COVER SHEET FOR PROPOSALS

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COVER SHEET FOR PROPOSALS


To: Scott Mandias

From: Rosa Gambier

Date: November 8, 1999

Subject:
Curriculum proposal to convert the special topics course BY82, Biotechnology in
our fast growing world to a

permanent catalog offering.



I.

Nature of Proposal (check all that apply)



A.

Curriculum Proposals:


1.

New Curriculum



( )




2.

Curriculum Revision(s)

a.

Course addition(s)



( )

b.

Course deletion(s)



( )

c.

Course substitution(s)


(X)

d.

Course rearrangement(s)

(
)

e.

Credit distribution changes

( )


Other changes (specify)

Special topics to permanent offering.

B.

Course Proposals:




1. New Course(s)



( )




a. Addition(s)




( )




b. Deletion(s)




( )




c. Substitution(s)



(…)


2. Course Rev
ision(s)




a. Change of description


( )




b. Change of title



( )




c. Change of catalog number

(X)

d.

Change of faculty contact hours

( )


e. Other changes (specify)








II.

Votes and Recommendations (please attach or sign below)


A.

Dean

of Faculty: (attach response to letter of intent)

B.

Vote of Department:

11 favor, 3 against

Date:

Nov 5 1999.

(vote in numbers)

C.

Department Head:




Date:

(signature)

D.

Other Departments/Campuses Affected: (attach notification(s) and
responses)

E.

Class Siz
e Committee: (attach notification and response)


SUFFOLK COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Biology Department



Curriculum proposal to convert the special topics course BY82, Biotechnology in our fast
growing world to a permanent catalog offering.



Area/Divi
sion:
Sciences

Department:
Biology

Title:
Biotechnology in our fast growing world.

Catalog Description:

This course is a biology course designed for non
-
science majors. The course introduces students to
basic concepts and techniques in biotechnology and

their applications in forensic science, paternity
cases, genetic engineering, bioremediation, medicine and agriculture. It has an emphasis on the
development of laboratory skills and includes issues of social interest such as the bioethics of
genetic clo
ning, legal uses of DNA technology in criminal cases, discussions on the use of
engineered organisms for ecological control, gene therapy, disease diagnosis and food production.
This course has a "hands
-
on
-
approach" with a strong laboratory content.


I.
STATEMENT OF OBJECTIVES


After this course the student will be able to:


a. Learn basic concepts in molecular biology and biotechnology.

b. Understand the importance and use of DNA manipulation in today's world.

c.

Become familiar with laboratory techniques and data analysis.

d.

Develop practical skills in DNA manipulation

e.

Understand the application of these laboratory techniques in forensic sciences,

environmental sciences, biology, medicine and agriculture.

f.

Lea
rn to create and execute a scientific research project and to report its results in a written
format.


II. RELATIONSHIP TO STUDENTS


a. Eligibility:
This course will be open to all students.

b. Credit:
Four.

c. R
equired/Elective:

Elective.

d. Transferability:
This course will be transferable as a
science elective for non
-
science majors
.

e. Estimate of student enrollment:

This class would be limited to 16 students per class.

g.

Prerequisites:

BY14 or equivalent
is required or permission of the instructor.







III. RELATIONSHIP TO FACULTY


a. Number of current faculty available to teach this course: 1

b. Number of additional faculty needed:

None

c. Number of other staf
f needed:
One

Lab technician

d. Discipline (s) required and/or minimum preparation to teach the course.
A

thorough knowledge of molecular biology, molecular biology laboratory techniques, genetics
and biotechnology.


IV. RELATION TO THE LIBRARY


a. Additional books and resources needed:
None. The Lab will have textbooks and manuals for
student consultation. Papers will be placed on reserve by the instructor for student use.


V. RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING COURSES
AND/OR CURRICULUM


a.

Substitution/addition:
This course will be an additional offering.

b.

How is this course different?
This course is unique. Based on lectures, laboratory work,
internet use a
nd computer assignments the students will be exposed to a vast diversity of
subjects under a general context: Biotechnology and their applications to everyday life. No
other course of this nature is offered at S.C.C.C. Simultaneously, this course provide
s basic
training in laboratory work and provides students with a deep complete understanding of the
scientific background behind events that are reported in the science section of newspapers and
wide distributed publications. It sharpens basic math skills
, teaches the basics of scientific
method use, develop critical thinking and writing skills.

c.

