The materials in this guide were adapted from the cou

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DISCLAIMER STATEMENT







Contributions of many individuals and from many written resources have collectively
made this curriculum guide possible. The major authors, however, do not claim or
guarantee that its contents will eliminate acts of malpractice o
r negligence. The
responsibility to adhere to safety standards and best professional practices is the duty
of the practitioners, teachers, students, and/or others who apply the contents of this
document.







This guide was developed with federal CARL D.
PERKINS Career and Technical
Education ACT of 2006 funds.







Career and Technical Education

North Carolina Department of Public Instruction

6361 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699
-
6361













The materials in this guide were adapted from the cou
rse guide “Marketing
Principles” from the MBA Research and Curriculum Center. Materials may be
reproduced for use in NC Public Schools only.

FOREWORD

This curriculum framework guide, Marketing Management, was adapted to assist
teachers in preparing stude
nts to meet the North Carolina State Board of Education’s
Guiding Mission “that every public school student will graduate from high school,
globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and prepared for life in the
21st century.” The course is
rigorous and relevant, is based on state and national
content standards, and engages technology to teach today’s generation of students.
Related business and industry partners have endorsed this course as one that helps to
prepare students for high
-
skill,
high
-
wage, and/or high
-
demand occupational
opportunities. This curriculum framework guide was adapted from the course titled
Marketing Applications produced by the MBAResearch & Curriculum Center, which is a
non
-
profit (501(c)3) consortium of state educati
on departments.


In this course students acquire an understanding of management environments of
marketing concepts and functions. Topics include human resources, marketing
information, products/services, distribution, promotion, and selling. Students devel
op an
understanding of marketing functions applications and impact on business decisions.
English language arts and social studies are reinforced. Work
-
based learning strategies
appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mento
rship,
school
-
based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not
available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students)
competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opport
unity
to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic
experiences.


This course content will enhance the core academic areas of reading, writing, and
mathematics. It includes materials and performance assessments that are alig
ned to the
course content. Formative assessments provide continuous feedback to measure
student learning throughout the course. A companion classroom assessment bank

aligned, valid, and reliable

is available and provides summative assessments for each
esse
ntial standard.


We trust these significant efforts will guide North Carolina’s teachers in their mission to
prepare globally competitive students for a successful, 21
st
-
century life.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


Many Marketing and Entrepreneurship Educators and bus
iness and industry leaders
have given a great deal of time and energy to the development of the blueprint and
content/teaching outline for this course. Without the collaboration of knowledgeable and
committed professionals, it would not be possible to prov
ide current curriculum
materials necessary for effective instruction in Marketing and Entrepreneurship
Education program. The continual advancement of technology and constant changes in
the technology industry make collaboration an essential part of the pr
ocess of preparing
young people to become competent members of the workforce.


The following teachers participated in and collaborated during the Piloting of this course:


Pilot Teachers

Candace Cashwell
-
Nash Central High School

Kevin Crudup
-
Nash Central
High School

Amanda Mozingo
-
Southern Wayne High School






Project Director

Delores P. Ali, Consultant, Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education






State Staff for Marketing and Entrepreneurship

Education

Delores P. Ali, Consultant, Marketing and Entrepr
eneurship Education

Pam O’Brien
-
DECA State Adviser

Atkins “Trey” Michael
-
Curriculum Specialist, CTE

Carol Short
-
Curriculum Section Chief, CTE

Jo Anne Honeycutt
-
Director, CTE






Marketing
and Entrepreneurship
Education

Career and Technical Education

Nort
h Carolina Department of Public Instruction

6358 Mail Services Center, Raleigh, NC 27699
-
6358

Table of Contents


Marketing Management



Marketing Management Curriculum Guide Cover

State Board of Education (SBE) List

Disclaimer Statement

Foreword

Acknowl
edgements

Table of Contents

Course Description

................................
................................
................................
.

i

Adapted CTE Course Blueprint

................................
................................
.............

ii

Post
-
assessment Specifications

................................
................................
...........

vi

Equipment Lists and DPI Facilities Guidelines

................................
....................

vii

Program Area Professional Learning Community (PLC)
Moodle...
………………viii

Formative

Assessment
..

................................
................................
.......................

ix

Internet Policy

................................
................................
................................
......

xi

Going Green: A Guide to Using CTE Curriculum for

Environment Sustainability

................................
................................
.......

xii

Overview of Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSO)

...................

xiii

Overview of CTSO
-
Program Area Specific

................................
........................

ivx

Integrating CTSO Competitive Events in Cl
assroom Instruction

........................

xvi


MBA

Research Curriculum Framework Guide is divided into six sections:


Introduction to Course


Course Philosophy and Goals


Course Descriptions and Learning Outcomes


Course Outline


Planning Guide Sheets


Using Project
-
Based Learn
ing and Projects


Appendices


6622 Marketing Management

Summer 2011, Version 2

i


COURSE DESCRIPTION



6622 Marketing Management

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:

30

Hours of Instruction:




135 (block) 150 (regular)

Prerequisite:





6621
Marketing or

6631 Fashion Merchandising


In this course students
acquire an understanding of management environments of
marketing concepts and functions. Topics include human resources, marketing
information, products/services, distribution, promotion, and selling. Students develop an
understanding of marketing function
s applications and impact on business decisions.
English language arts and social studies are reinforced. Work
-
based learning strategies
appropriate include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship,
school
-
based enterprise, service l
earning, and job shadowing. Apprenticeship is not
available for this course. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students)
competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity
to apply essential standards and wo
rkplace readiness skills through authentic
experiences.


The Marketing and Marketing Management courses can help prepare students for
credentials:

Assessment of Skills and Knowledge (A*S*K),
http://www.askinstitute.org/

Professional Certification,
www.nrff
oundation.com

Sales & Marketing Executives International, www.smei.org


6622 Marketing Manage
ment

Summer 2011, Version 2

i
i



Career and Technical Education (CTE)

Adapted CTE Course Blueprint

of

Essential Standards and Indicators


Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education


6622 Marketing Management


Public

Schools of North Carolina

State Board of Education


Department of Public Instruction

Academic Services and Instructional Support

Division of Career and Technical Education

Delores P. Ali, Project Director


Raleigh, North Carolina

Summer 2011, Version 2

C
ontact MarketingEducation@dpi.nc.gov for more information.



Special thanks to the following educators who developed this Adapted CTE Course Blueprint.


Pilot Teachers

Candace Cashwell
-
Nash Central High School

Kevin Crudup
-
Nash Central High School

Amanda M
ozingo
-
Southern Wayne High School




This Adapted CTE Course Blueprint has been reviewed by business and industry
representatives for technical content and appropriateness for the industry.


6622 Marketing Management

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i
ii


Adapted CTE Course Blueprint of Essential Standards


Essential
standards are big, powerful ideas that are necessary and essential for students to know to be successful in a
course. Essential standards identify the appropriate verb and cognitive process intended for the student to accomplish.
Essential standards provid
e value throughout a student’s career, in other courses, and translate to the next level of
education or world of work.


