Benchmarking & Metrics

visitormaddeningUrban and Civil

Nov 25, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Benchmarking & Metrics

Project Level Survey


Version
11


(Large Project Questionnaire)

(For comments)











September

201
2


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T
able of Contents


I.

Project Selection Criteria

................................
................................
................................
.......

3

II.

Logging into the CII Website

................................
................................
................................
..

3

III.

Performance Assessment System (PAS) Access

................................
................................
....

3

IV.

Instructions

................................
................................
................................
............................

3

1.

General Project Description
................................
................................
................................
...

4

2.

Engineering Deliverables

................................
................................
................................
.......

7

3.

Contract Type

................................
................................
................................
........................

8

4.

Project Cost

................................
................................
................................
............................

9

5.

Project
Schedule

................................
................................
................................
..................

13

6.

Achieving Facility Capacity

................................
................................
................................
...

16

7.

Project Outcomes

................................
................................
................................
................

18

8.

Workhours and Accident Data
................................
................................
.............................

19

9.

Project Impact Factors

................................
................................
................................
.........

20

10.

PDRI (Project Definition Rating Index)

................................
................................
.................

21

11.

Practices

................................
................................
................................
...............................

21

12.

Engineering Productivity Metrics

................................
................................
........................

28

13.

Construction Productivity Metrics

................................
................................
.......................

44

14.

Pipeline Specific Questions

................................
................................
................................
..

62

15.

Building
Project
Specific
................................
................................
................................
......

67


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I.

Project

Selection

Criteria

Applicable for both
Owners and Contractors



TIC > $5MM



14 months or longer in duration



Managed

by a dedicated project team



Any industry group: buildings, heavy industrial, light industrial, infrastructure



Completed within the past 2 years (with access to project team members)

II.

Logging into the CII Website

Log in to the CII website at

http://construction
-
institute.org/Source/Security/Member
-
Logon.cfm


If you do not know your login and/or password, you may change it by going
to the log on
page and c
lick

Reset My
Password

. If you have any questions about your access to
the CII website, contact
Hong Zhao

at
hong.zhao
@
cii
.utexas.edu

or
(512) 232
-
0864
.


III.

Performance Assessment

System

(PAS)

Access


Performance Assessment
System

(
https://www.construction
-
institute.org/nextgen/
)

Training:
submit projects thr
o
u
gh

PAS

is limited to trained Benchmarking Associates



Includes questions to evaluate the value of
CII Practices



Project
-
level, confidential Key Report with scores and benchmark comparisons
will be provided



Includes measures for industry
-
specific and productivity metrics

IV.

Instructions

G
eneral
p
roject
information

and
p
erformance

information

are required.
The remaining
sections are
recommended.

If a
question

does not apply
, indicate as much and follow the directions to skip to the
next section.
The online questionnaire
has
skip patterns

programmed into the interface,
thereby reducing the burden to the respondent and enhancing the validity of the
responses
.
Text appearing
in bold
and red

in the paper version prompts the respondent
to skip sections that don’t apply.

Once finished with the questionnaire

and the internal validation
, submit it to CII. After
submittal, CII will review the project data and validate it to ensure t
hat the information is
complete and correct.
Thank you for benchmarking with CII
.




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1.

General Project Description

1.1

General Information

1.1.1

Your Company Name:








1.1.2

Your Name:







1.1.3

Project Name
:





1.1.4

Project
Owner:








1.1.5

Primary Designer
:







1.1.6

Primary
Constructor:







1.1.7

Project Construction Location:

City:



,
(State or
Province
):



, Country:




1.1.8

Lead design office location

City:



, (State or
Province
):



, Country:




1.1.9

Cost Index City (
International Construction Intelligence (previously known as
Hanscomb Cost Index) for international projects, and R.S. Means for U.S. and
Canada projects
)







1.1.10

Midpoint of construction

(mm/dd/yyyy)







1.1.11

Unit Type


Metric (e.g., meter, kilogram, kilometer)


Imperial

(e.g., foot, pound, mile)


1.1.12

Primary Currency

Used on the Project (e.
g., American Dollar, and Euro)








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1.2

Project Description

Which of the following best describes industry group for this project?

Heavy Industrial


Light Industrial

Chemical Manufacturing

Electrical (Generating)

Environmental

Metals Refining/Processing

Mining

Tailing

Natural Gas Processing

Oil/
Gas Exploration/Production (well
-
site)

Oil Refining

Oil Sands Mining/Extraction

Oil Sands SAGD

Oil Sands Upgrading

Cogeneration


Pulp and Paper

Other Heavy Industrial

Autom
otive Manufacturing

Consumer Products Manufacturing

Foods

Microelectronics Manufacturing

Office
Products Manufacturing

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

Pharmaceutical Labs

Pharmaceutical
Warehouse
Clean
Room (Hi
-
Tech)

Other Light Industrial



Buildings


Infras
tructure

Communications Center

Courthouse

Dormitory/Hotel/Housing/Residential

Embassy

Low rise Office (≤3 floors)

High rise Office (>3
floors
)

Hospital

Laboratory

Maintenance Facilities


Movie Theatre



Parki
ng Garage

Physical Fitness Center

Prison

Restaurant/Nightclub

Retail Building

School

Warehouse

Other Buildings

Airport

Central Utility Plant

Electrical Distribution

Flood Control

Highway (including heavy haul road)

Marine Facilities

Navigation

Process Control

Rail

Tunneling

Water/Wastewater

Telecom, Wide Area Network

Pipeline

Tank fa
rms

Gas Distribution

Other Infrastructure




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1.3

Project Nature

From the list below, please select the
category that best describes the primary nature of
this project. Please see the glossary for definitions.


Grass Roots, Greenfield


Brownfield (co
-
locate)


Modernization, Renovation, Upgrade

(changes to existing capacity)


Addition, Expansion


Other Project Nature


1.4

Project Priority

Please

select the
primary

factor

influencing the execution of this project. Assume safety
is a given for all projects.


