HVLS FANS - College of Engineering - Southern Illinois University

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HVLS Fans: Aisin Mfg. Illinois


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PROPOSAL


HVLS FANS


to
AISIN MFG. ILLINOIS

by SALUKI ENGINEERING COMPANY, TEAM 48

Alex Kee

Bill Ennis

Joel
Chaplin

Kyle Florian

Micah Buchanan

Ryan Riffel

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November 18, 2010


Saluki Engineering Company

Senior Engineering Design Center

College of Engineering


Mailcode 6603

Carbondale IL 62901
-
6603

618
-
453
-
7031


Jim McReynolds

Facilities Engineer

11000 Redco Drive

Aisin Manufacturing Illinois

Marion, IL 62959


Mr. McReynolds,

This letter is in response to your request for proposals concerning the overall comfort of the
employees
at

your facility. Our company has assembled an impressive and competitive proposal
for your project, which you will find attached to this letter. Furthermore, I would like to
personally thank you for giving us the opportunity to submit a design proposal for
this project.

The proposal is based
off of

the need for an effective and economical system to provide a
comfortable work
ing

environment. Design goals include improvements in thermal comfort and
heating/cooling costs.


Once again, thank you for your consid
eration.


Respectfully,



Alex Kee

Project Manager, TEAM 48

Saluki Engineering Company




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Executive Summary

The Saluki Engineering Company (SEC) proposes to study three design options for the current
Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning
(HVAC) systems at AISIN Manufacturing Illinois
(AMI) to reduce temperature and energy costs, and to make a recommendation as to which
design should be implemented into AMI’s facility. The criteria for the design are cost,
effectiveness, and economical ben
efit. The primary reason for modifying the current HVAC
system is to create a system that is able to maintain a comfortable environment through the hot
summer months. During research for this pr
oposal, certain standards from t
he American Society
of Heati
ng, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) were found regarding
thermal comfort
,

and the design recommendation
s

will be based on these standards.

Design 1 will consist of adding a new chiller to the current HVAC system. The size of the n
ew
chiller needed will be calculated based on the difference between the current load capabilities
and the load requirements during the hot summer months. This addition will create a greater
efficiency regarding the chillers as well as providing lower tem
peratures for a better work
environment in the facility. Design 2 will consist of adding High Volume Low Speed (HVLS)
fans to the facility to supplement the current HVAC system to improve the humidity level and air
flow, which will increase comfort in the

facility even if the temperature stays the same. If
Designs 1 or 2 will not provide the desired conditions

cost
-
effectively
, then the two options will
be combined to make up Design 3. An energy audit and economic analysis will also be included
in the stu
dy.

The projected date of completion for the proposed engineering study and design recommendation
is April 26
th
, 2011. It is estimated that there will be no cost to the Client for the study and design
recommendation, since this project will be carried ou
t from a consulting standpoint
,

and all
resources and instruments needed are on hand.


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RESTRICTION ON DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION

The information provided in or for this proposal is the

confidential, proprietary property of the
Saluki Engineering Company of Carbondale, Illinois, USA. Such information may be used
solely by the party to whom this proposal has been submitted by Saluki Engineering Company
and solely for the purpose of evalu
ating this proposal. The submittal of this proposal confers no
right in, or license to use, or right to disclose to others for any purpose, the subject matter, or
such information and data, nor confers the right to reproduce, or offer such information for

sale.
All drawings, specifications, and other writings supplied with this proposal are to be returned to
Saluki Engineering Company promptly upon request. The use of this information, other than for
the purpose of evaluating this proposal, is subject to

the terms of an agreement under which
services are to be performed pursuant to this proposal.

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Table of Contents

Transmittal Letter (AK)

................................
................................
................................
..................

2

Non
-
Disclosure Statement

................................
................................
................................
............

4

Introduction (AK)

................................
................................
................................
.........................

7

Literary Review (MB)
................................
................................
................................
...................

7

I. HVLS FANS (JC/RR)
................................
................................
................................
............

7

Table 1: Comparison of HVLS Fans [7], [8], [9] (RR)

................................
...........................

7

Concepts (JC)

................................
................................
................................
..........................

7

Figure 1: Typical Air Foil Design for Fan Blade [4] (JC)

................................
.......................

8

Figure 2: HVLS Fan Air Circulation [4
] (JC)

................................
................................
.........

8

Benefits (JC)

................................
................................
................................
............................

8

II. HVAC SYSTEMS (AK/BE)

................................
................................
................................

9

Chillers
-

Background (
BE
)

................................
................................
................................
.....

9

Current Setup(AK/BE
-

Controls)

................................
................................
.........................

10

III. THERMAL COMFORT (MB)
................................
................................
........................

10

Figure 3: Thermal Interaction of the Human Body with the Environment
[12] (MB)

..........

11

Figure 4: ASHRAE Summer and Winter Comfort Zones [12] (MB)

................................
..

12

Figure 5: Air Speed to Offset Temp above Warm
-
Temp Boundaries of Figure 2 [12] (MB)

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

12

Figure 6: A
ir Velocities and Operative Temperatures at 50% RH Necessary for Comfort of
Persons in
Summer

Clothing at Various Levels of Activity

[12] (MB)

................................

13

Figure 7: Draft C
onditions
Dissatisfying

15% of Population

[12] (MB)

..............................

14

Figure 8: Percentage of People Dissatisfied as Function of Mean Air Velocity
[12] (MB)

.

14

IV. SUM
MARY (MB)

................................
................................
................................
.............

15

Basis of Design (RR)

................................
................................
................................
...................

15

Table 2: Design Basis (RR)

................................
................................
................................
...

15

Project Description (AK/MB)

................................
................................
................................
....

15

Figure 9: Block Diagram (MB)

................................
................................
.............................

16

Engineering Specification (MB)
................................
................................
................................
.

16

Scope of Work (BE
)

................................
................................
................................
....................

16

Subsystems (MB/JC)

................................
................................
................................
...................

17

1.

Current Load Capabilities (MB)

................................
................................
....................

17

2.

Energy Audit (MB)

................................
................................
................................
..........

17

Figure 10: Example for Energy used in Cooling (MB)

................................
.........................

17

3.

Required Load Calculations (MB)

................................
................................
.................

17

Application for Cooling Load (MB)

................................
................................
......................

18

Figure 11: Schematic Relation of Heat Gain to Cooling Load (M
B)

................................
....

18

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Infiltration (MB)

................................
................................
................................
....................

19

Auxiliary Heat Sources (MB)

................................
................................
................................

19

Conduction (Thermal Transmittance) (MB)

................................
................................
..........

20

RTSM for Cooling Load Calculations (MB)

................................
................................
.........

21

Load Calculation Based on History of Energy
Consumption and Ambient Temps. (MB)

...

21

4.

Design 1: Additional Chiller (AK)

................................
................................
..................

22

5.

Design 2: HVLS Fans (JC)

................................
................................
..............................

22

6.

Design 3: Combined System (MB)
................................
................................
..................

23

7.

Control System (AK)

................................
................................
................................
.......

23

8.

Economic Analysis (MB)

................................
................................
................................
.

23

References (MB
-

compile/edit)

................................
................................
................................
..

24

HVLS FANS (JC/RR)

................................
................................
................................
.............

24

HVAC Systems (AK/BE)

................................
................................
................................
........

24

Thermal Comfort (MB)

................................
................................
................................
..........

24

Commercial (MB)

................................
................................
................................
.......................

