Ottawa 20/20 - University of Toronto

workkinkajouBiotechnology

Dec 5, 2012 (4 years and 10 months ago)

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The Ottawa Life Science


Biotech
Cluster


Robert Dalpé

Dép. de science politique and
CIRST

Université de Montréal

ISRN

Vancouver

May 2004

Life Sciences as «

Emerging Clusters

» I

There are corresponding forces for collaboration. The greater the
collaboration

even with other cities


the greater the potential for
innovation and success. Clusters within the growth sector are not static

over the next 20 years individual industries will grow or shrink. For the
moment, here is what Ottawa’s industry clusters look like:


Expanding Clusters
(high growth, high employment concentration):
telecommunications equipment, micro electronics/semiconductors,
tourism


Transforming Clusters
(low growth, high employment concentration):
software and communications, professional services


Emerging Clusters
(high growth, low employment concentration):
photonics, life sciences


Seed Clusters
(low growth, low employment concentration): wireles
s,
creative industries, environmental technologies, micro electromechanical
systems (MEMS)

Source : Ottawa (2003),
Ottawa 20/20


Economic Strategy

Life Sciences as «

Emerging Clusters

» II

Emerging cluster: Life Sciences

Good Base, Currently Lacks Scale

Value:
There are almost 100 life sciences companies in Ottawa employing close to
4,000. The region has cutting
-
edge research and new product development in the fields
of medical diagnostic equipment, therapeutic equipment, implants/prostheses,
biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, and a range of electromedical applications. This cluster
also has strengths in the human, animal and agricultural sciences.

The cluster draws strength from the technical excellence found in the region’s excellent
research centres. Local universities and university
-
affiliated hospital research centres
further contribute to the strength of the cluster. If employment in research institutions and
centres is included, the cluster employs 7,000 more.

Investments in the cluster have been encouraging; more than CDN$140 million was
invested between September 2001 and May 2002. Innovative and novel technologies
are receiving funding, especially in the areas of biotechnology and environmental
technologies.

Source : Ottawa (2003),
Ottawa 20/20


Economic Strategy


DATA I



Private Biotech Firms (2001)


Toronto


73

Montréal


72

Vancouver


59

Ottawa





9





Source : Niosi (2002), ISRN.

DATA II




Source : Niosi (2002), ISRN.

1999
2000
2001
Montre al
Ottawa
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
Ye ars
C$M
Financ ing s
Montreal and Ottawa, venture capital
biopharmaceutical financings, 1999 to 2001
Montre a l
Otta wa
Questionnaires



methodological issues




Small number of firms


Firms : founders


Confidentiality


RESULTS

$

Federal Government

University

Federal Government


Ottawa : head office of the federal
government


NRC : research centres, IRAP


Other Departments :


Regional vs national mission


Type of research ; functions


Regulation of IP

University


Univ. of Ottawa and hospitals


Federal university R&D policy


Ontario Health Policy

$ : venture capital, angels


No links with IT


Young firms


Role of the Ottawa
-
Montreal community

AMEX BIOTECH INDEX

1999
-
2004






















Nortel


1999
-
2004

Other issues


Law firms


HQP


Management

Policy Implications

-

Federal government


-

functions


-

regulation of IP


-

University


-

size

-

$


-

diversity