CONTENTS - The Civil Service

wastecypriotInternet and Web Development

Nov 10, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

47 views


1























































Disability Awareness Guides

Guide number five:





Disability Etiquette















Published January 2004

b
y the Race and Diversity
Action Team







2



CONTENTS


A.

INTRODUCTION








3




I) Getting it right from the start




3




II) Legal Framework






4




III) What support and advice is available?


4





B.

KEY POINTS TO REMEMBER WHEN MEET
ING A
DISABLED PERSON







5




I) General Advice






5




II) Language







5




II) Glossary of Language





6




IV) Visual Impairments






7




V) Hearing Impairments





9





VI) Limited mobility and dexterity




11




VII) Speech Difficulties






13




VIII) Facial Disfigurement





14




IX) Learning Disabilities





15




X) Mental Health







15



C.

SOURCES OF ADVICE AND INFORMATION



17


D.

DISABILITY AWARENESS TRAINING CONTACTS


20



3

E.

THE DISABILITY AWARENESS GUIDE SERIES


22



F.

USEFUL HOME OF
FICE NOTICES




23




HARASSMENT AND DISCRIMINATION ON THE GROUNDS OF
DISABILITY OR A REASON RELATED TO IT WILL NOT BE
TOLERATED BY THE DEPARTMENT.


EVERY MEMBER OF STAFF HAS A RESPONSIBILITY NOT TO
BEHAVE IN A DISCRIMINATORY WAY TO COLLEAGUES
WITH DISABIL
ITIES.




























4




A.

INTRODUCTION


This booklet, which is one of a series, provides advice, guidance
and information for line managers and colleagues of staff with
disabilities. It gives advice on good communication so as to avoid
any un
necessary embarrassment or discrimination.



I) Getting it right from the start


With advances in technology; the provision of adequate facilities;
increasing access to buildings and public transport, there are
growing opportunities for individuals with a
disability to play a full
and effective role within the workforce. Currently 2.3% of staff
working within the Home Office have declared some form of
disability although the number of disabled members of staff is likely
to be much higher. It is likely that

at some point in your career you
will work with a member of staff with a disability, possibly without
even knowing it as some disabilities may not be immediately
obvious.


We all have a responsibility to avoid creating barriers for
people with disabilitie
s either as their line managers or their
colleagues. Common sense and a little thought can go a long
way.


Good communication is essential and we must ensure that we do
not use any language or take any actions that will discriminate


either directly or in
directly


against members of staff with a
disability.


Thought needs to be given to removing any barriers that a person
with a disability might face at work. These barriers are not just
physical. Lack of awareness, frustration and other peoples’
attitude
s can all create barriers. Misunderstandings and
thoughtlessness can lead to a breakdown in communication that
could easily cause feelings of isolation and exclusion.


Disabled members of staff, like any other member of staff, need to
be fully involved in

what is happening in his/her unit/directorate.

5

They need to play a full part in any meetings and be kept up to
date with developments.


Do not make assumptions
. Not knowing what the issues are for
an individual will lead to mistakes so take the time to as
k and find
out.



II) Legal framework


The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 gave rights to people with
disabilities, seeking to end unfair discrimination and requiring
employers to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to help them
overcome disadvantages they ma
y face. The legal framework is
important but there is a lot more we can do to ensure that people
with disabilities have satisfying and rewarding careers in the Home
Office. (For more information on the Disability Discrimination Act
1995 see HONS 171/1996,
128/1997 and 94/1999).


III) What support and advice is available?


Further advice on topics covered in this booklet and other disability
matters can be obtained from Janet Edden in the Race and
Diversity Action Team on 020 7273 3887. Or Sarah Bucher
-
Jones

in the Equality and Diversity Team for IND on 020 8603 5468 or
Stacey Muncaster and Suzanne Jones in the Equality team for the
Prison Service on 020 7217 6744 or 2563 (see also Annex D).


You may also wish to approach the HODS (Home Office Disability
Supp
ort Network) secretary, Sue Saunders, for guidance and
advice on 020 7273 2425 (see also Annex D).














