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CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

2009 by Maury Riner, UAA Chemical Hygiene Officer

Formatted by Doug (Molby) Markussen August 12, 2010

Chemical Safety Committee approved


(For a full version document of this site, please download from the following
links:
.pdf

.docx

)


Chemical Hygiene Plan Table of Contents

Chemical Hygiene Plan Abbreviations


1.

PURPOSE


The Chemical Hygiene Plan (
CHP
) for the University of Alaska Anchorage (
UAA
)
provides written guidelines as required by law and for the establishment of a
Safety First Approach (
SFA
). The
SFA

will encourage and support the use of
‘standard and prudent practices’ in all teaching and research laboratories that
use chemicals on a laboratory scale in accordance with definitions provided in
the Occupational Safet
y and Health Administration (
OSHA
) Laboratory Safety
Standard. The
SFA

warrants the use of personal protective equipment (
PPE
)
and safe and prudent practices in the handling, storage and disposal of
chemicals. In addition, the
SFA

will include the appropriate use of all scientific
equipment in teaching and research laboratories. The
SFA

should help to
minimize exposure risks by protecting employees and students from potential
health
hazards resulting from the use of hazardous chemicals or while
performing hazardous procedures while pursuing their education at
UAA
.


The
CHP

is designed to meet the requirements o
utlined in the U.S. Department
of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, 29 CFR Part
1910.1450. This plan complies with any additional requirements outlined in
Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories,

as adopted by
the State of Alaska. These sets of regulations are commonly known as the
“Laboratory Standard.”


2.

SCOPE


2


2.1

Employees


The
CHP

covers all employees who use or are exposed to hazardous
chemicals in teaching and research l
aboratories at
UAA

under the
Laboratory Standard regulations. Current University poli
cy is outlined in
the Administrative Services Manual, EHS/RMS, Policies and Procedures
section, policy section 3 (
.pdf

.doc
).


Non
-
laboratory, (custodial, electricians, etc.), employees are covered
under the
OSHA

Hazard Communications requirements. Current
University policy is outlined in the Administrative Services M
anual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures section, policy statem
ent 2 (
.pdf

.doc
).


2.2

Students


The coverage of students under the Laboratory Standard is not required
by law; however, by establishing an
SFA

the university can voluntarily
extend applications to students who often end up as employees or student
researchers.


3.

EXCLUSIONS


The
CHP

does not directly cover work with radioactive materials or infectious,
medical, pathological
(animal or animal carcasses), recombinant DNA, and all
other types of biological agent wastes. These materials will be addressed by the
Radiation Safety Committee and the Biological Safety Committee and those
policies will be added to this
CHP

in the appendices.


4.

UNIVERSITY RESPONSIBILITIES


4.1

President


The University President has the legal res
ponsibility for the development
and enforcement of the University
CHP
, program
-
specific lab Sta
ndard
Operating Procedure(s) (
SOP
) and research
-
specific
SOP
. The President
provides support for the Chemical, Biological and Radiation Safety
Committees for the adminis
tration and development of the University
-
wide
CHP

and program specific lab
SOP
.


3


4.2

Safety Committees


Current University policy for the establishment and rules governing safety
committees is outlined in the Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
,
Policies and Procedures section, policy statement 1 (
.pdf

.doc
).


4.2.1

Chemical Safety Committee


The Chemical Safety Committee has the delegated responsibility of
developing the University

CHP

related to the use of hazardous
chemicals on a laboratory scale and promoti
ng the adoption of a
SFA

in all policies. This committee has the responsibility of
reviewing a
nd updating the
CHP

annually, or as required by
regulatory changes within the Environmental Pro
tection Agency
(
EPA
), Drug Enforcement Agency (
DEA
), Department of Homeland
Security (
DHS
), Department of Environmental Conservation (
DEC
),
or Municipality of Anchorage (
MOA
).


4.2.2

Biological Safety Committee


The Biological Safety Committee has the delegated responsibility of
developing general and lab protocol
-
specific
SOP

with regard to the
handling, use and disposal of infectious, medical, pathological
(animal or animal carcasses), recombinant DNA, and all other
types of biological agent wastes, an
d promoting the adoption of a
SFA

in all biological policies. This committee has the responsib
ility
of reviewing and updating the biological program specific lab
SOP

annually, or
as changes in Centers for Disease Control (
CDC
) or
National Institute of Health (
NIH
) regulations require.


4.2.3

Radiation Safety Committee


The Radiation Safety Committee
has the delegated responsibility of
developing general and lab protocol
-
specific
SOP

with regard to the
procurement, handling, use and disposal of all radio nuclides, and
compounds possessing radio nuclides, and promoting the
SFA

to
all adopted radiation policies. This committee has the responsibility
of reviewing and updating the radiation lab specific
SOP

annually,
or as Nuclear Regulatory Commission (
NRC
) regulations require.


4





4.3

Research Proposal Reviews


4.3.1

Student Research Proposal Review


The Student Researc
h Review Committee has the delegated
responsibility of reviewing all under graduate/graduate student
research grants/proposals. This committee ensures that each
proposal has a complete
SOP

outlining chemical usage,
methodology, waste generation, and disposal for all research
projects prior to the ordering of any chemicals.



4.3.2

Faculty Research Proposal Review


The Faculty Research Review Committee has the delegated
responsibility of reviewing all faculty research grants/proposals.
This committee ensures that each proposal has a complete
SOP

outlining chemical usage, methodology, waste generation, and
disposal for all research projects prior to the ordering of a
ny
chemicals. Current University policy is outlined in the
Administrative Services Manual, EHS/RMS, Policies and
Procedures section, policy statement 23 (
.pdf

.doc
).


4.4

Environmental Health Safety & Risk Management Support
(
EHS/RMS
)


The
EHS/RMS

Department is responsible for compliance assurance of
EPA
,
DHS
,
DEA
,
CDC
,
NIH
,
DEC
,
OSHA
,
NRC

and
MOA

regulations and
policies. Department Heads, Deans and Directors are responsible for
enforcement of regulations and policies. The Department reviews
research
SOP

to ensure that appropriate risk/hazard assessments are
completed.
EHS/RMS

assists and advises departments, committees,
instructors, and researchers with selection of appropriate
PPE
, evaluation
of the suitability of facilities for performing projects, approving waste
generation plans and disposition of

approved waste streams. The
Chemical Hygiene Officer and Radiation Safety Officer facilitate
EHS/RMS

in carrying out departmental duties.
EHS/RMS

authority is vested through
Department Heads, Deans and Directors except in cases of imminent
threats to life, limb and property when it may become impractical or

5

impossible to consult with normal administrative chains of command i
n a
timely manner.


EHS/RMS

will serve on the chemical, biolog
ical and radiation safety
committees in an ex
-
officio capacity to provide advice and to assist with
identifying physical and training resources as well as to review issues for
regulatory compliance.


4.5

Department Chairs


The Department Chairs and/or Lab
Coordinators of each Department are
responsible for development and enforcement (through Department
Chairs) of program
-
specific lab
SOP

for teaching labs at the Department
level. The Department Chairs are responsible for compliance and
enforcement of all
EPA
,
DHS
,
DEA
,
CDC
,
NIH
,
DEC
, and
MOA

regulations and policies applicable to each Department.


4.6

Principle Investigators (
PI
)/Research Lab Supervisors (
RLS
)


The
PI

is responsible for the health and safety of all persons working in
their research laboratory. The
PI

may delegate safety duties to a
RLS
.
Responsibilities for ensuring that any delegated duties are carried out
remain with the
PI
. Additional responsibilities of the
PI
/
RLS

are as follows:


1.

Implementing and enforcing a
SFA

for activities in their laboratory
by applying all applicable standard and prudent safety practices.

2.

Establishment of general and protocol
-
specific
SOP

for all
hazardous activities in t
heir lab.

3.

Safety training of all laboratory personnel working with hazardous
chemicals / procedures, and operation of potentially dangerous
equipment. Written records of safety trainings must be kept on
file for a period of five years.

4.

Maintaining an
online
-
chemical inventory for their laboratory.

5.

Providing laboratory personnel access to the
UAA

CHP
, protocol
-
specific
SOP
, and all other prudent safety information, including
reference materials and
MSDS

sheets.

