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Nov 2, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Functi onal Speci fications

Revision v0.9
5


Team Gay
Avenue


University of Portland

School of Engineering

Phone 503 943 7314

5000 N. Willamette Blv d.

Fax 503 943 7316

Portland, OR 97203
-
5798


Functional Specifications

Project battLEDship

Team
Gay Avenue

Team Members:

Melody Kidd (Fall Team Lead)

Scott Matsuo

Kelly McFarlane

Raphael Ramos

(Spring Team Lead)


Industry Representative:

Paul Imel


Faculty Advisor:

Dr. Wayne Lu




Functi onal Speci fications

Revision v0.9
5


Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

2

Table of Content
s

Introduction

4

Requirements



Arduino

Board



The
10x10 LED Array



The
10x10 Phototransistor

Array



Audio Amplifier w/ Speaker



Shell Boards



Ships

4

5

6

6

6

6

6

Use Cases

6

User Interface



Top Interface



Bottom Interface

7

7

7

Development Process



Project Proposal



Order All Parts



Functional Specification



Software Framework



Test Sensors and LEDs



Design Document



Microcontroller Programming/Testing



Wiring of LEDs and Sensor Arrays



Construction of Shell Boards



Test & Debug
Programming



Test & Debug Wiring



Assemble Game



Test & Debug Whole System

8

8

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

10

10

10

Milestones

10

Preliminary Budget

1
2

Facilities

1
2

Risks



Sensors



Surface
-
Mounted LEDs



Coding



Microcontroller



Prototype Board



Audio Amplifier w/
Speaker

12

12

12

12

12

1
2

1
3

Constraints



Technical



Political



Sustainability



Security



Environmental

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

3





Health and Safety



Standards



Codes



Economic



Ethical



Professional



Social



Manufacturability



Legal

13

13

14

14

14

14

14

15

15

Conclusion

1
5

Glossary

1
5

Functi onal Speci fications

Revision v0.9
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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

4

Introduction

The game of battLEDship is a fun and creative system aimed at increasing the gaming
experience of

the classic household game of B
attleship. The main goal of the game is the
same,
but the way of playing the game is much improved. Instead of manually placing your
ships and recording the enemy’s attacks, the battLEDship game is
designed
to strategically
place your ships and locate the enemy ships using LED and interactive touch senso
rs. This
user interface

will have the unique ability to ensure player honesty by giving each player direct
and immediate feedback for every move, indicated by the color of the LED light. Players will
place their ships on their coordinate system and attack
the enemy
’s

seas with a mere touch on
one of the coordinate squares. If the move is a hit, the LED will illuminate red, and if it is a
miss, it will appear white. These technological advances will make the game more fun and
advanced

for players, and the bo
ard will ideally be able to
play

other games and activities. The
main components of the board include LED lights, photosensitive sensors, and an Arduino

board
,
which is
compatible with the C computer programming language.


In order to fully understand this

document and the project schematics and descriptions, the
reader should have a background in electronics and digital systems.

This document maps our
project

ideas
and efforts, including project requirements, all possible project uses, the
development process,
our

schedules
and milestones, budgeting, facility and risk information,
construction and manufacturing cons
tr
a
ins, and a

conclusion.



Requirements

The battLED
ship game consists of three major components: 10x10 LED Array, Arduino
Board, and 10x10 Phototransistor Array, as shown in Figure 1.







Figure 1
. S
ystem

functional d
iagram of
the battLEDship game


The battLEDship game user interface consists of four boards.

Each
game board
measures
around 13” x 13” and
is

organized as a 10 x 10 squares labeled as 1 to 10 a
nd A to J as
shown in Figure 2.

Each game board hosts a

10x10 LED Array a
nd
a
10x10
Phototransistor

Array
.


Four

10x10 LED
Array
s

Arduino

Board

Four
10x10
Phototransistor
Array
s

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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

5


Figure 2. Diagram of battLEDship Game Board
Interface
Layout


The required system components for the battLEDship game are explained below.


