BIOM22 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT & MANAGEMENT

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Nov 9, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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BIOM22 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT & MANAGEMENT


Semester:



1

Lecturer/Coordinator:


Dr Ian Horsfall

Credit points:



20

Contact hours:



2
0

Pre
-
requisites:



None


Co
-
requisites:

Compulsory/Optional

Assessment:



Continuous Assessment (
5
0%)

Examination (
5
0%)





Aims and objectives/learning outcomes
:

In this module the students will learn techniques and methods for Environmental Impact
Assessment (EIA), including the associated legislation that will enable them to assess the
risks and impacts of differ
ent industrial and economic activities on environmental systems.
They will also learn how to apply and develop models of ecological systems, how to predict
potential impacts though modelling, and how to manage natural resources in a sustainable
way.

Outli
ne of lecture topics:



Rationale and overview of EIA



Methods, techniques and applications of EIA



Legislation

in biodiversity & EIA



Landscape ecology & biogeography



Sustainable management of natural resources



Case studies in environmental assessment and management



Synopsis
:

This module covers Environmental Assessment & Management skills for students wishing to
pursue a MSc in Environmental Biology
, Conservation and Resource Management
at the
Department of
Biosciences.
Students enrolled in this module will learn to choose suitable
environmental management systems to solve environmental problems in the real world, to
apply a variety of techniques to environmental evaluation, and to make environmental
impact a
ssessments and reports.

This module introduces the SPICOSA System Approach
Framework through stakeholder interaction and construction of conceptual models of
ecosystems
followed by delivery of the outcomes of these to stakeholders.

It aims to give
the stud
ents an overview of the full process of developing a
generic
management strategy
for a range of natural ecosystems.


Basic reading:

Hardisty, J., Taylor, D., and Metcalf, S., 1993, Computerised environmental modelling: a
practical introduction using Excel.

(Chichester, Wiley)

Research journals as recommended during lectures and located by the students via
database searches

Wood, C. (1995) Environmental Impact Assessment

Tett P, Sanderg A, Mette A (Eds).
Sustaining Coatal Zone Systems. 173pp UK,
Dunedin
Academic Press; 2011.

Vermaat et al (eds), 2005,
Managing European Coasts: Past, Present and Future.
Springer,
Germany. 387 pages


The SPICOSA SAF:

SPIOCSA (2010) D 3.3 System Design
,
SPICOSA (2009) D 4.2
System Formulation
,
SPIOCSA (2009) D 5.2 System App
raisal
,
SPIOCSA (2010) D 6.2
System Output

BIOM25B SCIENCE SKILLS & RESEARCH METHODS


Semester:



1

Lecturer/Coordinator:


Dr Carlos Garcia de Leaniz

Credit points:



20

Contact hours:



20

Pre
-
requisites:



None


Co
-
requisites:

Compulsory

Assessment:



50% Assignments and practical reports

50%
Examination



Aims and objectives/learning outcomes
:


This module will provide students with the necessary scientific skills to carry out
postgraduate studies in the
Department
.
MRes,
MPhil and PhD students
will also be
expected to undertake (and pass) the module, and their marks may be used in determining
their progression.


Topics Covered:



Library and internet resources including WoS, Voyager, Email, Blackboard



Philosophy of science



Experimental design



Ethi
cal issues in science



Plagiarism and how to avoid it



Presentation skills (PowerPoint and graphics packages)



Data analysis (SPSS)







Students will be able to:



Critically assess the merits of different experimental designs and the key concepts in
methodol
ogy and philosophy of science



Understand safety requirements of their work



Make lucid and timely presentations of their data



Understand the problems and consequences of plagiarism in scientific research



Make efficient use of databases, library and internet

resources for their postgraduate
studies


Synopsis
:


This intensive lecture and practical based module covers science skills for students wishing
to pursue
postgraduate studies, including
MSc
, MRes

and PhD degrees. It will teach
students how to make good use of library and internet resources (including Web of Science,
Voyager and Blackboard), to design and analyse their experiments, and to make
presentations of their data during conferences and symp
osia.