6

B

KEY POINTS TO REMEMBER WHEN MEETING A
DISABLED PERSON


I) General Advice


Most individuals with a disability do not require any extra help. Th
e
most common reason for requesting extra help is a restrictive
environment. You should only offer help if it seems appropriate.
Always wait until your offer is accepted before you do anything and
listen to what the person says.


Address the person with a
disability directly


not anyone
accompanying that person e.g. a sign
-
language interpreter.


Only make the same physical contact as you would with anyone
else. Do not help someone to get up or sit down without first
asking if they would like some help.


Do
n't be afraid to ask the disabled person whether he or she
needs any adjustments to the workplace.


II) Language


Do not be over
-
concerned about language. Ask and learn about
what is acceptable to that person.


Some words and phrases have negative connotat
ions and can
give offence. Never use terms like ‘handicapped’, ‘crippled’ or
‘retarded’.


Don't be afraid to use common expressions which could relate to
someone’s impairment, such as 'see you later' but avoid using
insulting labels such as 'blind as a bat
'.


Some people prefer to be referred to as a 'disabled person', others
favour 'person with disabilities'
-

ask the individual what they
prefer.


A person is not a condition. Avoid referring to an individual by their
condition. An individual has cerebral
palsy, they are not a ‘spastic’
and someone who has epilepsy is not an epileptic. Never refer to
someone as ‘a victim of’ or ‘suffering from’ a particular condition.



7

Never use collective nouns such as 'the disabled' or 'the blind.'
This implies people are

part of a uniform group which is separate
from everyone else.


Do not use language that suggests that disabled people are frail or
dependent or which suggests that the disabled person should be
the object of pity.


Remember that the opposite of 'disabled
is
not

'able
-
bodied' it is
‘non
-
disabled’. Disability is not only physical; 'non
-
disabled' means
neither physically nor mentally disabled.



III) Glossary of Language


Acceptable Terms

Unacceptable Terms



Person who has… / person
with…/ person who
數灥p
ienced….


䔮朮 jr 卭楴h 桡s 数楬数獹

Victim of…/ crippled by…/
suffering from…/ afflicted by… /
楮i慬楤aL 桡湤楣慰a敤e


䔮朮 jr 卭楴h s畦fe牳 f牯r
数楬数獹I is 慮a数楬i灴楣.


t桥敬c桡楲 us敲 L p敲e潮 w桯h
畳es a w桥敬h桡楲.

t桥敬c桡楲 扯畮搠L c潮f楮敤 t漠
a

w桥敬h桡楲.

a敡e L h慲搠of 桥慲h湧nL 桥慲楮朠
業灡楲敤p

q桥ha敡e.

䉬楮搠慮a 灡pt楡汬i s楧桴敤
灥潰汥pL v楳楯i 業p慩牥搮

q桥h䉬楮B L 扬楮b as 愠扡t.

健潰汥mL 灥牳潮ow楴栠愠l敡牮楮e
摩dfic畬ty.

q桥hm敮e慬汹 桡湤hc慰灥a L
牥r慲摥a L m潲潮 L im扥b楬i L
m敮e
慬汹 摥dic楥it.

偡牴ic畬慲 湥敤s 潲o湥敤n

印散楡i k敥es.

印敥捨 業灡楲敤 L im灡楲p敮e L
摥慦dw楴桯ht s灥pc栮

j畴攠潲 摵db L 摥df 慮a 摵db.

k潮
-
摩d慢汥a 灥pso渮

䅢汥A扯摩敤e

䅣c敳s楢汥 q潩汥t

a楳慢汥a q潩汥o.







8

IV) Visual Impairments


The term ‘vis
ual impairment’ covers a range of sight restrictions of
varying severity, from failing vision to total loss of sight. There is a
common misconception that blind people cannot see at all. In fact
only a small proportion of registered blind people have no us
eful
vision. Some people are born with a visual impairment and others
become visually impaired as a result of an illness or an accident.


Those people with partial sight can see to varying degrees and in
different ways. For example, some individuals may se
e in a
patchwork of blanks and visually defined areas, others may have
very blurred vision or no side vision. Some may have distance
vision which allows them to move about without difficulty whilst
others may have adequate close up vision, but experience g
reat
difficulty in negotiating their way round.


