MEGS-KT: SOCIAL NETWORKING AND INFORMATION EXCHANGE FOR THE RENEWABLE ENERGY SMALL AND MEDIUM SIZED ENTERPRISE (SME) COMMUNITY IN THE MIDLANDS

yieldingrabbleInternet and Web Development

Dec 7, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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MEGS
-
KT: SOCIAL NETWORKIN
G AND INFORMATION EX
CHANGE
FOR THE RENEWABLE EN
ERGY S
MALL AND MEDIUM SIZE
D
ENTERPRISE (SME)
COMMUNITY IN THE MID
LANDS

Andrea

Wheeler
1

a
nd Martin Hamilton

2

1
Loughborough University (UNITED KINGDOM)
a.s.wheeler@lboro.ac.uk

2
Loughborough University (UNITED KINGDOM)
m.t.hamilton@lboro.ac.uk


Abstract

European Policy debates about the importance of Open Access to Resources in Higher Educati
on
Institutions have fueled the need for Institutions to create innovative partnerships.
T
he imperative for a
sustainable and robust energy infrastructure in the UK

will require a level of investment

and training
needs are emerging from within the energy i
ndustry. Furthermore,
the necessity for a reduction of
energy demand

amongst householders has given rise to training
needs for the renewable energy
and
construction sectors
. Anticipating the prerequisite for business growth and associated training needs,
M
EGS
-
KT, a Jisc Funded Business Community Engagement and Open Access to Resources project,
developed a demonstrator for the co
-
development of educational resources. Through the
establishment of a community around an inspirational lecture series
and
an analy
sis of business
needs using ethnographic methods, questionnaire and interview, the project provided a virtual platform


“the demonstrator”

for the sharing of resources
. The platform is collaborative
,

collecting relevant
documents, twitter feeds, blogs an
d other resources from members of the community, (academic,
researchers, SME community and local residents). Building the community and the role of social
networking has been a core approach of the project and this paper will chart the methods adopted and

illustrate the benefits of the project through narratives from both workshops and from online
engagement.

Keywords:
Renewable Energy, Business and Community Engagement, Small and Medium Sized
Enterprises, Open Access to Resources,
Innovatio
n, Higher Educa
tion Institutions
, research project
.


1

INTRODUCTION


This paper charts the methods adopted by the MEGS
-
KT project to develop an online
platform
aimed
at delivering innovative educational resources to the growing green energy sector in the Midlands. The
proj
ect
was
funded by the Jisc
and
extends
an existing
collaboration between the University of
Nottingham, Birmingham University and Loughborough University
-

in the form of the Midlands Energy
Graduate School (MEGS)
-

set up to co
-
deliver postgraduate courses
.
MEGS is in turn part of a larger
project called the Midlands Energy Consortium (MEC), which brings the three Universities together
around an agenda of energy research and training, with a particular focus on renewables.

The MEGS mission statement states

that: “Combining the capabilities of three of the leading
universities in the UK for energy related research and teaching, MEGS will help meet the growing
demand in the UK for more highly trained low carbon technologies researchers.


K
ey research themes
a
re:
f
uel cells, h
ydrogen production and storage; solar, wind and biomass energy; c
lean fossil fuels
and carbon abatement technologies; Demand reduction and management in buildings; Power
electronics and electrical networks; Sustainable societies: economics
, policies, practices and impacts;
Sustainable transport, advanced engines and systems
.

2

THE RESEARCH PROBLEM



The problem presented to

researchers was that of method:

h
ow to develop a relevant, up
-
to
-
date
desirable platform for “CFD” opportunities, openi
ng up University resources and allowing SMEs to
share their knowledge.

Time constraints of engaging with HEIs are considerable for the directors of
SMEs
. Hence, t
he concept of an e
-
learning environment that ma
kes use of tools for networking and

existing re
sources (both inside and external to the University sector) with a suitable search interface,
offers the potential to connect to innovative knowledge and experienced people with little effort.