Effect on curriculum offerings of the College:
This course will be another science


elective for non
-
science majors.

d.

What generic requirements of the required

courses in the General Studies program does
this course meet?

This course meets the following generic requirements:


Critical thinking.

Through Problem solving and laboratory exercises, students develop critical thinking skills.

Computer proficiency.

S
tudents are required to use computers for their assignments, which include the use of databanks,
such as genebank, webcutter and others. In addition, spreadsheet software programs such as Excell
and molecular biology software programs are used for the ana
lysis of lab results.


Writing across the curriculum and library information/literacy.

Students are required to maintain a laboratory notebook, to write pre
-
labs and laboratory reports,
which sharpens their writing skills as well as it develops science lit
eracy. In addition, students have
an extensive list of readings from scientific journals, science magazines, books and biotechnology
reviews.


Application to career objectives.

Students passing this course will have completed a general education science
requirement that will
allow them to obtain the associates degree.


VI.

RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER COLLEGES:


Suffolk County Community College is a pioneer in the offering of this course. The course was
offered for th
e first time in the fall semester of 1998 and spring semester 1999. At that time, this
course or similar was offered in very few schools. In the last year, similar courses has been
developed and are offered in the following academic institutions:


Univer
sity of Minnesota. ScAg 1500 Biotechnology, Society and the Environment.
http://www.plpa.agri.umn.edu/~neviny/scag1500/glance.html


Biotechnology, Society and the Environment (ScAg
1500; 3 credits; Winter quarter) is a non
-
technical introduction to biotechnology and genetic engineering and their impact on people and the
environment. ScAg 1500 is organized into four blocks of related subject material. The course begins
with a brief in
troduction to genetic engineering technology, followed by the biotechnology of
microbes (with emphasis on the bioremediation of pollution, biocontrol of environmental disease
organisms, and food microbiology), then moves onto the biotechnology of plants (w
ith emphasis on
genetically engineered crops), and ends with the biotechnology of animals and humans (with
emphasis on biopharming, genetic screening, genome mapping, and gene therapy).


University of Hawai. PMP 418 BIOTECHNOLOGY
(
http://www2.ctahr.hawaii.edu/pmp/Pmp418.html

)

Lecture course exploring the general principles, applications, and recent advances of the rapidly
growing science of biotechnology on medicine, animal science, environment, a
griculture, and
forensics. The economic and social
-
ethical issues raised by this new technology will be discussed.
Pre: BIOL 270, or consent. (Cross
-
listed as BIOL 418)


Rensselear Polytechnic Institute.

70216 Introductory Biotechnology.
http://www.rpi.edu/dept/bio/info/bioinformatics.html



The application of biological principles and materials in the production of commercially important
products. Fermentation, biocatalysis, hybridoma tec
hnology, and plant cell culture are treated in the
history and development of modern biotechnology, including social aspects. Prerequisite: 70101 or
70212. Spring term even
-
numbered years.


University of Michigan. Biology 140: Genetics and Society.

http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio140/bio140web.html



College of the Holy Cross. Genetic Engineering
.



In a lecture
-
discussion format we consider three recently developed
experimental technologies of
great social and scientific importance: recombinant DNA (gene splicing), production of monoclonal
antibodies using hybridomas, and nuclear transplantation (cloning). We study the techniques
themselves, starting at an elementary

level but progressing far enough to be able to appreciate the
incredible scientific advances they represent. Finally, we discuss the need for society to regulate this
work, the consequences of regulation, and a consideration of risks and benefits.


Kirkwo
od Community College. Iowa.
BI101T Introduction to Biotechnology.

http://www.kirkwood.cc.ia.us/cgi
-

bin/catalog/query.cgi?course=BI101T




Designed to introduce a student with little or no background i
n science to the field of
biotechnology. Approximately one
-
half of the course will consist of lecture over assigned materials
with the remaining time devoted to guest lectures in the field of biotechnology.


In addition, SUNY Stony Brook is in the process

of adopting and offering this course to their non
-
science majors. This course will transfer to SUNY schools and others as a science elective for non
-
science majors.


VII. PROPRIETY OF OFFERING THIS COURSE AT SOPHOMORE
-
JUNIOR LEVEL:


Since this would be an elective science course, it could be taken at any level. A prerequisite of
Introductory Biology is necessary as it will provide students with the needed background to
understa
nd the material in this course.


