Howard Road Academy PCS Parent and Student Handbook

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Howard Road Academy

PCS

Parent and Student Handbook

2011
-
2012




2



Table of Contents



School Leadership

Message







3

School Ov
erview/Mission Statement






4

School Calendar









6

Textbooks and Supplies
L
ist







7

Curriculum

and
Instruction

D
e
si
gn






9

Placement,
Promotion & Retention Policy






16

Student
C
onduct









19

Parent
I
nvolvement and
C
ommunication






20

Community Involvement








21

School
U
niforms








23

Attendance









24

Admission
s
, Re
-
enrollment, Transfers






27

Student

Records and Confidentiality






29

Grading
S
cales









31

Breakfast and
L
unch








32

Health and
S
afety








33

Portable Communication Devices







35

Student Services









36

Public Access to School








37

Code of C
ivility









3
8

I
ntroduction








39

Levels of Intervention







40

Inappropriate Beha
vior Consequences Chart




45

Student
R
e
sponsibilities in Common Ar
eas





47

Parent/Student

C
ompact







50

Midd
le School Addendum








52

Child Find Addendum








62

Attenda
nce Addendum








63



















3





Lett
er from the
School Leadership Team




August

2011



Dear Howard Road Academy
F
amilie
s
:


Welcome to the 20
11
-
201
2

school year! To help your student be
a success in this new
year, it is important
that you and
your student be aware of important school system policies and procedures, as well as
academic and behavioral expectations.


Everyone associated with Howard Road Academy Public Charter

School
--

from your child’s bus driver to
the classroom teache
r, from t
he
school leadership

to
each member of the school board


is dedicated to
providing a safe, orderly, productive learning environment for students. We encourage every student and
parent to review the contents of this handbook and to work with school staff t
o achieve our academic and
safety goals so that all students may enjoy a quality and effective education.


The Parent/Student
H
andbook includes contact information for the
school’s leadership, general information
about our p
roven curricular

and instruct
ional design,
as well as
specific school policies and procedures
which, if followed consistently, will contribute to the development of our community and the success of
our school.
You will also find helpful resources


the school calendar
, textbook and su
pplies

lists

for each
grade level
.


We are fortunate to have the caliber of students that we do at Howard

Road

Academy

Public

Charter

School. The vast majority of our students are respectful, conscientious young
scholars who do well
academically and who ne
ver need to be disciplined beyond the classroom level. They care about their
studies, teachers, and each other. Howard Road
Academy
’s

enforcement of its policies and Code of Civility
provides you assurance that we take your child’s education and safety ver
y seriously in our school.


At Howard Road Academy, we recognize that educating children requires a team effort, and we look
forward to joining you in this vital pursuit. Working together, we can realize our shared vision of
excellence in public educatio
n.


Should you have
a question that is not answered within
this handbook
, please
feel free to contact me,
another member of the school leadership team, or your child’s teacher.




Sincerely,




School Leadership Team

HowardRoadAcademy
PCS






4



S
chool Overview

Defining “World
-
Class”


At

Howard Road Academy Public Charter School, “world
-
class”
is defined as
any product, service, or
organization that is judged by qualitative and quantitative measures as one of the best in

its class, and that
is ackn
owledged, accepted, admired, and emulated by stakeholders, professional peers, and competitors
alike.In the context of this definition, schools that are considered to be “world
-
class”
are characterized by
the following:




High academic standards for all



A c
omprehensive, challenging, and relevant curriculum



Effective, engaging instructional strategies



Accurate and meaningful assessments



High performing and inspiring employees committed to


professional development, training, and lifelong learning



A saf
e and secure learning environment



Productive community and parental partnership



Information technology systems that advances teaching and learning



Behavioral standards for all that are conducive to teaching and learning



Commitment to meeting the needs o
f its internal and external communities while building on their
diverse ideas and strengths











Mission

Statement
:

The Academy is committed to Academic Excellence for all students. We will achieve individual,
measurable academic outcomes through a rigoro
us, engaging and safe learning environment designed
to prepare students to gain entry into selective high schools
-
No exception, No excuses!


Belief Statements
:



all students can learn



every child can be challenged to reach their full potential



children’s le
arning can be broadened through experience



all students have
the

right to tools that develop them as productive members of society



all students have the right to tools that facilitate achievement



school can provide educational experiences that prepare stud
ents for both



all children have a right to an environment that supports both their social and emotional
growth



all children have a right to safety, love and learning



children learn at different rates and in different ways



success is directly related to s
elf
-
esteem


5



Leadership


The school’s highly skilled and experienced leadership team is eager to serve you and your child through
the provision of a “world
-
class education”. Your satisfaction is the school’s highest priority, so we hope
you will c
ontact the school’s leaders with any questions or concerns at the following numbers:



Dr. Shelley Jallow, Regional Vice
-
President (RVP)

(202)

610
-
5713



Mr.
Tracey Johnson
,

Chief Operations Offer
(COO)

(
202)
610
-
5713



Dr.
Latrice N. Hicks, Head of School, Mai
n Campus

(HOS)

(202)



Mr.
Claude Presley, Head of School, Middle School Campus

(HOS)

(202)



Dr. Nicole Garcia

, Head of School
, Pennsylvania Avenue Campus
(HOS)

(202) 610
-
4193



Mr.
Allen Blessing, Curriculum Implementation Specialist (CIS)

(202) 582
-
3322



Ms.
T
alia Robinson
-

Curriculum Implementation Specialist

(CIS)


(202) 610
-
4193




Dr. Lisa Reid



Curriculum Implementation Specialist
(CIS)


(202) 610
-
4193



Ms. Rohini

Ramnath
-
Data Manager

(202) 610
-
4193




Ms. Mia Long
-

Director of Special Educat
ion


(202) 610
-
4193



Management


The HowardRoadAcademy is part of a national network of schools managed by MosaicaSchool design,
which includes Paragon, and Mosaica’s rigorous curricula in other subjects, a character education progr
am,
second
-
language instruction, school uniforms, art and music instruction
, and an extended school day and
year.


Mosiaca corporate office may be contacted at:

Mosaica Education

100Wall Street

9
th

floor

New York, NY10005

www.mosaicaeducation.com



Hours

of Operation


Hours of operations are 7:30 a.m.
-
4:00 p.m.
Instruction will begin promptly at
8:00a.m.

and end at
3:30p.m.
,
Monday through Friday.
No student will be admitted into the school building before
7:40
a.m.
There is no adult supervision for childre
n until
7:40
a.m
.