Cost


Schedule


Balanced

1.5

Business Driver

Please check all
that
appl
ied
.


Quality


Capacity


Risk


Operability


Environmental


Social


Others



1.5.1

Actual Total Cost of Major Equipment


The purpose of this question is to determine the extent to which the overall project cost
and cost performance are driven by the purchase of major equipment. Please see the
Equipment Reference Table provided below. Record the total purchase cost of major
e
quipment for this project.
Exclude

costs for field services, bulk construction equipment
(such as valves, bus ducts etc.) and off
-
the
-
shelf equipment. Project team costs and
transportation costs are
in
cluded
.

$







Not Applicable (no major equipment)


Don’t Know

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Equipment Reference Table

Examples of Major
Equipment

Kinds of

Equipment Covered

HVAC Systems


Prefabricated air supply houses

Columns and Pressure Vessels

Towers, columns, reactors, unfired pressure vessels, bulk
storage spheres, and unfired kilns; includes internals
such as trays and packing.

Tanks

Atmospheric

storage tanks, bins, hoppers, and silos.

Exchangers


Heat transfer equipment: tubular exchangers,
condensers, evaporators, reboilers, coolers (including fin
-
fan coolers and cooling towers).

Direct
-
fired Equipment


Fired heaters, furnaces, boilers, kilns
, and dryers,
including associated equipment such as super
-
heaters,
air preheaters, burners, stacks, flues, draft fans and
drivers, etc.

Pumps

All types of liquid pumps and drivers.

Vacuum Equipment

Mechanical vacuum pumps, ejectors, and other vacuum
producing apparatus and integral auxiliary equipment.

Motors

600V and above

Electricity Generation and
Transmission

Major electrical items (e.g., unit substations,
transformers, switch gear, motor
-
control centers,
batteries, battery chargers, turbines,
diesel generators).

Materials
-
Handling Equipment


Conveyers, cranes, hoists, chutes, feeders, scales and
other weighing devices, packaging machines, and lift
trucks.

Package Units


Integrated systems bought as a package (e.g., air dryers,
air compressors
, refrigeration systems, ion exchange
systems, etc.).

Special Processing Equipment


Agitators, crushers, pulverizers, blenders, separators,
cyclones, filters, centrifuges, mixers, dryers, extruders,
fermenters, reactors, pulp and paper, and other such
machinery with their drivers.


1.6

Turnarounds / Shutdowns / Outages

[
Heavy/Light Industrial project only
]

Construction performance (cost, schedule, quality) during project turnarounds,
shutdowns, and outages may be impacted by schedule demands of the turnaround,
shutdown or outage. These turnarounds may be scheduled or unscheduled. Please
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complete the blocks b
elow to indicate the percentage of total construction
work
-
hours
completed

during turnaround.

1)

Percent construction during
scheduled turnaround:



%

2)

Percent construction during
unscheduled

turnaround:



%

3)

Percent construction during
non
-
turnaround:



%


Note: the percentages should add up to 100 %


Don’t Know


1.7

Project Delivery Method

Please choose the project delivery
method

from those listed below that most closely
characterizes the delivery
method

used for this project. If more than one d
elivery
method

was used, select the
primary
method
.


Delivery Method

Description


Design
-
Bid
-
Build

Serial sequence of design and construction
phases; Owner contracts separately with designer
and constructor.


Design
-
Build (EPC)

Owner contracts with Design
-
Build (EPC)
contractor.


CM at Risk

Owner contracts with designers and construction
manager (CM)
. CM holds the contracts.


Parallel Primes

Owner contracts separately with designer and
multiple prime constructors.


[
If not CM at Risk
]

Did you use a Construction Manager not at Risk in conjunction with
the selected del
ivery system?



Yes



No


1.8

Work Scope

[
Contractor Only
]
What

was your company responsible on this

project?

(
please
check
all that applied)


F
E
P


Detail
Design/Engineering



Procuremen
t


Construction


Commissioning and
Startup


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1.9

Project Complexity

Please choose a rating below that best describes the level of complexity for this project,
compared to other projects within the same industry sector as this project (e.g., heavy
industrial, light industrial, building, infrastructure)
. Use the definitions

below as general
guidelines.



Low

-

Characterized by the use of
well

established, proven technology, a relatively
small number of process steps, a relatively small facility size or process capacity, a
facility configuration or geometry that your company ha
s used before,
well

established, proven construction methods.



Average


Characterized by the use of established technology, a moderate number
of process steps, a moderate facility size or process capacity,
facility configuration or
geometry that your compa
ny has used before,

established, proven construction
methods.



High
-

Characterized by the use of new, “
unproven
” technology, an
unusually

large
number of process steps, large facility size or process capacity, new facility
configuration or geometry, new con
struction methods.

Low



A
verage



High

1

2

3

4

5

6

7
















1.10

Percent Modularization

Choose a percentage value that best describes the level of modularization (offsite
construction) used. This value should be determined as a ratio of the cost of all modules
divided by total installed cost.
Include all costs for transportation, setting and
hooking up
field connections.























0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%


1.11

Project Classification

Projects submitted for benchmarking should be representative of the typical project that

you execute, i.e.,
not impacted by extraordinary factors

that might influence
performance or practice use metrics. If the project is not representative, it can still be
submitted to be scored, however, please let us know by checking the appropriate box
below.
Was this project typical or representative of most o
f the projects that your
company performs?


Typical



Not Typical

If project is not typical,
p
lease
provide

a

reason
:

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1.12

Project Scope


Please provide a
brief

description of the project scope

(what is actually being designed /
constructed), limit your response to 200 words.











