WRMIS

fishnibblersspongyDéveloppement de logiciels

14 déc. 2013 (il y a 3 années et 5 mois)

60 vue(s)

Kim Jacobsen,

Carl Bro as
, Glostrup, Denmark


Saulius Maskeli
ū
nas, Institute of Mathematics & Informatics
,
Vilnius, Lithuania

Water Resource
Management
Information System
b
ased
o
n

Web Services
a
nd
Distributed

Data Warehouses


AGENDA

1.
Web Services, SOA

2.
Data Warehouses

3. Water Resource Management
information system (WRMIS)


Background


Concept


Architecture


Challenges


Demonstration


1.
Web Services (WS)



Definition



Architecture



Main Technologies



Samples

WS Definitions
(h
ttp://www.jeckle.de/webServices/#def
)





WebServices.org :


Web

Services

are
encapsulated
,

loosely coupled


contracted

functions offered
via standard protocols
.

E
ncapsulated
:

the inability of a user to gather information about
the internal service realization
;

Loosely Coupled
:

the possibility of changing the implementation
of

one function without requiring changes to clients invoking the
function
;

Contracted
:

a description of
t
he
function (including
interface
offered by the function to invoke it
) is
publicly available
;

the
behavior of the function and its
I/O

parameters are fixed
;

T
he usage of standard protocols
:

a
technical infrastructure relies
on open, widely published and freely available protocols.

WS Definition (
World Wide Web Consortium
)

[
http://www.w3.org/TR/ws
-
gloss/#webservice
]
14

05


03
:



A
Web
S
ervice
is a software system
identified

by a URI
, whose public interfaces and bindings are
defined and
described using XML
.
Its definition

can be discovered

by other software systems. These
systems may then
interact

with the Web service

in a manner prescribed by its definition,
using XML
based messages

conveyed by
Internet protocols
.

Web Service architecture (WSA)


WSA is a partial case of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA)


[
http://www.w3.org/TR/ws
-
arch/

,
14 May 2003
]










SOA generic diagram

WSA


SOA


Distributed System


A
Service Oriented Architecture

is a specific type of
distributed system

in which the agents are

services
”.


A
D
istributed
S
ystem

consists of discrete software
agents that must work together to implement some
intended functionality.
(T
he
agents

in a distibuted
system do not operate in the same processing
environment, so they must communicate by
hardware/software protocol stacks

that are
intrinsically less reliable than direct code invocation
and shared memory
)
.


A

service

is a software agent that performs some well
-
defined operation (i.e., "provides a service") and can
be invoked outside of the context of a larger
application.

Web Service architecture stack


[
http://www.w3.org/TR/ws
-
arch/

,
14 May 2003
]

Web Services main technologies










Systinet Corporation
.

Introduction to Web Services
.

White paper
,
2002


http://www.systinet.com/resources/white_papers


Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)


SOAP is an extensible XML messaging protocol
that forms the foundation for Web

Services.

SOAP
provides a simple and consistent mechanism that
allows one application

to send an XML message to
another application.

Fundamentally, SOAP
supports peer
-
to
-
peer communications.


SOAP consists of:

Envelope
,
Transport
b
inding
f
ramework, Encoding
r
ules
,

and RPC
r
epresentation.


SOAP [vers. 1.2] specification is announced as
W3C Recommendation (
http://www.w3.org/TR

’03.6.24)

WS Definition Language (WSDL)


WSDL
defines a standard mechanism to describe

Web Services.


WSDL document describes
:


what functionality a Web Service offers,


how it communicates, and


where it is

accessible.


A WSDL description is an XML documant that
contains

a set of definitions for: data
Types

used within
messages; format of
Message
s;
PortType

(set of
operations, with input and output messages),
Binding

(maping operations and messages),
Service
s (collection of related ports).


WSDL was developed by Ariba, IBM, Microsoft;

WSDL 1.1 specification was submitted to W3C

in March 2001 [ http://www.w3c.org/TR/wsdl ]

Universal Description, Discovery and
Integration (UDDI)



http://www.uddi.org/specification.html


It provides a standard mechanism to register and
discover Web Services

(i.e.,
UDDI enables companies and applications to
dynamically publish, locate, and use Web services
).


The OASIS interoperability consortium
(
http://www.oasis
-
open.org/
) on
20 May 2003
announced that its members have approved the
Universal Description, Discovery and Integration
specification (UDDI) version 2.0 as

an

OASIS Open Standard

[
a status that signifies the highest level of
ratification
]
.

Sample scheme of Web Services

©

http://www.webservices.org

2. Distributed Data Warehouses


A
data warehouse

is a repository of an
organization's data, where the informational
assets of the organization are stored and
managed, to support various activities such
as reporting, analysis, decision
-
making, as
well as other activities such as support for
optimization of organizational operational
processes.