Things to remember when meeting someone with a visual
impairment
.




Always speak first. Introduce yourself and other people clearly,
indicating where people are in relation to the person.




Say the person’s
name when you are starting a conversation. It
may be that without visual clues they cannot know to whom you
are talking.




When shaking hands advise a blind or partially sighted person
that you are about to shake their hand, as they may not see
your hand.




Ask the visually impaired person what assistance, if any, is
needed in getting around. If you are asked to assist
-

guide
rather than lead. Allow the person to take your arm and let
them know when you are approaching steps or obstacles.




Be ready to gi
ve a brief description of the ‘geography’ (shape,
size and windows) and contents (furniture and people) of a
room. Warn a blind person about possible dangers in a new
environment, for example, very hot radiators. Tell a person
where a chair or object is, a
nd place their hand on the chair
back or object. Don’t push them down into it.




9

Expect blind people to touch things. This helps them to orientate
themselves.




In an environment that a person with little or no sight uses
regularly, remember that order is
vital. If anything has to be
changed, tell the person and show them what change has been
made.




Do not avoid the words see, look, etc. Some totally blind
people appreciate description using colours, even though they
may have never seen them, they may have

their own
conception of them.
Ask
.




Always advise the person that you are leaving so that they are
not left talking to an empty space.




Do not pat or distract a guide dog while he/she has their
harness on, and under no circumstances should you feed it.




Move out of the way of a person feeling their way along by the
use of a long cane. Be aware that a white cane with red circular
stripes around the top usually indicates someone who has a
hearing impairment as well as a visual impairment,




Don’t make ass
umptions about what a blind or partially sighted
person can do. Many activities are possible with small
modifications or adaptations to equipment.


Written or printed material


The inaccessibility of written or printed information can be one of
the most ‘
disabling’ factors of society for all people who cannot see
textual information or visual images easily. Braille, large print and
taped books redress only a fraction of the balance. Developing
technology helps, for example, computer software packages whi
ch
‘read’ print aloud. But nothing will take the place of aware
colleagues who remember to ‘translate’ print into words, or other
accessible formats. Offer minutes of meetings, or any other written
communications in the person's preferred format (on floppy

disc, or
audio cassette or in large print or Braille).




10


V) Hearing Impairments


Some people are born deaf, others may lose their hearing later on
in life perhaps as a result of an accident or illness or as part of the
ageing process. The onset can be g
radual or sudden. Unless a
person wears a visible hearing aid it is not easy to tell at a glance if
someone is deaf or hard of hearing. There are different degrees
and types of deafness, and different ways for deaf or hard of
hearing people to communicate.



People who are hearing impaired may ‘get by’ with guesswork and
using visual clues to a great extent. They may or may not use
hearing aids or have a noticeable difference in speech patterns. If
a person has a hearing loss, ask them to describe in detai
l how it
affects them and what would be useful in terms of support.


Profoundly deaf people will probably have unusual or absent
speech and may use a visual language. They may have the use of
less vocabulary or use vocabulary in a different way to a heari
ng
person. Their conversation may be quite literal and can appear
blunt and to the point


do not take offence at this. Ask the person
to tell you how they prefer to communicate


signing, lip reading,
type talk, loop system or palantypist.


Things to reme
mber when meeting someone with a hearing
impairment.




Ask the person to tell you how they prefer to communicate.




Arrange for a lip speaker, signer interpreter or palantypist to
attend any meeting, and/or arrange an induction loop facility.
You should be a
ware that a person who uses a hearing aid
fitted with a T switch can benefit from the use of induction loops.
For more information on things to consider when organising
events please refer to HON 215/2001.




Background noise can make it much harder for a he
aring
impaired person to communicate orally. Leave your important
conversations for quiet surrounds.




Check regularly that you have been understood.



11



Remember that it requires a lot of energy and concentration for
a deaf person (and any facilitator, palan
typist, etc) to deal with a
hearing community. They may get tired, frustrated and want to
‘switch off’ literally. This need should be acknowledged. A deaf
colleague should be asked to say when they need a break, or
when they have had enough.