Basic reading:


Fowley, J and Cohen, L (1992) Practical statistics for field biology, J. Wiley

Williams B (1993) Biostatistics: Concepts and applications for biologists, Chapman & Hall

Original research papers given in reading list

BIOM31 TERM PAPE
RS IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY


Semester:



1

Lecturer/Coordinator:


Dr Carlos Garcia de Leaniz


Credit points:



20

Contact hours:



4

Pre
-
requisites:



None


Co
-
requisites:

Compulsory

Assessment:



100% Continuous assessment




Aims and
objectives/learning outcomes
:

In this module the students will learn to undertake an in
-
depth desk study based on a
thorough analysis of appropriate scientific literature, and to prepare a detailed scientific
review essay. Assessment for this module is

100% through continuous assessment. MSc
level library provision is required, including access to current journals. The title of the first
term paper will be chosen by the course coordinator (40%) and the second term paper will
be chosen by the student (6
0%) after approval by the course coordinator. Each student will
require access to University IT facilities. Each student is required to prepare two review
papers.


On completion of this course, students will be expected to:




Have the ability to use litera
ture databases to identify scientific papers of relevance.



Be able to appraise individual scientific papers and effectively extract information of
relevance.



Be capable of presenting the results of a literature search in a clear and logical
manner within a

correctly structured essay format.


Synopsis:

Students in this course will learn to identify scientific papers of relevance using literature
databases, to appraise the results of scientific research and effectively extract information of
relevance, and to

present the results of a literature search in a clear and logical manner
within a correctly structured essay format


BIOM32 ECOSYSTEMS


Semester:



2

Lecturer/Coordinator:


Dr.
Dan Forman

Credit points:



20

Contact hours:



25

Pre
-
requisites:



None


Co
-
requisites:

Compulsory

Assessment:



Continuous Assessment (50%)





Exam
ination

(50%)


Aims and objectives/learning outcomes
:


In this module, the students will learn to identify and understand the diversity and
contrasting characteristics of terre
strial and aquatic ecosystems with an emphasis on the
origin and effects of various human
-
induced environmental impacts.


Outline of lecture topics:



Terrestrial systems



Aquatic systems



Stoichiometry in ecology



Algal blooms



Environmental biology of aquati
c and terrestrial ecosystems



Ecological monitoring for conservation



Biodiversity and biogeography



Role of behaviour in ecology and conservation



Anthropogenically driven climate change


On completion of this course, students will be expected to have
acquired advanced,
specialised knowledge on:




Transfer of materials through food webs and the mechanisms by which the biota
interact and interrelate with the environment;



Research into the free
-
living behaviour of marine and terrestrial, vertebrates;



Appli
ed Conservation biology and Management;



The role of behavioural studies in animal ecology and in particular its applications in
the ecology and conservation of endangered populations;



Implications of anthropologenically driven habitat changes and its possi
ble relation to
climate change.


Synopsis
:

This module introduces students to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, food webs, and the
mechanisms by which biota interact and interrelate with the environment. Students in this
module will acquire an understanding for how to conduct research into free
-
living behaviour
of marine and terrestrial organisms and understand the debate on anthropogenically driven
environmental change, including climate change.




Basic reading:


Lalli, C M & Parson, T R (1997)
Biologically Oceanography. An Introduction (edn 2
)

,
Oxford, Butterworth


Heinemann

Marine Biochemistry (1993), Roy Chester, Chapman & Hall, London ISBN 0412 53530 0

Field identification keys for plants and animals

Grime, J P, Hodgson, J G & Hunt R (1988)
Comparative Plant Ecology

Gates, D M (1993)
Climate Change and its Biological Consequences

Cox, C B and P D Moore (1993)
Biogeography

Huston, M A (1994)
Biological Diversity




BIOM34B

RESEARCH PROJECT IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY


Semester:



3 (summer)

Lecturer/Coordinator:

Allocated supervisor
according to topic

Credit points:



60

Total study hours:

600 (including supervision, research and writing)

Pre
-
requisites:



Successful completion of Part One

Assessment:

Dissertation (maximum 20,000 words)



80% of mark


Oral presentation


20% of mark



Aims and objectives/learning outcomes:

In this module the students will learn how to:



perform a literature search in order to establish what has already been published in
the selected subject area



appreciate the safety considerations of scientific
research by completing appropriate
audits of the materials and methods involved



investigate a problem in environmental biology in which hypotheses can be
generated and tested with the application of appropriate statistical analysis



acquire a range of skill
s in the conduct of scientific research



integrate material from the literature with the results obtained from the research
carried out into an effective dissertation


The investigation will typically last for 12 to 15 weeks. The first two weeks will be sp
ent
undertaking a literature survey, a safety audit and in planning the research. Students will be
expected to spend an average of at least 30 h per week in the laboratory and/or field during
the following 10 weeks. The last three weeks will be spent com
pleting the dissertation (of
not more than 20,000 words). A

compulsory
oral presentation

on the project
(worth 20% of
the mark)
will be given
on 27
th

September 2013,
after submission of the dissertation.