2.1.1

Aims and Objectives

Whilst t
he overall
objective

of the projec
t was to build a highly skilled workforce in the Midlands
,

the
project explored the potential
to
achieve

this

objective
through
co
-
development of a

socially networked
platform

that could deliver desirable business development information for the community
.

This
represented an
innovative form of CPD
.


3

METHOD


3.1

Creating a
community to build the demonstrator


The SME community was
involved throughout the project
-

from the identification of business need
phase, in the co
-
development and in review phases of th
e dem
onstrator (the IT solution).

The

prototype platform was specified, tested, refined and evaluated by the community.

Whilst original
research methods
proposed detailed ethnographic

questionnaires and interviews

with
the SME community
,

ethnographic metho
ds were soon
found to be
too time consuming
.

However,
more traditional questionnaires and interviews
were also found limited due to

poor
access and
participation
with SMEs.
In fact, i
t was only with the introduction of evening events to the research and
de
velopment programme that the community began to take shape. Hence, a
lternative
research
methods were proposed that would encourage the SME community to engage more deeply in the form
of co
-
research

than originally anticipated
, extending the Service Design
methods proposed to take on
a more significant role in the
specification

phases of the project.

3.1.1

An Inspirational Captured Lecture Series

The project in
its
early stages
sent out
questionnaires

to local companies in the sector and carried out

follow up int
erviews and
even some
“work shadowing” (ethnographic research). Whilst this approach
provided rich information about business need, the time demands on the researchers meant that
ethnographic methods had to be augmented by more traditional questionnaires a
nd interviews
.
However,
these were

also found to have limitations:

SME directors did not have the time to complete
questionnaires and in interview were not keen to share any perceived weakness associated with lack
of access to resources. Ultimately, s
ocial

networking technology itself played a

role in identifying the
community and allowing researchers to further investigate business need

with a more enthusiastic
community
,

inspired by lectures by “fellows” representing some of the most innovative companies
in
this field.

Hence,
whilst
the first phase of the project (Work Package 1 and 2) examined the business
development needs and networking skil
ls of SMEs in the energy sector, t
he second stage of the
project worked with the SME community
,

forged in the firs
t phases

to build this community
,

adding
n
ew

emerging
social media proficient
members.

L
ectures
by

inspiring speakers and subsequent
discussions at these events helped refine the business development and resources needs of SMEs
identified in initial inter
view activities.

S
ocial networking tools


LinkedIn groups

[1]

and

twitter

[2]
-


were adopted to identify and invite
a
select
audience
to lectures.


Evening events hosted 50 participants in over 8 workshops with 9 "catalytic" speakers
of “fellows”
from
in
dustry and academia. The twitter group, associated with the project, has 920 followers [insert link]
and the LinkedIn group associated with the project has 50 o
r more SME members
.

Fellows

included
: Robin Nicholson (Award Winning Architect, ex
-

Vice Presi
dent RIBA), Parity
Projects (Award Winning SME), Institute for Sustainability (Training Centre), John Davis (Green Deal
Assessor), Saucy Horse (Social Networking Business Champion), Carl Benfield (Prescient Energy
[Solar and Wind]), Keyur Vadodaria (Resear
cher/ Architect), Richard Cartright (Engineer, RDC Energy
Ltd, [Heat Pumps]) Jonathan Gilbert (Rapid Technology Transfer Group [Innovative Technologies])
and Mo Kelly (Sasie limited). Attendees at events also included: PhD students/Researchers
(Loughboroug
h University, Nottingham University) Enrique Centelles, Kate Simpson, Sergey Fomin,
Paula Cosar, Becky Gough, Philip Leicester, Sven Hallin and academics: Professor Jacqui Glass, Dr
Paul Rowley, Dr Steven Firth, Zulfikar Adamu.
The lectures are all publish
ed online in full and links are
included below.

