Children in Poverty

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5 févr. 2013 (il y a 4 années et 9 mois)

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CHILDREN IN
POVERTY

Celia Valmoro

July 2, 2009

"
But [no one] can tell us what it means to a child to
leave his often hellish home and go to a school
-
his
hope for a transcendent future
-
that is literally
falling apart.” ~Jonathan
Kozol

CHILDREN IN POVERTY

2006 Statistical Analysis US Census
Bureau:

Income, Expenditures, Poverty, &
Wealth:
Poverty


Out of 72,609 children from all races,
12,299 of them were living in poverty.


7,522 were white alone


3,690 were black alone


3, 959 were Hispanic


351 were Asian alone


398 were Asian/Pacific Islanders



The
one in five American children
living in poor families are among the
poorest in all developed nations.

Children in Poverty

What is poverty?


Merriam
-
Webster Dictionary defines it as:


The state of one who lacks a usual or socially
acceptable amount of money or material
possessions; Debility due to malnutrition; lack of
fertility.”


Ruby Payne’s “working definition” :

“The extent to which an individual does without
resources”


Financial


Physical


Emotional


Relationships/Role Models

Mental



Spiritual

Support Systems

Knowledge of Hidden Rules

Children in poverty

Relative Income Poverty by Country


Interestingly, despite having by far the highest percentage of children in
poverty, the US also had the third
lowest

percentage of children in homes without an
employed parent, strongly suggesting that the problem of poverty in the US is not
unemployment but severe income inequality.

A recent study by UNICEF, compares 21 OECD countries for the
wellbeing of their children based on the goals set forth in the UN
Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Children in Poverty

Children in Poverty


2007

NCHEMS Information Center for Higher Education
Policymaking and Analysis

Children in Poverty
-
2007 By specific state

Children in Poverty

A few characteristics/behaviors related to poverty
and intervention:


Laugh when disciplined

~
Understand the reason for the behavior. Tell students three or four
other behaviors that would be more appropriate


Arguing with the teacher

~
Don’t argue with the students. Model respect for students


Inappropriate or vulgar comments

~
Have students generate phrases that could be used to say the same
thing


Inability
to follow directions

~
Write steps on the board. Have them write at the top of the paper the
steps needed to finish the task.


Physically fighting

~
Stress that fighting is unacceptable in school. Examine other options
that students could live with at school other than fighting.




Children in Poverty




Hands always on someone else

~
Give them as much to do with their hands as much as possible in a
constructive way.


Harm other students verbally or physically

~
Tell students aggression is not a choice. Have students generate
other options that are appropriate choices at school.


Extremely disorganized

~
Teach a simple, color
-
coded method of organization in the classroom.



Complete only part of the task

~ Write on the board all the parts of the task. Require each student to
check off each part when finished.




Revenge

Power

Self
-
Concept

Attention

Defaces
property

Refuses to
follow rules

Emotional

Speaks

out
without
permission

Fights or
bullies

Criticizes

Will

not
participate

Gets up
without
permission

Argues

Bosses other
students

Blames
others for
failure

Class clown

Does things
own way

Tries to take
over class

Threatens to
drop out

Makes

noises
to entertain

Children in Poverty


What’s a teacher to do?


Understand the reason for the behavior.



Help students to see other options for their behavior
while in school



Provide lot s of kinesthetic activities



Teach them positive self
-
talk



Don’t argue with the students



Speak to them in the adult voice


(Payne 2001)





THE ADULT VOICE
:


non
-
judgmental, free of
negative non
-
verbal, factual,
often in question format,
attitude of win
-
win.

Children in Poverty

POVERTY

MIDDLE
CLASS

WEALTH

Decision

making
is
basked on survival,
relationships, and
entertainment

Decision making
is based
on school and career
achievement.

Decision

making
is based
on social, financial, and
political connections.

Possessions
are

people.
A relationship is valued
over achievement. Too
much education is feared
because a person might
leave home & family

Possessions

are things.
If material security is
threatened by

someone,
often the relationship is
broken.

Possessions

are legacies,
pedigrees, and one
-
of
-
a
-
kind objects.

The world
is defined in
local terms.

The world
is defined in
national terms, such as
national news and travel.

The world

is defined in
international terms.

Fighting

is physical and
respect is given to those
who resolve conflict with
physical force.

Fighting

is done verbally.

Physical fighting is looked
down upon.

Fighting

occurs through
social exclusion and
through lawyers.

Food

is valued for
quantity.

Food

is valued for quality.

Food

is valued for
presentation.

Ruby Payne’ s Hi dden Cl ass Rul es

POVERTY PUTS CHILDREN AT RISK



“TELL ME AND I FORGET, SHOW ME AND I REMEMBER, INVOLVE ME
AND I UNDERSTAND.”



“BEAUTIFUL SURROUNDINGS REFINE THE SOULS
OF CHILDREN

SQUALID SETTINGS COARSEN THEIR
MENTALITIES”

~JONATHAN KOZOL

Children in Poverty

Citations



Overview of Child Wellbeing in Rich Countries


http://www.higheredinfo.org/dbrowser/index.php?subme
asure=73&year=2007&level=nation&mode=data&state=0




Payne, R.K. (1998)
A

Framework for
U
nderstanding
P
overty
. Highlands, TX: Aha process Inc.



Sadker, M. P. & Sadker, D. M. (2005).
Teachers, Schools,
and Society

(8th ed.). New York: McGraw Hill
.



Tileston
, D.W. (2004)
What every teacher should know
about classroom management and discipline.
Dallas, TX:
Corwin Press.



United States Census Bureau Report

www.census.gove/prod/2005pubs/p60
-
229.pdf
\


www.raisethehammer.org/blog/494/