The
Arduino

Board


Figure 3
.Arduino Mega 2560 Microcontroller


The Arduino

board

is
the
main component of the device. The microcontroller
on the
Arduino board
will be doing the bulk of the work
such as
sending and receiving data
through input and output pins to gather, process, and display data using other components
of this dev
ice.

The Arduino Mega can operate on a power supply of 6
-
20 volts,
however the recommended

range is 7
-
12 volts.
We can power the boar
d by
using a
USB connection,
an

AC
-
DC adapter o
r
a 9
-
volt

battery. The adapter
need
s to

be a
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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

6

2.1mm center negative plug.
The battery wo
uld be connected between the GND

and
V
in

pin headers of the POWER connector.


The
10x10 LED Array

Four
10x10 LED arrays

are

used to display data pertaining to the battLEDship
game to the user. The LEDs will be
lit up as a

red or blue light
upon power
-
up
.

During

the game
,
the LEDs
will change color
s

to
enhance
the overall experience
of the game to the users.

When the opponent misses the target, the LED will light
up
blue

and when the opponent hits the target, it will light up red.

Both player
s
will get color indicators of every hit or miss that is made.


The
10x10 Phototransistor Array

The four 10x10 phototransistor arrays gather data to track what
is
going on with the
game. If
a square is
covered, the phototransistor
in the square
sends a piece of data to
the Arduino

m
icrocontroller
indicating
where the data
came from

and the

corresponding LED is
lit
to the

correct

color.


Audio Amplifier with Speaker

The audio amplifier with speaker will work together with the LED Arrays.
Depending

on the events of the game
,
the speaker will play a different type of s
ound to indicate
the results of a turn taken by the users playing the game.

When a ship is placed on
the game board, sound1 will play, notifying those around of the event. When a
player

makes a move on the opponent, and the selection turns out to be a hit,
sound2 will play; otherwise sound3 will play signifying a miss. Once all of a
player
’s ships

have sunk, sound4 will play indicating the game has finished with
one of the players being
a winner.


Shells Boards

The boards that will be used for the battLEDship game will be a printed circuit
board. Since the sensors and LEDs are surface
-
mounted, the team prefers to order
customized boards that will then be etched in house.


Ships

The ships that the team considers to use will be constructed out of plastic or a see
-
through type of material that will allow light to pass through.


Use Cases

An obvious use of the game would be among children and young adults as

a fun and
interactive act
ivity, but this game can be played and enjoyed by all age groups.

This vers
ion of
the classic household game will be more intriguing

due to
its
enhanced lighting and
sound
effects
.
It
will
also
be capable of
reducing

playing times,
because
no action needs
to be taken
by the players besides
simple touch
es

indicat
ing

attacks.


Another use of this game involves its potential to port other games onto the board using the
Arduino microcontroller.
For example
,

users
could
purchase the game and if they have
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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

7

sufficient knowledge of the C language, program their own
apps
for the LED touchscreen
boards.


Lastly, we hope that this project will be able to inspire new technological advances of classic
household board games to make them more appealing to modern
times. These advances will
contribute to creating the utmost gaming experience for all ages and purposes.


User Interface


Two players play the battLEDship game
. E
ach
player
has two
interface
boards: one is
horizontal
ly placed

(the b
ottom interface

board
)
for deploy
ing
the
player’s
ships

and
displaying the result of opponent’s attacks
;
the other board is

mounted vertically
(the top
i
nterface

board
) and attached back
-
to
-
back with the opponent’s vertical board
for
send
ing
the
player’s
attack
s

and displaying t
he results of
the
a
ttacks.

Each interface board consists of 10 x
10 squares as shown in Figure 2.