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1.13

Project Management Team


Project Management Team (PMT) Size and Participation

Please indicate the peak and average number of participants on the Project
Management Team (PMT) during the Front End Planning (FEP) and execution phase of
the project. The execution phase of the project is defined to include detail engineering
through me
chanical completion. To account for individuals responsible for multiple
projects, your response should reflect Full Time Equivalents (FTE’s). FTE’s represent
the number of participants and the percent of time each is allocated to the project. For
examp
le, if one team member responsible for procurement works ½ time on the project,
then the procurement contribution to the FTE measure is 0.5. Likewise, if two project
controls specialists work on the team full time, they contribute 2.0 to the FTE.
For
own
ers, t
he participant count should include owner or owner representative members of
the PMT, but only those participants whose labor is accounted by the Owner as part of
the cost of the project.
For contractor, participants don’t include craft labors.
Typ
ical
PMT participants are listed in the table below.


Project Phase

PMT Size (FTE’s)

Peak

Average

Front End Planning



Design



Construction




1.14

Union Site Construction Workforce



Union




Non
-
union jobsite



mixed jobsite


If mixed,


% Union work force (by work hours)

Typical PMT Participants

Project Manager

Contracting

Engineering Manager / Project Eng.

Project Controls (Cost and Schedule)

Business Manager

QA / QC

Construction Manager

Safety

Operations Manager

Operations

Discipline Engineering Leads

Maintenance

Procurement

Consultants

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2.

Engineering Deliverables


Please provide information about this project's use of engineering standards and
specifications.

Process In
dustry Practices (PIP) is a consortium of process industry
owners and engineering/ construction contractors who serve the industry. PIP publishes
“Practices" that reflect standards in many engineering disciplines.

2.1.

Source of Standards and Specifications


Strongly

Disagree

Disagree

Neutral

Agree

Strongly

Agree

NA /
UNK

0

1

2

3

4

A

The project was executed with internal
owner engineering standards and
specifications.







B

The project was executed with contractor
engineering
standards and specifications.







C

The project was executed using industry
consortia engineering practices for
standards and specifications.







D

The project was executed using Process
Industry Practices (PIP) standards and
specifications.








2.2.

Were engineering deliverables released in a timely manner?

Seldom



Sometimes



Always

1

2

3

4

5

6

7









Don’t Know


2.3.

To what extent were the engineering deliverables complete and
accurate (with minimal errors and omissions)?

Seldom
Complete
and
Accurate



Sometimes
Complete
and
Accurate




Always
Complete
and
Accurate

1

2

3

4

5

6

7









Don’t Know


2.4.

Please provide the number of RFIs issued on this project?








Don’t Know


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3.

Contract Type

[
Owner
required s
ection
; Contractor please check the contract type for your work
scope
]


Please indicate below the contract types that were used on this project. If you
had multiple contractors for a particular function, please answer the questions below in
terms of what was most common.

3.1.

What was the principal contract type
for:


Lump Sum

Cost Reimbursable

(including unit price
,
Guaranteed
Maximum Price
)

FEP

(or FEED)



Engineering or design



Procurement



Construction



Startup

/ Commissioning



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4.

Project Cost

4.1.

Budgeted and Actual Project Costs by Function

Please indicate the Budgeted (Baseline) Cost, Contingency,

and Actual Project Costs in
the table below.

1)

If this project did not include a particular function
,

please select N/A for Not
Applicable.

2)

If you know total project costs but have incomplete function information
, you
may enter as much function information

as you know and override the automatic
totaling by manually filling in the total project cost. As long as you don't click back
into a function field, your total will be accepted and recorded.

Owner Instructions

1.

Budget amounts include contingency and corr
espond to funding approved
at time of
authorization
.

This is the original baseline budget
, and should
not be updated

to include any
changes since change data are collected in a later section.

2.

The total project
budget

amount should include all
planned
expenses (
excluding

the cost of
land
)

from
Front
-
end

Planning through startup
, including amounts estimated for in
-
house salaries,
overhead, travel, etc
.

3.

The total
actual

project cost should include all
actual

project costs
(
excluding

the cost of land
)

from

Front
-
end

Planning through startup
, including amounts expended for in
-
house salaries,
overhead, travel, etc.


Contractor Instructions
: Only enter data for your scope of work

1.

Only enter cost data for your scope of work. Budget amounts should include contingency and
correspond to the estimate
at time of contract award
.
This is the original baseline budget
, and
should
not be updated

to include any changes since change data ar
e co
llected in a later section.

2.

The total
project
budget

amount should
be the
planned expenses

of all functions performed by
your company, including amounts for in
-
house salaries, overhead, travel
, etc., but
excluding the
cost of land.

3.

The total
actual

project cost should
be the
actual

project

costs
for

functions performed by your
company including amounts expended for in
-
house salaries, overhead, travel
, etc., but excluding
the cost of land.


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4.1.1.

Project Cost



Baseline Budget

(Including Contingency)

Amount of Contingency

in Budget

Actual Cost


$___________


$___________


$___________



4.1.2.

Phase Cost


Project
Function

Baseline Budget

(Including
Contingency)

Amount of
Contingency

in Budget

Actual Cost

Front
-
end
Planning

(or
FEED)

$





$




$






NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

Detail
Engineering

$





$




$






NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

Procurement

$





$




$






NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

Construction

$





$




$






NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

Startup

/
commissioning

$





$




$






NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know




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4.2.

Cost of
Project Development and Scope Changes

Please record the
approved

changes to your project by phase in the table provided
below. For each phase indicate the

net cost impact resulting from
approved

project
development changes and scope changes. Either the owner or contractor may initiate
changes.

Project Development Changes

include those changes required to execute the original
scope of work or obtain origina
l process basis.
Scope Changes

include changes in the
base scope of work or process basis.

1)

For contractors,

please only enter data for your scope of work.

2)

Changes should be reported for the time period in which they were initiated.
If
you can only provide

total amounts, please indicate Don’t Know in the pre
-
construction and construction through startup rows and indicate the total
amounts in the totals row.
As long as you don’t click back into a detail
information row, your total will be accepted and record
ed.

3)

Indicate whether the net impact was a (
-
) decrease or an (+) increase by
indicating a negative number for a decrease and a positive number for an
increase.
If no change orders were granted during a phase, please enter zero.

4.2.1.

Total project change cost:

$






4.2.2.