The essential standards use Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) category verbs (remember, understand, apply, analyze,
evaluate, create) that

reflect the overall intended cognitive outcome of the indicators. Each essential standard and indicator
reflects the intended level of learning through two dimensions; The Knowledge Dimension is represented with letters A
-
C,
and the Cognitive Process Dime
nsion by numbers 1
-
6.


This document will help teachers plan for curriculum delivery for the course, prepare daily lesson plans, and construct valid

formative, benchmark, and summative assessments. Assessment for this course is written at the level of t
he
ESSENTIAL
STANDARD

and assesses the intended outcome of the sum of its indicators. Curriculum provider is MBA Research &
Curriculum Center.


For additional information about this blueprint, contact the Division of Career and Technical Education, North C
arolina
Department of Public Instruction, 6361 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, North Carolina 27699
-
6361.


Reference: Anderson, Lorin W. (Ed.), Krathwohl, David R. (Ed.), et al.,
A Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching, and Assessing:
A Revision of Bloom’s Taxon
omy of Educational Objectives,
Addison Wesley Longman, Inc., New York, 2001.


Interpretation of Columns on the NCDPI Adapted CTE Course Blueprint

No.

1

2

3

4

Heading

Essential Std #

Unit Titles, Essential
Standards, and Indicators

Course Weight

RBT

Design
ation

Column
information

Unique course
identifier and
essential standard
number.


Statements of unit titles,
essential standards per
unit, and specific
indicators per essential
standard. If applicable,
includes % for each
indicator.


In addition, inclu
ded are
the assessment
references used by 3rd
party MBA Research and
Curriculum Center, The
assessment references
identify core or
supplemental content.

Shows the relative
importance of each unit
and essential standard.

Course weight is used to
help deter
mine the
percentage of total class
time to be spent on each
essential standard.

Classification of outcome behavior in
essential standards and indicators in
Dimensions according to the Revised
Bloom’s Taxonomy.


Cognitive Process Dimension:

1 Remember

2 Understand

3 Apply

4 Analyze

5 Evaluate

6 Create


Knowledge Dimension:

A Factual Knowledge

B Conceptual Knowledge

C Procedural Knowledge

Career and Technical Education conducts all activities and procedures without regard to race, color, creed, nationa
l origin, gender,
or disability. The responsibility to adhere to safety standards and best professional practices is the duty of the practition
ers,
teachers, students, and/or others who apply the contents of this document.

Career and Technical Student Orga
nizations (CTSO) are an integral part of this curriculum. CTSOs are strategies used to teach
course content, develop leadership, citizenship, responsibility, and proficiencies related to workplace needs.


6622 Marketing Management

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Adapted CTE Course Blueprint Essential Standards

for

6622 MARKETING MANAGEMENT

(Hours of instruction: 135
-
180)


Essential
Std #

Units, Essential Standards, and Indicators

(The Learner will be able to:)

Course

Weight

RBT

Designation

1

2

3

4


Total Course Weight

100%


A

CUSTOMER/CLIENT/BUSINESS BEHAVIO
R, MARKET PLANNING,
SELLING, FINANCIAL ANALYSIS, ECONOMICS, PRODUCT/SERVICE
MANAGEMENT, EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, COMMUNICATION, AND
CUSTOMER RELATIONS.

52%


1.00

Understand customer/client/business behavior and intermediate marketing
planning.

10%

B2


1.01

Und
erstand marketing’s role and function in business to facilitate economic
exchanges with customers. (MK:002),
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

1.02

Utilize critical
-
thinking skills to determine best options/outcomes. (PD:019),
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

1.03

Acquire foundational knowledge of cust
omer/client/business behavior to
understand what motivates decision
-
making. (MK:014), (MK:019)

1.04

Employ marketing
-
information to develop a marketing plan. (MP:007),
(MP:008), (MP:013)

0%


0%


5%


5%


2.00

Understand selling, financial analysis, and economic
s.

14%

B2


2.01

Understand sales activities to show command of their nature and scope.
(SE:380)

2.02

Acquire a foundational knowledge of accounting to understand its nature
and scope. (FI:579)

2.03

Implement accounting procedures to track money flow and to determine
fin
ancial status. (FI:091), (FI:093), (FI:094)

2.04

Acquire knowledge of the impact of government on business activities to
make informed economic decisions. (EC:072)

2.05

Utilize critical
-
thinking skills to determine best options/outcomes. (PD:012)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

3%


3%


5%


3%


0%


3.00

Understand product/service management, emotional intelligence, financial
analysis, selling, and customer relations.

28%

B2


3.01

Generate product ideas to contribute to ongoing business success.
(PM:127), (PM:128)

3.02

U
s
e communication skills

to foster open, honest communications. (EI:038)

3.03

Use communication skills to influence others. (EI:012)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

3.04

Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively. (CO:031)

3.05

Use communication skills to in
fluence others. (EI:062)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

3.06

Manage financial resources to ensure solvency. (FI:106)

3.07

Interpret marketing information to test hypotheses and/or to resolve issues.
(IM:062), (IM:191)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

3.08

Acquire product knowledge to communicate product

benefits and to ensure
appropriateness of product for the customer. (SE:112), (SE:404)

3.09

Understand the nature of customer relationship management to show its
contributions to a company. (CR:016), (CR:017), (CR:018)

3.10

Employ product
-
mix strategies to meet cus
tomer expectations. (PM:041)

3.11

Position company to acquire desired business image. (PM:207)

4%


3%

0%

3%


0%

3%

0%


4%


5%

3%

3%



6622 Marketing Management

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v


Essential
Std #

Units, Essential Standards, and Indicators

(The Learner will be able to:)

Course

Weight

RBT

Designation

B

CHANNEL MANAGEMENT, SELLING, PROMOTION, MARKETING
-
INFORMATION MANAGEMENT, COMMUNICATION, AND ECONOMICS

48%


4.00

Understand channel management and selling.

21%

B2


4.01 Manage channel activities to minimize costs and to determine distribution
strategies
. (CM:007), (CM:008)

4.02 Understand sales processes and techniques to enhance customer
relationships and to increase the likelihood of making sales. (SE:359)

4.03 Perform pre
-
sales activities to facilitate sales presentation. (SE:001),
(SE:400), (SE:369),

(SE:366), (SE:067), (SE:119)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

4.04

Employ sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships
and to increase the likelihood of making sales. (SE:810), (SE:883),
(SE:811), (SE:113), (SE:893), (SE:115), (SE:874), (SE:895)

4.05

Employ sale
s processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships
and to increase the likelihood of making sales. (SE:875), (SE:392),
(SE:387), (SE:046), (SE:073)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

4.06

Process the sale to complete the exchange. (SE:117)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

4.07


Write internal
and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively. (CO:094)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

4%


3%


0%


14%



0%



0%

0%



5.00

Understand promotion, marketing
-
information management and
communication.

