Common Core Connections

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Nov 10, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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Common Core Connections

with

Core Arts Standards

Scott C. Shuler, Ph.D.

Connecticut Department of Education

Scott.Shuler@ct.gov

Most content developed by:


American Alliance for
Theatre and Education


Arts Education
Partnership


The College Board


Educational Theatre
Association


National Association for
Music Education



National Art Education
Association


National Dance Education
Organization


State Education Agency
Directors of Arts Education


Young Audiences

See
NCCAS.wikispaces.com

for regular updates on Core Arts Standards development

N
ext
generation
National Core Arts
S
tandards
will include:

1.
Philosophical Foundations

2.
Lifelong Goals
(= vision of
Arts Literacy
)

3.
Enduring Understandings
(and

EQs
)

4.
Artistic Processes

5.
Model Cornerstone Assessments


with

Student Work

Also to be identified:
Connections

(web
-
based)


Common Core (ELA, Math)


21
st

Century Skills/College & Career Ready


Cross
-
Arts Connections



Philosophical

Foundations


Lifelong Goals

(
Defining Artistic

Literacy)

Communication

Artistically literate citizens use

a variety of artistic media, symbols, and metaphors to
independently create and perform work that communicates their own ideas, and are
able to respond by analyzing and interpreting the artistic communications of others.

Creative
Personal
Realization

Artistically literate citizens find at least one

art form in which they develop sufficient
competence to continue active involvement in that art form as an adult.

Culture, History,
and Other
Connections

Artistically

literate citizens know and understand artwork from varied historical
periods and cultures, and actively seek and appreciate diverse forms and genres of
artwork of enduring quality/significance. They also understand relationships among
the arts, and cultivate habits of searching for and identifying patterns and
relationships between the arts and other knowledge.

Wellbeing

Artistically literate citizens find joy, inspiration, peace, intellectual stimulation,
meaning, and other life
-
enhancing qualities through participation in all of the arts.

Community
Engagement

Artistically literate citizens seek artistic experience

and support the arts in their local,
state,

national, and global

communities.


Artistic
Processes


Creating


Performing/Presenting/Producing


Responding


Connecting

(dance, theatre, media arts)

There is no such thing as doing the nuts and
bolts of reading in Kindergarten through 5th
grade without coherently developing
knowledge in science, and history, and the arts.
Period.





David Coleman, co
-
leader of the development of
Common Core Standards for English/Language Arts
and new President of the College Board

Connections are Two
-
Ended

Humanities

The Arts

Social
Sciences

Creating
new art

Performing
Existing Art

Responding
to Art

Arts History

Aesthetics

Arts Criticism

History

Philosophy

Language

Religion

Social/Cultural
Context

Cultural
Anthropology

Sociology
Anthropology

Civics/ Government

Economics

Arts Therapy

Psychology
Therapy

Geography

Richest Areas of Overlap: Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

© 1995 Scott C. Shuler

Two types of alignment:


Explicit

Arts references in Common
Core standards


Parallels

in
broad goals and thinking
skills
(CCSS ≈ new Arts Standards)

Common Core Connections:

Research Overview

Arts References in Common Core

Standards for
Reading



If
definition of
text

includes non
-
print texts
(dance, media arts, music,
or theatre works)…



…then
all

reading standards
refer to arts
-
based content or
investigation.

Reading a work of drama:


RL.5.3:

Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings or events in a story or drama,
drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact.)

Using songs in instruction:


RL.2.4:

Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated
lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

Comparing the same work in different media:


RL.6.7:

Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to
or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see”
and “hear” when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch.

Analyzing and interpreting images:


RI.K.7:
With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the
text in which they appear.

Multimedia references:



RI.7.7:
Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text,
analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject.

Arts References in Common Core

Standards for
Writing


Eight arts links in 100 standards


Visual art/drawing links found in the standards for the lower
grades


W.K.2:
Use a combination of drawing, writing, and dictating to
compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name
what they are writing about and supply some information
about the topic.


Media Arts/multimedia links:


W.8.2.a:

Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow;
organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader
categories; include formatting, graphics (e.g., charts, tables)
and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

Arts References in Common Core Standards for
Speaking and Listening



16 arts links in 60 standards


Most references are related to standard #5:

Make strategic use of digital media and visual
displays of data to express information and
enhance understanding of presentations

Standard 5:

Make strategic use of digital media and digital displays of

data to express information and enhance understanding of
presentations


SL.K.5: Add
drawings

or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide
additional detail.


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SL.5.5: Include
multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays
in
presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.



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-
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Arts References in

Common Core Standards for
Language


The language standards contain
one

direct arts reference in standard L.5.3:


Compare and contrast the varieties of English
(e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories,
dramas, or poems

Part II: Comparison to

National Core Arts
Standards Framework

Philosophical

Foundations


Lifelong Goals

(
Defining Artistic

Literacy)

Communication

Artistically literate citizens use

a variety of artistic media, symbols, and metaphors to
independently create and perform work that communicates their own ideas, and are
able to respond by analyzing and interpreting the artistic communications of others.