6.

Providing necessary and appropriate
PPE

to all laboratory
personnel working in their lab. (
ANSI

Z87.1
-
2003 approved
goggles, non
-
permeable gloves etc.). Providing additional

6

recommended
PPE

by
EHS/RMS

for specific hazards/risks
related to their individual research projects.

7.

Reporting malfunctioning facilities equipment (eye washes, fume
hoods, leaking sinks, light bulb replacement etc.) to a
ppropriate
personnel for scheduling repairs or testing as needed in a timely
manner.

8.

Reporting all accidents or injuries to appropriate personnel and
EHS/RMS

immediately. Accident forms must be filled out and
sent to
EHS/RMS

within 48 hours.

9.

Compliance and enforcement of all
EPA
,
DHS
,
DEA
,
CDC
,
NIH
,
DEC
, and
MOA

regulations and policies pertaining to lab waste
disposal.

10.

Correct all deficiencies in a timely manner after a lab inspection
by
EHS/RMS

and other internal or external inspection or audit
groups.

11.

Inform non
-
laboratory
personnel of any lab
-
specific hazards prior
to working on or repairing any building facilities, (electrical,
plumbing etc.) or specialized equipment (refrigerators, freezers
etc.). Any identified hazard should be minimized to provide a safe
working environ
ment for non
-
laboratory personnel.

12.

Consult
EHS/RMS

when orderi
ng and using any chemical in the
following categories: restricted, particularly
-
hazardous chemicals,
carcinogens, acutely
-
toxic chemicals, p
-
listed chemicals, highly
reactive chemicals or controlled substances.

13.

Consult
EHS/RMS

for special safety precautions needed when
changing or scaling up experimental procedures
which increase
the risks/hazards to laboratory personnel.


4.7

Employees


Employees are responsible for participating in department
-
specific safety
trainings annually. Employees should be aware of the health and safety
hazards presented by the chemicals
and equipment they are working with,
or may come in contact with in the laboratory. All accidents or injuries
should be reported to the appropriate personnel immediately.


4.8

Students


Students should observe and practice all safety procedures outlined i
n the
UAA

CHP
, and any teaching or research lab
-
specific
SOP
. Students

7

should be aware of the health and safety hazards presented by the
chemicals and equipment they are working with, or may come in contact
with in the laboratory. All accidents or injuries should b
e reported to the
appropriate personnel immediately.


5.

CLASSIFICATION OF CHEMICAL HAZARDS


Laboratory personnel must have a clear understanding of the associated
physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of any chemical they are
using or come in contact with. In addition, compressed gases and cryogenic
liquids present unique hazards.



5.1

Physical (Contact) Hazards


5.1.1

Corrosive Chemicals


Corrosive chemicals are those that chemically react with living
tissue at the point of contact causing destruction and irreversible
alterations resulting in permanent damage or scarring. This is
most
common in the case of skin exposure (visible), but can occur in the
respiratory tract (invisible) due to inhalation of corrosive fumes.


5.1.2

Sensitizing/Irritant Chemicals


Sensitizers are those chemicals that cause an allergic response in
individu
als upon repeated exposure usually by skin contact. This
allergic response can be delayed and not be apparent until after a
number of repeated exposures.

Irritants are those chemicals when in contact with the skin cause
reversible effects at the site su
ch as itching, redness or an
inflammatory response.


5.2

Flammable/Combustible (Fire) Hazards


5.2.1

Flammable/Combustible Liquids


Substances that readily burn in air are considered flammable.
Flammable/combustible liquids are classified according to th
eir
flash points. The degree of flammability depends on various factors
including flash point, boiling point, vapor pressure, fuel
-
to
-
air ratios

8

and the available ignition source. Current University policy is
outlined in the Administrative Services Manual,

EHS/RMS
, Policies
and Procedures section, policy statement 35

(
.pdf

.doc
).


5.2.2

Flammable Solids


Substances that may cause a fire through friction, spontaneously
ignite upon contact with air, (pyrophoric) and/or self heat to a
temperature that supports spontaneous co
mbustion are classified
as flammable solids. This includes chemicals labeled ‘Dangerous
when Wet.’


5.3

Multiple Hazards


5.3.1

Highly Reactive/Unstable Chemicals


Substances that under the right conditions may polymerize,
decompose violently or react violently upon contact with another
chemical or substance are classified as highly reactive or unstable.
These types of chemicals may also react violently under condit
ions
of shock, pressure, temperature, light and other energy sources.


5.4

Particularly Hazardous Chemicals (
PHC
)


High risk materials defined as: highly toxic, select carcinogens, or
reproductive toxins are classified as particularly hazardous substances
and require additional provisions to ensure employee and student safety
when worki
ng with these types of chemicals. To ensure the safety and
minimize the risks associated with the usage, storage, handling and
disposal of
PHC

and carcinogenic chemicals the following standard and
prudent practices outlined below are required. Where warranted, the use
of special
PPE
, techniques or protocols will be addressed in the lab
specific
SOP
.



5.4.1

General
SOP


1. Use only the minimum amount of chemical needed for the
procedure.

2. Perform all work in a fume hood, glove box, or a
designated area when performing the following operations:


9


a.

Volatilizing or dissolving
PHC
.

b.

Any manipulation that produces aerosols or
fines.

c.

Weighing out
PHC

using the tare method with
a sealed container.

d.

Use HEPA filters, carbon filters or scrubber
sy
stems with containment devices to protect
effluent and vacuum lines/vacuum pumps.

e.

Decontaminate the area if necessary when
done.

f.

Report all exposures of carcinogenic materials
immediately.


5.4.2

Highly (Acutely) Toxic Chemicals


Substances that are
acutely toxic fall into the exposure values
listed:


1.

Oral LD
50

values from > 5 < 50 mg/kg of body weight for
humans.

2.

Skin contact < 200 mg/kg body weight.

3.

Inhalation LC
50

< 200 ppm for 1 hr, and inhalation LC
50
<
2,000 mg/m
3
for 1 hr, or has
OSHA

defined permissible
exposure limits and threshold limit value of 50 ppm used
b
y the American Conference of Governmental Industrial
Hygienists (ACGIH).


5.4.3

Select Carcinogenic Chemicals


Substances that meet one of the following criteria are regulated by
OSHA

as carcinogens:


1.

Listed as a known carcinogen by the National Toxicology
Program (
NTP
).

2.

Listed under groups 1, carcinogenic to humans, 2A,
probably carcinogenic to humans, 2B, possibly
carcinogenic to humans.


10

3.

Listed as reasonably

anticipated to be a carcinogen to
humans is classified as a select carcinogen (
Candidate
Substances for 12t
h NTP Report on Carcinogens
).


Current University policy is outlined in the Administrative Services
Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures section, policy
statement 16 (
.pdf

.doc
).


5.4.4.

Reproductive/Developmental Toxins


Substances that cause chromosomal damage (mutagens) and are
lethal or cause malformations in fetuses (teratogens) both fall under
reproductive/developmental toxins as defined by
OSHA
.


5.5

Restricted Chemicals


Chemicals that fall under the restricted category are

all p
-
listed
chemicals, controlled substances and other chemicals that require
very specialized safety/hazard assessments to ensure safety to
employees and students when used. All chemicals that fall in this
category must be approved by
EHS/RMS

prior to purchase.


5.5.1

EPA

P
-
Listed Chemicals


Those chemicals currently defined by the
EPA

as acutely
hazardous substances, p
-
listed chemicals, may be seen in
spreadsheet format
.


5.5.2

DEA

Controlled Substances


T
hose chemicals listed by the
DEA

as
chemicals that are used in
the illegal manufacture of controlled substances (drugs) may be
seen in the current
DEA

Lists of Regulated Chemicals and
Quantities
.



5.5.3

DHS

Chemicals of Interest


Those chemicals currently listed by the
DHS

as chemicals of
interest that are used in terrorist activities by internal or external
groups may be seen on their
"chemicals of interest list."



11


5.6

Cryogenic Liquids


Cryogens are liquefied gases with a boiling point of 110K (
-
160°C).
The
two most common cryogenic liquids are nitrogen and helium. These
compounds have additional hazards and require additional safety
precautions as outlined below.