16%

B2


5.01 Understand the use of an

advertisement’s components to communicate with
targeted audiences. (PR:014), (PR:251)

5.02 Manage stressful situations to minimize negative workplace interactions.
(EI:028)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

5.03 Understand the use of public
-
relations activities to communica
te with
targeted audiences. (PR:252), (PR:253)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

5.04 Understand the use of trade shows/expositions to communicate with
targeted audiences. (PR:254), (PR:255)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

5.05 Manage promotional activities to maximize return on promotional
efforts.
(PR:073), (PR:076)

5.06 Evaluate marketing research procedures and findings to assess their
credibility. (IM:292), (IM:293), (IM:428)

5.07 Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively. (CO:091)

4
%


0%


0%


0%


4%


5%


3%


6.00

Understand economics.

11%

B2


6.01

Analyze cost/profit relationships to guide business decision
-
making.
(EC:014), (EC:015)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

6.02

Analyze cost/profit relationships to guide business decision
-
making.
(EC:023)

6.03

Understand
economic indicators to recognize economic trends and
conditions. (EC:083), (EC:017), (EC:082), (EC:084), (EC:018)

6.04


Determine global trade’s impact on business decision
-
making. (EC:016),
(EC:100), (EC:045)
(SUPPLEMENTAL)

0%


3%


8%


0%


`




6622 Marketing Ma
nagement

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i

POST
-
ASSESSM
ENT SPECIFICATIONS


The post
-
assessment will be administered through the Elements Instructional
Management System using a third party assessment provided by the MBA Research
and Curriculum Center. The post
-
assessment will be a 100
-
item multiple choice test
.
The post
-
assessment will assess students’ knowledge and skills of the content at the
essential standard level as specified on the adapted blueprint.


Background Information on Essential Standards

Essential standards are big, powerful ideas that are nece
ssary and essential for
students to know to be successful in a course. Essential standards identify the
appropriate verb and cognitive process intended for the student to accomplish.
Essential standards provide value throughout a student’s career, in other

courses, and
translate to the next level of education or world of work.



Assessment for courses developed using the adapted CTE course blueprint is written at
the level of the essential standard using one RBT category verb (remember,
understand, apply,
analyze, evaluate) that reflects the intended outcome of the sum of
its indicators. For example, the indicators copied from an industry credential for an
essential standard may use an immeasurable verb or may use a verb that is misaligned
with the true int
ent of the indicator. Those verbs would still be used, since they are
derived from the credential, but the assessment items would not necessarily reflect the
definition of that verb. However, NC CTE will review the items and ensure alignment
cognitively at

the essential standard level.


6622 Marketing Management

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v
ii

EQUIPMENT LIST, TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS, and FACILITIES GUIDELINES



Access the equipment list, technical requirements, and facilities guidelines using the
following links:


Equipment list

http://ctpnc.org/cte/equipment/


Technical requirements

http://bit.ly/KwN1Lv


Facilities guidelines

http://www.schoolclearinghouse.org


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iii

COURSE PROFESSIONA
L LEARNING COMMUNITY

(PLC) MOODLE


Please join the Marketing and Entrepreneurship Education Moodle PLC by
following these steps:

1.

Obtain the Enrollment Key supplied by your local CTE Director or Administrator
or from the Program Area Consultant. Program Are
a Consultants may be
reached by email at:
MarketingEducation@dpi.nc.gov

.


2.

Create a LearnNC account by going to this website:
http://accounts.learnnc.org




C
lick on Create an Account (if you have used Moodle in the past, you can
use your existing username and password).



You pick your own username and password.



Enter your email address so that your username and password can be
emailed to you.


3.

Join the Moodle C
lass by going to Moodle's website:
http://moodle.learnnc.org




Login using your username and password.



In the upper left corner, click on All Courses.



Click on DPI under the PLC tab.



Click on the course PLC key.



E
nter the Enrollment Key supplied by your local CTE Director or
Administrator or from the Program Area Consultant. The Program Area
Consultant may be reached by email at:
MarketingEducation@dpi.nc.gov



Cli
ck on Enroll me in this Course


Teachers are encouraged to share ideas and activities in the course PLC and to
participate in the discussion forums provided for each essential standard.



6622 Marketing Management

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x

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT


Frequently Asked Questions

Formative Assessm
ent and North Carolina’s Formative Assessment Learning
Community’s Online Network (NC FALCON)



1.

What is formative assessment?

Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that
provides feedback to adjust ongoing teachi
ng and learning to improve intended instructional
outcomes (CCSSO FAST SCASS, 2006).


2.

What is the primary purpose of the formative assessment process?

The primary purpose of the formative assessment process is to provide evidence that is used by
teachers
and students to inform instruction and learning during the teaching/learning process.


3.

How does formative assessment fit into North Carolina’s next generation
assessment system?

North Carolina’s next generation, comprehensive, balanced assessment system i
ncludes
formative assessment, interim/benchmark assessments, and summative assessments that are
aligned to state standards. Formative assessment is an essential component of this system
because it forms the foundation of teaching and learning. In contrast
to summative assessment,
formative assessment is more focused on collaboration in the classroom and identifying learning
gaps that can be addressed before end
-
of
-
year assessments. Formative assessment should
occur in the classroom more often than any other

assessment.


4.

Are there “formative tests”?

The definition that North Carolina has adopted defines formative assessment as a process. With
this in mind, there is no such thing as a “formative test.” Formative assessment is regarded as
an ongoing process rat
her than a particular kind of test.


5.

What formative assessment strategies can be implemented during classroom
instruction?

There are a number of formative assessment strategies that can be implemented during
classroom instruction. These range from informa
l observations and conversations to
purposefully planned instructionally embedded techniques designed to elicit evidence of student
learning to inform and adjust instruction. See the
Collecting and Documenting Evidence
professional development module on
North Carolina’s Formative Assessment Learning
Community’s Online Network

(NC FALCON) for additional information on formative assessment
strategies.


6.

What resources are available to educators that will provide t
hem with a basic
understanding of formative assessment and illustrate the role it may play in a
comprehensive, balanced assessment system?

The online professional development series modules located on
NC FALCO
N

are intended to
serve as a primer for teachers wishing to learn more about how formative assessment can
impact their instruction and help their students achieve targeted learning goals.




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x

7.

What professional development modules are available to educator
s on NC FALCON?

There are currently five different formative assessment modules in the online professional
development series located on NC FALCON. The following is a list and description of the
modules:



Importance of Formative Assessment
––
An introduction
to formative assessment and
its role in North Carolina’s 21
st

century balanced assessment system.



Learning Targets and Criteria for Success
––
An exercise in writing clear learning
targets and defining criteria for success to help students answer the questio
n,
Where am
I going?



Collecting and Documenting Evidence
––
An exercise in collecting and documenting
evidence of learning to help students answer the question,
Where am I now?



Analyzing Evidence and Descriptive Feedback
––
An exercise in analyzing evidence
an
d providing descriptive feedback to help students answer the question,
How do I close
the gap?



Administrator’s Role in Formative Assessment
––
An exploration of the
administrator’s role in formative assessment, as outlined by the North Carolina
Standards for

School Executives
, and its implementation in the school or district.


8.

How much time does it take to complete the modules?

