Computational Research Needs for Alternative and Renewable Energy

usefultenchMechanics

Feb 22, 2014 (3 years and 3 months ago)

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Computational Research Needs for

Alternative and Renewable Energy


Six

Candidate Breakout Sessions

1.

Renewable Fuels


Hydrogen

a.

Hydrogen production

(Photoel
ectrochemistry, Photobiology, …)

b.

Hydrogen storage

(nanotechnology)

2.

Re
newable Fuels


Bioenergy conversion

a.

Enzymatic

b.

Thermochemical

c.

Photobiological production biodiesel

d.

Biorefinery (process) modeling

3.

Renewable Electricity


Wind Energy

a.

Aeroacoustics

b.

Aeroelasticity

c.

Gear box reliability

d.

Micro siting

e.

Wind farm management

f.

Tidal
and Ocean currents

(power buoys, tidal fences)

4.

Renewable Electricity


Solar Energy Conversion

a.

Ultra high efficiency


3
rd

generation solar

b.

Ultra low cost


Organic photovoltaics

c.

Concentrated PV; Solar Stirling Engines

5.

Energy Distribution


Grid Futures an
d Reliability

a.

Changing from centralized to distributed generation

b.

Grid as energy storage

c.

Regulating the exchanges

6.

Thinking outside the box (brilliant/crazy ideas)

a.

G
eothermal
, a
re there some computation challenges here?

b.

Space
-
based solar collection?

(really
?


why?)

c.

Ocean Thermal Electric Conversion with robotic islands

Other Workshop Speakers (tbd)



Welcoming remarks by workshop organizers and representatives of the collaborating
DOE offices




Luncheon and/or dinner talks by thought
-
provoking speakers



N
ate Lewis, CalTech



Dan Nocera, MIT



John H
oldren
.(?), Harvard Kennedy School of Gov’t



Steve Koonin, BP



Someone on climate change and carbon foot print (NCAR or NOAA)


recommend Thomas Karl from the NCDC



Al Gore or Larry Bender




Morning and afternoon plenar
y talks by leading experts



Panel sessions to focus on:

Suggesting the definition and composition of a computational
research program for alternative and renewable energy
, r
ecommending
p
riority
r
esearch
d
irections




Related documents

Biofuels Initiative
(
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/biofuels_initiative.html
)

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Office of the Biomass Program
has implemented the Biofuels In
itiative (BFI), with the goal of reducing U.S. dependence
on foreign oil by meeting the following targets:



To make cellulosic ethanol (or ethanol from non
-
grain biomass resources) cost
competitive with gasoline by 2012.



To replace 30 percent of current le
vels of gasoline consumption with biofuels by
2030 (or 30x30).



Hydrogen Fuels Initiative (
http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/presidents_initiative.html
)

The central mission of the U.S.

DOE Hydrogen Program is to research, develop, and
validate fuel cell and hydrogen production, delivery, and storage technologies. Hydrogen
from diverse domestic resources will then be used in a clean, safe, reliable, and
affordable manner in fuel cell veh
icles and stationary power applications. Development
of hydrogen energy will ensure that the United States has an abundant, reliable, and
affordable supply of clean energy to maintain the Nation's prosperity throughout the 21st
century.



Solar America Ini
tiative


(
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/solar_america/technology_pathway_partnerships.html
)

To fulfill solar energy's promise, the
President's Advanced Energy Initiative and the 2007
Budget

proposes a new $148 million Solar America Initiative (SAI)


an increase of $65
million over the FY06 budget. The Solar America Initiative will ac
celerate the
development of advanced solar electric technologies, including photovoltaics and
concentrating solar power systems, with the goal of making them cost
-
competitive with
other forms of renewable electricity by 2015.



Wind

Powering America

(
http://www.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/windpoweringamerica/
)

Wind Powering America is a commitment to dramatically increase the use of wind
energy in the United States. This initiati
ve will establish new sources of income for
American farmers, Native Americans, and other rural landowners, and meet the growing
demand for clean sources of electricity.


Through Wind Powering America, the United
States will achieve targeted regional econo
mic development, enhance our power
generation options, protect the local environment, and increase our energy and national
security.