EmergencySchool Openings and Closings

If it is necessary to open late or close early, the announcement will be made on:



Channels 4,5, & 7



www.howardroadacademy.org

6




Call 202
-
610
-
4193 and pre
ss 6

7



8





Pennsylvania Avenue Campus Early Childhood Supply List

Revised

Summer 2010


All STUDENTS

should bring an old
, oversized men’s shirt for a smock for
arts and crafts

Preschool /P
K

Kindergarten

1
st

Grade

Big Crayons

(primary colors

8
crayo
ns)

Big Pencils

Big glue sticks

(at least 5)

5 pocket folders

3 bottles of hand sanitizer

3 boxes of Kleenex

3 rolls of paper towels

1 pair of fiskers blunt edged
scissors

1 package of dry erase
markers

2 cans of unscented shaving
cream

1 complete unifor
m change
of clothes

2 containers of baby wipes

1 box of quart sized zip
lock bags

1 bottle of household
cleaning spray (409, etc)

1 box of crayons

(24 count)

3 packages of pencils with
erasers

5 glue sticks (large)

5 pocket folders

3 primary writing table
ts

2 storybook writing tablets

2 boxes of Kleenex

1 box of quart sized zip lock
storage bags

2 rolls of paper towels

2 containers of baby wipes

1 package of dry erase
markers

1 pair of student scissors

1 bottle of household
cleaning spray (409, etc)

1 b
ox of crayons

(24 count)

3 packages of pencils with
erasers

5 glue sticks (large)

5 composition books


5 pocket folders

3 primary writing tablets

2 storybook writing tablets

2 boxes of Kleenex

1 box of quart sized zip lock
storage bags

2 rolls of paper
towels

2 containers of baby wipes

1 package of dry erase
markers

1 pair of student scissors

9



Main Campus &
Middle School
Textbooks and
Supplies

Lists


HowardRoadAcademy furnishes
all textbooks and materials
needed for academic instruction;
however, stu
dents are required to
have additional materials and/or
supplies. All students should
have these supplies by the end of
the first week of school. As the
year progresses, the student’s
supplies should be replenished at
the end of every quarter. Parents
ar
e required to reimburse the
School for lost or damaged
books, before new books are
issued. Parents, below is a list if
supplies per grade level. All
items must be labeled with the
student’s name in his or her book
bag.

Kindergarten Student
Supply List

1
box crayons (24
-
count)

2 packages #2 pencils with erasers

1 large eraser

2 glue sticks

2 two
-
pocket folders

2 primary writing tablets

1 small plastic School box

1 large eraser

1 pair Fiskar’s blunt
-
edge scissors

2

box
esof
facial tissues (200
-
count)

1 compl
ete uniform change of
clothes

(Including socks & underwear
labeled with the child’s name in a
bag)

2 rolls of paper towels

2

container
s

of baby wipes

1 household cleaning spray

1 anti
-
bacterial spray

2 bottles of hand soap


First Grade Student Supply
List

1 pencil box

1 box of #2 pencils with erasers

1 box crayons (24
-
count)

2

box
es of

facial tissue (200
-
count)

4 two
-
pocket folders

2containers of
baby wipes

2

rol
ls

of paper towels

1 bottle white School glue or glue
stick

1 box zip
-
lock quart
-
size plastic ba
gs

1 pair student scissors

2 primary writing tablets

2 primary story
-
book writing tablets

1 pair student scissors

Second Grade Student
Supply List

2 packages wide
-
rule notebook paper

6 #2 pencils with erasers

1 box crayons (24
-
count) or colored
pencils

1 p
encil box

2 box facial tissue (200
-
count)

1 glue stick

1 pair scissors

1 pencil sharpener

2 spiral 1 subject notebooks

7 two
-
pocket folders

2 composition books

1 bottle of hand sanitizer

1 container of baby wipes

2 rolls of paper towels


Third Grade Studen
t
Supply List

2 packages wide
-
rule notebook paper

6 #2 pencils with erasers

1 box crayons (24
-
count) or colored
pencils

1 pencil box

2 box facial tissue (200
-
count)

1 glue stick

1 pair scissors

1 pencil sharp
e
ner

3

spiral 1 subject notebooks

7 two
-
pocket f
olders

4 composition books

1 bottle of hand sanitizer

1 container of baby wipes

2 rolls of paper towels


Fourth Grade Student
Supply List

3spiral 2 subject notebooks

3

packages wide
-
rule loose
-
leaf
paper

1 pencil sharpener

6

#2 pencils with erasers

1 pack
of color pencils

/ crayons

1 pair of scissors

1 red ink pen

2 glue sticks

2 boxes of facial tissues

1 container of wipes

1 bottle of hand sanitizer

1 plastic pencil holder for binder

2 composition books

7

two
-
pocket folders

5
th
& 6th

Grade Student
Supply Li
st

1 two
-
inch three
-
ring binder
notebook

2 package wide
-
rule loose
-
leaf paper

1 pencil sharpener

2 #2 pencils with erasers

1 pack of color pencils

1 pair of scissors

1 red ink pen

1 plastic pencil holder for binder

1 spiral 5 subject notebook

2 composition

books

5 two
-
pocket folders

Middle School: 7
th
& 8
th

Grade Student Supply List

4

package
s of

wide
-
rule
d

paper

1 pencil sharpener

1 pair of scissors

2

glue stick
s

2
packs of
#2 pencils with erasers

1
pack of
red ink pen
s (3 minimum)

1 pack of highlighters (3

minimum)

1
color pencils

1 plastic pencil holder for binder

5

two
-
pocket folder

2 boxes of facial tissue

2 containers of wipes

1 container of hand sanitizer

1 protractor

1 compass

1Calculator

2
-

4
-
inch 3

ring binders

6


Composition books

1 package of d
ividers with pockets

1 package of dividers without
pockets

Stephen

Covey
’s

Book
“ 7 Habits of
Successful Teens”
























10



Curriculum and
Instruction

Design

At the heart of HowardRoadAcademy is a highly structured curriculum that sets high e
xpectations and provides
individualized monitoring to assist students in attaining ambitious goals for achievement. The
HowardRoadAcademy provides a strong academic foundation for students at the elementary/middle school level,
which will prepare them for
demanding academic studies in junior high school and for college
-
level work in senior
high school.



THE PARAGON CURRICULUM

A World of Ideas That Make A World of Difference


Across eras, Continents and Disciplines

The unique Paragon Curriculum is predicate
d on the idea that we must impart to all children the content knowledge
and
academic skills which will provide them with the necessary intellectual capital to succeed in mainstream culture.
Rather than teach history in bits and pieces in arbitrary sequence
, Paragon’s fully integrated, chronological approach
demonstrates to students how one idea builds on and evolves into another. The curriculum illustrates how sweeping
cycles of conflict and resolution repeat themselves and leads to understand how and why v
arious world cultures
have risen to power and prominence, only to be supplanted by others.


Studying history across continents depicts, for older students, the manner in which many ideas develop at the same
time in independent cultures unaware of others’
breakthroughs. In comprehending synchronicity and the genealogy
of ideas, students develop a larger conceptual picture of
history and an enhanced awareness of the interrelationship
of many areas of knowledge. Rather than memorize names, dates and wars in i
solation, students recall the sequential
circumstances surrounding these events and remember more readily both the factual information and the conceptual
relevance.


The paragon Curriculum is designed around ten ages of history or
Human Eras
, which constit
ute the monthly
conceptual themes:




The Ancient World 40,000 B.C. to 500B.C.



The Classical World 499 B.C. to A.D. 500



Trading Goods and Communicating Ideas 501 to 1100



The Middle Ages 1101 to 1460



The Renaissance 1461 to 1600



Adventurers and Colonist 1601

to 1707



Slavery and Revolution



Empire and Industry 1836 to 1914



The World at War 1915 to 1950



The Global Village 1951 to Present Day


Aligning P
aragon with Local and State Standards

Although all Paragon students will immerse themselves in the historical,
cultural and scientific worldview of the
Human Era they are studying simultaneously with other grade, each grade will focus on a unique
Global
Understanding
.

The monthly conceptual theme

or
Global Understanding

allows teachers to foreground one
unifying p
rincipal over others and to render reading, writing, and academic content far more focused. This also
enables Paragon to satisfy various local and state curriculum standards by highlighting those areas that students are
expected to master at a specific gra
de level. Paragon aligns its curriculum with national, state, and local district
needs, freeing faculty to spend their time crafting creative and compelling

lessons for the unique interests and needs
of their students. Step
-
by
-
step daily Lesson Plans are o
rganized around Essential Questions that have no easy
answers and that have captivated thinkers for millennia.