5.6.1

Cold Burn Hazards


Skin contact with cryogenic liquids or non
-
insulated equipment
(
metallic) parts can cause frostbite or cold burns. Eye contact with
cryogenic liquids can cause permanent eye damage.


5.6.2

Asphyxiation Hazards


When large amounts of a cryogen are spilled or are released by
failure of a large Dewar, asphyxiation can re
sult due to oxygen
deficiency which is undetectable in an unventilated or enclosed
room. The volumetric expansion rate from the liquid to gaseous
phase ranges from 690 to 750 times. Dewars containing liquid
nitrogen cannot to be stored or used in any co
ld room.


5.6.3

Fire and Explosion Hazards


Liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are not flammable; however, they
are capable of condensing liquid oxygen out of the air creating an
oxygen rich environment which could ignite any flammable
materials in the imme
diate area.


5.7

Cryogenic Liquid
SOP


5.71

Required
PPE


When transferring cryogenic liquids or removing samples from a
Dewar, the
PPE

listed below must be used:


1.

Cryo
-
gloves

2.

Safety Goggles and Face Shield

3.

Lab Coat and Long Pants


12


5.8

Solid Carbon Dioxide
(Dry Ice) or Dry Ice/Acetone Mixtures




Solid carbon dioxide with a boiling point of 195 K (
-
78°C) is a substance
that undergoes sublimation.


5.8.1

Cold Burn Hazards


Skin contact with a solid carbon dioxide or
carbon dioxide/liquid
acetone can cause frostbite or cold burns. Eye contact with carbon
dioxide/liquid acetone mixtures can cause permanent eye damage.



5.8.2

Asphyxiation Hazards


Sublimation of large amounts of solid carbon dioxide in an
unventilated
or enclosed room can result in asphyxiation due to
oxygen deficiency. Over exposure to carbon dioxide in an enclosed
room is undetectable.


5.8.3

Flammable Liquid Hazards


The acetone used in an acetone/dry ice bath is a flammable liquid.


5.9

Dry Ice or Dry Ice/Acetone Mixtures
SOP


5.9.1

Required
PPE


When using dry ice/acetone solutions the
PPE

listed below must be
used:


1.

Cryo
-
gloves

2.

Safety Goggles

3.

Lab Coat and Long Pants


5.10

Compressed Gases


A gas or mixture of gases contained in a cylinde
r with an absolute
pressure greater than 40 pounds per square inch (psi) at 21°C, 104 psi at
54°C, or any flammable liquid with a pressure exceeding 40 psi at 38°C
are defined as compressed gases. The most commonly used compressed

13

gases are hydrogen, heli
um, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide,
carbon dioxide, argon, acetylene, and methane. Compressed gases are
both mechanically and chemically hazardous depending on the type of
compressed gas. Mechanical hazards can occur from the pressures
causing a

cylinder rupture or a regulator failure. Chemical hazards arise
from the flammability, reactivity, or toxicity of the gas.


5.11

Compressed Gas Cylinder
SOP


1.

Cylinders should have a company label and user name.

2.

Cylinders should have a collar indicating its status
-

full or empty
(MT).

3.

Both full and empty cylinders will be secured by tw
o straps or
chains spaced 1/3 distance from the top and bottom of the
cylinder. Alternate security is the use of a cylinder stand and a
single strap mounted to a secure bench or wall.

4.

All cylinders not in
-
service should have the valve cap screwed in
place.

5.

When bringing a cylinder into or out of service, move the
cylinder using a cylinder dolly, with the valve cap in place. DO
NOT ROLL ANY CYLINDER
BY HAND
!

6.

When a cylinder is taken out of service, leave at least 50 psi in
the cylinder. Do not continue use u
ntil the pressure is reduced
to zero.

7.

Flammable and reactive compressed gas cylinders should be
stored separately from oxidizing compressed gas cylinders.

8.

Do not order small lecture bottle gas cylinders which are non
-
returnable to the manufacturer as they

require special
procedures prior to disposal through
EHS/RMS
.

9.

Lines leading from a compressed gas cylinder to any piece of
equipment using the compressed gas should be labeled with the
type of gas and the hazards of the gas, i.e., “Hydrogen Gas
-

Flammable.”

10.

Lines leading from a compressed gas cylinder to any piece
of
equipment should be checked for leaks every 3 months or if
indicated by any unusual pressure changes at the regulator
using ‘snoop’
-

a mild soap and water solution.

11.

The use of small in lab gas generators, hydrogen, or nitrogen is
to be encouraged as t
hey omit the hazards associated with the
use of high pressure cylinders.


14

12.

Large liquid argon, nitrogen, and helium pressurized Dewars
often vent off excess pressure automatically. Keep this in mind
while using these devices.


6.

REDUCING HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL
EXPOSURES


The use and possible exposure to hazardous chemicals has associated health
risks due to inhalation, skin contact, etc. These risks can be minimized and
controlled by adopting a
SFA
, in addition to applying administrative controls,
engineering controls, and through the use of appropriate
PPE
.


6.1

Administrative Controls


1.

All outdated
SOP

or methodologies (> 10 yrs old) should be
reviewed and updated to reduce risks/hazards.

2.

All current
SOP

should include a risk/hazard assessment.

3.

All current
SOP

should be reviewed for their waste generation
and disposal compliance.

4.

Replace wet (classical) chemistry methods with micro
-
scale
experiments, chemical procedures and instrumental
methods to
decrease chemical usage/exposures.

5.

Maintain a current and complete on
-
line chemical inventory for
all laboratories. Chemical inventories should be kept as small
as possible to reduce disposal costs.


6.1.1

Laboratory Inspections


Laboratory inspections are essential to a
SFA

program in the
identification and addressing of p
otential health and safety
deficiencies. All lab inspections by
EHS/RMS

should be done
annually.

Completed inspection checklists and actions to correct identified
unsafe conditions should be maintained by the Department Lab
Coordinator/
PI
/
RLS

for the time specified by
EHS/RMS
. Follow
-
up
inspections to addressed corrective measures will ensure
compliance.


6.2

Engineering Controls



15

1.

All laboratories using hazardous chemicals that are flammable,
volatile, corrosive, reactive, toxic, etc. shall have a fully functional
and opera
ting fume hood.

2.

Fume hoods are to be tested annually. Documentation of test
results will be kept on file in the building manager’s office. Each
hood will have the test result displayed on a sticker affixed to the
front edge. Each hood will have the maxim
um sash height (
RED

arrow) displayed on a sticker affixed to the front edge.

3.

Hood users must check the status of the hood prior to each use
by observing the continuous air
-
flow meter on the right side of
the hood with a recommended face velocity of 80
-
100

cfm, or the
manometer on the upper right hand corner of some hoods. Do
not assume a hood is working properly.

4.

All work should be done at least six (6) inches from the back side
of the front sash to prevent turbulence and possible escape of
hazardous vapor
s from inside the hood.

5.

Any large piece of equipment used inside a hood must be
elevated and placed as far back as possible in the hood without
blocking the rear or side exhaust openings.

6.

Laboratory fume hoods are not to be used for storage of
chemicals or

equipment, except in the case of continuous
procedures that are being carried out in the hood.

7.

Do not allow debris such as paper, latex/nitrile gloves, or small
objects to be sucked up into the exhaust ducting as this may
cause serious damage to the exhau
st fan and impair fume hood
performance resulting in a hazardous chemical exposure or
inadvertent hood failure.

8.

When a hood fails or has cfm readings below recommended
values it will be tagged ‘Out of Service’ and will not be used for
any procedure that re
quires ventilation in order to control any
type of chemical exposure.


6.3

Personal Protective Equipment


6.3.1

Choosing Appropriate
PPE




1.

Employees and students shall review each
SOP
,
MSDS
,
and any other available safety or hazard information to
determine the appropriate
PPE

needed based on the

16

chemical hazards encountered in all teaching or research
laboratories.

2.

Glove selection should be based on the known literature
risks/hazards or sa
fety precautions, and the anticipated
level of chemical contact. Glove selection for newly
synthesized compounds where no literature is available,
should be based on the risk hazards associated with the
starting materials accounting for possible higher le
vels of
risks/hazards.

3.