The modules and the activities contained within each module have been created so that the
series can be completed in approximately se
ven hours. Approximately forty
-
five minutes to one
hour of computer time is needed for each module. The modules are self
-
paced; therefore,
individual participants control the pace and location of their learning.


9.

Is it better to complete the modules indiv
idually or with a school or district learning
team?

The modules have been designed so that they can be used by individual educators working
independently or with a school or district learning team. The NCDPI recommends participants
work collaboratively in

learning teams. Working together, teachers may assist one another as
they complete the modules and practice their formative assessment skills.


10.

Is CEU credit available for participants who complete any or all of the NC FALCON
modules?

At the completion o
f each module, participants will be able to print a certificate of completion
which includes a recommendation for renewal credit or continuing education units (CEUs). Final
awarding of CEUs must be approved by the local education agency (LEA). The LEA dete
rmines
the content area and the number of CEUs granted.


11.

How do educators access the modules on NC FALCON?

NC FALCON is located at
http://center.ncsu.edu/falcon/
. For more information about login and
password

access, please visit the website or contact your LEA/school test coordinator.


6622 M
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INTERNET POLICY



Career and Technical Education curricula and 21st Century Skills require students to
use many technologies, including the Internet. Each school should have

an Internet use
policy, and all students should sign the school Internet policy prior to beginning any
class that uses such technologies. Students who violate the school’s Internet policy
must be held accountable for his/her actions and face appropriate c
onsequences
deemed necessary by the school in accordance with the school’s policies.


Teachers must use extreme caution when assigning Internet activities to students.
Teachers must preview sites, which can change daily, prior to ANY activity. If the
teach
er determines a website used in an activity is inappropriate, or students are not
mature enough to behave properly and according to the school’s Internet policy, the
teacher should make alternate arrangements for completing the activity.


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xii



Many of the Instructional Support Materials (ISMs) are developed to help students
organize and use the unpacked content relative to the designated Revised Bloom’s
Taxonomy (RBT) verb. These are designed to help students study and retain rel
evant
information.


Ideally, each ISM would be duplicated and handed to students in class. Realistically,
teachers may have to find alternative approaches for implementing the ISMs in the
classroom.


Teachers may have to “show” what each ISM looks li
ke and rely on students drawing
each in either a journal or on paper that is accumulated in a notebook.


Consider these alternative approaches for using the Instructional Support Materials in
the classroom:



Draw the ISM on the board.



Duplicate the ISM an
d hand out one per group and collect at the end of class for
use in another. To add longevity, consider laminating or using sleeve protectors
for each ISM.



Laminate and have students use dry
-
erase marker pens if they need to write on
the ISM. An alternat
ive would be to place the ISM in a sleeve protector and have
the students use dry
-
erase marker pens.



Prepare a transparency of the ISM and show it on an overhead projector.



Display the file in electronic form (PowerPoint or Word) through a digital
projecto
r.



Display the file in electronic form on an interactive whiteboard.



Display the file in electronic form via a document camera and digital projector.



Deliver the file electronically via an internal network, Blackboard, Moodle, or
secure website. This wou
ld provide added benefit to homebound and absent
students needing to make up work.


Other helpful conservation hints…



Always use both sides of the paper!!



If a student needs to redo an assignment, whenever possible, have the student
use a different color

pen or pencil and work on the same paper.


We hope these ideas will help conserve paper and other valuable resources!


G
OING GREEN: A GUIDE

TO USING CTE CURRICU
LUM
FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SU
STAINABILITY




6622 Marketing Management

Summer 2011, Version 2

xiii

OVERVIEW OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS (CTSO)


Introduction

Career and Technical Student Organizations provide the opp
ortunity for students to connect to business
and industry professionals and career options. Additionally, CTSOs motivate students to higher level
academic achievement and build interpersonal and employability skills. CTSOs are co
-
curricular, meaning
they c
omplement the state curricula in the classroom and incorporate realistic educational experiences
not available through classroom instruction alone. Teachers must coordinate with local CTE directors to
enhance the delivery of state curricula through CTSO ac
tivities. Through this coordinated effort, teachers
improve student achievement on state and national Career and Technical Education (CTE) accountability
measures. The
Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006

allows CTE directors to fund
certain CTSO activities as identified in the 2009 NC CTE Fiscal and Policy Guide.

What are CTSOs?


The three components of a quality Career and Technical Education program include classroom
instruction, workforce readiness and on
-
the
-
job training, and Ca
reer and Technical Student
Organizations. CTSOs have been a part of Career and Technical Education since the passage of the
Smith
-
Hughes Act of 1917. CTSOs are found in middle and high schools and post
-
secondary institutions
throughout the nation and aroun
d the world.
It is important to realize that CTSOs are not just “clubs”, but
instructional tools that work best when integrated into the curricula. CTSOs:



Support and enhance related school
-
based and work
-
based learning,



Provide students with skills and kn
owledge to succeed in the new global economy,



Provide career exploration and competence,



Provide students with the opportunity to experience competition related to classroom instruction,



Encourage students to experience community service projects, and



Pro
vide and enhance the development of leadership skills in students.


Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 Defined

“The Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Public Law 109
-
270) is the vehicle
through which federa
l support is distributed to states, local school districts, and postsecondary institutions
to develop more fully the academic and technical skills of secondary and postsecondary students who
elect to enroll in career and technical educations programs.”
(So
urce: CTSO Guide to accessing Federal
Perkins Funds, 2008)

What are the benefits of CTSOs?




Develop meaningful business partnerships



Develop school and community leaders



Enable students to achieve high academic and occupational standards



Enhance studen
t self
-
esteem and self
-
confidence



Help students to integrate contextual and academic learning



Link school
-
based learning to the real world of work and family



Motivate youth to become better students and productive citizens


6622 Marketing Ma
nagement

Summer 2011, Version 2

ivx


Mission Statement

The missio
n of NC DECA is to enhance the co
-
curricular education of students who have an interest in
marketing, management, and entrepreneurship. DECA seeks to help students develop skills and
competence for
entrepreneurial, finance, hospitality, management, and mar
keting careers, build self
-
esteem, experience leadership, and participate in community service. DECA

is committed to the
advocacy and the growth of business and education partnerships.


What is NC DECA?

North Carolina DECA is the premiere student marketin
g association. NC DECA is a Career and
Technical Student Organization that serves students who are either currently enrolled or have
successfully completed
at least one Marketing

Education course. NC DECA is affiliated with the national
organization, DECA
, Inc.

DECA chapters operate in over 4,000 high schools across the U.S., Puerto
Rico, Guam and territories, Mexico, Germany and Canada, with over 180,000 members.




DECA programs are co
-
curricular, meaning programs complement nationally recognized curricul
um
standards in the classroom and incorporate real
-
world educational experiences not available through
classroom instruction alone.



The high school division of DECA, Inc. is recognized and endorsed by all 50 State Departments of
Education and the U.S. Depa
rtment of Education.



The principles guiding DECA programs are curriculum related career skills, workplace experiences,
community service and the development of business leadership capabilities.