25

Resources Needed (MB)

................................
................................
................................
..........

25

Organizational Chart (MB)

................................
................................
................................
.......

25

Draft Schedule

(MB)

................................
................................
................................
...............

27

Draft Schedule
-

Detailed

(JC/MB)
................................
................................
........................

28

AIL

(MB)

................................
................................
................................
................................
..

29

Appendix
-

Resumes

30




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Introduction

In the summer months, when temperat
ures
reach well above 90°F
, buildings turn into ovens.
To
counteract the outside conditions, most buildings are fitted with an air conditioning/ventilation
system.
I
n some industrial settings

with large machines
creating

a massive amount of heat, these
systems

are not enough to
maintain a comfortable environment which

creates a prob
lem for
industrial production.
Production requires employees to do the work needed to
maintain a steady
process of production
, but when employees are uncomfortable production

can

dec
rease heavily.
American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air
-
Conditioning Engineers

(ASHRAE)

provides optimum
environment
al conditions

for
worker comfort.
The goal of this project is to
find a way to provide such an environment
as

will not only

help to

increase production

through
supplying thermal comfort
, but also cut down on energy costs.

Literary Review

I. HVLS FANS

High Volume Low Speed (HVLS) fans are a relatively new technology that is starting to gain
much momentum in the HVAC world. Si
nce the technology is so new, there are only a few
major producers of these fans which include
Macro Air
,
BigAssFans,
and
Rite
-
Hite
. Table 1
shows some specifications of fans comparable in maximum displacement and horsepower from
these companies.

Table 1: Comparison of HVLS Fans

[7]
,
[8]
,
[9]

Because Aisin has decided to test out a fan from
Marco Air
, this is where the project will start.
Macro Air

has a wide range of fans from which to choose. They have a fan for any situation
and available in every electrical voltage, so
they

can be imp
lemented into the existing electrical
system with minimal work. Currently, Aisin is using the MaxAir24 (see Table 1) as a
demonstration model on the floor.

Concepts

HVLS fans were designed by looking at the physics of air movement and at how to improve th
e
overall efficiency. The first thing that was addressed was how to make a fan that needed a less
powerful motor. Since the laws of physics dictate that the power needed to drive a fan is equal to
Company

MacroAir

Big Ass
Fans

Big Ass
Fans

Rite
-
Hite

Rite
-
Hite

Rite
-
Hite

Model Name

MaxAir24

Powerfoil
X

Powerfoil
X Plus

Revolution

Revolution

Revolution

Diameter (ft.)

24

24

24

24

20

16

# of Blades

6

10

10

4

4

4

Power of Motor (HP)

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

2.0

Max Displacement (CFM)

376,804

345,941

368,516

428,000

400,000

365,000

Max Speed (RPM)

65

42

39

48

58

72

Max Effective Area (ft
2
)

20,000

20,000

30,000

22,000

20,000

20,000

Fan Weight

236

439

446

300

292

284

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the speed of the fan cubed, the logical answer would be t
o create a low speed fan. Using this
logic engineers began looking at ways to design low speed fans. To do this they turned their
attention to the fi
eld of aviation. This is from where

the idea
came
to use an airfoil shape for the
blades of the fan.


Figure 1
: Typical Air Foil Design for Fan Blade
[
4
]

These airfoil blades let the fans move large quantities of air at very low speeds.
The fan blades
use an air foil design with greater pitch on the blade to get air flow upwards of 300,000 cfm and
produce

around 100 lbf of thrust.

The chord length also affects the performance of the blade (in
general, the longer the chord length the more lift the blade will have).

The design is especially
impressive as this air movement is all done at a low velocity, allo
wing workers to remain
undisturbed by windy conditions. Instead the fans produce low speed columns of air that hit the
ground and spread out along the floor, reaching well beyond the footprint of the fan.
This effect
is called the floor jet and has a heig
ht that is directly proportional to the diameter of the fan.
Under ideal conditions a 24ft fan would produce a floor jet of 108 inches. The figure

below

illustrates the air movement of the fan in a large room.




Figure 2
: HVLS Fan Air Circulation
[
4
]

Another carry over from aviation is the concern for weight. Since weight is the enemy when one
is trying to make something fly, the wings and rotors are made of lightweight strong materials
such as aluminum and advanced alloys. Using this technology in t
he fans helped reduce the
rotating mass and hanging weight of the fan, and since the technology is already there, costs are
kept reasonable. The extremely efficient design along with a small rotating mass allows these
fans to be powered by 1hp
-
2hp electric

motors. This translates to cheap operating costs since
much fewer fans would be required to keep conditions comfortable.

Benefits

HVLS fans result in decreased energy costs in relation to heating and cooling in every facility
that has been looked into.

From research, the actual energy savings
have

varied based on the
size of the building, layouts, and individual comfort levels, but seem to range from 10 to 30%.
Besides energy savings, there are also many other benefits of HVLS fans. When installed in
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b
uildings, people report that the humidity levels have decreased significantly, the air quality has
improved due to better mixing of the air, and worker productivity has also improved. In the
summer months, these fans are best used at a high speed setting,
pushing a lot of air down from
the ceiling. In the winter, most people want to reverse the fans to get the best effect. However,
this is actually counterproductive. The most effective way to use these fans during cold months
is to keep them blowing down

but at a very slow speed. This gradually moves the hot air down
to the workers without creating any draft effect or wind chill, as discussed later.

[1], [2], [3], [4],
[5]

II. HVAC SYSTEMS

In order to study the effects of adding HVLS fans to the
environment, it is important to have a
solid understanding of HVAC (heating, ventilating, and air
-
conditioning) systems


both of how
they work and what the current setup at Aisin is. If the addition of fans is insufficient to reach
requirements, it is pos
sible that additional cooling will be required via a new chiller or some
other method of HVAC.

Chillers
-

Background

HVAC chillers are refrigeration systems that provide cooling for industrial and commercial
applications. Chillers consist of a compressor,

condenser, thermal expansion valve, evaporator,
reservoir, and stabilization assembly. Chilled water systems operate like a normal air
conditioning unit except they use water instead of refrigerant in the condenser unit. A water
-
cooled air chiller works
by pumping refrigerant through coils that cool the water, filling the
condenser coils with the circulating cool water. Refrigerant is compressed, creating a high
pressure gas. The condenser uses cool water to condense the compressed gas turning it into a

warm liquid. The warm liquid goes through the thermal expansion valve releasing refrigerant
into the evaporator while converting the warm liquid into a cool, dry gas. A hot gas bypass is
generally used to warm up the evaporator to stabilize the temperat
ure of the chilled water. The
water is then pumped from the reservoir to the compressor to start the cycle over. The
temperature of the water pumped through the coils is determined by the set point of the chiller.
The temperature change through the chil
ler is typically around
10
o
F
. The normal temperature of
the water leaving the chiller is generally around 45
o
F
, so the water returning to the chiller is
generally around 55
o
F
.
[10]

Chiller Controls

There are three different sizes for the power sources of
the

chiller controls
. These power sources
are given by three numbers separated by forward
slashes, which refer to the voltage, frequency
and phase.

