CS 375 - University of Hartford's Academic Web Server

waisttherapeuticSoftware and s/w Development

Nov 4, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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1


Instructor:
Ingrid Russell


URL:

http://uhaweb.hartford.edu/irussell


Office
: Dana 343

Email
:
irussell@hartford.edu

Office Hours:


Mondays 3:00 p.m.


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Course Prerequisite
:
CS 220


Course Descripti
on:

This course will explore, in depth, current client/server
-
side programming paradigms for creating World Wide
Web aware applications. The development of client
-
side web pages using the current version of
HTML/XHTML and a web scripting language will be
addressed. The Document Object Model (DOM) and its
role in dynamic HTML (DHTML) will be presented. The Common Gateway Interface (CGI), as a vehicle to
transfer client
-
server data, will be examined. Server
-
side programming will focus on the Java Servlets

API for
the development of
dynamic web pages, the creation and processing of HTML forms, and general client
-
server
communications. Servlet filters and security will be discussed. The development of applications using reusable
software programs will be p
resented.


Learning Outcomes:



Master
the current W3C

version of HTML to produce hypertext documents for the Web use.



Become proficient with the CGI abstraction, mastering data transfer to and from browser front
-
ends to
server back
-
ends.



Become conversant

in the way that object
-
oriented concepts are implemented in the Java programming
language using applets and servlets.



Write working Java code to demonstrate the use of applets and servlets for client and server
-
side
programming.

Required Text
:


Core Web
Programming, by Marty Hall and Larry Brown,
2
nd

edition, Sun Microsystems Press
, 2001

Optional/Reference Books
:

1. Web Development with JavaServer Pages, by Duane Fields and Mark Kolb, Manning, 2000

2.
Thinkin
g in Java
, by
Bruce
Eckel
, Prentice Hall (online copy of the book is available for free)

3. HTML and XHTML, t
he definitive Guide
, Musciano and Kennedy, O’Reilly

Exams:

Test #1




Thursday October 2, 2008

Test #2




Tuesday November 4, 2008

Test #3




Thur
sday December 11, 2008


Grading:

Projects

45
%


Tests 1, 2
, 3

45
%


Presentation

10
%



CS 375


Internet Programming Concepts

Fall 2008

Tuesdays and Thursdays 4:50 p.m.


6:05 p.m. Dana 318


2

CS 375 Internet Programming Concepts Course Outline


Cont’d



Course Syllabus
:



TEST#1



Course Policies and Procedures:

Homework

I strongly urge you to start working o
n an assignment as soon as it is assigned. You will find out that it will take
longer than you think.


Assignments are due at the
beginning

of the class period and should be submitted via
Blackboard (blackboard.hartford.edu).

Week #

Reading
Assignment


Topic

1

Chapters 1
-
3

PART I


The Hypertext Markup Language

D
esigning Web Pages with HTML, Basic Structure of HTML Documents, Block
-
Level Elements
including Lists and Tables, Text
-
Level Elements including Embedded Images and Client
-
side
Image Maps

2

Chapters 4
-
5

PART I


The Hypertext Markup Language

Frames, Cascad
ing Style Sheets

3

Chapter 18

PART IV


JavaScript

JavaS
c
ript Syntax, Generating HTML Dynamically, Customizing Web pages

4

Chapter 18

PART IV


JavaScript

Validation of HTML Forms, Storing and Examining Cookies

5

Handouts

Human Computer Interaction

Hum
an
-
Centered Computer Design and Evaluation, Accessibility

6

Chapters 6
-
8

Part II


Java Programming: OOP

Object
-
Oriented Programming with Java, Basic Java Syntax

7

Chapter 9

Part II


Java Programming: Applets

Applets and Basic Graphics

8

Chap
ter 10

Part II


Java Programming: Graphics

JAVA 2D: Graphics in Java 2

9

Chapter 17

Part II


Network Programming

Implementing a Client, Implementing a Server

10

Chapter 18

Handouts

PART III


Server
-
Side Programming

HTML Forms, Form Element, CGI, Serve
r
-
Side Technologies

TEST#2

11

Chapter 19

Part III


Server
-
Side Programming: Servlets

Servlets vs Traditional CGI, Server Installation and Setup, Servlet and JSP Software, Basic
Servlet Structure, The Servlet Life Cycle


12

Chapter 20

Part III


Server
-
Side Programming: JavaServer pages

JSP Overview, Advantages of JSP, JSP Scripting Elements, JSP Page Directive

13

Chapter 22

JDBC

Basic Steps in Using JDBC, JDBC Utilities


3

Attendance and Participatio
n

You are expected to attend every class. You should inform me of any absences prior to class. You will have
opportunities for in
-
class extra credits. You will not be able to take advantage of this if you are not in class.

Blackboard

Assignments and a
select course material will be posted on blackboard (blackboard.hartford.edu). You are
expected to logon to the system on a regular basis. I will announce in class when an assignment is posted on
Blackboard but it your responsibility to keep track of due

dates.

You are not to rely completely on blackboard. Some material as well as some announcements given in class
will not be announced on blackboard. You are responsible for all material and announcements given in class
including those that are not on
Blackboard.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is representing someone else’s work as your own. You are not to copy programs or other work from
any source including books and the internet without proper citation. You are expected to submit your own
work. You may d
iscuss an assignment with students and certainly with me, but you are expected to submit your
own work on all assignments.


Any assignments that are copied will be given a grade of zero as well as the ones
that were copied from.


The students involved will

be subject to further disciplinary action. The academic
honesty policy is described in the student handbook, the Source, which is available online at
http://www.hartford.edu/thesource
.

Quizzes

You should

be prepared for a quiz every Tuesday. The quiz will cover previous week’s material. There will be
no make up for quizzes. I will drop the two quizzes with the lowest grades.

Students with Special Needs

I strongly encourage students with special needs
, whether an athlete or a student with a documented learning
disability, to let me know of their needs as soon as possible so I can accommodate them.

Make
-
up Exams

Make
-
up exams are only given when there are
documented

extenuating circumstances and only i
f they are pre
-
arranged.

Office Hours

I have regular office hours. They are listed in the syllabus and are also posted on my web page. I urge you to
make use of them as soon as you need help. Do not wait until it is too late. You do not need to schedu
le an
appointment to see me during my office hours. Feel free to drop by anytime even to just say hello. You may
also meet with me at other times by appointment.

Tutoring lab

The department of computer science offers
free

tutoring in Dana 208. No appo
intment is needed. I urge you to
use this service. I will distribute the tutoring schedule once it is available. The tutoring lab is staffed by full
time faculty members as well as upper class students.

Cell Phones

Cell phones must be turned
off

during

class.