By Timothy Prickett Morgan - IT Jungle

towerdevelopmentData Management

Dec 16, 2012 (4 years and 7 months ago)

128 views

But Wait, There's More



Intel Talks Up Dual
-
Core Chips
,
b
ut "Dempsey" Xeons and
"Montecito"
Itanium
s

Still Far Away
. . .
Arkeia Backs Up Open
-
Xchange Groupware

. . .
IBM Launches Faster
'
Irwindale
'

Xeon Servers

. . .
Scyld
Releases
Beowulf Series 29 cz
-
5

Clustering
Update

. . .
Novell, IBM Partner for Power
-
Linux Push

. .

.
IBM Rolls Out Compact, Two
-
Core p5 Unix/Linux Server
. . .
Financing Advantage Helps IBM Speed Up
Deals For SMBs

. . .




<p>


<font face="sans
-
serif" size="+1"><b><span class="fh">But Wait, There's
More</span></b></font>


</p>


<br>




<p class="fb">



<font face="'times new roman', times, serif"><b><a name="#1">
Intel Talks Up Dual
-
Core Chips,
b
ut "Dempsey" Xeons and "Montecito" Itaniums Still Far Away
</b></font>


</p>



<p class="fb">



<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
If <a target="new"
href="http://www.intel.com">Intel</a> wants anything, it is to
prevent
being perceived as being behind
rival <a target="new" hr
ef="http://www.amd.com">A
dvanced
M
icro
D
ev
ices
</a>, which is angling to get
its dual
-
core Opteron chips into the market sometime this summer. Intel desperately wants to get its
"Potomac" and "Cranford" Xeon MPs, which have 64
-
bit memory extensions

and HyperThreading

sim
ultaneous multithreading on
each single
-
core chip,
into the field ahead of the dual
-
core
Opterons.
</font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
According to the latest In
tel roadmaps, the
Potomac and Cranford Xeon MP processors are being collectively grouped together as

the "Truland" family
of chips, and they could be announced at Intel Developer Forum in early March
,

for deliver
y

in late March
or early April. Intel will b
e delivering a Pentium 4 Extreme Edition
for high
-
end gaming machines and
workstations, but this won't be much good in servers. While Intel says it has over ten mu
lt
icore projects
underway in the labs, what it really needs
in order
to compete with Opterons

in the server space is dual
-
core Xeon DPs and MPs and dual
-
core Itaniums.

The "Dempsey" dual
-
core Xeons, probably for two
-
way
machines
,

and probably using 65 nanometer processes,
are
expected in early 2006. That gives AMD about
a six
-
month lead on Intel i
n the server racket. Intel is clearly betting that 64
-
bit support plus
HyperThreading are
good enough against dual
-
core Opterons
without

HyperThreading
. We'll see.
</font>


</p>



<p class="fb">



<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
The current implementation of the
"Montecito" dual
-
core Itaniums (the original Montecito was single
-
core and
was
due last year) is now
expected to start shipping at the end of 2005
,

and
is
expected
to be certified in systems beginning in early
2006.
Montecito
s

are
expected to have an incredible 1.7 billion transistors, almost all of which covers the
24 MB of L3 cache memory on the chip
s
. They are expected to run at between 1.6 GHz

(
like the
current
Itanium 2s
)

and 2 GHz. Montecitos will, however, have about three times the performance per socket,
thanks to
HyperThreading

and other tweaks. Moreover, Montecito will only burn 100 watts, compared
with
the 130 watts of the "Madison" Itanium 2s
.
</f
ont>


</p>




<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roma
n', times, serif"><b><a name="#2
">
Arkeia Backs Up
Open
-
Xchange Groupware
</b></font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
<a target="new"
href="http://www.arkeia.com">Arkeia</a>, one of the top providers of tape backup and archiving software
for Linux platfo
rms, announced
that
it has integrated its backup solution with <a target="new"
href="
http://mirror.o
pen
-
xchange.org/ox/EN/community
">Netline Internet Service</a>'s Open
-
Xchange
Server groupware.
</font>


</p>




<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
Netline is the German software company
that originally created the Linux
-
based groupware product that eventually because SUSE Openexchange
Server. When <a tar
get="new" href="http://www.novell.com">Novell</a> bought SUSE
,

in late 2003,
Openexchange Server conflicted with Novell's GroupWise software, and eventually Netline saw the
wisdom in taking the product back and developing it to run atop any Linux
,

instead
of being tightly coupled
with
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 8. Now Netline is getting ready to go commercial with its Open
-
Xchange Server, and needs an archiving solution for it.
</font>


</p>



<p class=
"fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
Enter Arkeia, which has created a variant
of its own archiving products that can keep a hot
-
backup of the PostgreSQL database and LDAP server at
the heart of Open
-
Xchange Serv
er. (We use Openexchange Server here at IT Jungle, and we can tell you
from personal experience that such a capability would come in pretty handy.) Customers can hook into
Open
-
Xchange Server from either Arkeia Network Backup or Arkeia Server Backup.