The power sources for the controls come in the following sizes: 208
-
230/60/3,
380/50/3, and 460/60/3. HVA
C chillers can have a local or a remote control panel with
temperature and pressure indicators. Some control units also have microprocessor controls,
emergency alarms, and an integral pump. HVAC chillers can also be used to cool plastics,
printing equipm
ent, laser cutting machines, and magnetic resonance imaging equipment. The
microcomputer control panel includes all controls necessary for the safe and reliable operation of
the chiller. There are many types of controls available for chillers. Fastforwar
d adaptive control
is a predictive control strategy used to compensate for load changes. Soft loading is a control
used to accommodate load changes or temperature set point by gradually applying these changes,
preventing unnecessary cycling by the chiller
. Multi
-
objective limit arbitration keeps the chiller
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focused on its main priority (evaporator

exit

temperature) until it can no longer obtain its ideal
temperature, then it switches to the chiller

s
second main priority
. The adaptive frequency drive
con
trol mathematically figures the best position for the inlet guide which allows the system to
run longer and
higher

efficiency. The variable primary flow control reduces the energy
consumed by pumps. Variable flow compensation improves the chiller

s abili
ty to accommodate
variable flow. With this information, it will be possible to look into coupling the systems (HVLS
fans and chillers)
to
find the best method for controlling the systems.

[11]
,
[12]

Advantages of Chillers

Air chillers are convenient as th
ey permit components of the system to be sold separately,
allowing the engineer to

strategically

place different parts of the system to accommodate space
specifications. Chilled water refrigeration systems are preferred because of their contained use
of r
efrigerant. The refrigerant in these units is centralized minimizing the risk for leaks or
making
them

easier to contain if one does arise.

Current Setup

HVAC systems are used to make for a more comfortable indoor environment and are employed
by many
different sizes of indoor environments ranging from an automobile to a 290,000 square
foot automobile component manufacturing plant such as Aisin Mfg. There are also different
types of HVAC systems. Trane offers a Direct
-
Expansion Unitary System, where a
n evaporator
is in direct contact with the air stream, and a Chilled Water Applied System, which is the system
currently in use at Aisin. A chilled
-
water applied system uses “chilled water to transport heat
energy between the airside, chillers and the out
doors” (Trane). Trane is not the only HVAC
manufacturer

on

the market; during a period of expansion, Aisin doubled the size of its
manufacturing facility and added an Aaon HVAC system to the addition which is similar to the
existing Trane setup. The chill
ers at Aisin have a capacity of 400 tons, and are set to cool the
water to 42

o
F
. They are connected to seventeen roof top units that pump out the cooled air.
Twelve of the roof top units (six on the original side and six on the addition) are responsible

for
providing conditioned air to the main manufacturing section of the building that is being studied.
With temperatures topping out around

83
to

85
o
F

inside the manufacturing section, these chillers

run
at maximum capacity 24 hours a day. During the su
mmer months, the temperature level in
the plant often reaches unacceptable levels, and since the chillers are running at full capacity
during this time, there is no way for the current system to keep the environment at a comfortable
temperature.

In such si
tuations, many companies have made the decision to simply add another chiller to the
equation. However, chillers that are the size of those at Aisin are quite expensive, and there are
other ways to deal with these uncomfortable temperatures. In looking f
or a solution to the
problem at Aisin, the effect of airflow through the plant to make for a more comfortable working
environment will be studied. One way to improve the airflow is the addition of the HVLS fans
in order to circulate the cool

air

from the
AC units to all employees on the plant floor.

III. THERMAL COMFORT

Thermal comfort, as stated by ASHRAE Standard 55, is “that condition of mind that expresses
satisfaction with the thermal environment”
.

In itself, thermal comfort is not quantifiable but i
s
based on one’s physical, psychological, physiological, as well as other processes. However, it is
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possible from an engineering standpoint to procure quantitative stipulations for an environment
that will provide for thermal comfort for an estimated perce
ntage of satisfied population. These
standards are based on combined calculations of a heat transfer energy balance of the human
body in varying conditions as well as results of surveys taken of people in these environments.
The environmental factors affec
ting a person’s thermal balance and therefore his or her thermal
comfort include the surrounding ai
r
dry bulb temperature, humidity, relative velocity, and
radiation
[13]
. Besides these, personal variables including the amount of activity and clothing of
a

person also affect his or her thermal comfort.


While some aspects of thermal comfort from the biological standpoint are beyond the scope of
this review, providing a comfortable work environment is essential for employee contentment.
Estimating thermal comfort can be simplified by doing an energy balanc
e on the body, as done
by ASHRAE (see Figure
3
), taking into consideration the majority of methods of heat transfer to
and from the body.


Figure
3
: Thermal Interaction of the Human Body with the Environment

[12]

The most applicable portion of thermal co
mfort for this project deals with the effect of wind
speed and humidity on thermal comfort (in relation to temperatures), both of which could
potentially be affected by the installation of HVLS fans and/or an additional HVAC unit.
Although based

on
a
nearly sedentary leve
l of activity, Figure 4

gives an estimate of acceptable
levels of operative temperature and humidity for environments of little to no air movement for
people wearing clothing appropriate for the season (1.0/0.5 clo winter/summer).

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Fi
gure
4
: ASHRAE Summer and Winter Comfort Zones

[12]

With the addition of the HVLS fans, the hope is that the HVAC units will run at a lower load and
that a higher temperature will be acceptable with the increased air movement. This would allow
for p
otenti
al energy saving. Figure 5

displays the air speed required to offset temperatures above
ideal operative temperat
ure
[12]
. Similarly, Figure
6

shows necessary air velocities for operative
temperatures at 50% relative humidity to maintain comfort for differ
ent levels of activity
measured in mets.


Figure 5
: Air Speed to Offset Temp above Warm
-
Temp Boundaries of Figure 2

[12]


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Figure
6
: Air Velocities and Operative Temperatures at 50% RH Necessary for Comfort of
Persons in
Summer

Clothing at Various Levels of Activity

[12]

It should also be mentioned that fans potentially could reduce dissatisfaction due to radiant
temperature asymmetry and vertical air temperature difference, as a significant amount of mixing
and more even condit
ions would occur throughout the plant,

discussed earlier.


With an increase in air speed, it is possible to cause discomfort due to drafts, especially during
winter months. Active persons are much less sensitive to these discomforts
(McQuiston)
, and it
can

be assumed that the majority of workers on the floor that would be affected by HVLS fans
will be somewhat active. However, in the winter months for workers doing near sedimentary
work, draft

could potentially become an issue. For this reason, it is import
ant to examine effects
of air movement on this subject. As stated earlier, in the winter HVLS fan manufacturers
recommend running the fans at lower speeds. This will cause warm air near the ceiling to be
slowly pushed downward. Figure 7

shows the effects o
f wind speeds and turbulences causing
15% of the population to be dissatisfied. It would be wise to keep this concept in mind in
determining operating conditions of HVLS fans or the HVAC system as a whole.
Along these
same lines, Figure 8

shows the percent
age of people dissatisfi
ed
for different temperatur
es as air
velocities increase
[12]
.

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Figure
7
: Draft Conditions
Dissatisfying

15% of Population

[12]



Figure
8
: Percentage of People Dissatisfied as Function of Mean Air Velocity

[12]

Using this gathered information and applying it while making calculations and modeling
installation of the HVLS fans and/or a new HVAC system/chiller, it will be possible to create an
environment that will be comfortable for team members working on the flo
or at Aisin. Knowing
these requirements will allow modeling to be done in such a manner as to provide a comfortable
work environment while potentially
reducing

heating and cooling costs.

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While this information is for standard acceptable conditions, it shou
ld be noted that Aisin has
their own requirements. The plant area where the study will be done is required to be in the range
of 68 to
82
o
F
. While a specific humidity range is not required, a comfortable working
environment is necessary for team members wo
rking on the floor.