Change cost by
Time period

Time period

Cost Increase (+) /
Decrease (
-
) of
Project
Development
Changes

Cost Increase (+) /
Decrease (
-
) of
Scope

Changes

Change Cost

Pre
-
Construction

$





NA


Don’t Know

$





NA


Don’t Know

$





NA


Don’t Know

C潮獴s畣ti潮
t桲甠ht慲a異

$





NA


Don’t
Know

$





NA


Don’t
Know

$





NA


Don’t
Know


4.3.

Direct
Cost of
Field Rework

4.3.1.

If you tracked field rework, indicate the

Direct Cost

of field rework
.
The direct
cost of field rework relates to all costs needed to perform the rework

itself. If
there was no direct cost or schedule impact of field rework, please enter “0”.

Direct Cost of Field Rework:
$






4.3.2.

Total f
ield rework hour
s
:






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4.3.3.

What was the
primary

source of rework on this project?


Design


Construction


Suppliers


Owner


Don’t Know

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5.

Project Schedule

Please indicate your
project
's Planned Baseline and Actual Project Schedule by function:

1)

If this project did not include a particular function please select
N/A
.

2)

If you have incomplete function information
,
y
ou must enter project
execution

start and stop dates
.

P
lease enter as much function information as
possible.

Contractor Instruction
:

please only enter schedule information for your scope of work
,
excluding

FEP from execution schedule
.

Owner instruction:

execution

schedule start from the beginning of
Detail

Engineering
and the end of S
tart
-
U
p.

5.1.

Execution

Schedule


Baseline Schedule

Actual Schedule

Start

mm/dd/yyyy

Stop

mm/dd/yyyy

Start

mm/dd/yyyy

Stop

mm/dd/yyyy

Execution
Schedule















NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

5.2.

Schedule by Phase

Project Function

Baseline Schedule

Actual Schedule

Start

mm/dd/yyyy

Stop

mm/dd/yyyy

Start

mm/dd/yyyy

Stop

mm/dd/yyyy

Front
-
end
Planning

(or
FED)


















NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

Detail
Engineering


















NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

Procurement


















NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

Construction


















NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

Startup

/
Commissioning


















NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know


NA


Don’t Know

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5.3.

Percent
Design

Complet
e

5.3.1.

What percentage of the total work hours for
detail

design was completed
prior to
total project budget authorization?




%



Don’t Know


5.3.2.

What percentage of the total work hours for
detail

design was completed prior to
start of the construction phase?




%



Don’t Know


5.4.

Schedule Disruption

5.4.1.

Were there any uncontrollable or unanticipated
schedule disruption

on this
project (this does not include project changes)?





Yes


No


Don’t’ Know

5.4.2.

If
yes, what was the total duration in weeks of any uncontrollable or unanticipated
schedule disruption
?





weeks


Don’t Know

5.4.3.

Please explain the reason(s) for the
schedule disruption
(s)



















































5.5.

Schedule Impact of
Project Development and Scope Changes

Please record the
approved

changes to your project by phase in the table provided
below. For each phase indicate the

net schedule impact

resulting from
approved

project development changes and scope changes. Either the owner or contractor may
initiate chan
ges.

Project Development Changes

include those changes required to execute the original
scope of work or obtain original process basis.
Scope Changes

include changes in the
base scope of work or process basis.

1)

For contractors,

please only enter data for
your scope of work.

2)

Changes should be reported for the time period in which they were initiated.
If you
can only provide total amounts, please indicate Don’t Know in the pre
-
construction and construction through startup rows and indicate the total
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amounts
in the totals row.
As long as you don’t click back into a detail information
row, your total will be accepted and recorded.

3)

Indicate whether the net impact was a (
-
) decrease or an (+) increase by indicating
a negative number for a decrease and a positive
number for an increase.
If no change
orders were granted during a phase, please enter zero.

5.5.1.

Total schedule impact of change:




(weeks)

5.5.2.

Schedule impact of change by
time period

Time period

Schedule Increase
(+) / Decrease (
-
) of
Project
Development
Changes

(weeks)

Schedule Increase
(+) / Decrease (
-
)
of Scope

Changes

(weeks)

Schedule Change

(weeks)

Pre
-
Construction













Construction
thru Startup













Sub
-
total











5.6.

Schedule Impact of
Field Rework

5.6.1.

If you tracked field rework
, indicate the schedule impact in weeks.

If there was
no schedule impact from field rework, please enter “0”.

Schedule impact of Field Rework:



(weeks)

Page
16

of
73


6.

Achieving Facility Capacity

[
Industrial
projects only
; not applicable to Pharma
]

Indicate the
primary

product or
function of the completed facility and the unit of measure which best relates the product
or function capacity of the completed facility.

Product or Function

Design Capacity

Unit of
Measure




Examples:


Product or Function

Unit of Measure

Chemical Products

Tons/Hour

Consumer Products

Cases/Day

[
Building projects only
; not applicable to Pharma
] Please indicate the size and the
unit of measure of the completed building
facility

Size

Unit of Measure


Square Feet / Square Meters


6.1.


[
Contractor only
]

Were you involved in
startup

activities?


No



Yes



Don’t Know

[
If contractor did not perform start up activities, skip the rest of this section
.
]

6.2.

[Heavy/Light Industrial project only]

What percent of initial planned capacities
were achieved
during Startup?

______%



Don’t Know

6.3.

[Heavy/Light Industrial project only]

To what extent were product quality
specifications achieved?

Not at
All



Moderately



Fully
Achieved

Don’t
Know

NA

1

2

3

4

5

6

7











6.4.

[Building project only]

To what extent was the planned functionality of the
building achieved?

Not at
All



Moderately



Fully
Achieved

Don’t
Know

NA

1

2

3

4

5

6

7











Page
17

of
73


6.5.

To what extent were planned
project quality specifications

achieved?

Not at
All



Moderately



Fully
Achieved

Don’t
Know

NA

1

2

3

4

5

6

7














Page
18

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73


7.