DECA as an Integral P
art of the Marketing Education Program

T
he three major components of a Marketing Education program include:



Marketing curriculum



Work
-
based learning experiences



DECA activities


DECA is co
-
curricular and
its activities can be used as teaching tools

or to reinforce skills. Integrating
DECA into t
he
Marketing Education

curriculum can be achieved successfully in many
ways for

meaningful
learning experiences.


DECA Student Membership Benefits



DECA supports students define college and career goals and emphasizes the relevance of academic
studies.



DEC
A promotes free enterprise and entrepreneurship and connects the importance of lifelong
learning with success.



DECA directly serves Marketing Education students.



DECA develops leadership skills by offering extensive training opportunities.



DECA offers stat
e, national, and international recognition through competition in 38 occupational
areas.



DECA, Inc. awards more than $250,000 in scholarships each year.



DECA’s student membership is a reflection of the nation’s student population.






6622 Marketing Management

Summer 2011, Version 2

xv

DECA Benefits from

Business and Industry Participation



A 60
-
member National Advisory Board provides financial resources and active personnel support.



Thousands of business leaders support local DECA chapters as employers, guest speakers,
competitive event judges, and sponso
rs.



Business leaders serve on local advisory committees.



Business involvement aids local, state, and international members.

Competitive Events

DECA offers a comprehensive program of competitive events based on the occupational goals of its
student membersh
ip and on the activities of chapters in high schools and postsecondary institutions.
Competitive events offered by DECA Inc. are replicated at the state or provincial association level as well
as at the chapter level.


Purposes of DECA Competitive Events



Contribute to the development of skills necessary for careers in marketing, management, and
entrepreneurship



Evaluate student achievement of the skills through careful measurement devices (performance
indicators)



Provide opportunities for student and team
recognition



Provide constructive avenues for individual or team expression, initiative, and creativity



Motivate students to assume responsibility for self
-
improvement and self
-
discipline



Provide a vehicle for students to demonstrate (via performance indica
tors) their acquired skills
through individual or team activities



Assist students in acquiring a realistic self
-
concept through individual or team activities



Help students participate in an environment of cooperation and competition



Provide visibility for
the educational goals and objectives of Marketing Education


DECA Websites

The North Carolina DECA website:

www.ncdeca.org



The National DECA website:


www.deca.org





Links to S
pecific R
esources



http://www.deca.org/membershipprocessing.html



This walks you through the online membership submission process and provides needed
background information.



http://www.deca.org/pdf/FAQs.pdf



This provides answers to common registration questi
ons.



http://www.deca.org/celisting.html



Complete, up
-
to
-
date event guidelines.



This includes a list of all of the competitive events and the guidelines for undertaking them.



Sample exams (Only 10 questions for a representative sample of the exam. The actu
al exams
have 100 questions.)



Sample role
-
plays for each role
-
play event.



Abbreviated versions of winning written event manuals.



http://www.schoolbasedenterprises.org



Certification, best practices and help for school
-
based businesses to provide students re
al
-
world
experience.



www.deca.org/q&a.html



Down
-
to
-
earth answers for down
-
to
-
earth questions.



http://www.deca.org/advcornerresources.html



http://www.deca.org/pdf/calendar.pdf



Click on a topic to g
o to that page of calendar material.



http://www.deca.org/pdf/DECAChapterManagement.pdf



Provides basic background information for most aspects of running a chapter.


6622 Marketing Management

Summer 2011, Version 2

xvi

INTEGRATING CTSO COMPETITIVE EVENTS

IN CLASSROOM INSTRUCTION


Co
-
curricular methodology of

integrating curriculum and CTSO competitive events
increases opportunities for student achievement. DECA, the CTSO for Marketing
Education students, the comprehensive competitive events framework is aligned with
the course adapted blueprint indicators and

curriculum framework guide performance
elements and performance indicators.


Teachers may facilitate competitive events with their students in the co
-
curricular
classroom. For example, if a student is planning to compete in the Principles of
Business Man
agement and Administration (PBM) event, the teacher and student may
want to become familiar with the guidelines, performance elements (adapted blueprint
indicators), and performance indicators for the PBM event.


Competitive event guidelines and performan
ce indicators (performance elements listed
within selected event document), sample exams, and sample events are available at
http://www.deca.org/competitions/highschool/

. A document titled
Conne
cting DECA’s
Competitive Events to Curriculum

that entails the comprehensive competitive events
framework and curricular structure is available at
http://www.
deca.org/_docs/college
-
career
-
ready
-
attachments/EventstoCurriculum.pdfs

.





Marketing

Management


MBA Research and Curriculum Center:

Marketing Applications

















A curriculum development project developed and produced by


MBA Research and C
urriculum Center®


©201
2

Table of Contents




Section

1



Introduction to
Marketing Applications



Description of
Marketing Applications

................................
.....................

1
-
2



Premises of the Curriculum

................................
................................
.....

1
-
2



Business Administration Curriculum

................................
........................

1
-
3



Curricular Organization

................................
................................
............

1
-
4



Curriculum Planning Level
s

................................
................................
.....

1
-
7



Curriculum Frameworks

................................
................................
...........

1
-
7


2



Course Philosophy and Goals



Philosophy

................................
................................
...............................

2
-
2



Student Organization

................................
................................
...............

2
-
2



Purpose

................................
................................
................................
....

2
-
2




Goals

................................
................................
................................
........

2
-
2


3



Course Description and Learning Outcomes



Course

................................
................................
................................
....

3
-
2



Credit

................................
................................
................................
.......

3
-
2



Suggested Grade Level

................................
................................
...........

3
-
2



Prerequisit
es

................................
................................
............................

3
-
2



Admission Requirements

................................
................................
.........

3
-
2



Student Characteristics

................................
................................
............

3
-
2



Description

................................
................................
...............................

3
-
2



Instructional Strategies

................................
................................
............

3
-
2



Standards of Completion

................................
................................
.........

3
-
2



Learning Outcomes

................................
................................
.................

3
-
3



Specific Learning Objectives

................................
................................
...

3
-
9


4



Course Outline



Introduction

................................
................................
..............................

4
-
2



Stud
ent Ability Level

................................
................................
................

4
-
2



Instructional Time

................................
................................
....................

4
-
2



Career
-
Technical Student Organization

................................
..................

4
-
2



Course Outline

................................
................................
.........................

4
-
3


5



Planning Guide Sheets

................................
................................
....

5
-
1


6



Using Project
-
based Learning and Projects

................................
.....

6
-
1



Appendices

A


SCANS Competencies and Skills

................................
....................

A
-
1


B


21
st

Century Skills

................................
................................
...........

B
-
1


C


Sample Semester Exams for
Marketing Applications

......................

C
-
1













Introduction to
Marketing Applications


Section 1



































Section 1

Introduction to
Marketing Applications

Page 1
-
2




Marketing Applications
Co
urse Guide


Copyright 2012,
MBA Research

and Curriculum

Center®

Description of
Marketing
Applications

“Marketing” is defined and used dif
ferently by individuals and organizations. Some
use it to mean exclusively “advertising/promotion,” while others focus on its
research aspect. Others include a mix of activities that address product, place,
price, and promotion considerations.