IV. SUMMARY

From what this information gathered, the thought is to create three possible solutions using a
combination of these systems researched. Using the current chiller setup and knowing current
conditions, it will be possible to
find the load of which Aisin is currently capable. Also, it will be
possible to perform load calculations to find the load required of the HVAC system in a worst
case scenario (using data from the hottest days of the year). Knowing the difference between
t
hese two loads, the load required to fulfill the need at Aisin will be known. From this point, it
will be possible to choose an appropriate system or combination of systems to make up this
difference.

Three design systems will be investigated and set forth

as options to Aisin: an additional chiller
to supplement the current chiller, a setup of HVLS fans, and a combination of these. For
choosing the additional chiller size, the information gathered in the load calculations can be used
directly, choosing a sy
stem capable of the load differences. For the HVLS fans option,
conditions for thermal comfort based on wind speeds, humidity, temperature gradient, etc. will
be used to determine the number and placement of fans. For the combined system, the possibility
o
f using both of the systems on a smaller level will be investigated. Cost analyses can then be
applied to each setup to help determine the best design.

Basis of Design

The documents listed
in Table 2

provide

the basis for

the designs
of SEC Team
48. In the

event
of a conflict between the Request for Proposal (RFP) and the Client’s design requests stated in
the project definition, the Client’s design requests control. As new data become
s

available, Client
may supply additional data and criteria that will be
incorporated into the designs. All designs will
comply with the 2011 National Electric Code.





Table
2
: Design Basis

Project Description

The purpose for modifying the current HVAC system is to create a more comfortable work
environment when the
current system cannot keep up with the ambient conditions. This
modification must keep the environment at a comfortable temperature while reducing energy
usage to cool the facility.

Three designs to fix Aisin’s cooling problem will be submitted to
Aisin
for consideration
, as described below, along with a brief economic analysis of each. Prior
Request for Proposal (RFP)

16
-
Sept
-
10

SEC RFP Project Definition


Attachment 1

16
-
Sept
-
10

SEC RFP Design Report Deliverables Checklist


Attachment 2

16
-
Sept
-
10

2011 National Electric Code (NEC)

16
-
Sept
-
10

Proposal for Project # F10
-
48
-
AISINFAN

18
-
Nov
-
10

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to these designs, a look at current load capabilities at Aisin will be investigated, as will a load
size required to maintain acceptable conditions during peak cooli
ng. Also, an energy audit of the
current system will be done as a basis for the economic analysis. The layout of these subsystems
is shown below in a block diagram.

The block diagram is composed of three levels, the
design
activities of each being able to
be
done simultaneously.


Figure 9: Block Diagram

Engineering Specification

The output of this project will be three proposed designs to solve Aisin’s problem of cooling to
comfortable temperatures during peek cooling times. Designs will be
done

so as to
produce

year
-
round comfort, keeping temperatures between
68
and

82
o
F

as required by Aisin, or at equivalent
conditions according to ASHRAE’s definitions of thermal comfort based on incorporated wind
speeds

and other conditions

(see
Literary Review section on Thermal Comfort
)
.

Scope of Work

The following subsystems of this project give in some detail what will be designed and presented
to Aisin. For anything beyond what is stated, Team 48 is not

responsible

though additional work
may be done as time allows
. Team 48 will be working only as a consulting
group

and will not
make a final decision
as to

which direction Aisin should go
.

It will be merely submitting
suggested designs as it finds will be
useful
. Team 48 is not responsible for the results of any
systems implemented at Aisin.

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Subsystems

1.

Current Load Capabilities

In order to determine what will be needed in order to maintain thermal comfort throughout the
year, it will first be important to e
xamine the current system and find what it is capable of
cooling (and heating


to be used to later examine energy savings). To do this, the ratings of the
current chillers will be taken to find cooling ability.


Also, temperatures at which the chiller be
comes unable to keep up will be examined, and
conditions at which this occurs will be noted.

Deliverables

Deliverables will include a report of the calculated total load capabilities.

2.

Energy Audit

Using past energy bills, an energy audit will be done to fi
nd current costs of heating and cooling.
This will be done by plotting average monthly gas and electrical usages from 2005 to 2010. For
heating, the approximated base load will be taken to be the amount of gas used during summer
months, and for cooling, th
e base load can be approximated by finding the electrical usage
during the winter months. This will allow for calculating the approximate energy used in both
heating and cooling by finding the amount under the curve but above the baseline (see example
Figu
re
10
.)


Figure
10
: Example for Energy used in Cooling

Deliverables

From the calculations done, all spreadsheets will be submitted to Aisin showing results of the
energy audit.

3.

Required Load Calculations

To determine the unit size needed to offset the current chiller system for year
-
round thermal
comfort at Aisin, an approximation of the actual load required to cool to desired temperatures
700000
750000
800000
850000
900000
950000
BTU

Electricity Used Monthly

COOLING

LOAD

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will be calculated. This load calculation will be based off of a ti
me when Aisin is running at full
production and when ambient temperature is at a design temperature of 100°F (99% of the time,
the ambient temperature in Southern Illinois is below this temperature).

Application for Cooling Load

Description of Heat Gain

H
eat gain is the rate at which energy is generated or transferred within a space. This energy can
be sensible or latent heat and must be computed separately. This heat gain can be in the form of
heat conduction through boundaries, sensible heat convection a
nd radiation from surfaces within
the space, latent heat generation within the space, solar radiation into the space, and ventilation
and infiltration air.

Description of Cooling Load

Cooling load is the rate at which energy must be removed from a conditi
oned space in order to
maintain the conditions with the space. It is different from the heat gain because radiation from
inside wall surfaces and objects inside do not heat the air inside the space directly. The
contribution to the cooling load from this r
adiant energy is delayed because the energy is first
absorbed by floors and interior walls and then later released to the space by convection. This is
displayed in the following schematic.


Figure 1
1
: Schematic Relation of Heat Gain to Cooling Load

Design

Conditions

Design conditions are given by ASHRAE, and will be used in load calculations. These
conditions include dry bulb and mean coincident wet bulb temperatures that equaled or exceeded
0.4%, 1%, and 2% of the hours during a year. Also, daily range of

dry bulb temperatures is given
for the difference between the average maximum and minimum for the warmest month, which
has an effect on the energy stored by the building structure. Also given are mean wind speed and
wind direction for the 0.4% design cond
ition. However, for summer conditions the local wind
velocity is generally assumed to be about 7.5 mph or 3.4 m/s.

Depending on the time of day, the hourly outdoor temperature is assumed to vary between the
outdoor design temperature and a minimum value o
f temperature. Thus is given by the following
equation:








(

)

where



is the design dry bulb temperature,


is the percentage of daily range, and


is the
daily range. All of these conditions are supplied by ASHRAE as well as McQuiston.

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Infiltration

Outside air leaks into a building no matter how well constructed it may be and an equal amount
of conditioned air leaks out of the building. This leakage of air through cracks and openings
around doors and windows is called infiltration air, which results
in heat loss or gain. Because
Aisin has many bay doors which may be opened at different times, this value may be somewhat
difficult to find. Although not part of the project per se, it would be suggested that Aisin that air
curtains be looked into for any
bay doors that are often in use. This may help to reduce heat
gain/loss from these points. Also, it may be possible to tie in rooftop units or proposed HVLS
fans to the doors to allow them to be automatically turned off in the vicinity of the door when
ope
ned.