Project Outcomes

Using a scale from 1 to 7, where 1 means “not at all successful” and 7 means “extremely
successful” please indicate the overall success of this project in
the following aspects
:


Not at All
Successful

Moderately
Successful

Extremely
Successful

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Meeting cost expectations








Meeting schedule expectations








Meeting safety expectations








Meeting business objectives








Meeting quality goals









Using a 1 to 7 scale where 1 means “not at all effective” and 7 means “extremely
effective”, please indicate how eff
ective the following were on this project:


Not at All
effective

Moderately
effective

Extremely
effective

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Project teamwork








Project team communications








Your working relationship with
the owner / primary contractor








The key project team members
understood the owner’s goals
and objectives of this project









Projects invariably differ in a variet
y of ways. Please indicate in the space below what
you found to be particular challenges or difficulties on this project, compared to other
comparable projects on which you have worked.






































What do you think could have imp
roved this project?


















































Page
19

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73


8.

Workhours and Accident Data

In the spaces below, please record the
safety statistics
for
this

project
.

1)

Use
the U.S. Department of Labor's OSHA

definitions for recordable injuries
among this project's workers. If you do not track in accordance with these
definitions, click Don’t Know in the boxes below.

2)

A consolidated project OSHA 300 log is the best source for the data.

Note: for the CM track
ing the safety data for the project, please report
the safety
statistics of
the whole project, or skip this section
.

8.1.

Total site work hours







Don’t Know

8.2.

Total
Number of first aids






Cases




Don’t Know

8.3.

Total OSHA Number of Recordable Incident Cases (Injuries,

Illnesses, Fatalities,
Transfers and Restrictions)




Cases



Don’t Know

8.4.

T
otal

Number of OSHA DART Cases (Days Away, Restricted or Transferred)




Cases



Don’t Know

8.5.

Total Number of Fatality Cases




Cases



Don’t Know

8.6.

Please indicate the number of Workman Compensation Claims on this project.




Cases



Don’t Know

8.7.

Please indi
cate the
total dollar value

of Workman Compensation Claims on this
project.




Cases



Don’t Know

8.8.

Percentage of Overtime Hours




%




Don’t Know



O
vertime

-

above 40 work

hours a

week
.
For example, if

working
55

hours a work, so
the overtime is
15 hours

and the percentage of overtime hours is calculated as

15 hours
overtime / 55 hours worked = 27.3% overtime
.

If the actual percentage cannot be
calculated, please provide your best assessment. Answer Don
’t Know only if you cannot
make a reasonable assessment.




Page
20

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73


9.

Project Impact Factors


Using a scale from
-
5 to +5, where
-
5 means “an extremely negative impact” compared
to what was expected or planned and +5 means an “extremely positive impact”
compared to
what was expected or planned, please indicate the extent to which each of
the following factors had a net positive impact, a net negative impact, or was essentially
as planned?


Extremely

Negative

As Planned

Extremely
Positive

Don’t
Know

-
5

-
4

-
3

-
2

-
1

0

+1

+2

+3

+4

+5

Labor Disruption













Engineering work
sequence













Owner site requirement













Engineering Deliverables













W
eather / Climate













Availability of Skilled
Labor













Materials Availability/Cost













Site Conditions













Project complexity













Regulatory requirements













Project team expertise













Project team
communication













Core project team
turnover













Use of offshore (remote)
engineering













Use of multiple design
offices













Material or labor cost
escalation













Construction productivity













Availability of
construction equipment
on the job
















Page
21

of
73


10.

PDRI

(Project Definition Rating Index)

Please refer to CII website
about
PDRI
.

Please

uses the
MS
excel

tool

or
the
link to calculate
the PDRI
score, the system need
s

to capture the score by section.


Ind
ustrial

Building

Infrastructure

Section I
-

Basis Of Project
Decision



%


%


%

Section II
-

Basis Of Design


%


%


%

Section III
-

Execution
Approach


%


%


%

Overall Score


%


%


%


11.

Practices

The following
Practices
section
s include

questions about practices implemented on this
project. Please respond to every
Practice
. If a project did not implement a certain
practice,

indicate as such and skip to the next section.


11.1.

Front
-
End

Planning

Front
-
End

Planning

involves the process of developing sufficient strategic information
such that owners can address risk and decide to commit resources to maximize the
chance for a successful project.
Front
-
End

Planning includes putting together the project
team, selecting
technology, selecting the project site, developing project scope, and
developing project alternatives.
Front
-
End

Planning is often perceived as synonymous
with front
-
end loading, pre
-
project planning, feasibility analysis, and conceptual planning.

11.1.1.

[Contractor

only
]

Did your company participate in the Front
-
End Planning
effort?


Yes, as a front
-
end planner for the owner


No, my company did not participate in the front
-
end planning effort


11.2.

Alignment During Front
-
End Planning


Alignment

is the condition where appropriate project participants are working within
acceptable tolerances to develop and meet a uniformly defined and understood set of
project objectives.

11.2.1.

Did
the project

implement

Alignment during FEP?


No


Yes


Don’t Know

Page
22

of
73


11.2.2.

How clearly was the project operations and maintenance philosophy
communicated?

Not at All,
Poorly

Fair

Very
Well

Don’t
Know

1

2

3

4

5

6

7











11.3.

Partnering


Partnering

is a commitment between two or more organizations for the purpose of
achieving specific business objectives by maximizing the effectiveness of each
participant’s resources. This requires changing traditional relationships to a shared
culture without rega
rd to organizational boundaries. The relationship is based on trust,
dedication to common goals and an understanding of each other’s individual
expectations and goals.

11.3.1.

Did you have a partnering agreement on this project with the
owner/
contractor?


No


Yes


Don’t Know


11.4.

Team Building



Team
Building

i
s a
formal

project
-
focused process that builds and develops shared
goals, interdependence, trust and commitment, and accountability among team
members and that seeks to improve team members’ problem
-
solving skills.

11.4.1.

Was a team building used
on thi
s project
?


No



Yes



Don’t Know


11.5.