11




The Content Core of the Paragon Curriculum

History and Social Studies

Social studies represent the integrated study of the social science and h
umanities to promote civic competence and
intellectual capital. Social studies constitute the organizing, chronological core of the paragon curriculum, precisely
because it is multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary in nature. It provides coordinated, syst
ematic study that draws
upon such
disciplines

as anthropology, archaeology, economics, geography, history, law, philosophy, political
science, psychology, religion, and sociology, as well as, appropriate content from the humanities, mathematics, and
natura
l sciences.




Social issues such as poverty, crime, and public health, are increasingly understood to transcend the
boundaries of disciplines, culture, and nations. As these issues grow increasingly complex, the effort to
develop solutions demands an increa
singly integrated view of scholarly domains and of the world itself.



Many scholars now define themselves by the issues and problems they address and use several
disciplines to inform their work. Entirely new departments and programs reflect this developmen
t.
Academic programs in Americans Studies, African
-
Americans Studies, Biotechnology, Comparative
Literature, Cultural Studies, and Medical Ethics, for example, draw on multiple disciplines and their
processes to address the needs of humanity.



Technology pr
ovides increasingly easy access to data bases that are interdisciplinary and
multidisciplinary
, as well as to scholarship in many disciplines.



Scholars increasingly consider themselves to be members of the international academic community and
share finding
s regularly across intellectual and geographic boundaries.


It is within this context that the Paragon Curriculum was conceived. It pays attention to the specific contributions of
history, social sciences, humanities, fine arts, natural sciences, and oth
er disciplines, while simultaneously providing
an umbrella for the integrative potential of these several disciplines. Paragon’s power stems from recognizing the
importance of these disciplines and their specific perspectives in understanding topics, issue
s, and problems.
Moreover, Paragon teaches students to recognize that topics, issues, and problems transcend
the boundaries of single
disciplines and demand the power of integrated within and across them.


Science

Science is fully integrated into the Para
gon Curriculum, which features biographies of great scientist, accounts of
break
-
through discoveries, and detailed hands
-
on activities for students to stimulate interest in the scientific method.
The interdisciplinary approach enables students to see scien
ce as an integral part of their lives, rather than as
daunting discipline.


The goal of the Paragon Curriculum is to enrich the science by integrating it with the liberal and fine arts, as well as
the social sciences, the synthesizing strands that weave to
gether the Paragon Curriculum. Mathematics as the
language of science, and of economics, also constitutes an integral part of the Paragon experience for students.


Technology and Computer Literacy

Technology is the application of scientific knowledge fo
r the purpose of solving practical problems, extending
human capacities, and improving the quality of life. The Paragon Curriculum emphasizes the use of technological
tools to facilitate and enrich learning across academic disciplines. Information technolo
gy is the most frequently
used technological tool.
Students use computers to communicate via the Internet, to express themselves creatively,
to solve problems, to organize data, to conduct research, and to explore mathematical and scientific principles
thr
ough simulations.

To master true computer literacy, students require hands
-
on access to computers in real time, rather than isolated
visits to a computer lab. A MosaicaSchool is equipped with a computer for every two to three students, as well as a
lap to
p for each teacher and administrator. The personal desktop computers are linked to the internet, affording
access to curriculum and resources available in cyberspace or on a disk. Paragon Lesson Plans direct students to
specific internet sites on a regular

basis. The computers wil
l also be linked to
,
MosaicaNet

school
-
wide Intranet,
permitting “real
-
time” monitoring of classroom
productivity

and student progress.


12


Mosaica’s distance learning program serves to engage students significantly in the science cur
riculum. A video field
trip, for example, will enable students to visit temple relics of ancient Incas and to uncover the mystery of how
immense stones were elevated to great heights and constructed into seamless monuments without bricks, mortar,
pulleys,
or wheels. Furthermore, real
-
time interviews with contemporary great thinkers will enable Mosaica students
to confer directly with a NASA astronaut involved in the latest space mission, a paleontologist, or any other
authority in a field of interest and of

relevance to them.


A Mosaica library is styled as a Media and ResourceCenter, supplying a library of excellent books and CD
-
ROMs,
as well as TV/VCRs, overhead and slide projectors for pedagogy.


Each classroom is equipped with a TV/VCR to support the EMG

distance learning technology, as well as the
Paragon Curriculum, which features film clips from classic and quality motion pictures to make history come alive
for students. Overhead projectors in every classroom will further enable teachers to engage stud
ents with the
captivating transparencies that support the paragon Curriculum.


The Arts

Rather than relegate art, music, and foreign language to the periphery of the curriculum, Paragon’s design integrates
them into its interdisciplinary center. To truly i
ntegrate the arts into the paragon Curriculum, Mosaica trains all
teachers in the visual and performing arts. Daily Paragon lesson Plans are outlined with step
-
by
-
step instructions to
ensure seamless implementation. Art, drama, music and dance interrelated

too

vicariously (not acting up) enables
students to try on different roles without compromising their quality of life. It is no accident that “playing” (as in
what children do) and “playing” (as in acting and putting on a play) and “playing” (playing a mu
sical instrument)
are the same word. Without “play”, the process loses its validity and vitality.


Paragon’s purpose is to make the arts a vital component of a child’s education, which at the same time placing the
strongest possible emphasis on the basic s
kills of reading, writing, and arithmetic. The arts offer children
opportunities to assimilate and apply what they have learned in ways relevant and meaningful to their experience.
Their enhanced
skills of communication, analysis, and self
-
expression enabl
e

them to compete far more successfully
with their traditional learning classmate.


Music

According to Plato, “Music…gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination …and life to
everything.” The impulse to make music is ageless a
nd universal. Music has the capacity to communicate volumes
about an era and its people. The Paragon Curriculum conveys to students, features of the music different eras and
composers by having them sing, dance, and perform with rhythm instruments. Student
s also learn to listen for
specific features and to discern how one era or culture often imitates and reinvents the music of another.


Mosaica has hired a music specialist for choral and instrumental instruction. The music specialist will consult with
teac
hers on the musical portions of paragon lessons and will draw from and extend the paragon Curriculum in
music.


ForeignLanguage

Paragon treats foreign language as an integral part of the core curriculum, providing instruction in the target
language to simu
late an environment of immersion, Spanish instruction commences in second grade and builds
purposefully toward proficiency with each success
ive grade level. Communi
cation

is lively and animated with
vocabulary content tied thematically to the integrated cu
rriculum. Moreover, multimedia pedagogical resources
(videos, CDs, CD
-
ROMs, children’s books) in the target language convey to students the cultural experience of their
peers in Spanish
-
speaking countries. A MosaicaSchool cultivates the natural facility of

younger
students for foreign
language acquisition by beginning at an early age with a high quality program.


How will Mosaica achieve academic excellence through the Paragon Curriculum?

Paragon’s program is designed to increase the student’s ability to re
ad, stud
y, search for information, use social
science technical vocabulary and methods, apply the scientific method to real
-
world situations, practice reasoning
through mathematical analysis and logic, and use computers and other electronic media. To devel
op this skill
category, category paragon increases the student’s ability to use the writing process and to classify, interpret,
analyze, summarize, evaluate, and present information in well
-
reasoned ways.