Inspect all gloves prior to use for holes, tears, swelling,
discoloration, and for a proper fit. Be aware of the
possibility of an immediate or delayed allergic reaction
when using latex gloves. Current University policy is
outlined

in the Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and
Procedures section, policy
statement 36 (
.pdf

.doc
).




4.

Lab coats or aprons should be worn when handling
corrosive or caustic chemicals, large containers of
chemical solutions, or when the possibility of bodily
contact due to chemical dust/fines is possible.

5.

H
earing protection should only be used when noise
levels of non
-
isolated devices such as vacuum pumps,
and NMR air pumps are above
OSHA

standards. Current
University policy is outlined in the Administrat
ive Services
Manual,
EHS/RMS
, policies and procedures section,

policy statement 11 (
.pdf

.doc
).

6.

6. Respiratory protection is not usually required for
normal lab operations. The use of respirators in lab
requires medical evaluation, fitting and training prior to
use. Current University policy is outlined in the
Administrative
Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and
Procedures section, pol
icy statement 7 (
.pdf

.doc
).



6.3.2

Using
PPE



1.

All persons entering/o
ccupying any laboratory where
chemical transfers/handling and the use of glass objects
is/are occurring shall be required to wear approved
chemical/splash proof impact
-
resistant goggles as
denoted by the
ANSI

Z87.1
-
2003 trademark (stamp) on

17

the goggles. Current University policy is outlined in the
Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and
Procedures section, policy statement 36 (
.pdf

.
doc
).

2.

All persons entering/occupying any laboratory where
procedures involve pressures above/below ambient
pressures shall use a full face and throat shield in
addition to the required chemical/slash proof goggles to
provide additional protection against
glass debris in the
advent of an implosion or explosion, unless the
procedure is being carried out in a fume hood with the
sash down and the pressurized or evacuated vessels
have been wrapped in tape.

3.

Before leaving your work area remove contaminated
glove
s before touching anything else in order to prevent
contamination of other objects or surfaces.

4.

Hands must be washed prior to putting on and after
removing
PPE
.


7.

LABORATORY
SOP



All faculty, staff and students should adopt a
SFA

by following the general
SOP

outlined in the University
-
wide
CHP

and the lab specific
CHP

in the appendices
to minimize their overall health and

safety risks, and to decrease accidents.
Each Department Chair and/or Lab Coordinator will be responsible for providing
written lab specific
CHP

for all teaching laboratories within their Department
which will then be added to the University
CHP

Appendices.


7.1

General Teaching Laboratory
SOP



1.

Laboratory facilities may be used only by individuals who have the
proper documen
ted qualifications and training.

2.

Emergency eyewash and shower stations are to remain free and
clear of all obstructions so as not to prevent their use when the
need arises.

3.

Exit doors will be clearly marked and show the appropriate escape
route to be used
in the event of an emergency, natural disaster, or
an ordered building evacuation.

4.

Exit doors and isles between lab benches shall remain clear of all
obstructions to permit an orderly escape in the event of an
emergency, natural disaster, or an ordered bui
lding evacuation.


18

5.

The maximum number of students in any laboratory shall not
exceed the number of lab stations in said laboratory.

6.

All injuries or accidents shall be reported to the appropriate staff
and
EHS/RMS

immediately. Accident forms must be filled out and
sent to
EHS/RMS

within 48 hours.

7.

The dissemination of all relevant/pertinent safety data, chemical
hazard warnings,

and waste disposal procedures for each
experiment shall be an integral part of the lab lecture presentation,
or lab book used for each and every experiment in all teaching labs.
Information should be updated as required or needed.

8.

Chemical exposure
should be minimized by using all current
methods of
PPE

available. Since most chemical
s used in
laboratories present various types of hazards, users should follow
all generally recommended precautions and any additional
precautions outlined in experimental
SOP

at the Department level.
Additional precautions may be outlined in the appropriate
MSDS

or
current referenced protocols. Employees and students are
cautioned against the underestimation of the risks associated with
the use of any chemical.

9.

The consumpt
ion of food or drinks in any lab where the use of
hazardous chemicals takes place is prohibited.

10.

Sink or drain disposal of laboratory chemicals, lab solutions or any
lab waste shall not occur until it has been determined that the
chemical, solution or was
te is classified as non

hazardous under
all current applicable
EPA
,
CDC
,
NIH
,
DE
C
, and
MOA

regulations
and policies.

11.

All medical and infectious biological waste shall be a
utoclaved
(sterilized) as necessary to remove any health hazards for non
-
laboratory personnel before discarding as normal trash. Current
University policy is outlined in the Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures section, procedure statement
14 (
.pdf

.doc
).

12.

Any employee or student that suffers a needle stick or sharps injury
when using a blood borne pathogen or potential blood borne
pathogen must report this to their supervisor or instructor
immediately. Current University policy is outlined in

the
Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and
Pro
cedures section, procedure statement 14 (
.pdf

.doc
).


19

13.

All small spills of any kind should be cleaned up immediately. The
appropriate personnel should be notified immediately in case of
large spills.

14.

Laboratories should be kept in clean and orderly condition.
Equipment and supplies stored in the laboratory should be neatly
organized and not pose any tripping or falling
-
object hazards, and
not violate current fire codes. The accumulation of trash
(pac
kaging materials) is to be avoided due to fire hazards.

15.

Individuals who pose a danger to themselves or others by being
under the influence of any drug, inhibiting medication, or who
become violent or threatening will be removed from any laboratory
by
UPD
. See the current
UPD

Incident Action Plan for Employees
and Students “
Disorderly or Disturbed Person
.”

16.

In the advent of a visible fire or the sound of a building fire alarm,
remain calm and follow your instructor’s directions for evacuating
the building. See t
he current
UPD

Incident Action Plan for
Employees and Students “
Fire Alarm
-

Academic Building
.”

17.

The use of cell phones, i
-
pods, Blue Tooth devices etc., while in
attendance of any

laboratory class, is prohibited except when
calling in an emergency. All cell phones should be placed in the
silent or vibration mode when in any teaching lab to decrease class
disruptions. A call notifying of a family or medical emergency may
be receiv
ed. Calmly notify your instructor and leave the room to
continue the call. When making an emergency call the call
receiver will need to know:


a.

Your name and location (building, room #, building
address)

b.

Nature of emergency (type & severity of injuries)

c.

Suspect description and direction of travel (if applicable)


See the current
UPD

Incident Action Plan for Employees and
Students “
Calling

In an Emergency
.”

18.

In the event of an earthq
uake remain calm, get under a bench or
stand against an inside wall. Do not stand in a doorway or against
windows. When the shaking stops, check for personal injuries and
ask others if they are injured. Then follow your instructor’s verbal
orders regardi
ng any building evacuation. During a building
evacuation, if time and safety permits, shut off all electrical devices
and stop any chemical procedures. Gather personal belongings

20

then calmly proceed to exit the building via the nearest and safest
exit.
Do not use the elevators. Once outside, stay at least 50 to
100 feet from any buildings. Do not leave your class evacuation
assembly point until your instructor has personally accounted for
everyone in your class.


7.2

General Research Laboratory
SOP



1.

Laboratory facilities will be used only by individuals who have the
proper documented
qualifications and training.

2.

Emergency eyewash and shower stations are to remain free and
clear of all obstructions so as not to prevent their use when the
need arises.

3.

Exit doors will be clearly marked and show the appropriate escape
route to be used in t
he event of an emergency, natural disaster, or
an ordered building evacuation.

4.

Exit doors and isles between lab benches shall remain clear of all
obstructions to permit an orderly escape in the event of an
emergency, natural disaster, or an ordered buildin
g evacuation.

5.

All injuries or accidents shall be reported to the appropriate staff
and
EHS/RMS

immediately. Accident forms must be filled out and
sent to
EHS/RMS

within 48 hours.

6.

The dissemination of all relevant/pertinent safety data, chemical
hazard warnings, and waste disposal procedures for all research
shall be an integral part of every lab
-
specific
SOP
. Information
should be updated as required or needed.

7.

Chemical exposure should be m
inimized by using all current
methods of
PPE

available. Since most chemicals used in
l
aboratories present various types of hazards, users should follow
all generally recommended precautions and specific guidelines as
outlined in the appropriate
MSDS

or current referenced protocols.

8.

Employees and students are cautioned against the underestimation
of the risks associated with the use of any chemical.