Air Change Method

For cooling load calculations, infiltration and required ventilation will be combined and
estimated as close as is possible from further investigation. The air
-
change method will be used
to calculate what effect this has on heat gai
n/loss. For this method, the flow rate of outdoor air
that crosses the boundary of the building and requires conditioning is expressed in terms of air
changes per hour (ACH). This relationship is shown in the following equation:


̇









where

̇

is infiltration in cfm or m
3
/s,


is building volume in ft
3

or m
3

and



is 60 for English
units and 3600 for SI units. ACH depends on construction, building type and use. Newer
buildings, such as Aisin, generally are in a range of 0.3 to 0.7 ACH. Howe
ver, losses from the
bay doors
may
need to be added into this, as will any values from ventilation.

Infiltration is usually based on volume flow rate at outdoor conditions. Therefore, the equation
for calculating latent heat transfer due to infiltration i
s


̇





̇


(


)




where



(





)

or



(





)

depending whether the HVAC system is heating
or cooling,



is the specific volume of the outdoor air, h
fg

is latent heat of vaporization at
outdoor conditions and


is the difference in design humidity ratio.

Similarly, sensible heat transfer due to infiltration is


̇





̇




(


)


where



(





)

or



(





)

depending whether the HVAC system is heating or
cooling,



is the specific h
eat of the air, and



is the difference in design temperature.


Auxiliary Heat Sources

Another large source responsible for heat gain is auxiliary heat sources from within the plant.
Being a manufacturing plant with several plastic injection lines and st
eam ovens, Aisin has
several large sources of heat from equipment as well as from its team members and lighting.

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Occupancy

Having over 700 employees, split up over 3 shifts, Aisin will definitely have a heat gain due to
occupancy. This heat gain is made up

of sensible and latent heat, the proportions of which
depend on the level of physical activity. Typical values of these ratios are given by ASHRAE
and will be used in these calculations. Also, for occupancy, it is generally assumed that sensible
heat gain

is 70% radiative (which will be slightly delayed) and 30% is convective (instant
cooling load).

Lights

Lighting is divided into radiative and convective loads. Lights are often turned off at times to
conserve energy. When lights are turned off, the cooli
ng load will decrease, but it does not
immediately go to zero due to the radiative component.

The instantaneous rate of heat gain is given by the following equations:


̇




(







)

(Btu/hr)


̇

(







)

(SI)

where


is the total ligt wattage,



is the use factor, and



is the ballast factor. Heat gain to a
conditioned space from fluorescent lighting is assumed to be 59% radiative and 41% convective.

Equipment

For cooling load calculations, heat gain from miscel
laneous equipment is generally assumed to
be 70% radiative and 30% convective.

Likely the largest source of heat gain at Aisin is due to equipment. To find this portion of gain,
the different types of equipment will be researched to find estimated amounts
of heat given off.
If this cannot be found, heat gain will be estimated based off of energy used in the process,
assuming that a given percentage is eventually turned to heat, i.e. for a plastic injection machine,
nearly all electricity used to run the mac
hine ends up as heat either given off from the machine
and barrel or by the process. Some energy is used to open and close the mold, and this
percentage would be estimated and subtracted.

There are two basic forms of calculating heat gain from equipment.
Evaluation
B
ased on
Operating Schedule

will be used if possible, which examines each piece of equipment
individually. Equations can be used for electrical motors and other types of equipment. When not
enough information is given, the maximum hourly heat ga
in can be estimated using 50% of the
catalog input rating.


Otherwise, a simpler method is the
Wattage
-
Per
-
Square
-
Foot Basis

which is generally employed
when not enough data is available for the use of the first method. This method uses estimate
factors es
tablished by experience for a given type of building and multiplies this by the square
footage.

Conduction (Thermal Transmittance)

This portion of the load calculation incorporates the effects of solar radiation, thermal radiation,
and convection. To calc
ulate this heat gain, the hourly outdoor air dry bulb temperature T
o

and
the effective temperature of outdoor air (sol
-
air temperature) are first calculated as shown:
















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where



is the hourly outdoor air dry bulb temperature,


is solar absorptivity,



is total solar
irradiation incident on the surface, h
o

is the exterior surface heat transfer coefficient/conductance,
and



is thermal radiation correction term (7°F f
or horizontal surfaces and 0°F for vertical
surfaces).

Because there are basically no windows on the floor at Aisin, conduction heat gains for due to
windows will be negligible. For the walls and the roof, after hourly



and



for a surface have
been

determined for all the 24 hours of the design day, the heat conduction at the inside surface
of the walls and roof is obtained from the equation


̇





(







)







where


is surface area,



is the nth periodic response facto
r,





is the value of


, n hours
ago and



is the room temperature. Periodic response factors for multilayer walls will be
found using a computer program (HvacLoadExplorer) which is associated with McQuiston.

Alternatively, a simpler me
thod of finding thermal transmittance may be used, which is not
applicable to the RTSM for cooling but will allow for an easy method of finding heat gain due.
This is the following.







where


is the U
-
factor equal to the inverse of the resistance

and



is the temperature
difference of the conditioned space and the ambient.

RTSM for Cooling Load Calculations

This method applies a radiant time series to the radiative portion of the heat gain. For this reason,
all gains must be divided into both th
e radiative and convective parts. The hourly cooling load
due to the radiative portion of each heat gain is obtained using the following equation.









̇







̇





̇







̇








̇










̇





where r
n

is the nth radiant time factor,





is the cooling load at the current hour, and

̇




is
the heat gain, n hours ago.

Design Activities

List of activities

for the RTSM calculation for load requirement include:



Determination of exterior boundary
conditions
-
incident solar radiation and sol
-
air
temperatures



Calculation of heat gains



Splitting of heat gains into radiative and convective portions



Determining of cooling loads due to the radiative portion of heat gains



Summation of loads due to convecti
ve and radiative portions of heat gains

Load Calculation Based on History of Energy Consumption and Ambient Temps.

This method will be used as a check on the previous approach to load sizing calculations. This
method uses the history of energy usage as wel
l as corresponding average ambient temperatures
along with the SEER rating of the system to calculate expected loads given an ambient
temperature. Using a design temperature, it will then be possible to find the required load.

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This method will give the ex
pected cooling load at a given temperature. To find the maximum
load, an error analysis will be done, and the maximum load will be estimated based on a chosen
prediction interval, e.g. at 90% confidence, the predicted cooling load at 95/78F (typical design

conditions) is 225 Btu/sf +/
-
50Btu/sf.

Deliverables

Deliverables for the Load

Calculation subsystem will include spreadsheets produced using the
RTSM procedure, listing the load requirement found as well spreadsheets produced for load
calculation require
ments based on the history of energy consumption.

This information will be
incorporated into the final design report submitted to Aisin.

4.

Design 1: Additional Chiller

In order for the HVAC system to keep up w
ith the troubling conditions, the feasibility of an
additional
chiller
a
dded to the current chiller system

will be investigated. The size

required
will
be
determined from the difference in current and required load calculations, described in
subsystems 1

and 3. The current chiller systems’ manufacturers will be kept in mind in looking
at possible units to install. A report will be submitted to Aisin containing the recommendations
for this chiller in the final design report.

5.

Design 2: HVLS Fans

This subsy
stem will be used to supplement the HVAC system to provide more efficient heating,
cooling and ventilation year round. This will lead to increased thermal comfort, better air
circulation, lower humidity, and lower energy costs.