17/10/2012 Robin Nicholson, Edward Cullinan Architects

[3]


24/10/2012 Russell Smith, Parity Projects

[4]

14/11/2012 Terry McGivern, The Institute for Sustainability and the Flash Programme

[5]

05/12/2012 J
ohn Davis, Domestic Green Deal Assessor

[6]

16/01/2013 Carl Benfield, Prescient Power

[7]

30/01/2013 Keyur Vadodaria, Researcher, CALEBRE project

[8]

20/02/2013 Rich Cartwright, RDC Energy
, Jonathan Gilbert, The Rapid T
echnology Transfer Group.

27/03/20
13 Mo Kelly, Sasie Limited

3.2

Engagement and co
-
creation

The community events around the lectures provided an opportunity for co
-
design workshops to take
place beforehand and for the conversation to expand to the business needs of the community,
and to
th
e call for collaboration and the need for innovative research and development projects
. Data from
these conversations was captured using the video/lecture capture facilities of the teaching room,
which had been extensively refitted as part of the MEGS prog
ramme. The project blog records these
workshops
.

4

RESEARCH FINDINGS


4.1


How do I know what my business needs are? The limitation of traditional
research methods.

The first phase of the project (Work Package 1 and 2) examined the business development needs an
d
networking skills of SMEs. This research work uncovered a generally low level of participation and
access to important business development information (the Green Deal being a frequent example).

Questionnaires and interviews focused on three questions:
W
hat would you say are the main
difficulties to overcome in your role at the present time?

What are the most important work related
questions in your mind right now?

What information are you lacking to support your business growth?

Insights from early quest
ionnaires and interviews included: the perhaps obvious complaints of time
pressures and not enough time for exploring business development; questions about the “Green Deal”
and how businesses could benefit (a lecture was set up to address the Green Deal sp
ecifically): lack
of work in the current economic climate; bureaucracy surrounding accreditation; issues of quality
assurance in the construction industry impacting on building performance; marketing of the need for
retrofit and the observation that many
of the interviewees were very poor
at
communicating their
needs.

Barriers emerging from the methods included:
h
ard to engage SMEs
;
SMEs
that do not
know what
their knowledge needs are (they don’t know what they don’t know)
;
p
rofessional bodies/networks
lim
iting access to SMEs by “outsiders” (difficult to send out questionnaire via professional bodies)
;

and
c
oncerns about sharing commercial information from SMEs


“I prefer not to say”

However, the second stage of the project focused on the lecture series an
d discussions afterwards
revealed some more complex needs whe
n
directors of SMEs
,

academics and researchers
were
reassured that their

concerns were shared when they
spoke together
.

4.2

Identifying d
esirable resources


The original project proposal outlined the

development of a taxonomy of the SME community in order
to categorise information resources which could be delivered “automatically” to users of the
demonstrator. The difficulty of this task for such a flexible community
,

together with Institutional
barri
ers to delivering existing resources to an “outside” community
,

raised considerable problems at
the technical development stages of the project
.
For example, companies and sole traders
participating in the project were
suppliers
, installers, wholesalers (
w
ithin the field or engineers
)
,
consultants or educators

or
a combination of all
.
Moreover, t
heir
position
s

straddle

both construction
and energy sectors.

The terms taxonomy and ontology are used sometimes synonymou
sly, not for
lack of definition

but due to

the nature of
the
subject demanding categorisation

and t
he energy sector
was a case in point: typical working roles of individuals within companies in the sector can be diverse
and multiple. SME directors may assist in household installation of renewable
technologies and
equally take on office management roles.

Taxonomy is defined as the division into ordered groups of either categories or things. For example, a
Web taxonomy would classify all the sites on the Web into a hierarchy for searching purposes.
An
ontology within Information Science further develops this classification into a systematic arrangement
of objects
,

or concepts
,

showing the relations between them. Whilst a

taxonomy is typically a
hierarchical structure containing all the relevant entit
ies and their relationships, an ontology is a non
-
hierarchical collection, for example, a “forest” rather than a “tree”. It describes a relationality:
“executor
-
of”, “player
-
of”, “part
-
of”, “has some”, “applied
-
in” and “is
-
a”, “part
-
of”, “has
-
a”, “instance
-
of”
are all examples of such relationality.