Project Delivery
a
nd Contract Strategy

[
Owner only; contractors automatically skip this entire sect
ion
]

Project Delivery and Contract Strategy

involves a structured process of evaluating
and prioritizing owner’s objectives, reviewing and evaluating delivery methods and
contract types, and then determining what is the appropriate delivery method and
contract type for this project.


11.5.1.

Did you consid
er alternative project delivery methods for this project?


No



Yes



Don’t Know

Page
23

of
73


11.5.2.

Did you consider alternative contract types for this project?


No



Yes



Don’t Know


11.6.

Constructability

Constructability

is the effective and timely integration of construction knowledge into
the conceptual planning, design, construction and field operations of a project to achieve
the overall project objectives in the best possible time and accuracy, at the most cost
-
effec
tive levels.

11.6.1.

Was there a documented constructability plan for this project?


No



Yes



Don’t Know

[
Answer the next question, if yes to above.
]

11.6.2.

Was the constructability plan integrated into the projec
t execution plan?

Not at All



Variable,
Partial



Fully

Don’t
Know

1

2

3

4

5

6

7









11.6.3.

How successful was constructability?

Not at All



Neutral



Very
Successful

Don’t
Know

1

2

3

4

5

6

7










11.7.

Project Risk Assessment

Project
Risk A
ssessment

is the process to identify, assess and manage risk. The
project team evaluates risk exposure for potential project impact to provide focus for
mi
tigation strategies.

11.7.1.

How would you describe the risk assessment(s) conducted on this project?
Please select t
he statement that best fits.


No risk assessment was conducted


Informal risk assessment


Formal structured risk assessment


Don’t Know


[
Skip the rest of this section if no risk assessment was conducted or don’t know
to above.
]


Page
24

of
73


11.7.2.

Was

the risk mitigation plan
developed and
implemented?

Not at All

Partially

Fully

Don’t
Know

1

2

3

4

5

6

7










11.8.

Change Management

Change Management

is the process of incorporating a balanced change culture of
recognition, planning and evaluation of project changes in an organization to effectively
manage project changes.

11.8.1.

Was there a documented change management process for this project?


No



Yes



Don’t Know


[
Skip this
section if no or don’t know to above.
]

11.8.2.

How clearly was the change management process specified in the project
contract?

Not at all

Clear



Moderate
Clear



Very
Clear

Don’t
Know

1

2

3

4

5

6

7









11.8.3.

How well would you say key project personnel (both owners and

contractors) understood the change management process?

Not at all

Clear


Moderately Well


Very Well

Don’t
Know

1

2

3

4

5

6

7










11.9.

Zero Accident Techniques


Zero Accident T
echniques

include site specific safety programs and implementation,
and auditing and incentive efforts to create a project environment and a level of training
that embraces the mind set that all accidents are preventable, and that zero accidents
are an obtainable g
oal.

11.9.1.

Was there a written site specific safety plan for this project?


No



Yes



Don’t Know



Page
25

of
73


11.9.2.

Overall how many workers per
full time
safety
professionals
were typically
(i.e., in terms of the average workforce) on site?

Over
201

151
to 200

71
to 150

21
to 70

1 to 20

Don’t
Know








11.10.

Benchmarking

Benchmarking

is a powerful technique that provides practical learning through
comparing measurements or outcomes across industries, sectors, products or services.
The essence of benchmarking is the process of identifying the highest standards of
excellence for product
s, services or processes and then making the improvements
necessary to reach those standards.

11.10.1.

Was benchmarking results
from past projects
used to plan or execute
this project?


No



Yes



Don’t Know


11.10.2.

Is benchmarking a
close
-
out activity in your company?


No



Yes



Don’t Know


11.10.3.

What’s
driving ben
chmarking in your company?

(please check all
apply)


Providing data for continuous improvement


Establish a performance baseline


Determine performance relative to peers


Establish basis for continued project funding


11.10.4.

How long did it take to organize and input the data?



Work Hours


11.11.

Planning
for Startu
p

[
For Heavy and Light Industrial Projects Only
]


Startup

is the transitional phase between plant construction completion and commercial
operations, including all of the activities that bridge these two phases.
Planning for
Startup

consists of a sequence of activities that begins during requirements definition
a
nd extends through initial operations. This section assesses the level of Startup
Planning by evaluating the degree of implementation of specific activities throughout the
various phases of a project.

Page
26

of
73


[
Contractor only question
]

11.11.1.

Was your company
responsible for startup?

Yes, full responsibility

Yes, partial responsibility

No, not responsible at all





[
If no, contractor
s

should skip the rest of this section
; the following questions
automatically apply to owners
]

11.11.2.

To what extent was a
formal

startup execution plan developed?

Not at All Developed

Partially Developed

Very Extensively
Developed

Don’t
Know

1

2

3

4

5

6

7









11.11.3.

To what extent was a
formal

startup execution plan implemented?

Not at All
Implemented

Partially Implemented

Very Extensively
Implemented

Don’t
Know

1

2

3

4

5

6

7










11.12.

Technology Use and
Integration

This section investigates the degree of technology use and integration for specific work functions
on your project. For each work function, please use the first column to assess the level of
automation. Using the second and third columns, please assess the

level of internal company
-
level integration such as integration with other functions, project management systems and/or
company systems and external company
-
level integration such as integration with other project
stakeholders, respectively.

Use Levels

A
utomation



None (1):

No electronic tools or commonly used electronic tools, all processes completed
manually



Minimal (2):

Checklists or simple tools are available to help complete the process



Moderate (3):

Electronic tools are available to help complete pa
rt of the work



Extensive (4):

Electronic tools complete most of the work after entering input data, with
minimal amount of manual work after data are entered



Complete (5):

Entire process automatically completed after input data are entered.

Integration



None (1):

No data communication

or sharing with other electronic tools

Page
27

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73




Minimal (2):

Data
(or information) produced from the work function are transferred manually
because the data are
rarely interoperable
.




Moderate (3):

Data
(or information) produced from the work function are still manually
transferred but some data are
somewhat interoperable

with other functions/stakeholders.