The A
rkeia solution
will also, by the way, integrate with the existing Openexchange Server from Novell, which the company is
still selling and supporting. The plug
-
in for the Arkeia software costs $690, and the first release candidate
for that plug
-
in will be a
vailable this week.
</font>


</p>




<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roma
n', times, serif"><b><a name="#3
">
IBM Launches Faster
"Irwindale" Xeon Servers
</b></font>



</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
<a target="new"
href="http://www.ibm.com">IBM</a> will this week deliver versions of its xSeries and BladeCe
nter
servers that employ the new "Irwindale" Xeon DP processor from <a target="new"
href="http://www.intel.com">Intel</a>. The Irwindale chip is a variant of the 64
-
bit "Nocona" processor,
except that it has 2 MB of L2 cache memory as well as the new Deman
d Based Switching and SpeedStep
power management and Execute Disable security enhancement.

It has an 800 MHz frontside bus, just like
the Nocona chip, which means it can

plug into the exact same slots (see the separate story in this issue for
more on the I
rwindale chip).
</font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
IBM says that the xSeries and BladeCenter
blade servers equipped with the new Irw
indale chips, which have twice as much cache memory as the
Noconas, can provide as much as an 18 percent performance boost, according to Intel's internal
benchmarks. But the Irwindales are expected to run at the same clock speeds as the Noconas, so this wi
ll
only be true on applications that can make use of that larger cache.
</font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
IBM
says that the Irwinda
le chips will ship
in four of its two
-
way servers and the HS20 two
-
way blade servers by the end of February. The xSeries 226
is a 4U tower or rack machine that supports from 512 MB to 16 GB of main memory
,

and
1.8 TB of
internal SCSI or 1 TB of internal SA
TA disks
,

and has three PCI
-
X, two PCI, and one PCI
-
Express slot. It
costs $1,225 with a single Irwindale chip running at 3 GHz plus 512 MB of memory and no disk; it costs
$1,475 to buy the machine with a three
-
year warranty. The xSeries 236 is a slightly
larger 5U tower or rack
server that supports the same memory configurations, but has room for nine disks. It has three PCI
-
X, two
PC
-
Express
,

and one PCI slot. It comes with a three
-
year warranty and costs $2,399 with a single 3 GHz
processor, 1 GB of main

memory, no disks
, and a three
-
year warranty
. The xSeries 336 is a 1U, rack
-
mounted server that can house two disk drives (300 GB SCSI Or 250 GB SATA) and has two PCI
-
X slots
and an optional PCI
-
Express slot. It supports up to 16 GB of main memory as well,

and costs $2,359 in a
base configuration (1 GB of memory, one 3 GHz chip, no disk
, and a three
-
year warranty
). And
,

finally, the
xSeries 346 is a 2U rack
-
mounted server
with four PCI
-
X or two PCI
-
X and two PCI
-
Express slots that has
the same memory expans
ion as the other Irwindale
-
based xSeries machines being announced today. A base
xSeries 346 comes with one 3 Ghz processor and 1 GB of main memory; it costs $2,745 with that three
-
year warranty.

IBM did not provide pricing on the HS20 blades.
</font>



</p>




<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roma
n', times, serif"><b><a name="#4
">
Scyld Releases
Beowulf Series 29 cz
-
5 Clustering Update
</b></font>



</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
The <a target="new"
href="http://www.scyld.com">
Scyld Software
</a> subsidiary of <a target="new"
href="http://www.penguincomputing
.com">Penguin Computing</a> is rolling out its next release of the
commercialized Beowulf clustering software for Linux servers. Beowulf Series 29 cz
-
5 is based on the
Linux 2.4.27 kernel, like prior Series 29 releases. The latest release, however, is weav
ing an open
-
source
distributed system monitoring program
with a graphical dashboard
,

called <a target="new"
href="http://www.ganglia.sourceforge.net">Ganglia</a>
,

into the BeoMaster Beowulf cluster management
software.
</font>


</
p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
The way Scyld has tweaked Beowulf,
explains Walt Wallach, vice president of software development, the
master
node in a cluster runs al
l of the
clustering and management software embodied in BeoMaster (and implemented in Linux 2.4 kernel
extensions) while the compute nodes in the cluster run a streamlined Linux kernel and none of the daemons
that a normal cluster would require. This archi
tecture means that compute nodes spend their time
computing, not managing. While many Linux clusters are equipped with Ganglia, which was created at the
University of California at Berkeley, the standard setup requires daemons running on all nodes. Scyld h
as
woven Ganglia into BeoMaster in such a way that the agents used to feed BeoMaster data from the
compute nodes are now feeding data into the Ganglia management program.