9.

The consumption of food or dr
inks in any lab where the use of
hazardous chemicals takes place is prohibited.

10.

Sink or drain disposal of laboratory chemicals, lab solutions or any
lab waste shall not occur until it has been determined that the
chemical, solution or waste is classified
as non

hazardous under
all current applicable
EPA
,
CDC
,
NIH
,
DEC
, and
MOA

regulations
and policies.


21

11.

Small spills of any kind should be cleaned up immediately. Lab
support

personnel should be notified immediately in case of large
spills.

12.

All medical and infectious biological waste shall be autoclaved
(sterilized) as necessary to remove any health hazards for non
-
laboratory personnel before discarding as normal trash. Curre
nt
University policy is outlined in the Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures section, procedure statement
14 (
.pdf

.doc
).

13.

Any employee or student that suffers a needle stick or sharps injury
when using a blood borne pathogen or potential blood
borne
pathogen must report this to their supervisor immediately. Current
University policy is outlined in the Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures section, procedure statement
#14 (
.pdf

.doc
).

14.

Laboratories should be kept in clean and orderly
condition.
Equipment and supplies stored in the laboratory should be neatly
organized and not pose any tripping or falling object hazards and
not violate current fire codes. The accumulation of trash
(packaging materials) is to be avoided due to fire haz
ards.

15.

Individuals who pose a danger to themselves or others by being
under the influence of any drug, inhibiting medication or who
become violent or threatening will be removed from any laboratory
by
UPD
. See the current
UPD

Incident Action Plan for Employees
and Students “
Disorderly or Disturbed Person
.”

16.

In the advent of a visible fire or the sound of a building fire alarm
remain calm and follow your
PI

or supervisor’s directions for
evacuating the building. See the current
UPD

Incident A
ction Plan
for Employees and Students “
Fire Alarm
-

Academic Building
.”
When making an emer
gency call the call receiver will need to know:


d.

Your name and location (building, room #, building
address)

e.

Nature of emergency (type & severity of injuries)

f.

Suspect description and direction of travel (if applicable)


See the current
UPD

Incident Action Plan for Employees and
Students “
Calling

In an Emergency
.”

17.

In the event of an earthquake remain calm, get under a
bench or stand against an inside wall. Do not stand in a doorway or

22

against

windows. When the shaking stops, check for personal
injuries and ask others if they are injured. Then follow your
instructor’s verbal orders regarding any building evacuation. During
a building evacuation, if time and safety permits, shut off all
elect
rical devices and stop any chemical procedures. Gather
personal belongings then calmly proceed to exit the building via the
nearest and safest exit. Do not use the elevators. Once outside,
stay at least 50 to 100 feet from any buildings. Do not leave y
our
class evacuation assembly point until your instructor has personally
accounted for everyone in your class.



8.

CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT & MEDICAL EXAMS


The use of a
SFA

and strict adherence to general laboratory safety practices
combined with the use of exposure controls is necessary to keep chemical
exposures at safe levels. Exposure ris
ks will increase when any of the chemicals
outlined in Sections
5.4.2

through
5.5.2

are used.


8.1

Personal Exposure Monitoring



Personal monitoring is conducted by
EHS/RMS
. If there is a re
ason to
believe an employee or student has been exposed to an
OSHA

reg
ulated
chemical above the action level or the permissible exposure level.
Personal monitoring is also used to determine the employee’s or student’s
exposure level when using any
OSHA

regulated chemical if this is deemed
necessary as a safety precaution, as in the case of formaldehyde.
Exposure monitoring and remediation ma
y be conducted by other support
groups as coordinated with
EHS
/RMS
. All expenses of exposure control
and monitoring, with the exception of medical consultations described in
Section
8.3

below, are the responsibility of each Department.



8.2

Frequency of Exposure Monitoring


The initiation, frequency and termination of personal exposure monitoring
will be determined by
EHS/RMS

in accordance with the current
regulations.


8.3

Medical Examinations and Records



23

Th
e
EHS/RMS

Department provides and required pre
-
exposure exams
to
individuals before working with any carcinogenic chemical and post
-
exposure medical exam at no cost to the Departments or individuals. The
results of any medical examinations will be provided within the time frame
specified under current laws. Current U
niversity policy is outlined in the
Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures
section, policy statement 16 (
.pdf

.doc
).


9.

GENERAL CHEMICAL
SOP

The standard and prudent practices outlined below must be followed to ensure
the sa
fety of employees and students, and minimize the risks associated with the
usage, storage, and handling of chemicals. The use of specialty chemicals in the
research laboratories will be addressed in the lab specific
SOP
.



9.1

Chemical Procurement



1. Chemicals should be purchased in quantities that will be consumed in a
six
-
month per
iod or less.

2. Purchase of chemicals using a University Procard is prohibited except
by individuals who receive special authorization from
EHS/RMS

and
Procurement Services.

3. Prior to purchasing any chemical, the current chemical inventory should
be checked to see if the chemical is in stock.

4. All chemical orders

should be placed through the appropriate
personnel.

5.
EHS/RM
S

must be consulted when ordering any chemicals in Sections
5.4.1

through
5.5.2
.




9.2

Chemical Inventories


1. All research and teaching labs that use or store
chemicals will have a
complete on
-
line chemical inventory.

2. Chemical inventories should be updated annually, and track chemicals
from ‘cradle to grave.’

3. Annual completed chemical inventories are to be submitted to
EHS/RMS

for
EPA
,
DHS
, and local emergency response teams for
regulatory compliance and reporting issues.



9.3

Chemical Storage and Labeling


24


1. Chemical storage is determined by chemical storage code, chemical
class, and chemical compatibility. A diagram showing the storage
classification will be displayed in all chemical storage areas.

2. Chemical storage
facilities should be approved for the type of chemicals
to be stored, such as flammable chemicals in flammable storage
cabinets, corrosive chemicals in corrosive
-
resistant cabinets, etc.

3. When using or storing flammable liquids Uniform and local Building
/Fire
Codes,
OSHA
, and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
gui
delines will be followed.

4. The type and size of container used for holding various classes of
flammable liquids will adhere to all applicable
OSHA
, and
NFPA

guidelines, except where hazards warrant smaller sizes.

5. Flammable chemicals that require refrigeration shall be stored in
explosion
-
proof refrigerators, or a UL listed flammable liquids
refrigerator. Household refrigerators shall not be used

for the storage
of flammable chemicals.

6. Secondary containment is to be used in addition to any other required
storage facilities, for acid, base and flammable solvent bottles larger
than 500 ml, etc.

7. All chemicals should be stored in chemically comp
atible containers of
an appropriate size depending on the chemical hazards of the
chemical.

8. All chemicals shall be labeled with the appropriate hazards to minimize
risks and inform the user of the risks and hazards.

9. When a chemical is transferred to
a secondary container it must be
labeled with all of the pertinent safety/hazard data from the original
container.

10. When transferring large bottles (1 liter through 4 liters) of hazardous
liquids between labs, secondary containment vessels shall be used

(i.e. a rubber boot.)

11. Chemical waste will be stored separately from other stored chemicals.



9.4

Controlled Substances/p
-
Listed chemicals


1. Controlled substances must be stored in a secondary secured lock box
within a limited access controlled
area with a sign indicating “controlled
substance” storage. Current University policy is outlined in the
Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures
section, policy statement 3 (
.pdf

.doc
).


25

2. All p
-
listed chemicals are to be stored in a secondary secured lock box
within a limited acces
s area and labeled “p
-
listed chemical” storage.


9.5

Shipment of Chemicals


1. All regulated or hazardous chemicals must be shipped according to
current Department of Transportation (
DOT
) regulations using an
outside vendor.

2. The use of an outside vendor is required for the shipping of non
-

regulated or non
-
hazardous chemicals to ensure pr
oper packaging and
limited liability in case of an exposure.

3. For chemicals or newly synthesized compounds for which hazards are
unknown, the compounds should be assumed to be hazardous and
shipment should be done by an outside vendor. Non
-
regulated
che
micals should also be shipped by an outside vendor because of
liability issues.


10.