13



Paragon cultivates the student’s ability to concep
tualize unfamiliar categories of information, to establish
cause/effect relationships, and to determine the
validity

of information and arguments. The
interdisciplinary

Paragon
Curriculum expands the boundaries of traditional, segmented courses to enable s
tudents to define their roles and
responsibilities as enlightened citizens.


The Paragon Curriculum enhances the
student’s

ability to express and advocate reasoned personal convictions
within groups, to recognize mutual ethical responsibility in groups, to

participate in negotiating conflicts and
differences or to maintain an individual position because of the ethical basis. Paragon calls upon the student to work
individually
and in groups.


Students learn about
character
, ethics, empathy, and self
-
esteem
i
mplicitly

by studying the world’s greatest thinkers,
both canonical and unsung, and by stepping into the shoes of great historical figures, both real and imaginary.
Through content
-
rich study, children come to understand the expansive potential open to the
m if they can identify
early, and with clarity, their individual strengths and sense of purpose. Paragon students contemplate questions that
have captivated thinkers for millennia: What makes a “Hero”? What makes me unique? How can we learn from the
past?
How do we apply that knowledge to the future?


By studying the history of human
culture
, students learn implicitly about values and ethics that transcend
time and place.



Individual beliefs/majority rule



Obeying the law/the right to dissent



Cultural variety
/cultural assimilation/uniformity



Individual rights/public safety



Community progress/individual liberties


The Paragon Curriculum features the following aspects of the best teaching and learning practices
worldwide. Integrate interdisciplinary work:



Allows

for more efficient use of time by students and teachers.



Instills in students a strong aptitude for assimilating disparate ideas.



Presents opportunities to apply esoteric concepts to practical contexts.



Provides a mechanism through project
-
based learning
for integrating newly acquired knowledge from
different disciplines.



Applies skills developed in reading, writing, and mathematics to relevant, real
-
world situations.



Enables students to develop accelerated academic, aesthetic, and technical skills.


The P
aragon framework


Paragon’s Essential Questions:



Reflect the grand, sweeping patterns in the evolution of cultural worldviews.



Represents a breakthrough in how people see t
h
emselves, their purpose or their relation to the physical
world.

Also exemplifies
a transition in awareness of the material world or the universe.



Define a prevailing worldview.



Illustrate a “great” idea with relevance, significance, and endurance that
transcend

time and place.



Address the “so what” question that we would have students
consider in heir writing, discussion, and
presentation.



Amplify the role of common people who become heroes in developing ideas, inventions, and art that
become mainstream social norms.


Paragon instills and cultivates the following:



Decisions making


ide
ntifying and
struggling

with complexities, solving problems and thinking critically,
developing creativity rather that strict conformity to conventional pra
c
tices;



Self
-
direction and personal initiative



Strong interactive skills
-
cooperation, networking, t
eamwork and information pathway knowledge.



Responsibility for learning, identification of goals, development of a plan, gathering information, and
implementation of a plan.

14




A sense of awe and a passion for inquiry.

Paragon Curriculum is practical because i
t is meaningful.



Students learn connected networks of knowledge, skills, beliefs, and attitudes that they will find useful both
in and outside of school.



Instruction emphasizes depth of development of information ideas within appropriate breadth of topics
coverage and
focuses on teaching these important ideas for understanding, appreciation, and life
application.



The significance and meaningfulness of the content is emphasized both in how it is presented to students
and in how it is developed through activi
ties.



Classroom interaction focuses on sustained examination of a few important topics rather than superficial
coverage of many.



Meaningful learning activities and assessment strategies focus students’ attention on the most important
ideas embed
de
d in what

they are learning.



The teacher is reflective in planning, implementing, and assessing instruction.



Drawing from the Core Knowledge Foundation’s advocacy of content
-
rich curricula, Paragon instills the
cultural literacy and intellectual capital children ne
ed in order to succeed in mainstream contemporary
culture. Paragon’s distinction from Core Knowledge is its fully integrated, chronologically sequenced
framework, arranged around meticulously designed Daily Lesson Plans.



Knowledge provides both content and

methodology. Moreover, Mosaica provides the necessary training
and support to enable teacher to implement the curriculum effectively and to ensure the integrity of its
program.



All disciplines, including math, science, liberal arts, fine arts, social stud
ies, foreign language,

and physical
education weave strands of connection between different ways of knowing (epistemology).


Paragon teaching and learning are effective because they are integrated.



Paragon

is integrative in its trea
tment of topics, across
both time and space.



Paragon teaching integrates knowledge, skills, belief, values, and attitudes to action.



Paragon teaching and learning integrates effective use of technology.



Paragon teaching and learning integrates across the curriculum.


Paragon teac
hing and learning are powerful because they are value
-
based.



Powerful teaching considers the ethical dimensions of topics and addresses controversial issues
, providing
an arena for reflective development of concern for the common good and application of s
ocial values.



Students are made aware of potential social policy implications and taught to think critically and make
value
-
based decision about related social issues.



Rather than promulgate personal, sectarian, or political views, paragon teachers make su
re students that
students: 1) become aware of the values complexities, and dilemmas involved in an issue; 2) consider the
costs and benefit to various groups that are embedded in potential courses of action; and 3) develop well
-
reasoned positions consisten
t with basic democratic social and political values.


How does Paragon Curriculum teach to the Multiple Intelligences?

Multiple
Intelligences
, a term coined by psychologist and author Howard Gardner, refers to seven domains of ability
in which students can

excel.



Linguistic Intelligences (speaking, reading, explaining things to others)



Logical
-
Mathematical Intelligence (measuring recipes, balan
cing a checkbook, estimating distance)



Spatial intelligence (drawing, finding one’s way around a room, picturing so
mething in the mind’s eye)



Musical Intelligence (listening to music, singing, playing an instrument)



Kinesthetic Intelligence (playing sports, making things by hand)



Interpersonal Intelligence (having friends, working or playing with a group)



Intrapersonal

(enjoying time alone to think to wonder and to imagine)


The last two intelligences
,

inter
-

and intrapersonal, are comparable to “Emotional Intelligence,”
-

the determining
factor for success in life delineated by Daniel Goleman, PH.D.
in his best
-
selling
book
.

The first two intelligences
outlined by Gardner, Linguistic and Logical
-
Mathematical, are those measured by standardized
tests.

15



The morning program of a MosaicaCharterSchool is devoted to the “basis” of Reading (including phonics and
spelling) and m
athematics, the first two intelligences. The afternoon session, the interdisciplinary Paragon
Curriculum, cultivates all seven of these multiple intelligences, along with an eighth, the “Integrative Intelligence,”
which refers to the ability to make connec
tions across disciplines.


To illustrate, a unit 4 Medieval lesson for
fourth

grade in the paragon Curriculum features a lesson on Robin Hood.
During the 2() hours session, students read and excerpt from the classic version of the story, discussing the “ol
d
-
fashioned” language features

(Linguistic Intelligence). Students then view and compare film clips of the folk hero’s
adventures (Linguistic and Spatial Intelligence). Students make a story board (comic strip for video production) of
the sequence of event
s in the reading selection, dividing into groups to make tableaux in dramatic poses (Linguistic,
S
p
atial, Interpersonal

and Kinesthetic Intelligences). Students then learn to make a 16
-
piece thumbnail sketch of a
hum
an figure (Spatial Intelligence
) and deb
ate the contradiction of Robin Hood being both a hero and
an

outlaw
(Linguistic, Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Intelligences).