Ganglia supplements
BeoMaster; it does not replace it.
</font>



</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
Scyld will also be announcing that Series
29 cz
-
5 will support Penguin's own BladeRunner blade servers, and an expanding set of

InfiniBand
interconnection fabrics. Scyld is also announcing a new customer support portal for customers who have
contractual support contracts
,

to help them gain access to tips and tricks for making BeoWulf clusters sit up
and bark. Scyld Series 29 cz
-
5
will be available at the end of March; in a base configuration, the software
costs $3,500 for a master node and $500 per compute node.
</font>


</p>




<p class="fb">


<font
face="'times new roma
n', times, serif"><b><a name="#5
">
Novell, IBM Partner
for Power
-
Linux Push
</b></font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, seri
f">
Just ahead of LinuxWorld this week, <a
target="new" href="http://www.novell.com">
Novell
</a> and <a target="new"
href="http://www.ibm.com">IBM</a> have announced a joint development effort to get more independent
software companies creating Linux applica
tions for IBM's Power
-
based server platforms.
</font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
Under the promotion, the two companies
are providi
ng prospective application porters
who sign up for the deal between now and the end of March
with 90 days of free technical support and an evaluation copy of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 for
iSeries, pSeries, or OpenPower servers. Customers have to come
up with their own iron, but IBM and
Novell are giving developers a software development kit that helps them
to
begin the job of porting. IBM
and Novell are also making vague promises about co
-
marketing and sales support, but what it really means
is that yo
u can register your application to be included in a big database of applications that support Linux
-
Power. You can sign up
on
<a target="new" href="
http://www.novell.com/ibmpower
">Novell's site</a> to
participate in the program.
</font>



</p>




<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roma
n', times, serif"><b><a name="#6
">
IBM Rolls Out
Compact
, Two
-
Core p5 Unix/Linux Server
</b></font>


</p>




<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
With the Power5
-
based "Squadron" servers
that IBM began rolling out last year, the company has taken a three
-
pronged attack on the server market.
One type of Squadron box is designed to support its OS/400 operating system with auxiliary AIX and
Linux partitions (the eServer i5), another is designed to only run Linux (the OpenPower), and the last
supports AIX and Linux and sometimes OS/400 (the eServ
er p5). Last week, the p5 line got a denser two
-
way machine, the p5 510.
</font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">
The p5 510 is a rack
-
mou
nted machine that
fits in a 2U form factor and comes with a dual
-
core Power5 chip. You can read all about it in <i>The Unix
Guardian</i>, our Unix newsletter. (See <a target="new" href="http://www.itjungle.com/tug/tug021005
-
story02.html">"IBM Rolls Out Com
pact, Two
-
Core p5 Unix/Linux Server"</a> for more details.)
</font>


</p>




<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roma
n', times, serif"><b><a name="#7
">Financing Advantage
Helps IBM Speed Up Deals
f
or
SMBs</b></font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">While <a target="new"
href="http://www.ibm.com">IBM</a> has

been offering various low
-
rate financing deals for its hardware,
software, and services for many years, companies that fall into the small or midsized revenue brackets often
have a much harder time obtaining financing on IT wares than their counterparts a
t large
organizations.</font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">That is why IBM's Global Financing unit
has launched a new worldwide progr
am called Financing Advantage. The company may not want to take
unwarranted risks in lending to SMBs, which do not always have steady sales or squeaky
-
clean credit, but
this is the fastest growing sector of the IT market, and everyone selling IT product is

figuring out how to go
after it.</font>


</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">One of the things that IBM has learned is
that SMB companies th
at may want to come to IBM for financing often want to finance non
-
IBM gear, so
the Financing Advantage program, which went live last week in the United States, Canada, the United
Kingdom, France, Germany, Australia, and Japan, allows for this. IBM says th
at the Financing Advantage
program offers competitive rates and a credit approval process that can within one hour give the thumbs up
or thumbs down to SMBs that try to finance as much as $300,000 in gear. IBM is providing the financing
through a rapid onl
ine financing tool, and some 1,200 of its resellers have been certified to use it. Both
IBM and its resellers want to not only do more business in the SMB space but also do it more quickly,
which helps drive up customer satisfaction and retention.</font>



</p>



<p class="fb">


<font face="'times new roman', times, serif">Financing Advantage is available
immediately in France, Germany, and the U
nited
K
ingdom
, and will be roll
ed out in other geographies
throughout the year.</font>


</p>