Hazardous Waste Disposal


Excellence in research and education is of primary importance at
UAA
. To
achieve these goals, the
EHS/RMS

department provides for the disposal of
hazardous chemicals and certain hazardous biological wastes, while a
ssuring the
University’s compliance with all
EPA
,
DEC
,
DOT
, and
MOA

regulations unde
r a
cradle
-
to
-
grave process. Departments and researchers must abide by the
guidelines set forth in this document and comply with all regulatory requirements
for waste generated. Hazardous waste falls into three categories: biochemical,
chemical and radi
oactive. All hazardous waste generated by any laboratory will
be disposed of in a safe, efficient, and sound ecological manner through
EHS/RMS
.
UA
A

is currently classified as a Conditional Exempt Small Quantity
Generator (
CESQG
) by the
EPA
.


Requirements for
CESQG
, under the
EPA

and 40 CFR 261.5, are shown below:


1.

CESQG

must identify all hazardous waste generated.

2.

CESQG

generate 100 kg or less of hazardous waste per month.

3.

CESQG

generate 1 kg or less of acutely hazardous waste per month.

4.

CESQG

may not accumulate more than 1000 kg of hazardous waste at
any time
.

5.

CESQG

ensures that all hazardous waste is delivered to a person or
fa
cility authorized to manage it.


26



10.1

Hazardous Biological Waste




Current hazardous biological waste fall into the following categories listed
below:


1.

Laboratory waste and regulated waste as defined in the
NIH

“Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA
Molecules” and the
CDC
/
NIH

“Guidelines on Bio
-
safety in
Microbiological and Bio
-
medical Laboratories.”

2.

Medical waste is defined as any solid waste which is generated
in the diagnosis, treatment (provision of medical services), or
immunization of huma
n beings or animals and in all research
involving the testing of biological agents including bloodborne
pathogens. Current University policy for bloodborne pathogens is
outlined in the Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
,
Policies and Procedures section, policy statement 17 (
.pdf

.doc
).

3.

Pathological waste is de
fined as the use or study of animals or
their carcasses.


10.2

Hazardous Chemical Waste


Hazardous chemical waste includes discarded commercial chemical
products and waste generated by all chemical processes used in any
laboratory. Any chemical or chemica
l mixture listed by the
EPA

is a
hazardous waste. A chemical or chemical mixture tha
t is not listed by the
EPA
, but has any one or more of the following hazardous
characteristics is
considered hazardous waste: ignitable, corrosive, reactive or toxic.


1.

Sink disposal of chemicals should be used only for those
chemicals, solutions, and water soluble mixtures that have been
determined to be non
-
hazardous to the e
nvironment.

2.

Disposal of insoluble chemicals, mixtures, or other types of
solids may be disposed of as normal trash after they have been
determined to be non
-
hazardous to the environment. These
items are to be double bagged to prevent spillage when
handled
by cleaning personnel.

3.

Any chemical that is unsuited for use or becomes out dated will
be disposed of as chemical waste through
EHS/RMS
.


27

4.

Release of de minimis (minimal) quantities of hazardous
materials from the rinsing or washing of glassware is allowed.
However, the dilution of larger volumes in an a
ttempt to use the
above statement for disposal is illegal.

5.

All chemicals not declared hazardous waste by the
EPA
, but
their
MSDS

information indicates ‘harmful to aquatic
environment,’ may have
DEC

and
MOA

regulations regarding
their disposal and should be considered hazardous.

6.

Hazardous waste generation is to be minimized through th
e use
of “green” chemistry, and through the use of modern protocols
and technology
-
aided techniques.



10.3

Hazardous Radioactive Waste


The Radiation Safety Committee and
RSO

are responsible for complying
with the
NRC

regulations for disposal of all radioactive wastes.


11.

SAFETY TRAINING AND INFORMATION


The adoption of a
SFA

requires employee training to be ongoing throughout the
employee’s career. The objective of the training is to inform all employees or
students of the associated physical and chemical hazards they m
ay encounter
when working with hazardous chemicals, performing hazardous procedures or
using hazardous equipment. This training is also necessary for those non
-
laboratory individuals who upon entering any teaching or research lab might be
exposed to a haz
ardous chemical or an ongoing hazardous procedure. All
employees are required to attend college level and Department
-
level safety
training presentations annually. The two types of training required are general
training and specific training.




11.1

Gene
ral (Teaching & Research) Employee Training


1. The training of an employee should take place immediately upon hire,
annually, and prior to the teaching of any laboratory class or starting a
research project. Training must occur for any current employee
i
nitiating a new laboratory procedure, a new exposure situation or
operating new or unfamiliar laboratory equipment.

2. All safety training for each employee shall be documented and the
documents held for 30 years after employment ends.


28

3. Employee training should cover the University
CHP
, Departmental
CHP
, lab specific
SOP
, and University emergency procedures as
applicable based on individual work assignments.

4. Any employee that teaches a lab should be trained/informed of the
associated physical health r
isks and chemical hazards for each
experiment in the course they are instructing.

5. Lab instructors should be trained/informed about the proper use of
specialized laboratory equipment that will be used during the lab course
to ensure the safe operation of

lab equipment and minimize damage.

6. Training will be done annually and at the discretion of the
EHS/RMS

and is dependent on regulation changes, updated information,
occurrence of accidents, and the legal requirements of the lab.


11.2

Specific (Teaching & Research) Employee Training


1. Faculty lab instructors, la
b coordinators, and research
PI

are
responsible for addressing or reviewing the chemical haz
ards specific
to the employees teaching or work assignment.

2. Faculty lab instructors, lab coordinators, and research
PI

are
responsible for addressing or reviewing all relevant lab specific
SOP

to
the employees teaching or work assignment.

3. Faculty lab instructors, lab coordinators, and research
PI

are
responsible for addressing or reviewing the building safety procedures
or information specific to the employee’s teaching or work assignment.

4. Faculty lab instructors or lab coordinators and research
PI

are
responsible for addressing or reviewing the equipment operational
hazards specific to the empl
oyee’s teaching or work assignment.




11.3

Information (Teaching & Research) Employees


1. Employees shall be informed and shown the location of the
UAA

CHP
,
any Departmental
CHP
, and lab specific
SOP
.

2. Employees shall be informed and shown the location of reference
materials on
the hazards, storage, and handling of chemicals as related
to their work assignments.

3. Employees shall be shown the location of personnel protective
equipment and trained in the selection of appropriate
PPE

as given in the
UAA

and Departmental
CHP

or lab specific
SOP

as related to their work
assignments.


29

4. Employees shall be shown the location
of and trained on the reading,
interpretation and understanding of material safety data sheets (
MSDS
)
as related to their work assignments.

5. Employees shall be informed of the permissible exposure limits for all
OSHA

regulated substances that they may use or come in contact with
prior to initiating work. For those hazardous substances not regulated by
OSHA
, employees will be informed of the recommended exposure limits.

6. Employees shall be informed of the signs and symptom
s associated with
an exposure to a hazardous chemical as related to their work
assignments.



12.

Working Autonomously


Working autonomously is defined as a student or employee who writes/proposes
an independent research project that is funded by the University through an
award, or from some outside funding agency or by the writer/proposer. All
research projects of this t
ype are to have a review by an appropriate
PI

based on
the area of research and a review by
EHS/RMS

and the appropriate Faculty or
Student Review Committee. The reviewing
PI

and the independ
ent researcher
are responsible for ensuring the following:




12.1

Working Autonomously


1. The independent researcher has a written document covering the scope
of their proposed work.

2. The independent researcher must notify in writing the
PI

and
EHS/RMS

when changing the written scope of their work.

3. The independent researcher prepares
SOP

and performs literature
searches relevant to safety and health hazards appropriate for their
proposed work.

4. The
PI

provides the appropriate oversight, training and safety
information to ensure the individuals safety and the safety of a
ll others
in the lab in which the project is going to be completed.

5. For safety and security reasons, undergraduates working with
hazardous operations must receive special authorization from
Department heads, Deans, and Directors along with
EHS/RMS

authorization. The same authorization chain must be followed for
u
ndergraduates to receive key or code access to labs and buildings off
-
hours.



30

13.

Working Unsupervised


Working unsupervised is defined as any student or employee working alone after
normal building hours or on weekends (no other persons are present or dir
ectly
available to respond in an emergency situation) when in any laboratory using
hazardous chemicals or hazardous equipment. This situation requires a
complete risk/hazard liability assessment by the
PI

and
EHS/RMS

covering the
training of the student or employee in relationship to the work to be performed.