The fans
will be integrat
ed into the

current HVAC system. When running
,

they will circulate the
cold air from the
A/C
system down to the workers on the floor. As the name implies
,

they will
do this at very low air speeds. An average air speed for a 24ft fan is 600 ft/min where
a 30in fan
would produce air speeds
near

4800 ft/min. This slower airspeed gives workers the cooling
effect of a light breeze without overly windy conditions. This added cooling effect will make the
workers feel cooler without changing the ambient temper
ature of the plant. We will consult
ASHRAE standards to
determine

the optimum air speed and the relative cooling effect it will
have.

Factors to be considered with HVLS fans:



Design of fan

o

Airfoil blade design and chord length

o

Construction of fan

o

Estima
ted life span

o

Solidarity



Placement of fans



Obstructions on floor



CFM ratings and how they were obtained



RFI and EMI compliancy

Deliverables



Fan specifications

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Expected energy usage



Fan placement in factory



Suggested operation during heating, cooling and ve
ntilation



Projected energy savings and return on investment

List of activities



Collect data from temporary fan in building



Estimate effective area with current conditions on floor



Build model to estimate fan interaction



Design fan layout in factory



Estimate effect on heating and cooling



Calculate operation cost on annual basis

6.

Design 3: Combined System

Combining attributes of designs 1 and 2, design 3 will be a proposal for a system composed of
HVLS fans and smaller chiller to supplement the current

HVAC system. A balance will be found
that will create the environment needed for thermal comfort. A cost summary will be compiled to
be used in the economic analysis, and all design information will be submitted in the final design
report to Aisin as an o
ption to correct the current problem.

7.

Control System

In the event of the HVLS fans being able to provide for a comfortable environment, a control
system for the fans will need to be put in place. Research will be done to provide a choice of
three differe
nt control systems for the HVLS fans.
A report of the findings will be submitted to
Aisin in the final design report.

8.

Economic Analysis

When designs 1, 2, and 3 have been completed, a cost analysis will be done on each of the
systems.

This
may

include

simple payback

period calculations
, life cycle cost/savings analysis,
and/or benefit to cost ratio.
Calculations will be done to find net present values and/or net future
values
of cash flows created for each design,
and
these will be
compared to find the

most
economical choice. All results will be incorporated into the final design report submitted to
Aisin.


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References

HVLS FANS

[1]
DeGaspari. "A fan for all seasons."
Mechanical

Engineering

121.12 (1999): 58.
MasterFILE
Premier
. EBSCO. Web. 11 Oct. 2010.


[2]
"HVAC manufacturer finds a cool solution with HVLS fans."
Plant Engineering

63.9 (2009):
37
-
39.
Academic Search Premier
. EBSCO. Web. 30 Sept. 2010.


[3]
"HVLS Fan."
Material

Handling Management

65.7 (2010): 34.
Business Source Complete
.
EBSCO. Web. 30 Sept. 2010.


[4]
Macro air
. (2010). Retrieved from
www.macro
-
air.com
, 1 Nov. 2010.


[
5
]
Oleson, Rick. "The top 10 myths about HVLS fans.
"
Plant Engineering

62.7 (2008): 40.
Academic Search Premier
. EBSCO. Web. 30 Sept. 2010.


[6]

"Installation and Warranty." MacroAir Technologies, Inc., 2010. Web. 4 Oct. 2010.
<http://www.macro
-
air.com/products/installation
-
and
-
warranty>.


[7]

"Literature
-

Rite Hite
-

Revolution HV/LS Fans." Rite Hite
-

Revolution HVLS Fans. Rite
Hite HVLS Fans, 2010. Web. 4 Oct. 2010. <http://www.ritehitefans.com/pages/literature>.


[8
]
"Technical Downloads." Big Ass Fan Co. Delta T Corp., 2010. Web. 4 Oct. 2010.
<http://
www.bigassfans.com/page/technical_downloads>.

HVAC Systems

[9
]
“Chilled Water Applied Systems
-

HVAC Systems”
.
Trane, 2010. Web. 4 Oct. 2010.
<
http://www.trane.com/COMMERCIAL/HvacSystems/1_1_ChilledWater.aspx?i=863
>


[10
]
“Water Chiller System”. Web. 5 Oct. 2010.

<
http://www.air
-
condition
ing
-
and
-
refrigeration
-
guide.com/water
-
chiller
-
system.html
>


[11
]
“HVAC Chillers”. Global Spec, 2010. Web. 5 Oct. 2010.

<
http://www.globalspec.com/LearnMore
/Building_Construction/HVAC/Cooling/HVAC_Chillers
>

Thermal Comfort

[12
]
2009 ASHRAE Handbook
-

Fundamentals (SI Edition)
. American Society of Heating,
Refrigerating and Air
-
Conditioning Engineers, Inc, 2009.


[13
]
McQuiston, Faye C, Jerald D Parker and Jeffrey D Spitler.
Heating, Ventilating, and Air
Conditioning Analysis and Design.

6th Edition. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, 2005.


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36


Commercial

Saluki Engineering Company hereby offers to do the work defined in
this proposal for the cost
-
plus
-
award
-
fee determined by Aisin Mfg. Illinois, equal to zero dollars or greater ($0.00 +).
This
project will be conducted as a consulting service offered to Aisin free of charge, with the
understanding that all expenses arisin
g that Aisin deems acceptable for equipment, travel, etc.
will be covered by Aisin.

This proposal is valid for a period of 30 days from the date of the proposal. After this time,
Saluki Engineering Company reserves the right to review it and determine if
any modification is
needed.

Resources Needed

The following is a table of items to be used in this project. All of the items are either on hand or
will be borrowed.

ITEM

DESCRIPTION

QUANTITY

$ EACH

$

1

Anemometer


Borrowed

0.00

2

Psychrometer


Borrowed

0.00

3

Pyrometer


Borrowed

0.00

4

Infrared Camera


Borrowed

0.00

5

HvacLoadCalc Software

1

On Hand

0.00

Organizational Chart

Below is an organizational chart for Team 48, which includes team members’ names, discipline,
and principle responsibility, as
well as the name of the faculty technical advisor.


TEAM 48 - Organizational Chart
NAME
DICIPLINE
PRINCIPLE RESPONSIBILITY
Alex Kee
ME
Current Load Capabilities
Bill Ennis
EE
Control System
Joel Chaplin
ME
Design 2, Economic Analysis, Design 3
Kyle Florian
EE
Control System
Micah Buchanan
ME
Current Load Capabilities, Energy Audit,
Load Requirements, Design 3
Ryan Riffel
ME
Design 2, Design 3
Faculty Technical Advisor - Dr. James Mathias


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The following pages contain
two schedules, the first being an overall chronological schedule of
events for the Spring ’11 semester.

Following this is a more detailed schedule of these events
with targeted and actual due dates given.

Finally, after the schedules is an
Action Item List for
the Spring ’11 semester
.