Ontologies are central to many applications such as scientific knowledge portals, information
management and integration systems and electronic commerce. Those developed in the Construction
sector include the B
S6100, ccXML, ISO 12006
-
3, and the Industrial Foundation Classes

(IFC)
. BS
6100:2010 (Glossary of Building and Civil Engineering terms), produced by the British Standards
Institution, is a glossary

[9]
. It provides a comprehensive number of synonyms per te
rm that can
contribute towards taxonomy or ontology development in the sector. The ccXML (eConstruct 2001) is
an XML vocabulary developed by the eConstruct IST project for the Construction industry

[10]
. The
ccXML provides the foundation for the developmen
t of a Building Definitions taxonomy which can be
set up
t
o create catalogue contents. The International Framework Dictionary ISO 12006
-
3 (ISO 2007)
defines a schema for a generic taxonomy model, which enables the definition of concepts by means of
propert
ies, to group concepts, and to define relationships between concepts

[11]
. The model
developed by the IAI (International Alliance for Interoperability), soon to become ISO 16739

[12]
, has
produced a specification of data structures with the aim of supporti
ng the development of the ‘Building
Information Model’. Additional standards used for the development of Building Information Modelling
(BIM) include ISO/PAS 16739
-

2005 and ISO/FDIS 29491
-
1: 2009

[13]
.These three distinct and
complementary standards resp
ond to the needs of the construction industry to share structured data
and are the essence of B
uilding
I
nformation
M
odelling
.

The strength of taxonomies in web based applications lies in their browsability. Users can easily start
from more generalized know
ledge and target their queries towards more

specific and detailed
knowledge.
However, t
he fluid nature of roles within the industry suggested a newer type of taxonomy
:

a folksonomy, which aims to categorize tags and create browsable spaces of information t
hat are easy
to maintain and expand. Photo and video tagging on sites like Flickr and YouTube are a type of
folksonomy. In addition to being community driven
,

folksonomies are rarely hierarchal


there is
typically no tree structure to tags and this
,

inde
ed
,

may best reflect the fluid nature of the community.
A folksonomy, where users tag content,
was ultimately considered the most valuable approach
considering the community context
.

(
For a

summary of research carried out in this phase
,

including a
Diagram
matic Representation of the Sector, Summary of Insights for Questionnaire and Interview and
"List of Lists"
-

a prototype taxonomy
,
all
are published in
project presentations

made at conferences
and to the project community
. These have
been made public on
Slideshare along with Fellows
presentations.

These include

Presentation 1

[14]
, Poster Presentation

[15]
, Presentation 2

[16]
,
Presentation 3

[17]
).


5

SOLUTION

5.1

Technical
d
evelopments

The

demonstrator

,

hosted on the
website

[1
8
]
,

provides a knowledge trans
fer framework and
structure upon which to maintain and further develop an industry
-
academic community of practice fed
by the participation and interaction of existing and new

community members
.

The
“micro” nature of some companies meant that
they

were very

unlikely
be known to the University
or to engage in initiatives.
Early leads allowed researchers to spend time with SMEs, observing the
activities of the office; but the limitation in contacts
m
ade
researchers
resort to a more traditional
questionnaire to

achieve a breadth rather than depth of research.
W
hilst questionnaires targeted
significant numbers, returns were low, and it was evident that the use of social networking tools that
were being identified in parallel to the needs analysis would be an appr
opriate way to engage SMEs.
The East Midlands Green Energy Heroes LinkedIn group and GreenEnergyHero Twitter account were
set up. These tools continued as “add
-
ons” to the website.

The progress of the development phases of the project are charted in a ser
ies of blog posts. These
describe the co
-
development of a specification and illustrate the wire frames prepared for the
demonstrator (see Blog Post 1
[19
]
Blog Post 2
[
20
]
Blog Post 3
[
21
]
, Blog Post 4
[
22
]
). The motivation
of the community and engagement
with social media as a result of our lectures and co
-
design
meetings was evident but it was also at this stage that some of our fellows began to publish regular
blog posts themselves (see Blog Post by Carl Benfield
[
23
]
.)