VIII. ADDITIONAL COSTS


This course is sponsored partially by a VATEA grant. Past funding from the National Science
Foundation has allowed the setup of our state of the art biotechnology lab. More information on
this faci
lity, the Biotechnology Learning Center, and its resources can be obtained at
www.sunysuffolk.edu/~gambier/biotechnologyl/
.


IX.


COURSE OUTLINE. See attachment.


Department:

Biology

Catalog
Number:
BY__

Title
: Biotechnology in our fast growing world.

Instructor:
Rosa M. Gambier, Ph.D.


1.

Catalog Description:


This course is a biology course designed for non
-
science majors. This course introduces students to
basic concepts and techniques i
n biotechnology and their applications in forensic science, paternity
cases, genetic engineering, bioremediation, medicine and agriculture. It has an emphasis on the
development of laboratory skills and includes issues of social interest such as the bioet
hics of
genetic cloning, legal uses of DNA technology in criminal cases, discussions on the use of
engineered organisms for ecological control, gene therapy, disease diagnosis and food production.
This course has a "hands
-
on
-
approach" with a strong labora
tory content.


2. Objectives:


After this course the student will be able to:


After this course the student will be able to:


a. Learn basic concepts in molecular biology and biotechnology.

b. Understand the importance and use of DNA manipulation in t
oday's world.

c. Become familiar with laboratory techniques and data analysis.

e.

Develop practical skills in DNA manipulation

h.

Understand the application of these laboratory techniques in forensic sciences,

environmental sciences, biology, medicine and a
griculture.

i.

Learn to create and execute a scientific research project and to report its results in a written
format.


3. Procedures for accomplishing these objectives:


There are going to be two weekly lectures (60 minutes) accompanied by two weekly lab
s of 2 hrs.
each. The labs have been designed to demonstrate various concepts and techniques currently used
in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology. Lab time will also be used for special projects.



4. Grading policy:


There
are going to be two lecture exams and two practical exams. If a student misses an exam, the
student will be dropped from the course. MAKE UP EXAMS ARE NOT GIVEN. Grading is based
on 1000 points and these points are distributed as follows:


Exam 1, 2 (150

pts. each).......................................... 300

Practical exams 1 and 2............................................. 200

Prelabs and other homework...................................... 100

Lab book..............................................
................. 50

Article discussion..................................................... 100

Final Project........................................................... 250




Experimental work.....................……..100



Pap
er.......................................……... 100

Final oral presentation..................…. 50



Total...........................................................1000


5. Attendance Policy


A large amount of new mate
rial will be presented at each of the class meetings. The students are
expected to attend 90% of the lecture and labs. If a student misses the equivalent of more than one
week of classes, he or she may be dropped from the course at the instructor's discre
tion. Students
who are withdrawn for poor attendance will receive a grade of W for the course. Absence at an
exam, field trip or oral presentation will be cause for be withdrawal from the course. The students
are responsible for all that transpires in c
lass whether or not they are in attendance.


6.


Textbook:

To be determined.


7.


Material to be covered.

Laboratory topics outline.



DNA revisited.

Lab equipment, measurements and micropipetting.

Agarose gel electrophoresis.

Sterile technique. Culture
of bacteria.

Bacterial transformation.


Lambda restriction digestion.

Cloning of the Human Growth Hormone (four labs).

Human DNA extraction. Polymerase chain reaction. Genes used for human
identification. Gene D1S80, TPA
-
25, ApoC, ZFY
-
ZFX and others.
STR’s.

Protein expression. SDS
-
PAGE protein analysis of different food products.

Western blot and immunodetection.


Lecture topics outline.



Introduction.
-

DNA revisited.

DNA revisited
-

Cell Biology revisited.

Microbial biotechnology: the bacterial w
orld, emerging diseases and antibiotic

uses. Antibiotic resistances. The fermentation industry.

Environmental Biotechnology: Bioremediation.

Recombinant DNA and its application in genetic engineering. Protein expression.


Protein synthesis. The enzy
me industry.

Food Biotechnology: Food, vitamins and pharmaceuticals produced by genetic

engineered organisms.

Plant Biotechnology and it uses in agriculture.

Forensics Biotechnology: Molecular Biology techniques used for human

identification in crimin
al cases, paternity cases, mass accidents (such as fires, plane

crashes, etc…). Polymerase chain reaction, STR’s, VNTR’s and other techniques

of identification.

Medical Biotechnology: gene therapy and disease diagnoses.

Animal Biotechnology: the engin
eering and cloning of animals.