HOW TO COMPUTE© - Computer Health Mall

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Dec 4, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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HOW TO COMPUTE©

Training Notes


“GO FORWARD”



HARRIET TUBMAN

The Moses of Her People


Humanity


Please pass this

knowledge


(or some other good, needed deed)

on

to at least two other people.


By
J. Nayer Hardin, Founder
, Computer Underground Railroad E
nterprises (C.U.R.E.)

Website:
www.computerhealth.org

,
www.compurest.com


E
-
mail:
nayer@compurest.com

/
c
ureworks@yahoo.com



2













HOW TO COMPUTE

By: J. Nayer Hardin


Published
as a series from
1994
-
2005


ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


E book published by Computer Underground Railroad Enterprises
-

C.U.R.E. Publishing


Copyright #PAu2
-
759
-
072

MOSES
-

A MOVEMENT

TO FREEDOM


© 2003


www.computerhealth.org


3



“If you seek to be one of the
chosen, simply choose
yourself.”


Invoking Your Celestial Guardians by Solara



4

TABLE OF CONTENTS


PREFACE

................................
................................
................................
..........................

6

WHAT IS LITERACY?

................................
................................
.............................

6

WELCOME TO THE EVOLUTION

................................
................................
.........

6

J. Nayer Hardin
-

Computer Underground Railroad Enterprises C.U.R.E. Publishing
PRODUCTION DOCUMENTS


HOMEWORK

................................
.....................

7

PRODUCTION DOCUMENTS


HOMEWORK

................................
.....................

8


LESSON ONE


INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS

................................
..............

9

ONE MORE SOUL GOT SA
FE©

................................
................................
.................

9

COMPUTER PARTS

................................
................................
................................
...

10

COMPUTER TOUR

................................
................................
................................
.....

11

HARDWARE, SOFTWARE, PORTS AND MEMORY

................................
.............

13

MEMORY
................................
................................
................................
.....................

14

HOW TO ASSEMBLE A COMPUTER

................................
................................
......

15

HARDWARE

................................
................................
................................
...........

15

ACCESSORIES

................................
................................
................................
........

15

TURNING THE COMPUTER ON AND OFF

................................
............................

16

KEYS ON THE KEYBOARD

................................
................................
.....................

17

ERGONOMICS MADE SIMPLE

................................
................................
................

19

HOW TO USE A MOUSE

................................
................................
...........................

20


LESSON TWO
-

WINDOWS & THE WEB

................................
................................

21

COMPUTERS, THE KEYS OUT OF BABYLON©

................................
...................

21

WINDOWS

................................
................................
................................
...................

22

WINDOWS TOUR

................................
................................
................................
......

23

GETTING IN AND OUT OF PROGRAMS

................................
................................

24

ENTERING
................................
................................
................................
...............

24

EXITING

................................
................................
................................
..................

24

WINDOWS LAYOUT

................................
................................
................................
.

25

SOFTWARE

................................
................................
................................
.................

26

HOW TO LOAD SOFTWARE

................................
................................
....................

27

E
-
BOOKS AND E
-
DOCS

................................
................................
........................

27

COMPUTER TALK

................................
................................
................................
.....

31

WELCOME TO THE WORLD WIDE WEB

................................
..............................

32

INTERNET BASICS

................................
................................
................................

32

INTERNET EXPLORER 6.
0 WINDOW

................................
................................
.

34

E
-
MAILING AND WEB
-
SURFING

................................
................................
.......

36


LESS
ON THREE
-

WORD PROCESSING


PT. 1

................................
...................

37

THE TAPESTRY©

................................
................................
................................
......

37

THE COMPUTER’S ATTENTION

................................
................................
.............

38

HOW TO TALK WITH
YOUR COMPUTER

................................
............................

38

SCREEN THINGS
................................
................................
................................
........

40

MENU BAR STRUCTURES IN WORD 2000 & 2003

................................
..............

41


5

LESSON FOUR WORD PROCES
SING, PT. 2

................................
..........................

53

HOW MOSES PARTED THE RED SEA©

................................
................................
.

53

THE CLOSET

................................
................................
................................
...............

54

HELP
................................
................................
................................
.............................

55

LET’S GET BUSY

................................
................................
................................
.......

56

SETTING MARGINS & PAGE LAYOUT

................................
.............................

56

SAVING

................................
................................
................................
.......................

56

CHOOSING HOW THE
TYPE LOOKS

................................
................................
.....

56

WORD ART

................................
................................
................................
.................

57

APPLYING OR REMOVING CHARACTER FORMATS.
................................
........

57

ALIGNING HEADLINES
................................
................................
........................

57

BULLETS AND NUMBERS IN A LIST

................................
................................

58

CHOOSING HOW THE PARAGRAPH LOOKS

................................
...................