5.2


Technical development s
tages

The

specification for the demonstrator included

the following
:

a simple, easy to use website that
members of our community
could post their own content to;

a way of
rat
ing

and comment
ing

on
content posted by the community
; a sharing of resources from the MEGS

institutions to the broader
community
;

and
an

experiment with automated approaches to finding and sharing material likely to be
of interest to the community
-

such as tender opportunities.

However, t
here was also the unspoken question
-

with rich collabor
ation services like Twitter and
LinkedIn, can a dedicated website add significant value to make it a worthwhile destination to return
to? Recognising the scale of the problem, we decided to use an incentive of Amazon vouchers to
encourage
some of community

for whom social media impacts on their business to provide
a critical
mass of website activity.

5.3

Technical issues

Researchers had

always recognised that it was going to be difficult to develop new software from
scratch during the short lifetime of the MEGS
-
KT project, and that an approach which re
-
used existing
software and web services to the largest possible extent would be crucial.
Researchers
also looked at
a number of online services
,

such as Paper.
Li

[2
4
]
, which try to aggregate content from multiple
sites,
and a number of potential data providers
,

such as the

TED European tender site, and regional tender
information from local authorities.

The
Wordpress platform
was chosen as host

and RSS as our key format for data feeds. Wordpress
was a natural choic
e, as the premier blogging platform, and feedback from prospective users
,

indicated that people would find it significantly easier to engage with than Moodle, with its underlying
bias towards classifying participants as "tutors" and "learners". Drupal woul
d have been as

easy for
our community to use
but was slightly more difficult to work with on a technical level.

However, t
here have been considerable changes during the course of the project to both Twitter and
LinkedIn's facilities for integrating with e
xternal sites and services. Twitter had been a very open
platform

but has been pulling back the boundaries of its Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) to
try to retain "eyeballs" on its own site and services. LinkedIn released an API, which we hoped t
o use
to integrate conversations from our LinkedIn group with the website, but sadly this use of the API was
expressly forbidden in the LinkedIn terms and conditions. What this meant
,

in practice
,

was that the
deepest integration able to
be
achieve
d in dev
elopment

between our site, our Twitter feed and our
LinkedIn group
,

was to feature a link to the LinkedIn group on the site, and embed recent Tweets on
the site.

These developments highlight a larger problem with so
-
called cloud services, a large proportio
n of
which come with no guarantees and can often dramatically change their terms of service with little or
no notice, or be "sunsetted" if they fail to maximise shareholder value. These problems do not exist
with open source software such as Wordpress, Moo
dle or Drupal, because these packages are
developed by their community of users as a collaborative effort.

However, we do also need to be aware that even with a popular open source package there is often a
range of add
-
ons, plugins or exten
sions, which va
ry in their take
-
up and the level of developer interest.
In choosing Wordpress, we also had to decide which extensions to use, based on our own previous
experiences and feedback from users on the Wordpress plugins website.

We had originally intended to pro
vide an automatic feed of open educational resources from the
participating institutional Virtual Learning Environments to the demonstrator website. However, as we
started to investigate this area
,

it quickly became clear that there was insufficient metad
ata
("cataloguing" information) present for typical VLE resources to enable any automated decision
making to be made. We found that whilst we were easily able to deduce popular resources, these
were often course handbooks and other generic material that wo
uld be unlikely to be of wider
applicability. There is still the possibility of automated data mining of the contents
of learning objects in
the VLEs

but this was felt to be outside t
he scope of the MEGS
-
KT project

and
,

in the interest of
making progress
,

we decided that resources would be selected initially by hand. Looking at the wider
potential of learning analytics revealed that our VLEs contained a wealth of statistical information
through the practice of logging every user interaction, and we expect t
o be carrying out further work in
the analytics area to help us better understand whether the patterns of engagement vary from
traditional campus based full time learner to (
for example) part time distance
-
based learners on
Massively Open Online Courses (M
OOCs) such as the UK's FutureLearn project.