Remember n
ot to speak too quickly as this will make it hard for
the deaf person, palantypist or interpreter to follow.




Sometimes a deaf person may use text phones and type talk
when using the telephone. Allow them time to read and
respond.




Written notes may help
you to present more complicated
information.


Using sign language


If the person is using British Sign Language as their first language
then make sure the person has an interpreter whenever she/he is
expected to, or needs or wants to communicate with non
-
B
SL
users.


Ask the person if they would like to suggest the name of an
interpreter they would like to use. A deaf person may have a
favourite interpreter that they have used before who they can
communicate easily with.


Use a qualified sign language interp
reter


not someone who just
knows a little sign language. This is especially important for
meetings and interviews.


When using an interpreter, speak to the deaf person and not the
interpreter.


Consider learning some commonly used BSL sings yourself, suc
h
as ‘yes’, ‘no’ and ‘thanks’.







12

Lip Reading


Make sure a deaf person is looking at you before you start
speaking; a gentle touch on the shoulder or arm will get their
attention. Stop talking if you have to turn away.


Make sure your face is in the ligh
t and not in front of a window.


Face the person and speak in a normal, clear and steady way.
Avoid shouting.


Try not to change track mid sentence.


Do not exaggerate your mouth movements but do use your facial
expressions to emphasise your meanings.



Don’t be afraid to be more expressive by using your hands, and
have a pen and paper handy.


Be patient and be ready to repeat yourself or rephrase a sentence
if necessary. Some words are more difficult to interpret and so it
may be useful to try differ
ent words.


Don’t put your hands in front of your face or smoke and speak at
the same time.


In a group situation where a deaf or hearing impaired colleague is
participating, arrange people in such a way that everyone can see
each others’ faces


circles r
ather than rows. If rows are
unavoidable, get any speakers to come to the front and face the
audience. Get each speaker to make a visible sign (e.g. a raised
hand) before speaking so that deaf people can locate which face
to look at. Get people to speak
one at a time.


VI) Limited mobility and dexterity


There are a number of conditions that can restrict a person’s
capacity to walk; stand; sit; bend and stretch; climb stairs; lift and
carry; grip; hold and manipulate things. Reduced mobility or
manual de
xterity can affect both physically disabled and visually
impaired people. It can also affect some people with mental health
problems.



13

People with disabilities are the experts on their conditions and
needs. Ask rather than make assumptions about their indi
vidual
needs. It is preferable to ask very specific questions like: ‘Would
you like me to open this door for you?’ rather than general
questions like ‘How do you manage?’ It is also polite to consider
whether your question is intrusive by first thinking
whether you
would ask a similar question of a non
-
disabled person.


Things to remember when meeting wheelchair users.




Ensure that public areas are free from obstructions, are well lit
and well sign
-
posted.




If you are aware it is not easy to move around
your building in a
wheelchair, offer to help
-

heavy doors and deep
-
pile carpets
are just some of the hazards for wheelchair users.




Advise colleagues of the location of the accessible toilets and of
the evacuation procedures in the event of an emergency.





Do not assume that ramps solve everything


they may be too
steep or too slippery.




Never push a person in a wheelchair without warning them or
asking them first. It is just the same as ‘pushing’ a person who
is not in a wheelchair.




If possible, posi
tion yourself so that you are on the same eye
level if you are talking for more than a few moments




Do not lean on a wheelchair
-

it is part of the user's personal
space.




If there is a high desk or counter, move to the front.



Things to remember when mee
ting other persons with limited
mobility.




Ask the person what assistance, if any is needed in getting
around. If you are asked to assist
-

guide rather than lead.



14



Offer to carry things for anyone who has a walking difficulty and
make sure they have som
ewhere to sit if needed.




If refreshments are being offered, ask the person if they require
assistance to be served.




Be aware of fatigue as an issue. Allow the person to define his
or her own needs and limits. You should also be aware that the
individual

may need to have frequent short breaks, regular
snacks, exercise or possible medication.




Be patient. Most people with disabilities like to do things for
themselves but maybe slower.



