Managing Human-Environment Interactions

upsetsubduedManagement

Nov 9, 2013 (3 years and 5 months ago)

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Chapter 1


Controlling and guiding interactions


Prevention


Conservation


Preservation



Protecting and Enhancing Health and
Welfare


Humans


Environment (why is this missing from the text?)


Environment presents a risk to humans


Natural Hazards




Society presents a risk to humans


Environment as vector


Pollution


Society exploits the environment


Unsustainable consumption




Pollution and consumption undermines
productivity of natural systems


A matter of values


Or… how do we place “value” on certain
systems?


The Market



The State



Civil Society


The Market


Landowners


RE Professionals


Developers


Financial Institutions



Their Motives


Internal


Short and Long Term (unenlightened or not?)


The State


Federal / State / Local


Regional



Their Motives


Multiple Use / Stakeholders


("the art of producing from the forest whatever it can
yield for the service of man.“


Pinchot)


Short and Long Term


Regulation and Incentive


Civil Society


Citizens


Non
-
Profits / NGOs


Property Owners


“The Community”



Their Motives


Internal or External


Short and Long Term


Instrumental Value



“Exploitation”


Economic valuation


Environment as an input


Tangible value to your well
-
being


Intrinsic Value


Aesthetics


Intangible value to your well
-
being



Inherent Worth


The value of the environment in
-
and
-
of itself


Consideration of the environment on an equal
level with everything else.


Optimists



Concerned Optimists



Hopeful Pessimists



Pessimists



The Self
-
Absorbed


Frontier Economics



Environmental Protection



Resource Management



Eco
-
Development



Deep Ecology


Dominant Imperative


Human/Nature Relationship


Dominant Threats


Main Themes


View on Property Rights


Who Pays (for EM)


Responsibility for Development and
Management


Environmental Management Technology
and Strategies



Analytic Modeling and Planning
Technologies



Fundamental Flaws (of perspective)


Bruntland

Commission (1989)


“…paths of economic, social, environmental, and
political progress that aim to meet the needs of
today without compromising the ability of future
generations to meet their needs.”



The Three (or five) “E”s


Economy, Environment, Equity (Engagement,
Eternity)