Seeing and Acting in a Virtual World

yardbellAI and Robotics

Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Seeing and Acting in a Virtual World


PSY 341K




Class hours:

Tues, Thurs 2.00
-
3.30 Room 4
-
242, SEAY


Instructor:
Professor

Mary Hayhoe



SEAY Room 5
-
238 X5
-
9338 mary@mailcps.utexas.edu



Office hours: Anytime by appointment


TA:

Brian Sullivan



SEAY Room 4.138G X 1
-
9034 brians@mail.utexas.edu

Web Site
:http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/class/psy341K/hayhoe/





Organization



1. Four experiments, approximately 3 weeks each.


2. Background lectures, data collection, analysis,
presentation; emphasis on class discussion.


3. Groups of 4.


4. Requirements: 4 papers, 2 exams (short answer),


attendance/participation/presentations.


5. Readings/lectures etc on web site.



The great unsolved problem:


How does the brain control behavior?

Phrenology

Localization of function

Even simple actions involve many parts of the brain.

action plan

Size, direction

velocity

motivation

signals to muscles

coordinate

feedback

respiration

heart rate

memory

Initiate

sequence

targeting

Classical Methods

What are the physical limits of Vision?


How accurate are eye movements?

What is the peak velocity?

What brain regions control eye movements?

A Typical Experiment

Why do some objects “pop out”?

An Experiment on Searching for Objects

And why are they sometimes hard to find?

Questions we might like to ask:

Where do we look in a scene in everyday life?


What information do we need?


How do we locate the information we need?


How are the movements controlled?




Why virtual reality?


Technological advances:



1. measurement of complex eye, head, hand movements


2. high speed image processing allows complex virtual


environments that can be controlled experimentally


3. head mounted displays, tactile feedback



Natural behavior unexplored.



Need to validate (or not) results from simpler


paradigms.


The CPS Virtual Reality Lab



a unique opportunity




What you’ll learn



-

Basic properties of perception, movements, and attention



-

Understanding the research process:


the question, design of experiments, data analysis,


making conclusions, communication.



-

Original contributions/ discoveries. Thinking independently.

Difficult things about this course




-

no good text


-

fragmentary


-

lack of background


-

data analysis




-

presentations

Date


Topic



Jan 15

Overview of the course: understanding human actions





Introduction to Virtual Reality lab.


Jan 17

Virtual Reality Lab: hands on demonstrations.



Jan 22

Background: The nervous system, vision, and motor control.






Jan 24

Using our Eyes in Everyday Tasks:


Lecture: The eye and eye movements





Jan 29

Lab: tracking the eyes while catching balls.





Jan 31

Lab: tracking the eyes.






Feb 5

Lecture: Interpreting the data


Feb 7

Discussion of Findings/ class presentations

Feb 12

Interdependence of Vision and Action:

Lecture




Feb 14

Vision and movement.



Paper 1 due













Feb 19


Lab: Catching virtual balls















Feb 21


Lab: ctd


Feb 26


Understanding the data


Feb 28


Discussion of Findings / class presentations




















Mar 4


Review



Mar 6


Mid
-
term




Paper 2 due


Mar 18

Learning Visuo
-
Motor Relationships
: lecture







Mar 20


Lecture











Mar 25

Lab: Learning to Reach


Mar 27

Lab: Learning to Reach


Apr 1


Discussion of Outcome




Apr 3

Class presentations





Apr 8

Attention & Vision:

Lecture


Apr 10

Lecture: attention and eye movements in natural environments







Paper 3 due


Apr 15

Lab: Walking in a Virtual Town








Apr 17

Lab: Walking in a Virtual Town




Apr 22

Understanding the data



Apr 24

Class presentations


Apr 29, May 1

Review





Paper 4 due




Final Exam