Orchestrating the Paragon Curriculum

Consider the metaphor of a musical ensemble such as an orchestra (the Paragon Curriculum
)

as it performs a
specific musical composition (a grade level or specific course within the curriculum). At certain times, one
instrument (a discipline such as history) takes the lead while others (such as geography and economics) play
supporting roles. At

other times, several instruments (history, fine arts, literature, etc.)
or the full ensemble play
together
too

fully address the composer’s thematic aims. The quality of the performance derives from the
composer’s creation of the music (design of the Para
gon Curriculum with the animated spark of creativity derived
from exemplary teaching). Accompanying features includes the unique qualities of individual instruments (the
contribution of individual disciplines), the acoustics of instructional
resources
). Cr
ucial to the success of the
performance are the skills of musicians and the conductors (students, teachers, curriculum design team and onsite
curriculum coordinator). All must work collaboratively and synergistically to know when and how to express the
mea
ning of the composition (curriculum).


Homework

Homework provides excellent opportunities for developing good study habits, providing for individual differences
and abilities, and encouraging self
-
initiative on the part of the student.


Parents and the s
chool share the responsibility for student learning. HowardRoadAcademy believes that parental
involvement in students’ homework is essential to making homework an integral part of the

educational program.
Parents should encourage and monitor homework assig
nments. Your child will be given homework assignments
regularly. Each student is responsible for completing his/her assignments
.




Kindergarten


20 minutes per evening



Grades 1 & 2


30 minutes per evening



Grades 3 & 4


40 minutes per evening



Grade
s 5
, 6
,
7
& 8

60 minutes per evening


Homewo
rk will be sent home in an agenda

book with a signature page; please initial this page prior to sending it
back to school with your child to verify that you have seen the homework.
The f
ollowing are some suggestions for

ways you can help your child gain the most from his/her homework experience.




Make homework rules together with your child. Decide when it will be done, where it will be done, and
what will happen if it is not completed.



Provide a quiet place for your chi
ld to do homework, such as desk in his/her room or the kitchen table.
Make sure there is sufficient light and that distractions are limited.



Show an interest in your child’s homework and him/her about it each night.



Give your child a healthy snack before h
e/she begins homework. This should help with concentration.



Give your child a short break from homework if needed.



Encourage your child to work independently. Assist him/her if needed.

16




Give your child positive words of encourage, such as, “I’m proud of you
,” or “I knew you could do this all
by yourself!”

Homework, if assigned on the weekend, should not exceed the above allotment. During student breaks students will
receive a spring break packet and a summer reading list. All homework assignme
nts and student

break packets will

align with curricular requirements in specific content areas.

Please feel fr
ee to contact your child’s classroom teacher
if you have any question about homework.


Field Trips

Field trips may be planned throughout the year for various a
cademic enrichment and extracurricular purposes.
Parents will receive advance notice of all such trips. A permission slip must be signed by a student’s parent in order
for the student to participate in a field trip. Students without signed permi
ssion sl
ips will remain at the s
chool in
another class. Participating students should bring a bag lunch unless otherwise noted.


Occasionally, parents may be needed to serve as chaperones on class field trips. No parent should feel obligated to
serve in this ca
pacity, but parents are encouraged to volunteer if possible. The primary responsibility of a chaperone
is to ensure appropriate supervision for students. Parental chaperones are asked to take this responsibility seriously
and to remain vigilant and atten
tive to the students’ needs throughout the trip.
Children who are not enrolled in
the class may not accompany the chaperones.

17




Grade Level Placement, Promotion and Retention Policy


Purpose
:
Howard Road Academy PCS

has established and maintains high s
tandards
for all students by establishing clear academic expectations, monitoring student
achievement and communicating student progress to parents/guardians in a continuous
and systematic manner. Insert School Name does
not

practice social promotion but
r
ather places and promotes students according to each student’s instructional level.

Recognizing the unique developmental needs of each student, the most appropriate
educational setting will be determined to meet those needs and a Personalized Student
Achi
evement Plan will be designed to support academic growth.


Placement Policy Statement
:
All

newly enrolled students applying to enter grades 3
-
8
are required to take a standards
-
based placement assessment to determine the
student’s most appropriate grade
level assignment. This assessment must take place
prior to the student’s first day of school. Students placing at a grade below
chronological age may have the opportunity to participate in summer school for the
purpose of gaining skills and knowledge nec
essary to advance. In order to take
advantage of this educational opportunity, students must complete placement testing
prior to May 30
th
. At the conclusion of summer school, a final placement test will be
administered to determine placement.

Performance

Series Scaled Score Grade Level Targets:

To be placed at grades three through eight, a student’s scaled score must fall
above the
25
th

percentile for mathematics and reading. See

scaled score targets below. Fall,
winter or spring norms will be used dep
ending on enrollment date.

Mathematics


Fall



Winter



Spring

2

1893



1967



2078

3

2081



2153



2247

4

2231



2263



2349

5

2323



2368



2443

6

2429



2416



2528

7

2495



2507



2571

8

2559



2535



2633

Fall 05 Winter Spring 06

Reading

2

17
74



1884



2032

3

2050



2159



2257

4

2286



2306



2441

5

2457



2496



2585

18


6

2591



2564



2677

7

2659



2663



2727

8

2747



2711



2793


Promotion and Retention Policy Statement
: No student shall be promoted to the
next successive grade level

based on age or other social reason unrelated to academic
performance.

To be promoted, students must meet or exceed the following targets:

1.

Mastery in all major content areas as evidenced by grade level report cards

2.

To be promoted to grades three throu
gh eight, a student’s scaled score on the
academy’s standards
-
based assessment must fall above the 25
th

percentile in
mathematics and reading.

3.

All students must
demonstrate a 95
% or better attendance rate.

Students who are placed or retained below chrono
logical grade level may be required to
participate in some or all of the following interventions:



After School Tutorial



Summer School



Saturday School



Supplemental Course Work



Individualized Assistance through the Intervention Assistance Team/Student
Assist
ance Team


Responsibility:

Decisions regarding a student’s placement, promotion or retention will
be determined on an individual basis based on academic results.
The Chief
Administrative Officer shall have the final responsibility of determining grade le
vel
placement and promotion or retention of each student. Parents/guardians will be
notified in writing at the end of the
second

quarter of children in danger of retention. A
conference will be scheduled at a time convenient for all parties to discuss th
e student’s
achievement, attendance, effort, work habits, behavior and other factors related to
learning.


Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of the Rehabilitation Act

Students who are identified disabled under the IDEA of the Rehabilitati
on Act or a
Section 504 will be promoted or retained in accordance with the IEP Team
recommendations, as documented in the IEP.


Students with disabilities

as defined in

IDEA (including English Language Learners with
a disability) receiving specialized i
nstruction and related services under an Individual
Education Program (IEP) are expected to meet the same promotion criteria as their
non
-
disabled peers. For standardized testing, students with disabilities must be
provided the accommodations/modificatio
ns outlined on their IEP. The designated
scores and other criteria used to determine promotion as described in this policy shall
apply to students with disabilities unless the IEP modifies the promotion criteria in whole
or in part. Promotion decisions th
at are based on standardized test scores can only be
made if the student was afforded the accommodations/modifications that are delineated
on the student's IEP.

19


Students with disabilities defined in IDEA (including English Language Learners with a
disabil
ity) receiving specialized instruction and related services under an Individual Education
Program (IEP) are expected to meet the same promotion criteria as their non
-
disabled peers. For
standardized testing, students with disabilities must be provided th
e
accommodations/modifications outlined on their IEP. The designated scores and other criteria
used to determine promotion as described in this policy shall apply to students with disabilities
unless the IEP modifies the promotion criteria in whole or in
part. Promotion decisions that are
based on standardized test scores can only be made if the student was afforded the
accommodations/modifications that are delineated on the student's IEP.

