LESSONS FROM MKEPP (KENYA)

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Nov 8, 2013 (4 years and 1 month ago)

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IFAD REGIONAL IMPLEMENTATION WORKSHOP




REPUBLIC


OF


KENYA

IFAD

INTERNATIONAL
FUND FOR
AGRICULTURAL
DEVELOPMENT




THE MANAGEMENT OF LAND AND WATER


RESOURCES IN CLIMATE CHANGE ENVIRONMENT:


LESSONS FROM MKEPP (KENYA)


MUTHONI F. LIVINGSTONE

PROJECT MANAGER
-
MKEPP
-
KENYA


15
-
18
TH

NOVEMBER, 2010


MAPUTO
-

MOZAMBIQUE


INTRODUCTION


The Republic of Kenya has an area of 586,000
square kilometers


Has a population of 38.3 million people (2009)



75% of this population live in the rural areas and
rely on agriculture for most of their livelihood.



The country is mainly arid and semi arid (80% of
the country) with about 20% classified as arable.



75% of the population is concentrated within the
arable 20% of the country


Kenya has five main water catchment towers for
most of her water requirements.
-
Mt Kenya being
the Most Important


National Environmental Challenges


Population pressure
on land especially on the 20%
which is arable


Soil erosion
especially on the ASAL and the sloping
grounds.


.High poverty levels due to unemployment and low
land productivity


Flooding

due to poor catchment protection
productivity
-

causes overexploitation of natural
resources.


Non optimal management and use of Natural
Resources


Low Forest cover (only 1,7%
as opposed to 10%
needed for environmental sustainability)




National Environmental Challenges cont.


Forest excisions
to other competing use
especially agriculture and urban


Food insecurity
due to poor food distribution
and low land productivity


Increased pollution

of water resource from
urban and rural centres putting great
pressure on water resource.


Poor
monitoring

of water resource use.





THE IMPORTANCE OF MOUNT KENYA
ECOSYSTEM


Provides water to 2 million people,two major irrigation
schemes,3 national parks.


Contributes 49% of Tana river flow

most important
river in kenya.


Tana reservoirs generates 80% of country hydro
-

power.


World heritage site(UNESCO 1997) and biosphere
reserve (1978)
-
has an international meteorological
station.


Important biodiversity conservation.



Mt

Kenya

National

Park

&

Forest

Reserve



World

Heritage

site
-

1997

(

2800

sq
.
km)


Importance

Biosphere

Reserve

1998


Source

of

many

rivers



ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES OF
MT. KENYA ECOSYSTEM
-

Protected Area


High population pressure. one million people

Live within10 km of the forest boundary.


Encroachment


Forest Fires


Poaching of forest produce.


Overgrazing


Human /wildlife conflicts


Over abstraction of water.


MT KENYA FOREST HAS LOST 92% OF ITS ICE MASS WHICH COMPRISE
AN IMPORTANT SOURCE OF WATER SOURCE

GLACIER

RESIDING




ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES OF
MT. KENYA ECOSYSTEM
-

FARM LANDS


Poor water and soil conservation.


Over exploitation of farm trees.


Poor solid waste management.


Poor water conveyance and utilization.
technologies.


Poor water resources management.


Low farm productivity
-
crops and livestock.








ENCROACHMENT INTO WILDLIFE PROTECTED
AREAS cont….


Livestock influx in forests/parks


Illegal

settlements

and

human

activities

Summarized Results of human activities in the
forests/farmlands


Increased poverty


Over exploitation of natural resources.


Food insecurity


Accelerating climate change.

STRATEGIES TO ADDRESS THE
CHALLENGES


The Government of Kenya and her development
partners have embarked on various strategies and
activities towards addressing the challenges both
within the protected areas and the farmlands.



One of the strategies is the Mt. Kenya East Pilot
Project for Natural Resources management (MKEPP
-
NRM) which is funded by Government of Kenya
(GOK), International Fund for Agricultural
Development (IFAD), Global Environment and
Climate Change (GECC), formerly Global
Environmental Facility (GEF), and

the local
community.



MKEPP OBJECTIVES


The overall goal of the project is to reduce poverty
through improved food security and improving levels
of income of farmer’s particularly rural women by;


promoting more effective use of natural resources,
improving access to water and introducing better
farming and water management practices for
sustainable use of land and water resources.


The immediate sectoral objective of the project is to
enhance equitable use of natural resources with
particular focus on environmental conservation. The
project aims at halting and eventually reversing
environmental degradation and decreasing poverty.


Specific objectives/activities


Capacity building
at the local level to achieve more water management
through equitable abstraction of river water and its more efficient use for
irrigation;


Minimising
human/wildlife conflict
around the Mt, Kenya Forest Ecosystem
through erection of barriers and other game control measures


Rehabilitation of degraded areas
within the Mt. Kenya Forest Ecosystem


Environmental
conservation and rehabilitation
in the areas adjacent to rivers
concentrating on soil erosion control on farms and on road sides;


Improvement in
Water resource Management
through community participation
in order to increase dry season base flow and reduce sediment loads and
pollution in these rivers(
WRUA
);



Improving
agriculture productivity
and promoting marketing of agricultural
and natural resources based products to raise household income.


Strengthening
governance at the local level
for better land use and water
management(
WUAs;CFAs/IGAs


Increased rain water harvesting and exploitation of alternative water sources.



Outcomes/Impacts of project

The project is in its seventh and last year of its
implementation and same impacts have started
being realized as follows:



Communities are managing Natural resources
through participatory approaches and strengthened
community based legal groups( WRUAs;CFAs)


More water use efficiencies and improved forestry
management(
RGS;ABSTRUCTION/DELIVERY TECHNOLOGIES;PFM)


More
alternative water sources
relieving pressure
on surface water eg sub
-
surface dams, roof
catchments, rock catchments can contribute to
climate change mitigation


Improved
tree cover
-

inside protected areas and farmlands



Lessons Learnt


Involvement of Local communities is key to
sustainanble Natural Resources mgt
-

Communities should gain directly or indirectly
through IGA
´
s


NRM requires approaches and policies that
are multisectoral


Climate change mitigation is a challenge that
requires action from all sectors


NRM requires the use of indigenous
traditional knowledge together with modern
technologies/approaches






EVERY DROP COUNTS,

COUNT EVERY DROP.





Thank you


AHSANTE SANA