and restore eroding stream banks
in the Deer Creek watershed



Stream bank restoration will reduce
sedimentation into the lake


Storage Reallocation


State contract with Corps requires storage
reallocation if sediment distribution
incorrect


Move flood to conservation storage


Reallocation costs approx. $1,000,000


Plus mitigation costs


Currently underway at John Redmond

Kansas Water Authority Lake
Restoration Policy


Approved November 2004


Conduct small lake dredging project


Review El Dorado and Oologah studies


Develop predictive model for determining
the occurrence and duration of algal
blooms


Clean Drinking Water Fee should be used
as one funding source for restoration
projects

Dredging


South Dakota small lakes program
-

$5,600/AF



At 296 AF/year loss
-

$1.66 million/year to keep
up


Summary


Clinton Lake conservation pool is silting in
36% faster than anticipated.


Clinton Lake as a whole is silting in only
11 AF/year faster than projected.


Reallocation under the federal contracts
will keep design water supply capacity
whole through the year 2073.

Summary


First action
-

reduce sediment load into lake


City of Lawrence should continue and
increase WRAPs efforts


Dredging potentially solves both quality and
quantity issues


Dredging is more expensive than other
alternatives