A
distributed data warehouse

is a
conglomeration of separate components that
are connected via a network
,
which appear
as a single global data warehouse image

(
i
.e. different physical databases work
together as a single physical database)
.

3. WRMIS


Background

The WFD:


Holistic approach


requiring integration of
data and knowledge from different
institutions and regions


Large requirements for data storing,
exchange, analysis and reporting


Requirement for reporting of GIS maps


Background

Findings during the analysis phase


Lot of data available i
n

different types of databases
at

many
different locations


Reuse of existing databases preferable


Difficulties to share data


The future reporting and administration of the water bodies
will be complex and it will be necessary to combine
information from many different institutions and sectors


It is required to generate information and knowledge based
on geographical borders



The amount of data to store and analyse will increase
dramatically

Background

Initial situation:


Strong division between groundwater,
marine water and fresh water


A high amount of data available in the
different institutions


A high degree of dedication and
specialisation


No
strong
tradition for coordination and
s
haring of data and knowledge

Background




Other

Expected future dataflow in EU:

WRMIS


concept


Distributed databases


Data maintained by
experts


S
haring of data via Internet


No
replication

of data or redundant data


Integration of maps


Required for reporting
and helping in analysis and data handling


WRMIS


t
echnologies


Internet


XML technologies


Web services (communication between
applications)


Integration of maps


Required for reporting
and helping in analysis and data handling


Collaboration diagram of stakeholders in
surface water quality monitoring

Present dataflows in the
Lithuanian Water sector

Water

Resource
Management
Information
System

(based on

Web Services
and

Distributed

Data
Warehouses)




Internet

WRMIS Portal

SOAP

XHTML, XML, SOAP

DW, Surface water,

(JRC)

Point sources

SOAP

SOAP

DW, Coastal water


(MRC)

DW, Ground water


(LGT)

SOAP

DW,
M
eteorolog
y/H
ydrolog
y


(LHMS)


SOAP

DW,
Bathing Water


(MoH)

SOAP

EIONET/ReportNet

SOAP

DW,
????

()

SOAP

Other

institutions

Public

MoE

Regional Department
s

MoE

Water

companies

JRC

Enterprise

WRMIS, full scale

Proposed after a brief analysis


To
implement a WRMIS as a prototype based on
distributed databases and Internet technology


Handling

chemical and physical data for surface
water for rivers, lakes and point sources

(uWWTP >
2000 PE)


Handling ground water data

DB

Server




Internet

Data warehouse

(Surface water,
P
oint sources

)

JRC

DB

Server

Data warehouse

(Ground water etc.)

LGS

Meta

DB

Server

Portal

(WRMIS)

MoE

Other

institutions

Public

MoE

Regional Department
s

MoE

Water

companies

JRC

Enterprise

DB

WRMIS, prototype

WRMIS class diagram

WRMIS internal dataflows

WRMIS data warehouses


DW1, Surface water, location JRC, Surface water


-5&?¬V?
surface water database

(i.e.,
VANMON

database)


Windows, Delphi, SOAP


DW2, Point sources, location JRC


-5&?¬V

point sources database
(i.e.,
Water
consumption and emissions database
)



Windows, Delphi, SOAP


DW3, Ground Water, Location LGT


/*7?¬V?JURXQG?ZDWHU?GDWDEDVH


LINUX, JAVA, SOAP

WRMIS activity diagrams

WRMIS interaction diagrams

WRMIS
challenges


Ownership of data


Telecommunication/Digital infrastucture


Maintenance and development


institutional setup


manpower


Openness and Public participation

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

http://212.59.17.195/wrmis/login.asp

Conclusions


The

WRMIS

proves

that

it

is

possible

to

establish

a

Web

portal

that

provides

the

users

with

information,

on

request,

in

a

system

based

on

decentralised

data

sources
.

This

project

has

also

proved

that

it

is

possible

to

integrate

information

from

different

institutions,

based

on

different

technology,

into

a

common

information

system

by

means

of

the

Internet,

XML

and

Web

Service

technologies,

and

by

bridging

to

the

well

known

existing

systems
.


The

system

is

ready

for

data

interchange

with

external

Web

Services
.

Also,

the

system

can

be

easily

improved

to

share

information

on

digital

maps

with

external

systems

by

implementing,

using

and

supporting

the

OpenGIS

Web

Map

Server

(WMS)

and

Web

Feature

Service

(WFS)
.

Both

Mapserver

and

ArcIMS

can

be

configured

to

support

WMS
.



If

the

WRMIS

prototype

proves

to

be

successful,

the

same

solutions

will

be

applied

in

other

Lithuanian

Environmental

sectors,

too
.


Conclusions


In Denmark a full
-
scale environmental
information management system based on
Web Services and Distributed Data
Warehouses is being implemented this
autumn
, 2006
.


F
rom January 2007
t
he system will serve
the environmental administration as well as
the public. Main clients will be all the
Danish municipalities, regions and the
Ministry of Environment.


Thank you

for your

attention