.
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Draft Schedule


1-Jan
31-Jan
2-Mar
1-Apr
1-May
Data Collection - AK, MB, KF
Energy Audit - MB
Estimate Current System Capacity - MB
Unit Sizing/Load Required - MB
Design 1 - MB
Create Controller System - BE, KF
Explore HVLS Fans - JC, RR
Design 2 - JC, RR
Design Reviews - ALL
Progress Reports Posted - ALL
Design 3 - JC, MB
Economic Analysis - JC
Demonstrations - ALL
Design Report - MB
Build Integrated Fan Model - AK, KF
Design Poster Presentation - ALL
Design Oral Presentation - ALL
DRAFT SCHEDULE
-

TEAM 48

Completed
Remaining
TEAM MEMBERS: Alex Kee (AK), Bill Ennis (BE), Joel
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Draft Schedule
-

Detailed

Aisin Fan Project Schedule - Team 48
Class Deadline
Team Members
Group Deadline
Alex Kee (AK)
Bill Ennis (BE)
Estimated Working Time
Joel Chaplin (JC)
Kyle Florian (KF)
As Worked
Ryan Riffel (RR)
Micah Buchanan (MB)
Week of - Starting with Monday
PROJECT TASKS
DUE
DATE
3-Jan
10-Jan
17-Jan
24-Jan
31-Jan
7-Feb
14-Feb
21-Feb
28-Feb
7-Mar
14-Mar
21-Mar
28-Mar
4-Apr
11-Apr
18-Apr
25-Apr
2-May
Design Poster Presentation - ALL
3-May
Design Oral Presentation - ALL
3-May
Demonstrations - ALL
28-Apr
Design Reports - ALL
26-Apr
Progress Reports posted to Web Space - ALL
24-Feb
Design Reviews - ALL
3-Mar
Design 1 - MB
Design 2 - JC, RR
Design 3 - JC, MB
Energy Audit - MB
17-Jan
Estimate Current System Capacty - MB
Unit Sizing - Load Required - MB
Data Collection - AK, MB, KF
1-Jan
Create Controller System - BE, KF
Explore HVLS Fans - JC, RR
Economic Analysis - JC
Build Integrated Fan Model - AK, KF
Design Report
Project Deliverables
Design Tasks
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AIL


ACTION ITEM LIST
PROJECT: HVLS FANS - AISIN MFG. ILLINOIS
For Spring 2011
TEAM MEMBERS
Alex Kee, ME
Micah Buchanan, ME
Joel Chaplin, ME
Ryan Riffel, ME
Bill Ennis, EE
Kyle Florian, EE
ITEM #
ACTIVITY
TM
ASSIGN
ED
DUE
NEW
DUE
STATUS
COMMENTS
1
Current HVAC Load Calculations
MB
7-Nov
Find current load capabilities.
2
Energy Audit
MB
7-Nov
15-Dec
Find current energy usage for heating and cooling based off of energy bills.
3
Load Calculation Based on Energy Usage History
MB
7-Nov
20-Dec
Investigate procedure. Based on energy usage coorelated with ambient conditions.
4
Thermal Transmittance Calculations
MB
7-Nov
25-Dec
Conduction heat gain through walls, roof, etc.
5
Infiltration/Ventilation Calculations
MB
7-Nov
30-Dec
Use Air-Change method - approximation.
6
Auxiliary Heat Sources Heat Gain
MB
7-Nov
5-Jan
Due to people, lights, equipment. Based on operating schedule.
7
Total Required Load Calculations - From 2,3,4
MB
7-Nov
10-Jan
Use RTSM for cooling load calculations.
8
Additional Load Required Calculations
MB
7-Nov
15-Jan
Find current and required load differences.
9
Design 1
MB
7-Nov
25-Jan
Find appropriate chiller unit to offset load difference.
10
Design 2
JC/RR
7-Feb
11
Design 3
MB/JC
21-Feb
12
Create Controller System
BE/KF
25-Jan
13
Set Up Design Review
18-Apr
14
Progress Report
15
Economic Analysis
JC
21-Feb
16
Design Report
26-Apr
17
Create Model
AK
10-Apr
18
DATES

William Arthur Ennis

E
-
mail:
ennis747@siu.edu

Permanent:









Local:

933 Glenda Lane










1205 S. Wall St.

Taylorville, IL 62568








Carbondale, IL 62901

Telephone: (217)824
-
5494







Telephone: (217)825
-
5801



Objective:

An entry level electrical engineering position with a focus on power systems.


Education:



Lincoln Land Community College
-

Springfield, Illinois



Associates Degree in Business Administration, 2004




Southern Illinois University
-

Carbondale, Illinois



Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering, expected December 2011

Skills:



Excellent written and verbal communication skills



E
xperienced with Excel and spreadsheets



Very hard working and excellent with team work



Some experience with computer programming



Quick learner and dedicated employee

Experience:

May 2006
-
May 2008


Culligan Water Service
-

Decatur, Illinois





Route Salesman

and Service Technician



Built and repaired electrical components for water softener control units



Serviced and installed water softeners and drinking water systems on both a commercial
and residential level



Organized and managed routes for new and existing

customers



Delivered water and water softener salt while maintaining a good relationship with
customers


May 2005
-
May2006


GSI group
-

Assumption, Illinois





Machine Operator



Used computer programs to cut metal components for distribution and production



Organized and shipped steel components to other plants for production


June 2004
-
May 2005


MBM
-

Taylorville, Illinois





Puller/Loader



Pulled packages from pallets to fill orders for restaurants



Organized and stacked pallets to be pulled or to be shipped



Checked pallets ready for shipment for damage and accuracy



Strategically loaded pallets of product and loose product into semi trailers to be shipped


Relevant Coursework:



Computer Systems and Business Applications



Introduction to Business Organizations



Pr
oblem Solving with Computers



Discrete Logic and Digital Systems



Introduction to Management

Kyle Matthew Florian

E
-
mail:
kylef10@siu.edu

Permanent:

Local:


1602 W. Maplewood 12417 N. Hwy 51



Marion, IL 62959
Murphysboro, IL 62966

Telephone: 618
-
925
-
3722 Telephone: 618
-
925
-
3722

______________________________________________________________________________


Objective:

To obtain an entry
-
le
vel electrical engineering position to focus on power and
energy systems.


Education


Associate

Degree in Science,
May 2007


John A. Logan College, Carterville, IL 62918




Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, December 2011




Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901



Relevant Coursework



FTP Clients




Controls and Systems



Java Platform


Experience


Food Service Worker, Marion VA Medical Center
September 2005
-

present



Provide excellent
service and support to customers and veterans



Am now a Supervisor of Food Service Operations(from September of 2009)



Run diet reports on all veterans in the Marion VA Medical Center



Once awarded “Best Canteen in the Nation”



Gained many friends from
different departments at the Marion VA


Skills



PSpice and MATLAB



Microsoft Visio and Microsoft Vista



Xilinx and AutoCAD



Problem Solving with Computers



Electronics



Digital Circuit and Design Work


Activities



Adult League Softball with the Marion VA team



A
dult League Soccer



Recreational Tennis and Golf

Micah Buchanan

920 Kathryn Lane, Carterville, IL 62918

P: (618) 943
-
0123 E: micahbuchanan@gmail.com


SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS

Proficient team player with a positive and task
-
oriented attitude, as
well as an excellent team leader,
proven through design projects and past work experiences. Highly adaptable and able to learn and
apply engineering concepts quickly and completely. Excellent communication skills (oral and written)
demonstrated through gro
up work, experimental lab work, and course work. Ability to multi
-
task and
work with diverse people and organizations.