Extensive (4):

Data
(or information) produced from the work function are
mostly interoperable

with o
ther functions/stakeholders and do not require manual transfer.



Complete (5):

Data
(or information) produced from the work function are
seamlessly
interoperable

with other functions/stakeholders and no manual data transfer is required.



Level of Work
Task

Automation

Level of Internal
Integration

Level of External
Integration

N/A

or

UNK


1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

Project Management

















Front End Planning

















Detail Design

















Procurement

















Construction

















Startup/Commission
ing





















Page
28

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73


12.

Engineering Productivity Metrics


General Instructions

Please enter data at the most detailed level possible to produce the most meaningful
metrics. If you cannot input data for the breakouts, please enter totals where possible.

Instructions for Computation of Work
-
Hours and Rework
-
Hours

Work
-
hours are compu
ted by the summation of all the account hours that are listed as
Direct

in the table below. All account hours listed as
Indirect

are to be
excluded

from
the work
-
hours that are submitted in the productivity data. Within a category, direct work
-
hours that c
annot be specifically assigned into the provided classifications, and have not
been excluded, should be prorated based on known work
-
hours or quantities as
appropriate. Please review the table completely before providing data in the following
sections.

Dir
ect work
-
hours should
include

all detail engineering hours used to produce
deliverables including site investigations, meetings, planning, constructability,
RFIs, etc., and rework.

Specifically exclude work
-
hours for operating manuals and
demolition drawi
ngs.



Direct

Indirect

Account


Discipline Engineer


Document Control


Designer


Reproduction Graphics


Technician


Project Management




Project Controls (cost/schedule/estimating)




Project Engineer



Secretary/clerk



Procurement (supply management)



Construction Support


(test package support, commissioning, etc.)



Quality Assurance




Accounting




Legal




Page
29

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12.1.

Engineering
Team and Workhours

12.1.1.

Please provide the total detailed engineering work hours for
this project. This
total should include work performed by all disciplines including process
engineering:





Direct Work Hours







Indirect Work Hours


12.1.2.

Please provide information regarding process design listed as follows:

Total P
&ID Work
-
Hours for This Project _________

Total Deliverables for P&ID _________


12.1.3.

Please indicate the contractor engineering project manager’s level of experience
with similar projects / process.

No
Experience


2 or 3
projects


> 5 projects


NA/
UNK

0

1

2

3

4








12.1.4.

What is the size of the engineering team in this project on the basis of 40 wk
-
hr
/week?

Maximum _________
FTE
;

Average _________
FTE;


12.1.5.

What is the percentage turnover of engineering discipline / project leads
assigned to the team in this project? __________ %


12.1.6.

Please indicate the owner engineering project manager’s level of experience with
similar projects / process.

Low

No
Experience


Medium

2 or 3
projects


High

> 5 projects

NA/
UNK

0

1

2

3

4










Page
30

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73


12.1.7.

Please indicate
owner engineering

team’s level of experience with similar
projects / process.

No
Experience


2 or 3
projects


> 5 projects


NA/
UNK

0

1

2

3

4








12.1.8.

What is the average percentage of overtime hours during detailed engineering
phase excluding shutdown?


(Overtime Hrs / Total Eng. Hrs)

<
10%

10%~20%

20%~30%

30%~40%

>40%

NA/ UNK








12.1.9.

Estimate the percentage detail engineering schedule delay because of
information delay caused by suppliers: ________ %


12.1.10.

Was the Front End

Planning (FEP) desi
gn team the same as the detail

engineering team?


No



Yes



Don’t Know

[
If
yes
, the FEP Design team was the same as the detailed engineering team,
please
skip next question
.
]

12.1.11.

On average, the interfaces between prime design contractors were well
managed a
nd fully completed.

Strongly

Disagree


Neutral


Strongly

Agree

NA/ UNK

0

1

2

3

4








12.1.12.

The schedule of detail

engineering phase in this project is aggressive
considering team size and project complexity.


Strongly

Disagree


Neutral


Strongly

Agree

NA/ UNK

0

1

2

3

4








12.1.13.

Which type of organization is the most similar to the engineering team for this
project? (Please see the definition below)

Functional
Organization

Project
Organization

Matrix
Organization

Task
Organization

NA/ UNK







Page
31

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73


Chief
Executive
Engineering
Manager
Procurement
Manager
Construction
Manager
Electrical
Engr Manager
Civil Engr
Manager
Electrical Design Mgr
Civil Design Mgr
Electrical Draftsman
Civil Draftsman

Chief
Executive
Project
Manager A
Project
Manager B
Project
Manager C
Construction
Team
Procurement
Team
Design
Team
Construction
Team
Marketing
Team
Design
Team
Construction
Team
Marketing
Team
Design
Team


Chief
Executive
VP
Engineering
VP
Project
VP
Construction
Civil Engr
Lead
Electrical
Engr Lead
Project
Manager A
Project
Manager B
Electrical
Draftsman
Electrical
Design Mgr
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
VP
Procurement
X
X
etc
.

Task Organization (for every specialized skills)



Functional Organization


Staffs are recruited, trained,
and assigned to support
projects, but are permanently
assigned to a functional
manager.

Project Organization


Staff working
on a project
report to the project manager
regardless of function.

Matrix Organization

Project managers draw support
from each function as required.
Functional managers are
responsible for recruitment,
training and technical support.

Page
32

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73


12.2.

Concrete


[
Upstream Oil and

Gas will not include this section)
]

Instructions

Please complete the following tables indicating quantity and engineering work
-
hours for the
categories appropriate to your project. If you cannot enter all data then enter totals only. Include
rework in the

work
-
hours only. If the project had no
work hours

or quantities for a category,
check
none.

The quantity of concrete is that concrete that is required for the specified slab, foundation, or
structure provided in the final Issued for Construction (IFC)
drawings.

Refer to the section “Instructions for Computation of Work
-
Hours and Rework
-
Hours” for a
detailed listing of direct hours to be included and indirect hours that are to be excluded from the
computation of the work
-
hours.