VII) Speech Difficulties


Speech difficulties may manifest as a stamm
er, a stutter or a lisp.
As you become more familiar with an individual’s speech
impediment you will develop a better understanding of what the
person is saying. Remember that slowness or impaired speech
has nothing to do with an individual’s intelligence.


Lisp



A lisp is a functional speech disorder that refers to a
difficulty in achieving the correct tongue position when
pronouncing the s and z sounds.


Stammering

(also called stuttering)
-

is a speech/fluency difficulty
where the individual has speech
blocks, prolongation or repetitions
of sound. Speech may sound forced, tense or jerky. People who
stammer may avoid certain words or situations which they know
will cause them difficulty. Some people avoid or substitute words to
such an extent that friends

and colleagues may not realise that
have a stammer; this is known as covert stammering.


Various factors can have an affect on the ease or difficulty with
which people with a stammer can speak:


Environmental Factors


for example, when increased demands
a
re made on the person in speaking situations, when the person
has high expectations of themselves in particular situations or
when specific information needs to be given i.e. a name or
number.


15


Linguistic Factors



some individuals stammer when using words

carrying particular information or when using complex words of
several syllables.


Physical Factors



feeling ill, stressed, tired, upset or excited may
cause an individual to stammer.


Psychological Factors



individuals may become more dysfluent
dependi
ng on their feeling about their speech, their perceptions of
themselves or the reactions of others to their stammering.


Meeting persons with speech difficulties.




Speak normally. Converse in a natural, relaxed manner and
maintain natural eye contact.




Li
sten carefully and do not interrupt or pre
-
empt the end of the
sentence. Allow the individual time to speak and do not appear
embarrassed by the stammer.




Do not equate hesitant speech with uncertainty or say you have
understood when you have not. If it se
ems appropriate ask the
person how best to respond when they stammer.




At interviews



Remember that the person who stutters has 2
reasons to be nervous. Not only are they under the normal
pressure of the interview situation but they have the added
stress

of getting their point over and worrying about how the
interviewer will react to their stammer.



VIII) Facial Disfigurement


Some 400,000 people in Britain have severe disfigurements and
many more have noticeable marks or features. Some people are
born w
ith a disfigurement whilst others acquire it through an
accident or illness. Most of the difficulties people with facial
disfigurement experience stem from other people's behaviour and
reaction.


Disfigurement takes a wide variety of forms from facial in
juries to
birthmarks and cleft lips.


16


If you are surprised, or feel uncomfortable, by someone's
appearance, try not to show it. Make eye contact, as you would
with anyone else and avoid staring.


When you are speaking to an individual with a facial disfig
urement
listen carefully and do not let the person's appearance distract you.


No matter how curious you are do not ask ‘what happened to you?’



IX) Learning Disabilities


Many people born with learning disabilities live full and
independent lives in the

community, making their own choices,
with varying levels of support.


Things to remember when meeting people with learning difficulties.




Assume that the person understands you but also be prepared
to explain things more than once in different ways if ne
cessary.




Consider putting information in writing, include your name and
phone number; perhaps offer to tape a conversation so that the
person can consider it later and keep a record.




Avoid covering too much ground at a time. Break down
complicated inform
ation into chunks to give one piece at a time.
Keep the language simple and logical.




Keep distractions, such as background noise, to a minimum.



X) Mental Health


1 in 4 people will experience some form of mental health problem
in the course of a year. D
espite gradually changing attitudes, there
continues to be considerable discrimination against people with
mental health problems.


People with a past history of mental health problems can
encounter discrimination, despite the fact that most people make a
full recovery. It is possible that someone experiencing the

17

confusion and emotional distress associated with mental health
problems may find everyday activities very hard.


Be patient and non
-
judgmental, give the person time to make
decisions.


Be suppor
tive and open. Respect confidentiality.


Be aware that the person may be taking medication requiring
frequent fluids and that they may occasionally need a quiet room
to assist with problems of concentration.



It is important to remember that disability e
tiquette comes
down to basic courtesy and good manners. In all
communication with disabled people it is important to
understand that certain terminology and behaviour reinforces
the very prejudices and preconceptions that we are trying to
break. If you are

in any doubt ask the person you are talking
to for advice rather than behave in a way that might offend.