The America
n Marketing Association redefined marketing in 2004 to mean “
an
organizational function and a set of processes for creating, communicating, and
delivering value to customers and for managing customer relationships in ways
that benefit the organization and
its stakeholders.” At the end of 2007, the
American Marketing Association updated its marketing definition to “the activity,
set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and
exchanging offerings that have value for customers,

clients, partners, and society
at large.”


The United Kingdom’s Chartered Marketing Institute, the largest marketing
organization

in the world in terms of membership, defines marketing as the
“management process of anticipating, identifying and satisfyin
g customer
requirements profitably.”
These definitions indicate that marketing is a process that
involves a variety of activities focused on customers and profitable execution of
those activities, including, but not limited to, marketing research, promotio
n,
pricing, product/service management, channel management, and selling.


Marketing, therefore, is a multi
-
faceted, critical business function that is under
-
girded by such social sciences as economics, psychology, and sociology. Its
successful performance
depends on the application of mathematics and English
principles, the use of scientific problem solving, and the application of technology
to marketing situations and problems.


The pace at which marketing activities are changing has accelerated due to
env
ironmental shifts taking place in the business world: downsizing, outsourcing,
off
-
shoring, mergers, global competition, world markets, and technological
innovations. These changes impact the skills, attitudes, and abilities needed for
success in today’s w
orkplace.
Effective Marketing Education provides those skills.


To that end, the
Marketing Applications
course has been developed as the second
course in the marketing series to give students an opportunity to delve more
deeply into the marketing functions

and their application and impact on business
operations.


Premises

of the

Curriculum

The
Marketing

Applications
curriculum should:




Encourage students to think critically about the business world



Stress the integration of and articulation with academi
cs such as language arts,
mathematics, and social studies



Provide a foundation to support advanced study in business



Enable students to acquire broad understandings of and skills in marketing



Enable students to understand and use technology to perform clas
sroom
activities



Stress the importance of interpersonal skills in diverse societies



Foster a realistic understanding of the business environment in which marketing
activities are performed



Foster an understanding and appreciation of business ethics



Utilize

a variety of types of interactions with the business community




Section 1

Introduction to
Marketing Applications

Page 1
-
3




Marketing Applications
Co
urse Guide


Copyright 2012,
MBA Research

and Curriculum

Center®

Business
Administration
Curriculum



Business
Administration
Core




Cluster Core





Pathways





Specialties


The business administration curricular structure consists of four tiers of s
pecificity:
Business Administration Core, Cluster Core, Pathways, and Specialties. The
content of the broad
-
based Business Administration Core is
fundamental to an
understanding of business and can be viewed as co
-
requisites and as
prerequisites for the
Ma
rketing

Applications
course.


The content of the Business Administration Core should be mastered in order for
cluster
-
specific content to have relevance to student learning. There are 13
Business Administration instructional areas: Business Law, Communica
tions,
Customer Relations, Economics, Emotional Intelligence, Entrepreneurship,
Financial Analysis, Human
-
Resources Management, Information Management,
Marketing, Operations, Professional Development, and Strategic Management.


The Cluster Core tier repres
ents the skills and knowledge that were identified as
common across the Pathways in a cluster. For example, the Marketing Cluster
Core is composed of six instructional areas: Channel Management, Marketing
-
information Management, Pricing, Product/Service Ma
nagement, Promotion, and
Selling.


The Pathways tier addresses the content of a variety of broad
-
based occupational
opportunities within a cluster. In the Marketing Cluster, for example, the skills and
knowledge that are common across sales careers appear
in the Professional
Selling Pathway.


The fourth tier, Specialties, focuses on specific job opportunities that are tied to a
pathway. The job opportunities identified in the Specialties require knowledge and
skills unique to a product or service. In Market
ing, for example, Specialties for the
Professional Selling Pathway include pharmaceutical sales, advertising sales,
heavy
-
equipment sales, and medical
-
equipment sales.


Thus, the business administration curriculum can be viewed as a continuum that
begins i
n the primary grades with career awareness and exploration and continues
through postsecondary education with the emphasis becoming more specialized to
the learner’s individual interest in business administration. The graph depicting the
relationship among

the four tiers is shown in Figure 1.





Figure 1. Relationship of Tiers


Section 1

Introduction to
Marketing Applications

Page 1
-
4




Marketing Applications
Co
urse Guide


Copyright 2012,
MBA Research

and Curriculum

Center®

Curricular
Organization






Knowledge

and Skill
Statements

Within each tier, the curricular content has been organized into Knowledge and
Skill Statements, Performance Elements,

and Performance Indicators. The
Knowledge and Skill Statements are broad
-
based content standards. They
identify what students should know and be able to do as a result of instruction in
any of the business
-
related clusters. These statements encapsulate th
e
overarching intent/purpose of a work function. The Knowledge and Skill
Statements identified for the Business Administration Core are:


Business Law
:

Understands business’s responsibility to know, abide by, and
enforce laws and regulations that affect bu
siness operations and transactions

Communication Skills:
Understands the concepts, strategies, and systems
used to obtain and convey ideas and information

Customer Relations:
Understands the techniques and strategies used to
foster positive, ongoing relati
onships with customers

Economics:
Understands the economic principles and concepts fundamental
to business operation
s

Emotional Intelligence
:

Understands techniques, strategies, and systems
used to foster self
-
understanding and enhance relationships with o
thers

Entrepreneurship:

Understands the concepts, processes, and skills
associated with identifying new ideas, opportunities, and methods and with
creating or starting a new project or venture

Financial Analysis:

Understands tools, strategies, and systems
used to
maintain, monitor, control, and plan the use of financial resources

Human Resource Management
:
Understands the tools, techniques, and
systems that businesses use to plan, staff, lead, and organize human
resources

Information Management:

Understands

tools, strategies, and systems
needed to access, process, maintain, evaluate, and disseminate information
to assist business decision
-
making

Marketing:

Understands the tools, techniques, and systems that businesses
use to create exchanges and satisfy orga
nizational objectives

Operations:

Understands the processes and systems implemented to
monitor, plan, and control the day
-
to
-
day activities required for continued
business functioning

Professional Development
:
Understands concepts, tools, and strategies
us
ed to explore, obtain, and develop in a business caree
r

Strategic Management:
Understands tools, techniques, and systems that
affect a business’s ability to plan, control, and organize an
organization/department



Marketing
Core

The second tier of specifi
city represented those skills and knowledge that were
identified as common across the five marketing pathways. The instructional areas
addressed in this tier include Channel Management, Marketing
-
Information
Management, Market Planning, Pricing, Product/Se
rvice Management, Promotion,
and Selling.
The Knowledge and Skill Statements identified for the Marketing Core
are:

Channel Management:
Understands the concepts and processes needed to
identify, select, monitor, and evaluate sales channels

Marketing
-
Inform
ation Management:
Understands the concepts, systems,
and tools needed to gather, access, synthesize, evaluate, and disseminate
information for use in making business decisions

Section 1

Introduction to
Marketing Applications

Page 1
-
5




Marketing Applications
Co
urse Guide


Copyright 2012,
MBA Research

and Curriculum

Center®

Market Planning
:
Understands the concepts and strategies utilized to
determine a
nd target marketing strategies to a select audience

Pricing:
Understands concepts and strategies utilized in determining and
adjusting prices to maximize return and meet customers’ perceptions of value

Product/Service Management:
Understands the concepts a
nd processes
needed to obtain, develop, maintain, and improve a product or service mix in
response to market opportunities

Promotion:
Understands the concepts and strategies needed to
communicate information about products, services, images, and/or ideas t
o
achieve a desired outcome

Selling:
Understands the concepts and actions needed to determine client
needs and wants and respond through planned, personalized communication
that influences purchase decisions and enhances future business
opportunities


Per
formance
Elements

Each Knowledge and Skill Statement is composed of multiple Performance
Elements. These statements are broad
-
based work or cognitive performances that
aid in defining the Knowledge and Skill Statements. The Performance Elements
addressed i
n this course are:

Communication Skills

Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively.