6

E
VIDENCING CHANGE

6.1.1

Benefits

The importance of collaborative activity to achieve this aim was explored in relation to theories of
participation and social change in a number of project blog posts (see Blog Post
[2
5
]

and Blog Post
[2
6
]
).

Feedback from the community has demonstrated the perceived value and benefits of the
demonstrator. Feedback videos were uploaded to YouTube

and include: a l
ocal Loughborough SME

[27
]
; a l
ocal homeowner

[2
8
]
;
l
ocal freelance writer

[
2
9
]
;
l
ocal homeowner

[
30
]
.




The community has engaged in the co
-
development of the demonstrator and has already exhibited a
degree of ownership of the project. This is a good sign towards the continued development of the
demonstrator by the community the
mselves.

The project
has been
highly successful in terms of business and community engagement. Research
carried out in the early stages of the project demonstrated that the SME community was in need of
technical knowledge
but was unsure of what was availab
le
to them or indeed how it could be
delivered. T
he buil
ding of a community of practice;

made up of SMEs and micro businesses working in
the renewable energy sector, young academics, post graduate researchers and local home owners
;

allowed
SME directors
,

t
ogether with researchers
,

to explore these needs with the community as a
group
. I
n addition, a significant number of the local community (in the form of highly motivated
consumers of renewable energy technologies) engaged in evening lectures held in Loughb
orough
University and hence the consumer view was not absent from the nature of engagement. The benefits

of the project
have thus
include
d
:



Knowledge sharing and community access to resources achieved through the development of
an active community of pract
ice and an online demonstrator.



Business support for a competitive
,

local knowledge
-
based green economy
,

through the
engagement of the target SME and micro business community as well as home owners.



The mutual knowledge exchange and support from notable se
nior professionals identified as
“catalytic individuals”, such as Robin Nicholson, the ex
-

Vice President of RIBA
,

and other key
award winning SMEs such as Parity Projects and John Davis.

6.1.2

Impact

The project has opened up technological and business develo
pment possibilities for renewable energy
companies working in the building and construction sector and fostered relationships between young
academics and experienced SME directors.
Engaging SMEs in business support is indeed difficult
,

as
directors are so

often lacking time. Nevertheless, a number of researchers have made productive
research links and are beginning to plan collaborative research or innovative product development.
Many of the “fellows” have also raised the possibility of community energy pr
ojects as an investment
opportunity for community groups (such as that emerging from the MEGS
-
KT project) and this has met
with significant interest from the local homeowners
associated with
the community.

6.1.3

Ongoing b
arriers

to open access to r
esources


The

identification of “fellows”
-

both academic and industry focused as SME directors themselves
-

was vital to stimulate the growth of the community

and development of the demonstrator
. Even at an
early stage of the project fellows, such as Robin Nicholson,
freely gave their advice and access to
contacts within the Industry that would have been difficult to establish without this support.

Very little knowledge transfer activities have taken place between SMEs in the renewable energy
sector and HEIs, and it i
s an area of considerable need. The research project has begun to fill this gap
and sustained support from the community and the University
,

in terms of resources derived from the
Midlands Energy Graduate School (MEGS)
,

will continue the impact of the proj
ect within the sector.

7

CONCLUDING REMARKS


The project raises a question about the politics of the social in building a local low carbon economy
and the role of social networks in fostering the growth of such communities. Participatory, interactive
and co
llaborative practices, characterize some of the most spirited social art practices of current times
[25], [26]; and the resulting community initiatives engaging with ethical and political questions have a
value for any ongoing development of the MEGS
-
KT pr
oject. MEGS
-
KT exists in an educational
context with an educational purpose. The development of an online community, and the use of social
media to build that community, as well as the preparation of an online platform to share resources,
takes an educatio
nal perspective on the aim of building local low carbon economies.