Top Interface

The top interface
consists
of a 10x10 LED display
array
and

a 10x10 phototransistor
array

placed on a
n
interface board
. The user should be able to
touch

on any square
(
such as
B5) and depending on whether the
pressed
square

is a hit or miss, the LED
will light up to show the correct color
: red for a hit and blue for a miss.


Bottom Interface

The bottom interface also

con
sists of

a 10x10 LED display
and
a 10x10
phototransistor array
and is used by
the user
to deploy
their ships
.
Whenever the
opponent attacks,

depending on whether they hit the user’s ships or not, the LED in
the corresponding square will light up to
display

the correct color
.



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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

8

Development Process

The
battLEDship

development process is outlined in
the flow chart as shown in
Figure

4.

Figure 4
.

Development process flow
chart


The overall development process consists of a number of phases

that must be completed in a
timely manner
.


Project Proposal


Team Gay Avenue came up

the idea for this project towards the end of summer 2013.
Upon further meetings, the implementation
method
for this device was decided on. What
really sparked
the
interest
for

this project was to make the Battleship game more dynamic,
more
user friendly and overall a better experience for it
s

players. The proposal was

approved by the
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
faculty at
the
University of

Portland.

Project Proposal

Order All Parts

Test sensors and LEDs

Wiring of LED and
Sensor Arrays

Test & Debug Wiring

Functional Specification

Design Document

Construction of Shell
Boards

Assemble Game

Test & Debug Whole
System

Founder's Day Display

Software framework

Microcontroller
Programming/Testing

Test & Debug
Programming

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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

9

Order All Parts

The parts needed to construct this device were decided

after

our design plan for the
project
was finalized. Ordering

parts will be done during
the
week of September 15, 2013 after
consulting

the

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
faculty.


Functional Specification

This document outlines and details the plans for the project, including requirements,
preliminary budget, and method of development. There will be one draft done for this
document until the final one is due at the end of
September 2013.


Software Framework

The
software
framework is
mainly
coding

the

functionality of the project
.

The developed
software will be tested on a

host

computer
prior to loading

onto the
Arduino

microcontroller
.


Test Sensors and LEDs

Testing
Sensors

and LEDs is a necessity
in order
to make sure the parts ordered are
reliable and will work throughout testing and development of the project. Once the testing
of the various sensors and LEDs are complete, the

circuit construction

can begin.


Design
Document

The design document will detail the final design of the project. It will contain various
diagrams detailing how the project will be done, block diagrams detailing how the system
operates, as well as
the schematics
.


Microcontroller Programming/Te
sting

Once the software framework is completed and works reliably on the

host

computer, the
software will be loaded into the microcontroller
on the Arduino board
to verify that
the
device will work

up to the specifications
.


Wiring of LEDs and Sensor Arra
ys

This task includes but not limited to arranging, soldering, and wiring of the many LEDs
and Sensor Arrays that will be used throughout the project into an acrylic housing. With
the current design, there will be 400
RGB surface mount
LEDs and
400
surface

mount
Sensors to be wired.


Construct
ion of

Shell Boards

Construction of the Shell Boards will include arranging and determining ways to securely
organiz
e

the many internal parts efficiently.


Test & Debug Programming

Once the program is loaded
into the
m
icrocontroller
, it must be able to perform the
necessary tasks needed for the project. Testing and debugging the program will be done to
tweak the functionality if
it is
not working as intended.



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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

10

Test and Debug Wiring

Upon completion of the wiring between LEDs and sensor arrays, the testing and
debugging will occur to verify that the components were hooked up correctly and are
working as intended.


Assemble Game

Once the components are constructed and tested separately
, they can be wired together
and the overall physical construction of the project can be completed.


Test & Debug Whole System

Once the game board assembly is complete, the LEDs, sensor arrays, and microcontroller
will be tested together to ensure that
they operate as intended. If bugs occur

or

they don’t
act as intended, the team will loop back into the development process to isolate problems
and fix them.


Founder’s Day Display

The completed project will be demonstrated on Founder’s Day, April 8
th
,

201
4.