Customer Relations

Understand the nature of customer relationship management to show its
contributions to a company.

E
conomics

Acquire knowledge of the impact of government on business activities to
make informed economic decisions.

Analyze cost/profit relationships to guide business decision
-
making.

Understand economic indicators to recognize economic trends and
conditio
ns.

Determine global trade’s impact on business decision
-
making.

Emotional Intelligence

Use communication skills to foster open, honest communications.

Use communication skills to influence others.

Manage stressful situations to minimize negative workplace

interactions.

Financial Analysis

Acquire a foundational knowledge of accounting to understand its nature and
scope.

Implement accounting procedures to track money flow and to determine
financial status.

Manage financial resources to ensure solvency.

Marke
ting


Acquire foundational knowledge of customer/client/business behavior to
understand what motivates decision
-
making.

Professional Development

Utilize critical
-
thinking skills to determine best options/outcomes.

Channel Management

Manage channel activiti
es to minimize costs and to determine distribution
strategies.

Marketing
-
Information Management

Understand marketing
-
research activities to show command of their nature
and scope.

Understand data
-
collection methods to evaluate their appropriateness for the

research problem/issue.

Section 1

Introduction to
Marketing Applications

Page 1
-
6




Marketing Applications
Co
urse Guide


Copyright 2012,
MBA Research

and Curriculum

Center®

Market Planning

Employ marketing
-
information to develop a marketing plan.

Product/Service Management

Generate product ideas to contribute to ongoing business success.

Employ product
-
mix strategies to meet customer expectations.

Pos
ition company to acquire desired business image.

Promotion

Understand the use of an advertisement’s components to communicate with
targeted audiences.

Understand the use of public
-
relations activities to communicate with targeted
audiences.

Understand the
use of trade shows/expositions to communicate with targeted
audiences.

Manage promotional activities to maximize return on promotional efforts.

Selling

Understand sales activities to show command of their nature and scope.

Acquire product knowledge to comm
unicate product benefits and to ensure
a
ppropriateness of product for the customer.

Understand sales processes and techniques to enhance customer
relationships and to increase the likelihood of making sales.

Perform pre
-
sales activities to facilitate sales

presentation.

Employ sales processes and techniques to enhance customer relationships
and to increase the likelihood of making sales.

Process the sale to complete the exchange.


Performance
Indicators


Performance Elements are defined through Performance

Indicators that are
specific work
-
based actions

either knowledge or skills. They specify what an
individual worker must know or be able to do to achieve the Performance
Elements. For example, the Performance Indicators for Selling’s Performance
Element

Pe
rform pre
-
sales activities to facilitate sales presentations

are:


Prospect for customers (SE:001
) (SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Qualify customers/clients (SE:400) (SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Conduct pre
-
visit research (e.g., customer’s markets/products, customer’s
compet
itors, and competitors’ offerings) (SE:369) (SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Book appointments with prospective clients (SE:366) (SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Prepare sales presentation (SE:067) (SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Create a presentation software package to support sales prese
ntation
(SE:119) (SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)


Section 1

Introduction to
Marketing Applications

Page 1
-
7




Marketing Applications
Co
urse Guide


Copyright 2012,
MBA Research

and Curriculum

Center®


Curriculum
Planning

Levels

Each performance indicator is assigned to one of six curriculum
-
planning levels
that represent a continuum of instruction ranging from simple to complex. The
levels can serve as buildi
ng blocks for curriculum development in that students
should know and be able to perform the performance indicators at one level before
tackling more complex skills and knowledge at the next level. The levels can also
be used as the basis for developing an

unduplicated sequence of instruction for
articulation between high school and postsecondary business courses. In these
cases, instructors can agree as to how far along the continuum students will
advance in high school so that postsecondary instructors ca
n initiate instruction at
that point in the continuum. This will enable students to focus on new, more
advanced subject matter rather than on content previously mastered. The
curriculum
-
planning level for each performance indicator is referenced on the
pla
nning guide sheets found in Section 5. The six curriculum
-
planning levels are
described as follows:


Prerequisite
(PQ)

Content develops employability and job
-
survival skills and concepts, including work
ethics, personal appearance, and general business be
havior.


Career
-
Sustaining

(CS)

Content develops skills and knowledge needed for continued employment in or study of
business based on the application of basic academics and business skills.



Specialist

(SP)

Content
provides in
-
depth, solid understand
ing and skill development in all business
functions.


Supervisor

(SU)

Content provides the same in
-
depth, solid understanding and skill development in
all business functions as in the specialist curriculum, and in addition, incorporates
content that addr
esses the supervision of people.


Manager (MN)

Content
develops strategic decision
-
making skills in all business functions needed
to manage a business or department within an organization.


Owner (ON)

Content

develops strategic decision
-
making skills in
all aspects of business that
are needed to own and operate a business.



Curriculum
Frameworks


In general, a framework is a skeleton structure that supports or encloses some
-
thing. In education, frameworks are used to support and enclose the curriculum

of
a discipline by defining the discipline’s main elements, thereby providing a big
picture overview of the discipline’s curriculum. They can act as gatekeepers by
helping educators and curriculum developers make decisions about what should
be addressed o
r eliminated from consideration in a curriculum. Once educators
have determined what content should be addressed, they can use the scaffolding
that frameworks provide as a basis around which curricular content is developed,
organized, and implemented. Its
visual presentation, or schematic, can serve as a
communications tool to share with those interested in a discipline. It quickly
communicates the main topics or areas of instruction that will be addressed.










Section 1

Introduction to
Marketing Applications

Page 1
-
8




Marketing Applications
Co
urse Guide


Copyright 2012,
MBA Research

and Curriculum

Center®

In the
Marketing Applications
course, ei
ght of the 13 Business Administration
Core’s Knowledge and Skills Statements and five of the six Marketing Core’s
Knowledge and Skill Statements are addressed. The title of each Knowledge and
Skill Statement in the entire Business Administration Core and t
he Marketing Core
are depicted in the schematic in Figure 2. The schematic also shows that the study
of marketing integrates academic concepts from Language Arts, Mathematics,
Social Sciences, and Social Studies. The successful application of these academi
c
skills is imperative for obtaining a marketing career and advancing in business.