Student Conduct

HowardRoadAcademy recognizes that effective instruc
tion requires an orderly environment focused on learning,
and that Schools have an important role to play in supporting parents’ efforts to teach basic values to their children.
The School’s
Code of Civility

clearly defines expectations for student conduc
t, focusing on

school
-
wide
expectations and common procedures. In addition, students learn

character virtues

as part of their study of heroes
through time, and explore how these character virtues apply to their lives.

Students

are encouraged to model the
character virtues in their every action and thereby to develop the habits that characterize a civil society. Parents can
help reinforce such lessons by talking about the virtues and encouraging students to model them at home.


A complete copy of the
Code
of Civility

is provided in Section II of this booklet. Please read the
Code

thoroughly,
discuss it with your children and sign and return to your child’s homeroom teacher the compact on the last page to
indicate that you understand and agree to the School
’s rules and expectations. Students are also asked to sign the
form, which will be
co
-
signed by the Chief
Academic

Officer

upon receipt. The
Code

will thus serve as a contract
among students, parents, and School staff, involving
parent’s

at the most fund
amental level in their children’s
character development. The School Director will make appointments to discuss the
Code of Civility

with any
parents who do not return signed copies of the form indicating their approval of the
Code
.

In addition to the expe
ctations described in the
Code of Civility
, the following rules apply in every classroom:

I will show respect for…


Myself by:



Attending school regularly and being on time.



Following rules and directions of adults



Practicing positive behavior choices



Rema
ining on school grounds unless I have permission to leave school



Learning from consequences of my behavior.



Choosing not to bring tobacco, alcohol, other drugs, or weapons to school.



Dressing in designated uniform.


Others by:



Being understanding of other’
s feelings



Using positive words with others (no putdowns)



Treating others like I want to be treated



Not bullying or threatening



Working with others in positive ways



Keeping my hands to myself



Refraining from using profanity in school



Working together and/o
r with adults to manage negative behaviors and emotions



Using a respectful, positive, and considerate tone of voice and body language when I am speaking to
others.



Listening when others are speaking to me.

20



Learning by:



Following school rules and school st
aff directions.



Keeping focused on my work.



Coming to school prepared to work.



Participating in class activities and discussions.



Completing my own schoolwork and homework.



Property by:



Taking care of things in my school and on school grounds.



Not bringi
ng dangerous or distracting things, such as matches, lighters, weapons, toys, fireworks,
alcohol/tobacco/others drugs, medicine not prescribed for me, etc.



Using school materials or a classmate’s materials for their intended purpose.

-

Using computers as dir
ected by adults




Following rules about safety:

-

Refraining from touching a fire alarm unless there is an emergency

-

Refraining from making threats about bombs or blowing something up.

-

Using playground equipment in a safe manner




Keeping cell phones off and o
ut of sight during school hours.


Helping your child meet these expectations will facilitate the creation of a safe and orderly learning environment.

Parent Involvement and Communications

Volunteering

Parents are encouraged to participate in School
-
related

activities, including those pertaining to curriculum and
instruction, such as tutoring and storytelling. Volunteers may also be involved in monitoring the playground,
student drop
-
off and pick
-
up, crosswalk, and assisting with School events. In addition
, parents are encouraged to
contribute their time and talent to organizing extracurricular activities and community outreach projects. A log of
volunteer hours is kept in the school office. A recognition night for volunteers is held at the end of the yea
r.

All volunteers must complete an Application for Employment and a Character Questionnaire, and each must be
fingerprinted (for federal and state clearance). Volunteers receive structured training, and must follow all policies
and procedures defined by t
he School. If activity occurs that is not in keeping with the School policies, the Chief
Administrative

Officer reserves the right to relieve the volunteer of his or her responsibilities.

Parent Teacher Organization

HowardRoadAcademy’s Parent Teacher Orga
nization (PTO) was founded by a group of parents dedicated to
supporting student learning and the overall success of the School. The PTO provides School leaders with ongoing
input on the operation of the School and serves as a vital link between the Schoo
l and you

its customers. All
parents are encouraged to join the PTO. For more information, contact
the Main Office at your campus.

Parent Conferences

Formal parent/teacher conferences are scheduled three times a year to facilitate open communication betw
een
parents and teachers regarding students’ progress. Refer to the School calendar for specific dates. Howard Road
Academy maintains an open door policy, and parents are encouraged to visit their children’s classrooms
upon
making an appointment with tea
cher
. Informal conferences or conversations may also be scheduled with teachers or
School leaders at any time throughout the year
.

21


Progress Reports and Report Cards

Progress reports will be sent to parents every twenty
-
five days during the semester to pro
vide specific information
about student progress in each subject. At the end of each semester, parents will receive report cards with
cumulative data on their children’s performance and progress.

These report cards indicate an assessment of the
student’s
progress in class. Every student will receive a Progress Report from his/her homeroom te
acher. The nature
of the report may be constructive and any include suggestions for improvement or positive reinforcement. The
progress report will also indicate the gr
ade the student is presently receiving in that course
.
IEP progress reports are
only provided quarterly.


Dropping
things off at
school


The
school years are often marked by a pattern of developmental “forgetfulness.” Parents often find themselves
coming
to drop off homework, books, lunch, lunch money, etc. at the school several times a week or even several
times a day. Although this is normal for this age group, students also need to be encouraged to take responsibility for
remembering their own things. S
ince we have so many parents dropping things off, we have developed a procedure
to facilitate the process. If you have something for your child, please come to the office. The secretary will ask you
if you have the student's name on the item and then call
the student to the office. If the item is needed for the class
currently in progress, the secretary will call the student to the office.
Parents should never try to find students on
their own.


Community Involvement


The charter school, by its very nature,

was developed as an initiative stemming from the interest of parents and
community members to find a “public school” that provides children with a quality program of education that
ensures that they are prepared academically and behaviorally for the futur
e. The manner in which community
groups can be involved with the school include:




An informal association with the local colleges and universities to:



Provide undergraduates and graduate students, faculty and staff the opportunity to participate in a
new
and promising public school reform movement



Provide student
-
teachers and graduate student interns a well
-
supervised, high
-
quality practical
experience



Provide an opportunity for pre
-
education students to perform volunteer service



Allow faculty and student

the opportunity to observe and study state
-
of
-
the
-
art technology being
implemented in both school instruction and school management



Provide future employment opportunities throughout the nation to graduates who have been
trained in the implementation of t
he
Paragon Curriculum



Partnerships with the surrounding communities, school districts and local businesses, enlisting their insight
and commitment to provide an exemplary public education for all children



Financial support and direction from local business
es to attract volunteers



Partnering with social service organizations



Participating in educational workshops, seminars and summits offered to the community by the charter
school



Sharing facilities with health/social service agencies



Youth service agenci
es share facilities/services with the school



Community members/organizations share their knowledge, and skills with the school (e.g. career days,
exploratory activities)



Parents, student, teachers and/or business persons trade places



Providing community se
rvice opportunities or projects for students



Community representatives serving on the steering committee


22



23



School Uniforms

(
All Students Pre
-
School Through 8
th

grade
)

It

is commonly accepted that student behavior and the school environment are strongly
influenced by the dress and
appearance of students.
To help create an environment conducive to learning, students at the HowardRoadAcademy
are required to wear simple uniforms. This policy is designed to permit students to focus their attention on academic

and on those aspects of their personalities that are truly important.