Milestones

The milestones are
outlined in Table 1
as shown
below:




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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

11



Table 1: Milestones

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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

12

Preliminary Budget


The preliminary budget is outlined in Table
2
as shown

below:


Table 2: Preliminary battLEDship budget

Facilities

The team needs to use
the following rooms to develop the project:

ROOM 110: Room 110 is needed for
creating
the shell boards and attaching them together.

ROOM 306: A bench space is necessary in room 306 for soldering LEDs and sensors to the
board.

ROOMS 309, 310: Both rooms ar
e

needed for wiring and testing

LEDs and sensors. It is
necessary to have access to both
rooms
because
each room is frequently used by classes.


Risks

Sensors

Sensors may be too sensitive. Attempting to make a move by
touching one square
and
the sensors
sen
se more than one move being made.

Contingency Plans: Using gloves with one finger that has reflective sticker. Put clear
filter over the sensors to minimize reflectance.


Surface
-
Mounted LEDs

Faulty
LEDs
,

one of the LED
R, G, B

colors not working,
or
LED
s

burning out
on the

day the
project
is
due.

Contingency plan: Buy extra LEDs for replacement.


Coding

For full functionality the boards must be able to communicate with each other. In
order to do this we must program code in the C language,
and assure it
works free of
programming bugs.

Contingency plan: debugging, creating
four

2D arrays for boards to communicate
,

or

consult
ing
Dr.
Crenshaw for help.


Microcontroller

Mismatching pins, improper soldering,
and incorrect

wiring.

Contingency plan: tutorials
on input
-
output pin layouts
.

Make sure
pins are being
soldered
correctly.


Prototype board

Not being able to

fit into

shell boards.

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UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

13

Contingency plan: Make sure that our shell board is big enough to fit all necessary
components.



Audio Amplifier with
Speaker



Not being able to generate a loud enough sound when triggered.

Contingency plan: Apply an additional amplifier to schematics till desired sound is
reached.


Constraints

Technical

The technical community might be impac
ted through the development of b
attLEDship
because of the innovative recreation of a classic board game

by using modern
technology such as touch sensors as well as multi
-
colored LEDs hooked up in unique
ways to enhance the once simple board game into one t
hat is a lot more dynamic, user
friendly, and enjoyable to play.



Political (Does Not Apply)

From a political standpoint
, b
attLEDship does not have any relation to the government
or public affairs of the country
. It is simply

a board game revamped in a mo
re modern
way

to increase user entertainment
.


Sustainability (Does Not Apply)

The project
battLEDship
wouldn’t have an impact on the sustainability community
due to this project not having any involvement with natural resources
.



.

Security (Does Not
Apply)

The development of project battLEDship is not dealing with any type of classified
information or any type of security framework, therefore this does not apply.


Environmental

The one way that battLEDship can affect the Environmental community can
be due to
the disposal of the device once completed. Since the project deals with many electrical
components, if not disposed of properly, can negatively affect the environment.


Health and Safety

Construction and manufacture of battLEDship poses several h
ealth and safety
concerns. The team must use several tools and equipment to construct the boards that
could

be harmful if used improperly. Wiring incorrectly is also a big concern because
it can potentially ruin the project and burn out the LEDs and sensor
s.


Standards

From

the consumer electronics standpoint, one standard that may need further
information as the designing and construction of this game develops is IEEE Standard
1621
-
2004
-

IEEE Standard for User Interface Elements in Power Control of
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Team Gay Avenue


UNIVERSITY OF PORTLA
ND


SCHOOL OF ENGINEERIN
G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

14

Electronic Devices Employed in Office/Consumer Environments
. Since this is a
consumer product, this standard may affect the game.


