Vision-Based Metrology

unclesamnorweiganAI and Robotics

Oct 18, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Vision
-
Based Metrology

IET 405

Vision Based Metrology Project

Bill Redman, Matt Herms, Matt Waldner, Brad Neufarth, Jason Marlar

Vision
-
Based Metrology History


Vision
-
Based Metrology
refers to the technology
using optical sensors and
digital image processing
hardware and software to:


Identify


Guide


Inspect


Measure objects


Vision
-
Based Metrology History


Vision
-
Based
Metrology inspection
systems evolved from
the combination of
microscopes, cameras
and optical
comparators


Vision
-
Based Metrology History


Vision
-
Based Metrology is
extensively used in general
industrial applications such as the
manufacturing of:


Electronics


Automotive


Aerospace


Pharmaceutical


Consumer products


Vision
-
Based Metrology is being
utilized in the automatic
identification and data collection
market as a complementary or
alternative technology to traditional
laser scanning devices for reading
bar codes



Vision
-
Based Metrology History


Early systems were integrated
into packaging lines for optical
character recognition and proved
to be a reliable way to check the
accuracy of product codes and
label information.


Today, high
-
resolution cameras,
advances in software and
imaging processors, and the
availability of powerful,
inexpensive compact computers
have made vision systems faster
and more reliable than ever.

When does a company need a vision
system?


Some products require 100
-
percent product
inspection with documented inspection
results.


In other cases a vision system may be
needed for high production product
inspection


Vision systems provide a means of
increasing yield
-
that is, the ratio of good
parts to bad parts.


When a serial defect is spotted, the system
not only recognizes it but can stop the
conveyor and inform the operator of the
defect and its magnitude.


The yield factor is particularly important in
manufacturing industries that produce large
volumes, as in the compact disc and
pharmaceutical industries.

Vision
-
Based Metrology in

Automobile Wrecks


Vision Based
Metrology is now
being used to focus on
the movement of
objects along with
their deformation


This is being used in
many car wreck
investigations

Vision
-
Based Metrology in
Automobile Wrecks


Two consecutive images
were grabbed from a high
speed video sequence


A displacement field of a
car at a certain moment is
presented


Vision
-
Based Metrology in
Automobile Wrecks


The deformation pattern
was obtained from the
principle vector analysis.


This analysis allows the
representation of the
deformation pattern.

Vision
-
Based Metrology in
Weather Patterns


Vision
-
Based
Metrology has also
been used to study
weather patterns


Flow information from
a tornado is able to be
extracted for scientists
to attempt to learn
more about them


Vision
-
Based Metrology in
Companies


There are many
companies that use
vision inspected
systems today


Some of the bigger
ones are ICS/
INEX
and
PPT Vision

ICS/
INEX


INEX can be traced all the way
back to the early 1900’s when
they developed a system called
OPTI
-
Tron which inspected bottle
beverages


The OPTI
-
Tron system would
eventually become the
OPTISCAN bottle inspector; a
worldwide standard in container
inspection with thousands of units
installed.


The introduction of the company's
SuperInspector 1055 became the
first commercial machine
inspection system to integrate
camera and computer
technologies

PPT Vision


Founded in 1982, PPT specializes in
industrial applications where
accuracy, repeatability, high speed
and flexibility are important
requirements.


They are the world leader in the
design and manufacture of
completely digital 2D machine
vision systems.


PPT's 2D machine vision product
line is sold on a global basis to end
-
users, system integrators, and
OEM's


PPT is involved primarily in:


Electronics


Semiconductor components


Automotive


Medical devices


Pharmaceutical and packaged goods

Quality Inspection at Work

Polymer Membrane:

Note texture defects

Machined Aluminum Bar:

Note tool
-
chatter marks

Stamped Metal Package:

Note scratch on grinded surface

Vision System Pictures

Missing Fuse

Golf Ball Specifications


Weight
: Less than or
equal to 1.620 Ounces


Size
: Greater than or
equal to 1.680 Inches


Shape
: Must be
symmetrical


USGA Golf Ball Testing


A ball passes USGA size inspection if it
falls, under its own weight, through a 1.680
inch diameter ring gauge fewer than 25/100
times in randomly selected positions.


Temperature is constant at 23
°

C (73.4
°

F).


Humidity is held constant
.

Test Outline


Random sample testing for different brands
of golf balls


Determine diameter


Analyze the results


Procedure


Place the ball on the test stand


Take a picture from a standard height for each golf
ball being tested


Analyze the image using National Instruments
®
v
ision analysis software


Compare the image to the standard size for the
USGA ball specification


Compile and analyze the data from the testing


Present information in graphical form

Test Device


Designed using Solidworks
®

CAD program


Made of extruded aluminum


Center positioned ball holder that provides
consistent images for each ball tested


Camera is secured using the tripod mount


Final Drawing

Test Device

Images from National Instruments
®

IMAQ Vision Builder

Images from the Vision Software

Horizontal Clamp

Horizontal and
Vertical Clamp

Measurement Data


Able to see variance between different golf
balls


Tolerance we detected was about 1.680
±

.010 inches


The device performed as expected to allow
us to complete the vision analysis

Conclusion


Vision systems are a reliable way to
accurately measure items


A vision system can measure minute details
to a precise and accurate level


We were able to observe this with golf balls
varying just a few pixels


We now have a better understanding of
vision systems and how they work


http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/sme/amac/research/metrology/tornado.htm

http://www.cranfield.ac.uk/sme/amac/research/metrology/carcrush.htm

http://www.qualitydigest.com/mar98/html/vision.html

http://www.rvsi.com/Pages/about.htm

http://www.inexvision.com

http://www.pptvision.com

http://www.visionxinc.com


References

Acknowledgements

Alufab® located in Mt. Carmel, Ohio


Donated materials for the prototype


Donated their shop and tools for the construction


Special thanks to Dr. Allameh for allowing us to
use his software and office for this project


Questions?