13.1

Working Unsupervised


1. All unsupervised individuals must be trained to ensure the work
to be
performed is done safely.

2. At least two people should be working in separate laboratories in the
same building and perform a periodic visual check to assure personal
safety.

3. Prior to leaving, the individuals should inform each other and all work

should stop. No one person should perform hazardous work alone.

4. Work using acutely hazardous or acutely toxic substances should not
be performed by people working alone.


14.

Equipment Operation


The operation of all laboratory equipment should follow
all recommended safety
precautions prescribed by the manufacturer as well as any additional safety
precautions warranted by the use of standard and prudent practices outlined in
any lab
-
specific
SOP
. Equipment examples include: gas chromatographs,
centrifuges, NMRs, UV spectrophotometers, ICP instruments, ASE instruments,
hplc instrument
s, mass spectrophotometers, gas generators, vacuum pumps,
roto
-
evaporators, shakers, freezers, refrigerators etc.


Individuals should be aware of the hazards the equipment may pose including
high voltage (electrical), high pressure, fluid hazards and mechanical part
hazards.


Equipment that may fall under
OSHA

authority due to required safety devices
such as belt guards must comply with these regulations as well.


15.

Emergency Situati
ons and Evacuations



31

Emergency situations can occur from natural disasters such as earthquake,
volcanic eruptions, and severe storms, or manmade events such as accidental,
biological, chemical, radiological spills, terrorist attack, medical emergency, etc.

All situations will be assessed with regard to the level of threat to individual life or
health.

Any employee who is injured as a result of actions occurring during a curse and
scope of their employment and the injury requires treatment by a professional

health care provider (short of first aid), must complete a report of occupational
injury and illness form (workers compensation) and submit it to the System Office
of Risk Services through their own Department’s Administrative Assistant. The
Employee has

the right to choose their own health care provider except in cases
involving chemical exposure evaluations which must be done through the
University’s contract Physician with
EHS/RMS

written approval.

Students on the other hand, are responsible for their own insurance needs. If
qualifying, students should be direct
ed to the student health clinic for relatively
minor injuries. Keep in mind that students who are currently employed by the
University and are injured during the course and scope of employment are
covered by workers compensation.


15.1

Non
-
life threatenin
g accidents



15.1.1

Non
-
chemical Burns


1. Depending on the severity of burn, escort the individual to the
student Health Center for evaluation.

2. Fill out an accident report.



15.1.2 Cuts


1. Use appropriate bandages from the first aid kit.





2. Depe
nding on the severity of the cut, or if the possibility of
imbedded glass or foreign materials exists escort the injured
person to Student Health Center for evaluation.

3. Fill out an accident report.


15.1.3

Chemical Burns Eyes


1. Immediately rinse eyes with copious amounts of water (for at
least 15 minutes) at the eye wash station. Assist the person in
holding their eyes open if needed.


32

2. Immediately call 911. Following that, call 6
-
4911,
UPD
, as time
permits.

3. Fill out an accident report.


15.1.4

Chemical Burns Skin < 10 % area


1. Immediately rinse the affected area with copious amounts of
water (for at least 15 minutes) at the safety shower/eye wash
station.

2. Escort the student to Student Health Center for evaluation.

3. Fill out an accident report.


15.1.5

Chemical Burns Sk
in >10 % area


Simultaneously perform the following functions using volunteers of
the same gender as the injured party:


1. Immediately escort the affected student to the safety
shower/eye wash station. Inform the injured person of the
possibility that th
ey must remove their clothing for
appropriate treatment. Ensure the injured person is rinsed
with copious amounts of water for at least 15 minutes.

2. One student should immediately call 911; all other
students s
hould be instructed to leave the laboratory.
Following that, call 6
-
4911,
UPD
, as time
permits.

3. One same
-
gender volunteer should shut down all
equipment (hot plates etc.), and experiments and then
leave the room.

4. Provide bath towels and a robe for the injured person and
wait for emergency personnel to arrive while encouraging
the victi
m to remain calm.

5. Fill out an accident report.


15.2

Life threatening accidents


All life threatening accidents involving employees or students, including
any major cut, uncontrolled bleeding, epileptic seizures, fainting with
possible head injury, etc.
, requires an immediate call to 911. Following
that, call 6
-
4911,
UPD
, as time permits.



33


15.3

Small Chemical Spills (< 4 L non
-
flammable)


Most chemical spills in the teaching labs can be handled by the instructor
and appropriate personnel using the spill kits in each lab. Consult an
MSDS

if necessary. Know the spill and first aid procedures prior to
commencing work with hazardous chemicals and procedures.


1.

Determine the t
ype of chemical spill and use appropriate items
from a chemical spill kit.

2.

Clean up the spill and hand over materials to the appropriate
personnel for disposal.



15.4

Large Chemical Spills (> 4 L flammable, corrosive)


It may be necessary to evacuate
the area depending on the class of the
flammable liquid and other chemical hazards. Notify the appropriate
personnel of the spill. Appropriate personnel will follow the steps below to
contain and clean up the spill. Consult an
MSDS

if necessary.



1. Dike (surround) the spill with absorbent pigs. Then determine the
flammable class of the
spilled chemical and other chemical
hazards. Open windows if possible. Do not throw any electrical
switches as these may spark providing an ignition source for the
vapors.

2. Clean up the spill and deliver materials to
EHS/RMS

for disposal.




15.5

Natural Disasters or Emergency Building Evacuation


In the
event of an emergency evacuation for any reason, employees
should activate the building fire alarm system and contact
UPD

at 6
-
4911.


In the advent of an injury, first aid to an employee is covered under the
current University policy outlined in the Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures section, procedure statement 6 (
.pdf

.doc
).


During any natural disaster situation or emergency/accident,
EHS/RMS

will determine that any building or any portion thereof is not safe for
occupancy. The evacuation will

be coordinated by
EHS/RMS
. Current
University policy is outli
ned in the Administrative Services Manual,

34

EHS/RMS
, policies a
nd procedures section, procedure statement 5 (
.pdf

.doc
).


Additional emergency information can be found on the
UAA

Emergency
Procedures poster
.


16.

Research Policies


16.1

Purpose


The
CHP

for
UAA

provides general written guidelines regarding
University, faculty, employee and student responsibilities in relation to
using hazardous chemicals in their quest for knowle
dge in the teaching
and research laboratories. Section 16 of this document outlines additional
safety precautions and policies regarding the use and disposal of
hazardous chemicals in all research laboratories at
UAA
.



16.2

Scope


These policies cover all internally and externally funded research projects
by faculty, employee, student, and visiting research professionals
undertaken at
UAA
, including its satellite campuses. Safe and effective
research requires attention t
o all obligations/responsibilities that the
PI
/
RLS

have to: the University; research sponsors; and, most importantly,
to other employees, student researchers, and visiting research
professionals working in a research laboratory at
UAA
. Research
techniques shall not v
iolate established professional ethics pertaining to
the health, safety, privacy, and other personal rights of human beings or to
the infliction of pain or injury on animals. Current
UAA

policy is outlined in
Administrative Services Manual,
EHS/RMS
, Policies and Procedures
section, policy statement 23 (
.pdf

.doc
) and
http://www.alaska.edu/risksafety/complianceSurvey/
.


16.3

PI

Responsibilities


PI
/
RLS

responsibilities start with those given in Sections
4.2

through
4.4

and
4.6
. Additionally al
l research must comply with all Federal, State,
MOA
, and any recognized governing body rule
s and regulations covering
specific areas of research such as
CDC
,
IACUC
,
NIH
,
NRC

as it pertains
to each research project. These responsibilities apply to general lab

35

training and lab specific
SOP
. Ultimate responsibility for
SOP
/training
compl
iance rests with the
PI
/
RLS

within each research lab.


16.4

Research Proposal Reviews


Research proposal reviews will be undertaken as outlined in Sections
4.3.1

and
4.3.2
. These reviews should include a laboratory specific
SOP

governing the research and a substance specific
SOP

when using acutely
hazardous, extremely hazardous, radioactive, carcinogenic, mutagenic
chemicals, or infectious biological materials. Substance specific
SOP

are
required for all those hazardous chemicals that fall outside of the
UAA

CHP

general or hazard specific
SOP
.