Upon completion of this module students will be ab
le to:




survey the scientific literature, making appropriate use of electronic data base
searches where appropriate.



design meaningful experiments and/or surveys with adequate controls incorporating
appropriate statistical procedures.



research and
understand the implications of current health and safety regulations.



execute a careful and accurate research programme.



record data in a careful and accurate manner.



interpret data and plan appropriate subsequent research as indicated by earlier
results.



perform statistical tests and present data using appropriate graphical, pictorial and
tabular methods, making appropriate use of IT skills.



write a coherent scientific report


Synopsis:

Upon completion of this module, students will know how to survey the
scientific literature,
making appropriate use of electronic data base searches where appropriate, design
meaningful experiments and/or surveys with adequate controls incorporating appropriate
statistical procedures, execute a careful and accurate research
programme, write a coherent
scientific report, and give an oral presentation.


Basic reading:

Research journals appropriate to the subject matter of the dissertation.

BIOM37B CONSERVATION OF AQUATIC RESOURCES


Semester:



1

Lecturer/Coordinator:


Dr Carl
os Garcia de Leaniz

Credit points:



20

Contact hours:



20

Pre
-
requisites:



None


Co
-
requisites:

Compulsory/Optional


Assessment:



Continuous Assessment (50%)

Examination (50%)



Aims and objectives/learning outcomes
:

Students will acquire
advanced, specialised knowledge on:



Conservation practice globally



Specific issues of conservation to various taxa particularly those of key importance to
aquatic resources



Assessment of extinction risks



Role of captive breeding programmes in conservation
of aquatic species



Climate change and its potential impact on the conservation of aquatic species


This module will identify major issues in the conservation of both animal and aquatic plants
including those of relevance to both
MSc and MRes
students. Some

of the
lectures/seminars will be given by invited experts in the field. This module is assessed by a
combination of continuous ass
essment and written examination
.


Synopsis:


This lecture and seminar
-
based module will develop the knowledge base of
students in
conservation issues including those related to captive breeding programmes and the
potential effect of climate change on animal and plant extinctions.


Basic reading:


Pullin, A.S.

(2002)
Conservation Biology
, New York: Cambridge University Pr
ess

Hunter, M.L. (1996)
Fundamentals of Conservation Biology
, Cambridge, Mass; Oxford :
Blackwell Science

Caro, T. (ed). (1998)
Behavioural Ecology and Conservation Biology
, New York: Oxford
University Press

GEGM10
SATELLITE REMOTE SENSING


Semester:



2

Lecturer/Coordinator:


Dr Paul Alton

Credit points:



20

Contact hours:



20

Assessment:

50% Continuous Assessment (Practical Report)

50% Examination


Aims and objectives/learning outcomes
:

This course covers the follows:



The role of remote sensing in

providing information about human activity and
environmental processes



Principles behind the technology of satellites, imaging instruments and data analysis



Applications of remote sensing: A number of topics will be examined in terms of their
requirement
for information, the development of specific tools and techniques, and
the results achieved. For example:

a.

Human resources: Forestry and agriculture

b.

The human environment: The urban landscape

c.

The natural environment: The atmosphere and oceans

d.

Environmental
change: The land surface and global vegetation

e.

Environmental monitoring: Snow and ice


Practical sessions will be carried out in a computer laboratory and written reports of the
findings will form the continuous assessment assignments. These session will i
nclude:



Exploring spatial and spectral features in optical satellite images



Comparing image data from different parts of the spectrum



Global satellite data and time
-
series analysis



Topographic analysis and visualization of remotely
-
sensed data



Finding and
acquiring remote
-
sensing data using catalogues and archives


At the end of the course, students will have gained:



Conceptual understanding of the purpose and scope of remote sensing



Comprehensive understanding of how remote sensing techniques provide
infor
mation about human resources and environmental processes



Critical awareness of current remote sensing systems and ongoing research for
monitoring human and natural environments



Ability to explore, interpret and analyze satellite images in a computer enviro
nment


Synopsis
:


This module explains the use of remote sensing as a tool for gathering and analyzing
information about human resources and the natural environment. It is appropriate for
students who would find it valuable to understand how information
about human activity and
environmental change is retrieved from images of the Earth acquired by satellite. Emphasis
is placed on the role of ongoing missions in providing operational information for science
and society. Elements of Geographic Information S
ystems (GIS) appropriate for dealing with
spatially
-
explicit image data are examined. Lecture material is supported by hands
-
on
experience exploring satellite images in a computer environment.