Creative
Personal
Realization

Artistically literate citizens find at least one

art form in which they develop sufficient
competence to continue active involvement in that art form as an adult.

Culture, History,
and Other
Connections

Artistically

literate citizens know and understand artwork from varied historical
periods and cultures, and actively seek and appreciate diverse forms and genres of
artwork of enduring quality/significance. They also understand relationships among
the arts, and cultivate habits of searching for and identifying patterns and
relationships between the arts and other knowledge.

Wellbeing

Artistically literate citizens find joy, inspiration, peace, intellectual stimulation,
meaning, and other life
-
enhancing qualities through participation in all of the arts.

Community
Engagement

Artistically literate citizens seek artistic experience

and support the arts in their local,
state,

national, and global

communities.


Artistically literate citizens use a variety of artistic
media, symbols, and metaphors to independently
create and perform work that
expresses/conveys/communicates their own ideas,
and
are able to respond by analyzing and
interpreting the artistic communications of others.

Framework Connections with the standards for
READING



All

Anchor Standards for Reading connected to Lifelong Goal #1
:


The creative practices of
investigation

and
reflection

were included in every standard as well.

Part of our role is to model and require students
to use Tier 2 and Tier 3 vocabulary in literacy
-
based tasks.

Our Role re: Vocabulary

Special thanks to Brian Frazier

Stratford (CT) Public Schools

These are words that most students will use regularly.


Examples
:


Car, money, home, school, teacher

Tier

1

Vocabulary

Special thanks to Brian Frazier

Stratford (CT) Public Schools

These are words that are a little bit more colorful and
occur less frequently.


Examples
:


Phenomenal, saunter, sultry,

bizarre, bazaar, descendant

Tier 2

Vocabulary

Special thanks to Brian Frazier

Stratford (CT) Public Schools

The
Star

Spangled Banner


Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light

What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?

Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight,

O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?

And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,

Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.

Oh, say does that star
-
spangled banner yet wave

O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?


Determining the literal meaning of words or
phrases, either by the context of the sentence or
by researching the definition.

Decoding Complex Text

Close Reading

The careful, sustained reading and
interpretation of a passage of text

Special thanks to Brian Frazier

Stratford (CT) Public Schools


Questions that refer directly to the text.


Not

just literal questions.


Responses should be written.


The student must cite specific evidence
directly from the text.

Text
-
Dependent Questions

Special thanks to Brian Frazier

Stratford (CT) Public Schools

Academic or Content
-
Specific Vocabulary


Examples?



Kinesthetic



Timbre



Improvisation



Intaglio


Tier 3 Vocabulary

Special thanks to Brian Frazier

Stratford (CT) Public Schools

Creative Practices


Imagination


Investigation


Construction


Reflection

Framework Connections with

Standards for Mathematical Practice

Standard 1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.



Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of
a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints,
relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the
solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution
attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of
the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and
evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might,
depending on the context of their problem, transform algebraic expressions or the
viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need.
Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations,
verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and
relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might
rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize or solve a problem.
Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different
method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can
understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify
correspondences between different approaches.


Standard 1: Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.


Mathematically proficient students start by
explaining to themselves the meaning
of a problem

and
looking for entry points to its solution
. They
analyze givens
,
constraints, relationships, and goals. They
make conjectures
about the form and
meaning of the solution and
plan a solution pathway
rather than simply jumping
into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and
try special cases
and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution
.
They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary.
Older
students might, depending on the context of their problem, transform algebraic
expressions or the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the
information they need. Mathematically proficient students can
explain
correspondences

between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or
draw diagrams
of important features and relationships, graph data, and
search for
regularity or trends
. Younger students might rely on
using concrete objects or
pictures to help conceptualize or solve a problem
. Mathematically proficient
students
check their answers to problems using a different method
, and they
continually
ask themselves, “Does this make sense?”
They can understand the
approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences
between different approaches.

Framework Connections with

Standards for Mathematical Practice

Learning
Strand

Components

Enduring

Understandings

Essential Questions

Integrating:
Synthesize
Knowledge and
Experience

Media arts creates personal
meaning necessary for
internalizing knowledge and
experience.

How does media arts
create personal meaning so
that what is studied will be
internalized and learned?

Knowledge

Skills

Vocabulary

Reflect periodically on one’s
personal learning and
accumulation

of expertise
through the production of
media art works.

Model Cornerstone Assessment

Media Arts
/ K: Connect









See K
-
12 Media Arts Matrix

KEYWORDS/TAGS

Media Arts

Kindergarten


ATTACHMENTS/
RESOURCES

Lesson plan

Assessment rubric


CONNECTIONS

21
st

C Skills

Common Core


See
NCCAS.wikispaces.com

for regular updates on Core Arts Standards development

NCCAS extends thanks to Young Audiences for its support of our web
-
based work

(
Very Drafty)

How NCCAS Web Site MAY Present Connections