16.5

Research
SOP
)


Under the
OSHA

regulations
29 CFR Part 1910.1450 known as the
“Laboratory Standard,” one of the primary requirements is a laboratory
specific
SOP
. An adequate laboratory specific research
SOP

shou
ld
address the steps required to accomplish the research, the procedures to
safely carry out all laboratory activities including emergency procedures,
spill response, waste disposal, equipment failure procedures, and the
occurrence of a natural disaster.
A good research specific laboratory
SOP

will also serve as a training document for in
coming research workers so
that overall laboratory safety is not compromised. Typically “cook book”
protocols are lacking in addressing many of the safety requirements,
facilities equipment issues, etc. and should not be used to meet the
requirements of an

SOP
. All laboratory research specific
SOP

should
include the following sections given below in addition to those
requirements

outlined in Sections
4.6
,
7.2

and
9
. Research
SOP

shall be
reviewed and or updated annually
by the
PI

and Safety Committee.


A chemical
SOP

template is available in
.doc format
.




16.5.1

Identity Section





This section will be dated, include the name of the
PI
, building and
room numbers.




16.5.2

Purpose and Scope Section



36

This section will state proposed research listing necessary
chemicals and any specialized equipment.




16.5.3

Chemical Hazard and Risk Assessment Section


This section will give all the details regarding any chemical hazards
associated with all laboratory operations that will be carried out by
lab workers.




16.5.4

Personal Protective Equipment Section


This section will give all the details regarding what

safety
precautions are needed and identify the relevant
PPE

that must be
used to prote
ct lab workers from exposure to hazardous chemicals
or physical injury from mechanical hazards while working in the lab.




16.5.5

Engineering/Ventilation Controls Section


This section describes when a fume hood should be used and what
to do if a fume hood malfunctions. This section would also give
details about cold rooms, isolation rooms and other mechanical


ventilation safety equipment and how / when to use them safely
.




16.5.6

Chemical Storage, Handling, Hazards, and Container Labeling
Sections


These sections describe all of the procedures related to the proper
storage handling, hazards and container labeling for all chemicals
used in the research laboratory. See S
ections
9.2
,
9.3

and
9.4

of
UAA

CHP
. This section should also include a discussion of
specialized
PPE

required for any chemical if needed.


1. The chemical handling section describes all of the
procedures having to do with the safe handling of the
chemicals used in the
research laboratory. This section will
also include discussion of specialized
PPE

requi
red for any
chemical if needed.

2. The chemical hazards section describes all the
NFPA
,
WHMIS
,
NRC
, or
IARC

hazards associated with all
chemicals in the research lab for each specific
SOP
.


37

3. The chemical container labeling section describes
container labeling for repacked chemicals and working
solutions.


16.5.7

Material Safety Data Sheet(s) (
MSDS
)


This section will give directions where hard copies are posted and
how to acce
ss electronic copies on a computer.


16.5.8

Chemical Exposure and Chemical Contamination


The section
must outline the lab procedures when using any
acutely, toxic, highly toxic or radioactive substance in the lab to
prevent contamination of surroundings, equipment and lab
personnel based on those policies in Sections
5.4

through
5.5
.


16.5.9

Chemical Spill, Spill Cleanup and Waste Disposal Sections


These sections will give specific spill response measures for the
research lab based on the type of research and those policie
s
outlined in Section
15

and detailed disposal procedures for the
research lab based on t
he type of chemical, biological or
radiological waste generated by the research based on those
policies outlined in Section
10
. Where necessary the Biological
Safety Committee and
EHS/RMS

can assist a
PI

in the
development of chemical specifi
c
SOP

with regard to the disposal
of infectious, medical, pathological (animal tissue

or animal
carcasses), recombinant DNA, and all other types of biological
agent and chemical wastes as regulations require.


1. The waste container labeling section gives waste
container labeling information. All waste containers must
be labeled with all

appropriate chemical hazard warnings.





16.5.10 Research Protocol





Reserved for future use




16.5.11 Emergency Contact Numbers



38

Reserved for future use


16.6

Modification of
SOP


These
SOP

can be modified in specific instances when appropriate or as
research needs dictate. When major modifications are made to a
procedure that entails additiona
l risk, scale up of any chemical reaction, or
a need or change in any needed engineering controls for safety and
hazardous risk control the reasons for such modifications must be
documented and signed by the
PI
/
RLS

and approved through the
EHS/RMS
, Chemical Safety Committee, Biological Safety Committee, or
the Radiation Safety Committee, as necessary, prior to commencing with
such modifications.


16.7

Research Training


PI
/
RLS

responsibilities start with those given in Sections
11

through
11.3
.
All training for using chemicals covered in Sections
5.4

and
5.5

and any
specialty chemicals posing hazards not addressed in the lab specific or
research specific
SOP

must be documented. Training document will be
kept on file by the responsible
PI

and a copy of the training documents will
be forwarded to
EHS/RMS
.


16.8

Biological Agent Use





16.8.1

Biological Agents


All research laboratories that use biological agents, biological toxins
or recombinant materials must be registered with
EHS/RMS

in
order to comply with federal guidelines and regulations. The
PI

is
responsible for ensuring that his or her lab is registered with
UAA

Biological Safety Committee and
EHS/RMS

and that the lab is in
compliance with all federal guidelines and regulations. The
PI

is
responsible for determining if the recombinant DNA molecules used
in their research are exempt from
NIH

guidelines and, if so,
registration with
UAA

Biological Safety Committee and
EHS/RMS

is
not required.




16.8.2

Select Agents



39

The federal government (
USDHHS
/
CDC

and
USDA
) has restricted
certain biol
ogical agents and toxins, and has designated these as
‘select agents’. The possession, use and transfer of the restricted
or select agents must be registered with
UAA

EHS/RMS

and the
appropriate federal authorities.
EHS/RMS

can assist
PI

with this
procedure.



16.9

Chemical Use


Chemical use includes

the following actions: ordering, possession, use in
research or teaching, storage, disposal or abandonment of any chemical
in any
UAA

laboratory.


All training for using chemicals covered in sections
5.4

and
5.5

of the
UAA

CHP

and any specialty chemicals posing hazards not addressed in the lab
specif
ic or research specific
SOP

must be documented.


Restricted chemicals, p
-
listed chemi
cals must be reviewed by
EHS/RMS

to ensure any regulations are

complied with regarding possession and
disposal of any resulting chemical waste.


All chemical use policies will follow those guidelines given in Chapters 1
-
5,
7, 9 of the
Prudent Practices in the Laboratory, Handling and Disposal of
Chemicals,

published
by the National Research Council.


16.10

Chemical Waste


Chemical waste shall be segregated according to current accepted
standards and practices in conjunction with
UAA’s

current waste generator
classification and all applicable regulations as outlined in
UAA’s

CHP

and
current hazardous waste policies.



17

Incident Report Forms




17.1

Laboratory Report for Non
-
Injury Incidents




17.2

Laboratory Report for Injury Incidents




REFERENCES


40


1.

Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories
. Department of
Labor,
OSHA
, 29 CFR Part 1910.1450, Federal Register, Washington, DC,
January 3
1, 1990 “Laboratory Standard.”

2.

Prudent Practices in the Laboratory, Handling and Disposal of Chemicals
,
Natural Research Council, National Academy Press: Washington, DC, 1995.

3.

Safety in Academic Chemistry Laboratories
, 6
th

ed. American Chemical Socie
ty,
Washington, DC, 1995.

4.

Handbook of Chemical Safety
, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC,
2001.

5.

Standard University
CHP

6.

Michigan State University Waste Disposal Guide

7.

UAA

EHS/RMS

Policies and Procedures

8.

Flammable and Co
mbustible Liquids Code
,
NFPA
, Quincy, MA, 1996
NFPA

30.

9.

Fire Protection for Laboratories Using Chemicals
,
NFPA
, Quincy, MA, 1996
NFPA

45.

10.

University of Vermont
CHP

11.

University of Pennsylvania
C
HP

12.

UAA

Biological Department
CHP

13.

University of Vermont
CHP