The school
uniform consists

of the following:

Bottoms

Boys may wear khaki brown long or short pants, and girls may wear khaki brown long pants, knee
-
length skirts,
skorts or jumpers.
Skirts, shorts, and dresses must be able to pass the finger length test. Standing with your hands at
your side, the item must be longer than your fingertips. These items may be purchased at most department stores or
clothing outlets. Floor
-
length skirts

and baggy or wide
-
legged pants or allowing pants to sag are not permitted.
Denim and corduroy are not allowed.


Tops

Both girls and boys wear burgundy polo shirts

K
-

5
. Shirts must be tucked in and clean.
ONLY

Burgundy
sweatshirts may be worn in cool we
ather
.
Jackets of any kind may not be worn in the classroom
.

You may the
wear a school sweater or a sweater that is the school colors, no zips or hoods.


Middle School Students

(Only

Grades 6
-
8
)
.

These items

must be worn until
October 1, 2010
.
After

Oct
ober 1, 2010,

All Boys and Girl
s MUST Wear White Dress Shirts
and
a
Burgundy

Tie.

Shoes

Students are required to wear black or brown closed
-
to
e shoes without logos
. High
-
heeled shoes and open
-
toe
sandals or open heeled shoes are not permitted.

Socks and
Belts

Students may wear black or burgundy crew, ribbed, or knee
-
high socks without stripes or logos. Students must wear
belts, which match the color of their shoes, if there are belt loops on their pants, skorts, or skirts. Belts may not have
any design
or color other than brown or black.

Jewelry

Students may not wear anything around their necks, except for items worn inside their shirts, invisible to anyone
else. Students ma
y wear simple stud earrings or hoop earrings that are not bigger than a quarter
.

Nose rings,
eyebrow rings, lip rings, tongue rings are not allowed. Noticeable make
-
up, including nail polish, is not permitted.
One ring per finger is allowed. One bracelet per wrist is allowed.
No more than two
earring
s

per ear is allowed.

Any items

of clothing that is substantially or materially disruptive to the activities of the school will be considered to
be inappropriate. Parents of students who are not appropriately dressed will be asked to bring an acceptable change
of clothing to school. Stu
dents may receive disciplinary actions for failing to abide by the policy.

To ensure that the school’s uniform policy has its desired effect, it is important that it be implemented consistently.
School leaders, faculty, and staff will respond immediately t
o violations of the policy.

Repeated violations will result
in appropriate disciplinary action being taken for those who do not follow the dress code policy interpreted by
HowardRoadAcademy administration.



1
st

time offenders will be given a verbal warning
along with a letter expla
i
ning the violation

of the dress
code policy
.



2
nd

time offender will be sent to
(ISS)
in
-
school suspension until his/her parent can bring

an acceptable
change of clothing to
school, and

meet with the Behavior Intervention Specialis
t

24




3
rd

time offenders will
receive
1 day
(OSS) out
-
of
-
school suspension
.


A Families Helping Families Uniforms Bank is maintained at the School

Nurse’s office
for families in need and for
children who soil their clothes during the School day and require a

change. If a financial need exists in your family
and you would like to take advantage of this

resource, please contact the
School Nurse at 202
-
610
-
4193 x125
.
Donated items may be dropped at
t
he
Nurse’s
office in a bag marked “Uniform Donation
.”


Attenda
nce

Attendance Policy and Procedure

The Compulsory School Attendance law of the District of Columbia 8
-
247
, requires that children ages 5 and up
to their 18
th

birthday whose parents or guardians are residents of the District of Columbia or who are wards o
f the
district, must attend school. Parents and guardians are responsible for sending their children to school and those who
fail to do so may be subjec
t to court action.
If convicted
, they may be punished by a fine, a commitment to jail or
community servi
ces.


Only parents/guardians of record may provide information, make requests, or sign out students. This means the only
person(s) that can have access to the particular student or the student's records is the person(s) listed in our database
at the time o
f the transaction. Be prepared to show proper picture identification if requested.

All students need to attend school every day; there is no substitute for being present. Experiences one has in a
classroom are difficult, if not impossible, to duplicate an
d very often cannot be represented as well as the original
experience with make
-
up assignments.

ABSENCES
: Parents, guardians, and students need to read the school policies and procedures below. Trips and
vacations are not considered excused absences. Pare
nts/Guardians should schedule plans around the school calendar.
All major research studies in education show that school attendance is a major factor affecting student success.

Students presently enrolled are considered lawfully absent from school, inclu
ding absence for any portion of the
day, only under the following conditions:



Death in the immediate family: Our school defines the immediate family as:



father (step father, male legal guardian)



mother (step mother, female legal guardian)



uncle (brothe
r of parent/legal guardian/step parent)



aunt (sister of parent/legal guardian/step parent)



brother (step brother)



sister (step sister)



grandfather



grandmother



Illness of the student. (The CAO or designee shall require a physician's certificate from the

parent or
guardians of a student reported continuously absent for illness.
This is true even if the child has a
documented disability that has prevented them from attending school on the dates of absence.

A note from
the doctor must confirm that the absen
ces are directly related to the child’s documented disability.
)



Court summons.



Hazardous weather conditions. (Hazardous weather conditions shall be interpreted to mean weather
conditions which would endanger the health or safety of the student when in tr
ansit to and from school.)



Work approved or sponsored by the school, the local school system, or the State Department of Education,
accepted by the CAO, or designee as reason for excusing students.



Observance of a religious holiday.



State emergency.



S
uspension.

25




Lack of authorized transportation. (This does not include students denied authorized transpor
tation for
disciplinary
reasons or because they did not qualify for transportation as a related service on their IEP
)



Other emergency or sets of circu
mstances

which, in the judgment of the CAO or designee, constitutes a
good and sufficient cause for absence from school.

If a student is absent and the parent has not called in, school personnel will attempt to contact the parents at home or
at work. If th
e attempt to contact the parent is unsuccessful, the school will then attempt to contact the emergency
numbers that have been designated on the emergency card. If no one can be reached, the school administrator will be
notified and he/she will determine wh
at further action is necessary. This procedure is being used to ensure the safety
of our students.

LATE ARRIVALS TO SCHOOL
: All students who arrive after
8:30

AM must report to the attendance office with
a note specifying the reason for tardiness and acqui
re a late pass from the attendance office personnel before
reporting to class. "Family/Personal emergencies" must be explained, and the attendance office personnel will use
discretion and judgment in determining the legality of the late arrival. Students w
ho are late for medical/dental or
other appointments with professionals must present an excuse on letterhead from the professional visited. Students
late due to illness must present a note from the legal parent/guardian of record. Students late without a n
ote have 48
hours (2 days) to produce a note. Students late because of school buses will not be penalized and will be provided
with a late pass at the door. Passes will be distributed only to students who enter the building via the main lobby
entrance. Ver
ification of late buses will be confirmed from the late bus check
-
in list. Students late because of
transportation of any type other than school buses will not be excused. Trips and vacations are not considered
excused late arrivals.