EDUCATION

Southern Illinois University Carbondale (SIUC), Carbondale, IL

May 2011

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, Minor
in Mathematics

G.P.A.: 3.81/4.0


EMPLOYMENT HISTORY

Aisin Mfg. Illinois,
Marion, IL

April 2010
-
Present

Manufacturing Engineer Intern



Learning in depth the processes associated with plastic injection molding for automotive
components



Setting up new robot s
ystems, running mold trials, and preparing line setups for the 2012 Camry



Constructing new regrind systems to recycle scrap and mix with virgin material to reduce waste



Using teamwork to collaborate and solve problems in a manufacturing atmosphere


Buchanan Dairy Farm,

St. Francisville, IL

Jan 2003


Jan 2010

Lazy B Farms,
Lawrenceville, IL


May


Aug 2008, 2009

Farmhand



Gained experience in feeding/care of hogs (
managed a set of hog barns
-

5,000 head)
,
feeding/care and milking of cattle,
planting/harvesting of corn, soybeans, and wheat



Learned to resolve unexpected conflicts in order to maintain a steady process of production



Gained knowledge of how to accomplished large tasks through organized team work


Branching Out, Inc.,
Lawrenceville
, IL

May 2003


July 2005

Foreman



Managed the planting, care, harvesting, and sale of trees and shrubs



Increased profits by 10% through selective hiring and marketing strategies



Hired and oversaw a team of eight during planting and harvesting seasons


VOLUNTEER WORK

Mission Trip to Ecuador


Summer 2007 & 2008



Involved in preparations and management of multiple events at a children’s Bible camp



Visited several underprivileged communities to hand out evangelistic literature


Landscaper

April 2003


July
2008



Volunteered landscaping services for both a nearby church and an elderly neighbor



Consisted of mowing, trimming, landscaping, and painting


AWARDS



Dean’s List Fall 2007
-
Spring 2010



Awarded University of Evansville Trustee Scholarship ($18,000)


ACTIV
ITIES



American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, & A/C Engineers (ASHRAE), Vice
-
President 2010
-
2011



Tau Beta Pi, in the process of being inducted December 2010



American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) member since 2007


SKILLS

SolidWorks, Matlab, Simulink, SolidEdge
,
Maple,

Microsoft Office Platform (Word, Excel, PowerPoint)


Joel M Chaplin

416 s Washington St.


(573)579
-
4390

Carbondale, IL. 62901


jchaplin@siu.edu






Objective

To
pursue a career in Mechanical Engineering that is challenging with opportunity for
professional advancement.

Education



Southern Illinois University Carbondale (fall 2007
-
spring 2011)



Bachelor of Science



Major: Mechanical Engineering



Elective studies:



Inte
rnal Combustion Engines



Hydraulic systems



Penn State University (fall 2006
-
spring2007)



Major: Mechanical Engineering

Experience



Beck Bus transportation, Carbondale IL. (January 2010
-
present)



Successfully troubleshoot complex electrical and mechanical problems



Gained valuable knowledge of heavy duty equipment reliability issues



Maintained fleet of city and school buses



Outdoor turf professionals, Carterville IL. (March 2009
-
June 2010)



Maintain
ed and operated turf equipment



Marathon Petroleum LLC, Robinson, IL. (summer 2008)



Updated equipment files and documentation



Made excellent progress on an internal reliability program



Created a training program on this issues that addressed installation, s
afety and reliability
issues



Assisted engineers in troubleshooting problems



J&N Auto salvage and recovery, Coatesville, PA. (May 2003
-
June 2007)



Troubleshoot mechanical and electrical failures in automobiles, commercial trucks and
heavy equipment.



Inventoried used parts to ensure efficient and up to date information for customers



Fabricated recovery equipment to ensure safer operation of tow truck



H&H Nursery, Thorndale, PA. (spring
-
summer 2007)



Maintained and operated agricultural equipment to ensu
re efficient operation

Demonstrated Abilities:



Analyze research and apply corrective action to mechanical problems.



Highly skilled in the use of AutoCAD 2D&3D Modeling, over 6 years experience with various
versions dating back to AutoCAD 2000



Confident i
n basic functions in Solid Works and MatLab programs



Skilled in the use of Visio.



Highly Experience with the use of Microsoft office, including Word, Access, PowerPoint, and
advanced knowledge of Excel.



Work well in a team environment



Learn extremely fast
and anticipate where help is needed before being asked.



Advanced hands on skill set and knowledge base with va
st array of mechanical equipment


Ryan M. Riffel

ryan.riffel11@gmail.com

Permanent Address:









School Address:

485 Shadow Valley Ln.









606 E. Park St, Apt. N

Buncombe, IL 62912










Carbondale, IL 62901

618.833.4125












618.697.4749

_____________________________________________________________________________________


OBJECTIVE


An entry level position in mechanical engineering


EDUCATION

Southern Illinois University Carbondale




Carbondale, IL






Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, May 2011




Minor: Mathematics




GPA: 3.73/4.00





Southeast

Missouri State University




Cape Girardeau, MO






Major: Engineering Physics




August 2006
-
May 2008




GPA: 3.7/4.0


AWARDS/

ACTIVITIES



AISIN Mfg. Illinois, LLC (AMI) Scholarship, SIUC, 2010
-
2011



College of Engineering Dean’s Scholarship, SIUC,

2009
-
2010



Dean’s List Status, SIUC, 2008
-
2010



American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Student Member, 2010


SKILLS



Proficient in Microsoft Excel, Word, and PowerPoint



Experience with AutoCAD and MATLAB



Experience with C++ and Python programming


WORK

EXPERIENCE




Sales Clerk, Larry’s House of Cakes (July 2010
-
Present)




Carbondale, IL





Responsible for growth in volume, rate, and quality of sales



Improve customer satisfaction with excellent customer service



Increase
bakery production rate and quality of goods with team of bakers





Clerical Work & Laborer, Earthwork (May 2005
-
June 2010)




Carbondale, IL




Gained a strong work ethic by managing and maintaining customer p
roperties



Worked with a team on major landscaping projects



Responsible for bookkeeping and invoicing



Alex Kee

1408 Newton Ave.

Johnston City, IL 62951

618
-
889
-
1762

akee_11@msn.com

OBJECTIVE

Seeking full time employment as a Mechanical Engineer

Qualifications

Strong people, problem
-
solving, and group skills

Attention to detail, accuracy, and deadlines

Education

Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL

Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering, expected graduation May 2011


Black
burn College, Carlinville, IL, Aug 2006
-
May 2008



Transferred to SIUC

Experience

Blackburn College, New Construction Crew




Aug 2006
-
May 2007





Building maintenance including: drywall, brickwork, and wood
-
work



Working with hand
-
tools and power
-
tools



Wiring and reading/working with building plans


Blackburn College, Utilities Crew




Aug 2007
-
May 2008





Building maintenance including: electricity and plumbing



Working with hand
-
tools and power
-
tools while rebuilding many plumbing and electrical
applian
ces



Wiring and reading/working with building/piping plans


Aisin Manufacturing, Manufacturing Engineering Intern

Feb 2010
-
present



Injection molding and specialized maintenance on injection machines



Designing machine and mold modifications



Hands on modifica
tions to machines and molds using many different tools



Some machining work



Documentation i.e. capacity studies for new product launches

Employment

The Mattress Store, Delivery/Stock






Marion, IL

November 2004
-
May 2006








Franklin County Country Club,
Maintenance




West Frankfort, IL

Summer 2006
-
Summer 2007





General maintenance around the course, clubhouse, and swimming pool



Supervise 3
-
5 employees, making sure they perform daily duties along with special projects
around the course.


Kroger Co. Court
esy Clerk/Produce Clerk




Carbondale, IL

Feb 2009
-
Feb 2010




Awards/Activities



Blackburn College Honor Scholarship



Blackburn College Baseball