The sustainability of the solution depends on the success of the community of practice associated with
the research and development phases of the solution.
We hope that t
his has been succe
ssfully built
into the research programme from the very early stages
,

and
whilst it
has been evidenced through
by

the community in all stages of the design process
including
through a series of workshops associated
with inspirational lectures and through s
ocial media.

The ongoing success of the demonstrator
depends on the strength of the community itself.

8

REFERENCES

[1]

http://www.linkedin.com/groups/East
-
Midlands
-
Green
-
Energy
-
Heroes
-
4791757

[2]

https://twitter.com/GreenEnergyHero

[3]

http://www.slidesh
are.net/AndreaWheeler1/robin
-
nicholson
-
evening
-
lecture
-
for
-
the
-
megskt
-
project

[4]

http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWheeler1/megskt
-
lecture
-
2
-
chris
-
newman
-
parity
-
projects

[5]

http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWheeler1/terry
-
mcgivern
-
megskt
-
lecture
-
14th
-
novem
ber
-
2012

[6]

http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWheeler1/me
-
and
-
the
-
green
-
deal
-
john
-
davis

[7]

http://review.lboro.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/7a6533b0
-
4fc5
-
4563
-
b40d
-
5cee25998b37

[8]

http://review.lboro.ac.uk:8080/ess/echo/presentation/b261aae9
-
d1fd
-
497
f
-
85ca
-
93478d194251

[9]

See http://www.ihs.com/products/industry
-
standards/org/bsi/documentation
-
qa
-
historical/page8.aspx

[10]

Tolman F, Böhms M, Lima C, van Rees R, Fleuren J and Stephens J (2001) eConstruct:
expectations, solutions and results, ITcon Vo
l. 6, Special Issue Information and Communication
Technology Advances in the European Construction Industry , 175
-
197, http://www.itcon.org/2001/13

[11]

ISO 12006
-
3:2007
:

Building construction
--

Organization of information about construction
works
--

Part

3: Framework for object
-
oriented information. ISO

[12]

ISO 16739:2013
:

Industry Foundation Classes, Release 2x, Platform Specification (IFC2x
Platform) ISO

[13]

See [12] and ISO/FDIS 29491
-
1: 2009

[14]

http://www.slideshare.net/mayoubi/megs
-
conference
-
pr
es

[15]

http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWheeler1/megs
-
poster
-
megs
-
xmas
-
conference
-
2012

[16]

http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWheeler1/steering
-
committee
-
meeting
-
megs
-
kt
-
final

[17]

http://www.slideshare.net/AndreaWheeler1/short
-
short
-
pitch
-
york
-
meeting
-
megs
-
kt
-
27th
-
feb

[18]

http://www.greenenergyheroes.org

[19]

http://andreaswheeler.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/design
-
consultation
-
2/

[20]

http://andreaswheeler.wordpress.com/2013/01/17/wire
-
frames/

[21]

http://andreaswheeler.wordpress.com/2013/02/27/some
-
more
-
view
-
captured
-
from
-
our
-
community
-
about
-
the
-
value
-
of
-
the
-
megs
-
kt
-
project/

[22]

http://www.slideshare.net/comth/learning
-
analytics
-
for
-
green
-
energy
-
heroes

[23]

http://andreaswheeler.wordpress.com/2013/02/18/fw
-
poll
-
is
-
energy
-
too
-
big
-
for
-
politicians/

[24]

Paper.Li http://paper.li/f
-
1357910990

[25]

http://andreaswheeler.wordpress.com/2013/02/18/the
-
politics
-
of
-
the
-
social
-
in
-
building
-
a
-
local
-
low
-
carbon
-
economy/

[26]

http://andreaswheeler.wordpress.com/2013/02/18/agonism
-
and
-
social
-
media
-
why
-
an
-
online
-
commun
ity
-
can
-
help
-
build
-
a
-
low
-
carbon
-
economy/

[27]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xx602KnOiFM

[28]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYqLREd4kP4

[29]

Local freelance writer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35IDWaB_X98;

[30]

Local homeowner: http://www.youtube.co
m/watch?v=xdqYoF7IokU