EARLY DEPARTURES
: Stud
ents are required to submit a note to the attendance office the day before an early
departure in order for school personnel to verify information. The note must contain the reason for the early
departure, the student's ID number, a phone number where the p
arent can be contacted during the day, and the
signature of the parent. The attendance office verifies all early departure requests. If an unexpected event arises and
a student cannot provide an excuse note the day before, the parents will send in an excus
e note the day of the
request. If parents do not send in an excuse note and confirm the request via telephone, they must come into the
attendance office to sign the student out of school. Unless prior arrangements have been made, only legal guardians
and p
arents may sign a student out of school. No student should leave the building without signing out in the
attendance office before they leave. Trips and vacations are not considered lawful excuses.

EXTENDED ILLNESSES
: If a student will be absent from school

for more than three (3) days for medical
reasons
(including documented disabilities)
, the parent
/guardian needs to inform school personnel in order to arrange
make
-
up work.

The Absence Reporting Line is:
202
-
610
-
4193 or via email
mgreen@howardroadacademy.
org.

SCHOOL SPONSORED ACTIVITIES
: Absence from school or class for a school
-
sponsored activity will be
treated as an excused absence. Students are encouraged BUT NOT REQUIRED to get assignments in advance or to
have the assignments completed by the next da
y.

TRUANCY:

1.

A student who has been marked present in homeroom and subsequently is absent from three (3) different
classes, without permission, during the same day shall be marked “absent unexcused” for the morning or
afternoon session in which the majority

of these classes occurred. The absences shall constitute half
-
day
absences for purposes of the Compulsory School Attendance Act.

2.

A student who has been marked present in homeroom and subsequently misses four (4) different classes,
without permission, du
ring the same day shall be marked “absent unexcused” for both morning and
afternoon sessions. The absences shall constitute full
-
day absences for purposes of the Compulsory School
Attendance Act.

3.

Elementary and secondary students who have one unexcused ab
sence from homeroom where attendance
has been taken for purposes of the Compulsory School Attendance Act shall receive appropriate attendance
services initiated by classroom or homeroom teachers.

26




Five (5) or more unexcused absences in any class during a s
ingle advisory shall result in grade
reduction in that subject.



Ten (1
0
) or more unexcused absences in any class during a single advisory shall result in receiving
a grade of “Fa” (failure due to absences) in that subject.



An elementary student accumulat
ing forty (40) or more unexcused absences within a full school
year shall not be promoted.



A secondary student accumulating forty (40) or more unexcused absences in a course within a full
school year shall receive a failing final grade in that course with

a resulting loss of course credit.



A written appeal may be filed by a parent or student on behalf of any student receiving a reduced
or a failing grade(s) due to unexcused absences.



An appeal shall be submitted to the principal of the school within ten
(10) business days after
receipt of the failing grade(s).

4.

Upon receipt of an appeal, the principal shall appoint an Appeals Panel and shall forward all written appeal
requests to the panel chairperson within three (3) business days.

i.

The Appeals Panel ref
erenced above shall consist of not less than three (3) members to be
selected from the following:

(a) The principal’s designee, who shall be the panel chairperson;

(b) A guidance counselor;

(c) A department chairperson;

(d) A teacher, other than the on
e involved;

(e) An attendance staff person;

(
f) A student body representative; or

(g) A parent organization representative.



Appropriate substitutions in the Appeals Panel described above may be made when necessary;
provided, that a student body represe
ntative shall be on each Appeal Panel.



The Appeals Panel shall hold a hearing within ten (10) calendar days after its appointment by the
principal.



The student or his or her parent, guardian or duly authorized representative shall appear at the
hearing.
One of these individuals shall be given the opportunity to present the student’s case and,
upon request, to question the involved teacher and to be duly informed of the panel’s
recommendations.



Each appeals panelist, including the chair, shall have an equ
al vote.



In the case of a tie vote, the Appeals Panel shall recommend that the initial grade be upheld.



The Appeals Panel’s recommendation shall be forwarded immediately to the principal who shall
issue the Panel’s decision within ten (10) calendar days
after the hearing.



When an appeal is filed, the Student Hearing Office shall convene a hearing before an independent
hearing officer who shall issue the final administrative decision in the matter.



The following procedural guidelines shall apply to heari
ngs convened as described above:

a)

The burden to show why the grade(s) in question should be changed shall be on the
student or his or her parent or guardian;

b)

Strict rules of evidence shall not apply;

c)

Testimony or evidence shall be heard from both parties
; and

27


d)

A written determination shall be issued within five (5) business days of the hearing.

Admission
s,

Re
-
Enrollment, and Transfers

Admission
s

Howard Road Academy is open to all children

that live in
Washington,
DC
, on a space
-
available basis within ea
ch
grade. The School does not discriminate on the basis of intellectual or athletic ability, measures of achievement or
aptitude, disability, proficiency in English, or any other basis prohibited by law.

There are no admission requirements, and no tests o
f any sort are given to determine whether or not admission is
granted, although tests are used to determine group placementoncestudents are enrolled. Once all available slots are
filled, applicants will be placed on a waitlist. Students on the waitlist w
ill be a part of the school’s lottery as places
become available in each grade.

Non
-
DC Resident Admission

For students who live outside the district

Re
-
Enrollment

To secure your child’s place at HowardRoadAcademy for the next School year, you must officia
lly re
-
enroll him or
her. In February
, re
-
enrollment packets will be sent home along with the spring deadline for re
-
enrollment.
Students whose re
-
enrollment packets are received after the deadline will be added to the waitlist and admitted on a
space
-
av
ailable basis.

Transfers

The School asks that, whenever possible, pa
rents provide at least a two week

notice if a student must transfer from
Howard Road Academy for any reason. Such notice will allow the School to process the necessary transfer
paperwork,

including having the student’s records transferred. It will also enable the School to fill the vacant seat
with another student from the waitlist
.

Documentation will not be released to parents in hand. School records are
transferred from school to school
, directly.


Campus to Campus Transfers

There will be no campus to campus transfers.

McKinney
-
Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act


Children and Youth who have lost their housing live in a variety of places, including motels, shelters, shared
residences
, transitional housing programs, cars, campgrounds, and others. Their lack of permanent housing can lead
to potentially serious physical, emotional, and mental consequences. Howard Road Academy Public Charter School
will ensure that all children and yout
h receive a free appropriate public education and are given meaningful
opportunities to succeed in our schools. Howard Road Academy Public Charter School will follow the requirements
of the McKinney
-
Vento Homeless Assistance Act and will not refer to chil
dren as homeless; we will instead use the
term children and youth in transition. Under federal law, children and youth in transition must have access to
appropriate public education, including preschool, and be given a full opportunity to meet state and l
ocal academic
achievement standards. They must be included in state
-

and district
-
wide assessments and accountability systems.
Our schools will ensure that children and youth in transition are free from discrimination, segregation and
harassment.

McKin
ney
-
Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act states:



Children have the right to go to school, no matter where they live or how long they have lived there. They
must be given access to the same public education, including preschool education, provided to
other
children.



Continue in the school they attended before they became homeless or the school they last attended, if that is
the family’s choice and are feasible. If a school system sends your child to a school other than the one you
28


request, the schoo
l must provide the parent with a written explanation and offer them the right to appeal the
decision.




Receive transportation to the school they attended before the family became homeless or the school they
last attended, if the parent or guardian request
s such transportation.



Attend a school and participate in school programs with children who are not homeless. Children cannot
be separated from the regular school program because they are homeless.




Enroll in school without giving a permanent address.

Schools cannot require proof of residency that might
prevent or delay school enrollment.



Enroll and attend classes while the school arranges for the transfer of school and immunization records or
any other documents required for enrollment.



Enroll and

attend classes in the school of the parent or guardian’s choice even while the school and parent
seek to resolve a dispute over enrolling your children.