12.2.1.

Which design platform wa
s used for this category in this project? Check all that
apply.


2D




3D

Slabs

None

IFC Quantity

(cubic yards)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)


Ground & Supported Slabs





Area Paving




Total Slabs






Foundations

None

IFC Quantity

(cubic yards)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)


Foundations (< 5CY)





Foundations (>= 5CY)




Total Foundations (CY)

(Excluding piling)






None

IFC Quantity

(cubic yards)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)

Concrete Structures





This includes concrete structures, columns, beams, cooling tower
basins, trenches, formed
elevated slabs/structures, retaining walls, and drainage structures.

Page
33

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73




None

IFC Quantity

(cubic yards)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)

Total Concrete




The total concrete quantity and work hours may be
greater

than

the sum of totals for slabs,
foundations and concrete structures if the project included concrete not in these categories.



None

IFC Quantity

(each)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)


Piling





12.2.2.

Concrete Design Reuse

If the
project design includes multiple similar components that allow reuse of design effort,
estimate the percentage of the total quantity for concrete that did not require unique design.

Example:

The total concrete quantity for a project is 5,000 CY. The design

includes three
identical foundations of 1,000 CY each. There are no other identical components. The estimated
design reuse for concrete is:




2000 CY






5000 CY








=


40%















<

10%

>=

10%

>

20%

>

30%

>

40%

>

50%

>

60%

>

70%

>

80%

>


90%




12.3.

Structural Steel

Instructions

Please complete the following tables indicating quantity and engineering work
-
hours for the
categories appropriate to your project. If possible, separate data for structural steel, pipe racks
& utility bridges and miscellaneous steel. If you can not separa
te structural steel from pipe racks
& utility bridges, combine these data in the space provided below. If you cannot enter all data
then enter totals only. Include rework in the work
-
hours only. If the project had no workhours or
quantities for a categor
y,
check
none.

Page
34

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73


The quantity of steel is that quantity of steel provided in the final Issued for Construction (IFC)
drawings.

Refer to the section “Instructions for Computation of Work
-
Hours and Rework
-
Hours” for an
additional detailed listing of direct hou
rs to be included and indirect hours that are to be
excluded from the computation of the work
-
hours.

12.3.1.

Which design platform was used for this category in this project? Check all that
apply.


2D




3D

Structural Steel

None

IFC Quantity

(tons)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)

Structural Steel




This includes trusses, columns, girders, beams, struts, girts, purlins, vertical and horizontal
bracing, bolts, and nuts.

Pipe Racks & Utility

Bridges




This includes steel structures outside the physical boundaries of a major structure, which are
used to support pipe, conduit, and/or cable tray.

Combined

Structural
Steel
and Pipe Racks &
Utility
Bridges*




* Enter combined structural steel and pipe
racks & utility bridges if you cannot separate the
quantities above.

Miscellaneous Steel




This includes handrails, toeplate, grating, checker plate, stairs, ladders, cages, miscellaneous
platforms, pre
-
mounted ladders and platforms, miscellaneous
support steel including scab on
supports, “T” and “H” type supports, trench covers, and Q decking.

Total Steel




This is the total of structural steel, pipe racks & utility bridges, and miscellaneous steel from
above or the total of combined structural
steel, pipe racks & utility bridges (if not separated)
and miscellaneous steel. If you have quantities for steel not included in the breakouts above,
include them in the totals here.


12.3.2.

Structural Steel Design Reuse

If the project design includes multiple

similar components that allow reuse of design effort,
estimate the percentage of the total quantity for structural steel that did not require unique
design.

Page
35

of
73


Example:

The total steel quantity for a project is 5,000 tons. The design includes three
identical structural steel frames of 1,000 tons each. There are no other identical
components. The estimated repeated quantity for steel is:




2000 Tons






5000 Tons








=


40%















<

10%

>=

10%

>

20%

>

30%

>

40%

>

50%

>

60%

>

70%

>

80%

>


90%




12.4.

Electrical

Instructions

Please complete the following tables indicating quantity and engineering work
-
hours for the
categories appropriate to your project. If you cannot enter all data then enter totals only. Include
rework in the work
-
hours only. If the project had no
work hours

or quantities for a category,
check
none.

12.4.1.

Total Direct Engineering Electrical Work
-
Hours for This Project _________



12.4.2.

Total Connected Horsepower of Motors _________




12.4.3.

Number of Motors _________


12.4.4.

Total KVA Load of Project _________



The quantity of electrical equipment, conduit, cable trays, wire, termination, and lighting fixtures
are the quantity of each provided in the final Issued for Construction (IFC) drawings. Refer to
the section “Instructions for Computation of Work
-
Hours an
d Rework
-
Hours” for an additional
detailed listing of direct hours to be included and indirect hours that are to be excluded from the
computation of the work
-
hours.


12.4.5.

Which design platform was used for this category in this project? Check all that
apply.


2D




3D


Page
36

of
73


Electrical Equipment

None

IFC
Quantity

(each)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)

Electrical Equipment 600V & Below




Electrical Equipment Over 600V




Electrical equipment includes transformers, switchgear, UPS systems, MCCs, rectifiers, motors,
etc. This also includes work
-
hours for single line, elementary diagrams and studies. (Generator
data is collected in the power generation equipment section)


Total Electrical Equipment






None

IFC
Quantity

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)

Conduit

Linear Feet




Number of Runs



This includes power plan, cable and conduit schedule
and interconnects. Exposed /
aboveground and underground



None

IFC Quantity

(linear feet)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)

Cable Tray




This includes electrical and instrument cable trays, channels, supports, covers, etc.



None

IFC

Quantity

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)

Wire & Cable

(w/o conduit or
tray)

Linear Feet




Number of
Terminations



This includes power, control and grounding cables.



None

IFC Quantity

(each
-
Fixtures)

Engineering Work
-
Hours

(including rework)

(hours)

Lighting




This includes fixtures, conduit, wiring, panels, and control devices. Quantity to be number of