Memorandum To: From:

vivaciousaquaticAI and Robotics

Nov 13, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Memorandum

To:

Professor Paul Oh
, Faculty advisor

From:


Team
3, Section
00
8


Nicholas Klingbeil
, captain
,
nicholas.klingbeil@drexel.edu



Ian Fitzpatrick
,
ian.fitzpatrick@drexel.edu


Darius Jones
,
dj58@drexel.edu


Chris McGlinn,
cm435@drexel.edu

Date:


Monday
,
February 12
, 2007

Re:


Lego Mindstorm NXT Rescue Robot


The purpose of this memo is to conceptualize and propose solutions to the problem of disaster
mitigation.
During a disaster, h
uman rescuers are usually put in more danger than the actual
victims of the disaster
.
If a system could be designed where the huma
n presence at a disaster
could be drastically diminished, the lives of the victims could be saved without allowing more
lives to be put at risk. A robotic system that extracts casualties autonomously would allow the
maximum amount of effort to be used at a

disaster zone.



Simulation

To simulate the events of a disaster, we will be using Lego’s Mindstorm NXT robotic system.
This system allows for autonomous programming, asse
mbly, and digital prototyping; u
sed in this
way, it is similar
to the engineer
-
clie
nt relationship of the real world. The “disaster zone” will
consist of an incline ramp with a triage site at the top and casualties at the bottom. The goal of
the
robot

will be to bring causalities to the triage site completely autonomously under set crite
ria.


Criteria


Thresholds and Objectives

Successful completion of the solution will be based on seven criteria.

Within these criteria, the
minimum threshold must be met for client satisfaction and approval.

The thresholds and
objectives
can be viewed at
:
http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~pyo22/engr101/industryDay.pdf


Physical Design Solutions

Solutions for this problem initially lie in the physical design of the robot. This robot
mu
st

have a
device that is able to “latch” or somehow move the casualty
. Moving the casualty can be
achieved through a “claw”, conveyor, or ski
-
lift

type mechanism. The “claw” system would then
usually be attached to a mobile system, where the other systems
would tend to be immobile.


Programming Challenges

From the design, differing programming challenges arise. How will the system distinguish a
casualty? How will it know to drop it off at the triage site? Can the robot know its position if it
gets turned a
round? Can the process be sped up?
These are all problems effective designs will
have to deal with and solve.