18


C.

SOURCES OF ADVICE AND INFORMATION



AbilityNet

Provides free information and advice on any aspect of the use of a
computer by anyone with a disa
bility, training and technical
support.

General Enquiries:

Tel: 01926 312847





Fax: 01926 407425


E
-
mail:
Enquiries@AbilityNet.co.uk

Website:
www.
abilitynet.co.uk



Employers' Forum on Disability

The Employers' Forum on Disability is the employers' organisation
focused on the issue of disability in the workplace. It works closely
with Government and other stakeholders, sharing best practice to
mak
e it easier to employ disabled staff and serve disabled
customers. The telephone information line is available for all
Home Office employees and can advise on a range of disability
issues from employment to goods and services.


Nutmeg House

60 Gainsford S
treet

London

SE1 2NY

Enquiries and Informationline: Tel: 020 7403 3020

Fax: 020 7403 0404

E
-
mail:
efd@employers
-
forum.co.uk

Website:
www.employers
-
forum.co.uk



HODS
-

Home Office Disability Support Network

Chairman
-

Brenda Hawkyard

Tel: 020 8760 8368

Co
-
ordinator
-

Sue Saunders

Tel: 020 7273 2425

e
-
mail
HODSnetwork@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Website: See front p
age of HORIZON

The HODS website contains information on HODS and on
disability issues generally. The HODS office also contains a library
of information on disability issues and disabling conditions.


19


RNIB Helpline

Provides information, support and advice f
or anyone with a serious
sight problem.

Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm

Tel: 0845 7669999

Fax: 020 7388 2034

Textphone users dial 18001 before one of the numbers above and
a typetalk operator will join the line to relay the conversation.


RNIB Customer Service
s

Contact Customer Services for publications, equipment and
information about braille, tape and publishing services.

PO Box 173

Peterborough

PE2 6WS

Tel: 0845 7023153

Minicom: 0845 585691

Fax: 01733 371555

Email Customer Service:
Cservices@rnib.org.uk

RNIB Website:
www.rnib.org.uk


RNID

19
-
23 Featherstone Street

London

EC1Y 8
SL

Tel:
0808 808 0123 (freephone)

Text: 08
08 808 9000 (freephone)

Email:
informationline@rnid.org.uk

Website:
www.rnid.org.uk


The British Deaf Association

1
-
3 Worship Street

London EC2A 2AB

Tel: 020 7588 3520

Text: 020 7588 3529

Email:
info@bda.org.uk

Website:
www.bda.org.uk


National Society for Epilepsy

Chesham Lane,

Chalfont St Peter

Bucks. SL9 0RJ


20

Tel: 01494 601300

Fax: 01494 601337

Helpline: 01494 601400 (Mon
-
Fri 10am
-
4pm)

Website:
www.epilepsynse.org.uk


British Dyslexia Association

98 London Road

Reading

Berks. RG1 5AU

Website:
www.bda
-
dyslexia.org.uk


The British Stammering Association

15 Old Ford R
oad

London E2 9PJ

Tel: 020 8983 1003

Fax: 020 8983 3591

Email:
mail@stammering.org

Website:
www.stammering.org


Changing Faces

The way you face disfigurement

1
-
2 JunctionMew
s

London W2 1PN

Tel: 020 7706 4232

Fax: 020 7706 4234

Email:
info@changingfaces.co.uk

Website:
www.changingfaces.co.uk


Mind

Mental Health

15
-
19 Broadway

London E1
5 4BQ

Tel: 020 8519 2122

Email:
contact@mind.org.uk

or
publications@mind.org.uk

Website:
www.mind.org.uk









21



D.

DISABILITY A
WARENESS TRAINING CONTACTS


It is for the Unit/Directorate to arrange any specific awareness
training in relation to a member of staff with a disability joining their
team and to meet the cost.