Basic reading:


Campbell, J.B.,
Introduction to remote
sensing

(3rd Edition), Taylor and Francis, London.

Mather, P.M.,
Computer processing of remotely sensed images


An introduction

(2nd
Edition), Wiley, Chichester.

Liang, S.,
Quantitative remote sensing of land surfaces
, Wiley, Chichester.

Schowengerdt, R.A
.,
Remote Sensing: Models and Methods for Image Processing

(2
nd

Edition), Academic Press, London.



GEGM22 GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS


Semester:



1

Lecturer/Coordinator:


Dr Adrian Luckman and Dr Sarah Rodgers (Medicine)

Credit points:



20

Contact hours:



32

Pre
-
requisites:



None


Co
-
requisites:

Compulsory/Optional

Assessment:

50% Examination



50% Continuous Assessment (
Map (10%), Seminar (10%),
Report based on GIS analysis and mapping (30%) 2500
words)


Aims and objectives/learning
outcomes
:


At the end of this module the student should:



Have a critical awareness of the purpose, scope and potential applications of
Geographical Information Systems (GIS).



Be able to understand the nature of geospatial data and be able to critically eva
luate
a range of geospatial data types.



Be able to synthesize a range of primary (e.g. GPS, remote sensing) and secondary
(e.g. Ordnance Survey, UK census) sources of geospatial data.



Be able to critically evaluate maps using cartographic principles.



Be fa
miliar with the ESRI ArcGIS software package whilst having a critical awareness
of the strengths and weaknesses of alternative commercial and freeware GIS
software tools.



Have the skills to import, combine and synthesize geographic data from multiple map
s
ources in ArcGIS.



Be able to understand data standards and formats such as GeoTiff, Shape Files and
KML, and be able to exchange geospatial data between software packages including
Google Earth.



Be skilled in applying a range of GIS analysis tools from bas
ic data editing to view
-
shed and network analysis.



Be able to critically evaluate results from advanced applications of GIS, based on
case studies from epidemiology, demography, biological habitat mapping and
geography.



Have the skills to develop a GIS pro
ject from basic data sourcing to spatial analysis
and map visualization.


Indicative lecture topics:




Introduction to GIS in Geography, Public Health, and Bioscience.



Sources and types of geospatial data relevant to Geography, Public Health and
Bioscience.



Aspects of visualizing and manipulating data from understanding the geographic
reference frame through to spatial filters, spatial interpolation and map projections.



Approaches to querying data including combining attributes, selection of elements
using s
patial and attribute data, containment within regions and selection through
proximity.



Elements of data analysis including spatial statistics, analysis of road and other
communication networks, and surface elevation studies including line
-
of
-
sight
visibili
ty.



Basics of mapping and map design from cartographic principles, through symbolism
and generalization, to human perception of space and essential reference data.




Indicative computer project exercises:




Importing and manipulating GIS layers



Digitising and geocoding new data



Querying, measurement and retrieval



Raster and vector analysis



Combining layers using containment and buffering



Network analysis



Topographic analysis, visualisation and viewsheds



Public health case study



Habitat mapping ca
se study



Census geography case study


Synopsis
:


This module will provide students from a range of disciplines including geography and
demographics, public health, epidemiology, ecology and zoology, with a comprehensive
understanding of Geographical Information Systems and key skills in using GIS within
their
research work and future careers. It will take a hands
-
on approach in a computer lab,
combined with a series of lectures, to address the learning outcomes. Emphasis will be
placed on equipping students with practical skills in ESRI ArcGIS software, a
nd giving them
the ability to import, combine, spatially analyse, and map a range of data from field survey,
government agencies and census statistics.


Basic reading:


Longley, P.A., Goodchild, M.F., Maguire, D.J. and Rhind, D.W., (2010) Geographic
Information Systems and Science (Third Edition), John Wiley & Sons, Chichester.

Kang
-
Tsung Chang, (2010), Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (Fifth Edition),
McGraw Hill, New York.

Thebold, D. M., (2003), GIS Concepts and ArcGIS Methods, Conser
vation Planning
Technologies, Fort Collins, CO, USA.