Another standard that the team may need to coordinate with as the project progresses
is IEEE Standard
1680
-
2009
-

IEEE Stand
ard for Environmental Assessment of
Electronic Products
. Since this standard deals with electronic products, the game may
fall under this standard. When looking at this product in the eyes of computer
technology, this game may fall under the IEEE Standard
488.1
-
2003
-

IEEE
(Replaced) IEEE Standard For Higher Performance Protocol for the Standard Digital
Interface for Programmable Instrumentation

since we are dealing with a
programmable system (Arduino Microcontroller).


Also, the programming aspect of this

project falls under
IEEE Standard 716
-
1995
-

IEEE Standard Test Language for All Systems
-

Common/Abbreviated Test Language
for All Systems (C/ATLAS)
.


Codes

(Does Not Apply)

Since
the
battLEDship

project

will not need any sort of electrical connection except
for a 5V source, it does not apply under NESC (National Electrical Safety Code) and
NFPA (National Fire Protection Association).
Project
battLEDship does not fall under

those codes since there is no co
nnection to any panels, transformers, generators, etc.
Since

the game does not fall under any designing and construction of buildings, there
is no county code that it is breaking.


Economic

Unfortunately, a major dilemma facing our team proposal is cost. It is estimated that
our completed board will cost around $400. Costs would definitely be driven down if
mass
production

was

to take place, but the game would still be pricey. Ideally, the

po
tential

a
dded effects such as other gaming possibilities and artificial intelligence a
re
more than possible with the Arduino microcontroller
and
would make the board more
reasonably priced, giving the customer more bang for their buck. Lowered
manufacturin
g costs would ultimately increase profit potential.


Ethical (
Does Not Apply
)

The battLEDship game is created

for entertainment purposes, and therefore, ethical

constraints are not applicable.


Professional

This project design employs many of the subjects we have learned from engineering
courses taken at the University of Portland and beyond. The design and building
processes will require the application of all of our knowledge of engineering, as well
as chal
lenge us to learn new skills and business aspects of the engineering world.


Social

This invention will have an effect socially for those who use it. They will play with
their friends and have an enjoyable time. Perhaps if the invention reaches out to a

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Team Gay Avenue


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ND


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G

CONTACT: MELODY KIDD

15

larger crowd, it will be a popular item of discussion. However it will not change the
way we interact socially or be anything greater than for recreational purposes.


Manufacturability

If constructed efficiently, new techniques of development could be
derived from the
building process. Also if bought by many people, then the use of the product would
demonstrate what kinds of things could be manufactured and profited from.
Otherwise
,

it could be viewed as expensive and cost inefficient. For what it is

capable
of, the price tag seems steep.


Legal


This product would have little effect legally, even on the individual level. Other than
the fact the device is based on a copyrighted game, there is a lack of any real legal
issues to be solved or caused.

Th
is project has been modified to assure no legal issues
will arise.


Conclusion

Throughout this document we have stated the necessary steps we must take in order to
complete this project, as well as the challenges that we
will inevitably
face. Our success
d
epends directly on proper planning, organization, and efficiency.
As a team, we feel
confident in the success of battLEDship and our capability to complete all necessary tasks and
milestones
punctually
with the help of the engineering and hardware staff.
This game of
battLEDship will evolve the household gaming standard,
create

an immensely fun and
interactive system using LEDs and photosensitive sensors. If the project is completed before
Founder’s Day presentations, additional functionality will be added

to further increase
battLEDship’s potential as a product.
Additional functionality may include artificial
intelligence and/or other programmable activities compatible with the board’s size and layout.
Hopefully, if time allows, these upgrades will be poss
ible to further amplify
battLEDship’s
attraction.


Glossary

IEEE


Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers is a professional organization that is
devoted to advancing technological innovation and excellence.

NESC


National Electrical Safety Code

is a United States standard for safe installation,
operation and maintenance of electric supply and communication lines and

associated
equipment
.

NFPA


National Fire Protection Association is an international nonprofit organization whose
mission is to re
duce fire and other hazards by upholding codes and standards, research,
training and education worldwide.