The Equality Foundation

P O Box 164

St Lawrence House

29
-
31 B
road Street

Bristol

BS99 7HR

Tel: 0117 929 2778

Fax: 0117 929 2573


The Employers' Network on Disability

David Insull

Tel: 01902 830 202

Mobile: 07775 544 299

Fax: 01902 312976

E
-
mail:
dinsull@bitblackcountr
y.org


J Lawson & Associates
-

Jim Lawson

99 Sutherland Avenue

Coventry

CV5 7NH

Tel: 02476 403752

Mobile: 07941 139657

E
-
mail:
jimlawson@associates99.freeserve.co.uk


Churchill & Friend
-

Phil F
riend

Weltech Centre Trust

Ridgeway

Welwyn Garden City

Herts

AL7 2AA

Tel: 01707 324466

Fax: 01707 324432





22

People Matter
-

Hilary and Keith Adams

Pound Cottage

Knowle Road

Eastcote

Solihull

West Midlands

B92 0JA


Disability Matters Ltd
-

Dr Stephen Duckw
orth

The Old Dairy

Tiebridge Farm

North Houghton

Stocksbridge

SO20 6LQ

Tel: 01264 811120

Fax: 01264 810889


Domino Consultancy Limited

Field House

19
-
23 Field Street

Shepshed

Leicester

LE12 9AL

Tel: 01509 821770

Fax: 01509 821774


The Employability Forum

C/o Into Work

Holyrood Business Park

146 Duddingston Road

Edinburgh

EH16 4AP

Tel: 0131 661 7373

Fax: 0131 652 1314

E
-
mail:
employability
-
forum@intowork.org.uk





23


E.

THE DISABILITY AWARENESS GUIDE

SERIES


The Disability Awareness Guides provide advice, guidance and
information for line managers and colleagues of staff with
particular disabilities. Previous issues in the series are:




Guide number one: A member of our team is deaf or hard of
hearing
.




Guide number two: A member of our team is visually impaired.




Guide number three: A member of our team has limited mobility

and/or dexterity.




Guide number four: A member of our team has epilepsy.




These guides are available on Horizon. If you do not
have
access to Horizon, hard copies are available from Janet Edden
of the Race and Diversity Action Team (020 7273 3887).





Please contact the Race and Diversity Action Team (RDAT) on
020 7217 3887 if you require this guidance in an alternative
format.
This guidance is also available in electronic format on
HORIZON.





24


F.

USEFUL HOME OFFICE NOTICES


HON 271/1995

The Employment Service " Positive About
Disabled People" symbol.


HON 171/1996

The implications for the Home Office of the
Disability Discrimi
nation Act 1995 which
introduces measures relating to the employment
of, and provision of goods and services to
disabled people.


HON 128/1997

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995: a practical
guide to the application of "
reasonable
adjustment"
.


HON 131
/1997

Policy for Equal Treatment: New Guidance


HON 94/1999

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995: New
Requirements to make Goods, Facilities,
Services more Accessible to People with
Disabilities.


HON 161/1999

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995: Cod
e of
Practice on Rights of Access to Goods, Facilities,
Services and Premises.


HON 63/2000

Disability Assessment: a practical guide on the
action to take to help staff with disabilities remain
effective in their job.


HON 215/2001

Staff with Disabilities
: considering particular
requirements of staff with disabilities when
organising events in non
-
Home Office
accommodation.



HON 147/2002

Disability Leave: guidance on special leave with
pay for staff with disabilities for rehabilitation,
assessment or trea
tment.



25

HON 26/2002

Disability Awareness Guide: No. 1 "A MEMBER
OF OUR TEAM IS DEAF OR HARD OF
HEARING".


HON 100/2002

Disability Awareness Guide: No. 2 "A MEMBER
OF OUR TEAM IS VISUALLY IMPAIRED.


HON 166/2002

Disability Awareness Guide: No. 3 “ A





M
EMBER OF OUR TEAM HAS LIMITED





MOBILITY AND / OR DEXTERITY.



HON 100/2003

Disability Workplace Assessments


Access to





Work Scheme.



HON 4/2004

Access to Information for Staff and Public With





Disabilities: The need to provide documents or



information in alternative formats, or to have




procedures in place to make these available





swiftly to staff and public, on request.