Figure 2: Schematic of Curriculum Framework for the Business Administration Core and
Marketing Core
















Course Philosophy, Purpose,

and Goals


Section 2
































Section 2

Introduction to
Marketing Applications

Page 2
-
2




Marketing Applications
Co
urse Guide


Copyright 2012,
MBA Research

and Curriculum

Center®

Philosophy

Marketing Applications
enables
students to develop a deeper understanding of the
dynamic processes and activities involved in marketing. The course should provide
core content applicable to all aspects of marketing so

that students understand all
marketing activities.


A primary contributor to course success should be the use of and involvement with
the local business community. Putting the activities and projects in the context of
the local community should make them

real to students, thereby creating student
interest in the course.


To complete the activities and projects, students should use technological
business tools. Tools will be recommended; however, the instructor should modify
the activity or project so that

the most current, available technology can be used. In
addition, this course should integrate academic skills such as writing, reading,
communication, and research.


Student
Organization

A business
-
oriented student organization should be an integral part

of the
Marketing Applications
course. Through membership in a student organization,
students should develop respect for education that contributes to competence in
the application of marketing knowledge and skills. In addition, membership should
promote l
eadership development and an understanding of the responsibilities of
citizens in a private
-
enterprise system.


Purpose

The purpose of the
Marketing Applications

course is

to enable students to acquire
a realistic understanding of marketing processes and
activities. The course is
designed to introduce students to all marketing activities so that they can begin to
identify and focus on those activities of interest. Students will investigate marketing
functions, analyze ethical and legal issues associated wi
th each marketing
function, and recognize how technology is used in marketing.


Goals

The broad goals of the
Marketing Applications

course

are to accomplish the
following:




Reinforce academic skills in such areas as communication, reading, and writing



Enc
ourage creative thought, problem solving, and decision making



Enable students to understand and appreciate marketing and its application in
business



Stimulate student interest in marketing careers



Increase student awareness of the increasingly complex busi
ness world



Assist students in developing appropriate attitudes about marketing



Encourage the use of technology in classroom projects



Assist students with enhancing their teamwork skills



Stimulate reflection on processes, performance, and outcomes















Course Description

and Learning Outcomes


Section 3


































Section 3

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

Page
3
-
2




6622 Ma
rketing Management, Summer 2011 Version 2


Marketing Applications
Course Guide



Copyright 2012,
MBA

Research
and Curriculum Center
®


Course

Marketing Applications


Credit

One unit


Suggested

Grade Level


12



Prerequisites

Marketing

Principles

or another introductory marketing course is a prereq
uisite for
this course.


Admission

Requirements

Admission to the course should be open to all students who are interested in
pursuing a career in marketing. Students with special needs should be admitted to
the course after an individual educational plan

(IEP) has been prepared. The
course instructor should have input into the prescription process.


Student

Characteristics


Students in
Marketing Applications

should

represent a cross section of the student
body in terms of gender, race, handicap, and acad
emic ability. Students are 16
-

to
18
-
years
-
old and have an interest in pursuing a career in marketing.


Description


Marketing Applications

furthers student understanding and skills in the various
marketing functions. Students coordinate channel managemen
t with other
marketing activities, discuss the nature of marketing plans, generate product ideas,
coordinate activities in the promotional mix, and demonstrate specialized sales
processes and techniques. Economic and financial concepts are also stressed
th
roughout the course.

Current technology will be used to acquire information and
to complete the projects. Throughout the course, students are presented problem
-
solving situations for which they must apply academic and critical
-
thinking skills.
Formal refle
ction is an on
-
going component of the course

along with four projects
.


Instructional

Strategies

To encourage immediate excitement about a future in marketing,
Marketing
Applications

utilizes project
-
based learning for optional content delivery for some
a
spects of the course. During these projects, students work individually and in
teams to conduct primary and secondary research to obtain the necessary
knowledge required to complete the projects. Information about using project
-
based learning as an instruc
tional method is found in
Section 6.


A variety of additional strategies should be utilized to deliver instruction effectively.
Examples of these instructional strategies include, but are not limited to, small
-

and
large
-
group activities, discussions, brai
nstorming, oral and written reports, online
research, and community/school interactions.


Use of instructional aids such as presentation software s, handouts,
videotapes/DVDs, Internet access, CD
-
ROMs, and guest speakers is
recommended.


Standards of

Co
mpletion


Instructors should use formative and summative tests to evaluate student
progress. Rubrics are provided to evaluate specified aspects of projects and
appear in Section 6. Objective tests should be used for quizzes and end
-
of
-
year
testing. First
-

and second
-
semester exams are provided in Appendix C.


Remedial activities should be planned and provided for students who do not meet
the mastery level designated by the instructor. Use of mastery learning is
encouraged to hold students accountable for al
l performance indicators in the
Marketing Applications

course.



Section 3

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

Page
3
-
3




6622 Ma
rketing Management, Summer 2011 Version 2


Marketing Applications
Course Guide



Copyright 2012,
MBA

Research
and Curriculum Center
®


Instructional

Area


COMMUNICATION SKILLS


Performance
Element

Write internal and external business correspondence to convey and obtain
information effectively.


Performance
Indicators

Writ
e persuasive messages (CO:031)

(SP)

Prepare simple written reports (CO:094)

(SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Write executive summaries (CO:091)

(SP)




Instructional

Area


CUSTOMER RELATIONS


Performance
Element

Understand the nature of customer relationship manageme
nt to show its
contributions to a company.


Performance

Indicators

Discuss the nature of customer relationship management (CR:016
, CR LAP 2
)
(CS)

Explain the role of ethics in customer relationship management (CR:017) (SP)

Describe the use of technology i
n customer relationship management (CR:018)
(SP)



Instructional

Area


ECONOMICS

Performance
Element

Acquire knowledge of the impact of government on business activities to
make informed economic decisions.


Performance

Indicators

Describe the nature of

taxes (EC:072) (SP)



Performance
Element

Analyze cost/profit relationships to guide business decision
-
making.



Performance

Indicators

Analyze impact of specialization/division of labor on productivity (EC:014
,

EC LAP 7
) (SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Explain th
e concept of organized labor and business (EC:015, EC LAP 5) (SP)

(SUPPLEMENTAL)

Explain the impact of the law of diminishing returns (EC:023) (SP)


Performance

Element

Understand economic indicators to recognize economic trends and
conditions.


Performa
nce

Indicators

Describe the economic impact of inflation on business (EC:083) (SP)

Explain the concept of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) (EC:017, EC LAP 1) (SP)

Discuss the impact of a nation’s unemployment rates (EC:082) (SP)

Explain the economic impact of
interest
-
rate fluctuations (EC:084) (SP)

Determine the impact of business cycles on business activities (EC:018,

EC LAP 9) (SP)



Section 3

Course Description and Learning Outcomes

Page
3
-
4




6622 Ma
rketing Management, Summer 2011 Version 2


Marketing Applications
Course Guide



Copyright 2012,
MBA

Research
and Curriculum Center
®