58

PROOFING TOOLS

................................
................................
................................
.

58

FINDING AND REPLACING

................................
................................
.................

58

DROP CAP

................................
................................
................................
...............

58

THEMES & STYLES

................................
................................
...............................

58

EDITING TOOLS

................................
................................
................................
........

59

CUT
................................
................................
................................
...........................

59

COPY

................................
................................
................................
........................

59

PASTE

................................
................................
................................
......................

59

PRINTING AND FAXING

................................
................................
......................

60

HOW TO MAKE A LINK TO THE WEB

................................
..............................

60

HOW TO MAKE A LINK WITHIN A DOCUMENT

................................
............

60


LESSON FIVE
-

DESKTOP/WE
BSITE PUBLISHING

................................
............

61

MESSAGE FOR POSTERITY©

................................
................................
.................

61

MAIL MERGE

................................
................................
................................
.............

62

FORM LETTERS, ENVELOPES AND LABELS

................................
..................

62

TO MAKE BUSINESS CARDS AND LABELS

................................
....................

62

WORKING WITH TABLES

................................
................................
........................

63

TABLE OF CONTENTS

................................
................................
..........................

64

GRAPHICS AND BORDERS

................................
................................
......................

65

BORDERS

................................
................................
................................
................

65

MOVING A PICTURE
................................
................................
.............................

65

FORMATTING A P
ICTURE

................................
................................
...................

65

QUICK LIST OF EDITING TIPS

................................
................................
............

66

LET’S BUILD YOUR WEBSITE

................................
................................
................

68

GETTING PAID

................................
................................
................................
...........

69

DREAM ACHIEVED

................................
................................
................................
...

70

ADDITIONAL TUTORIALS FOR MICROSOFT OFFICE

................................
...

71

ABOUT COMPUTER UNDERGROUND RAILROAD ENTERPRISES

.............

72

ABOUT J. NAYER HARDIN

................................
................................
..................

73



6

PREFACE

WHAT IS LITERACY?

In the
1900
’s to be literate
me
a
nt

to be able to sign your name. By World War II it
was to r
ead at a 4th Grade Level
. By

1960 it was raised to c
omplete the 8th Grade
. Then, in
1991

the
National Li
teracy Act defined literacy as o
ne’s ability to read, write and speak
English &

compute
-
solve problems necessary to function on the job, in

society; to achieve
one’s goals and dev
elop knowledge.

-

Source: Emmy Bledsoe of Project Plus, New Jersey

WELCOME TO THE EVOLUTION

1800’S
-

AGRICULTURAL AGE,
1900’S
-

INDUSTRIAL AGE

2000’S
-

INFORMATION AGE

Welcome Conductors and Passengers to the Computer Underground Railroad, a
training stop

for the
Information A
ge. This is a journey into computer literacy, designed as a

road map
to the

basics of how to use a computer.
Anybody able to think through a
computer via microphone, keyboard,
laser,
digital
still or video
camera,
mouse, whatever, wi
ll
actively participate in this evolution called human plus computer.

These are the HOW TO COMPUTE computer training notes used in Harlem in the
1990’s to help train over 3,000 folks how to use a computer . They’re updated to cover a
Windows Based PC,
98+, with Microsoft Word 2000 and 2003 as examples. Program
tutorials on the subject matter listed will reveal the correct keystrokes for the edition you are
working with.
Learning requires you go over the material at least twice.
The first time just
let

the information flow over you and the second time interact with the computer. If you are
the teacher, conductor, demonstrate and add whatever wisdom you will.

Work material
should come from a participant’s own life. Material like letters we all need to

write, flyers
about causes one cares about,
web pages

as a way to kick a conversation up a
notch

or sell a
product to a wider marketplace, e
-
book creation and just having a good old time on the web
with games, video and music.
You can be your own web sta
tion.

You’ve made a wise decision to participate in the Information Age

either by entering
or helping others learn how to be here
. Computer illiteracy is the new slavery. You don’t
hear about a product recall until the news decides to report on it, if th
ey do.

“Second Hand Information in the

Information Age is the new Slavery.

If you have
to depend upon another for your daily data

It

will be old news by the time you get it, if you
get it.”

From filling out forms to engaging in digital commerce on the I
nternet, a grasp of
cyber skills is now vital for survival. For example, many companies no longer give out
product information over the phone. They just tell you to go to their website. If you don’t
have access the attitude is ‘shame on you.’ Fortunate
ly, shame and guilt are just emotions so
we can go forward. In the words of 92 year old Roxanna Dawson about learning how to
compute “If I can do it, the rest of you have no excuse.”

Massive amounts of information are being exchanged, some about you. U
nlike the
old days, you don’t have to know the deep inner workings of a computer or other
technology in order to be able to take advantage of the information it offers. PDA’S,
Beepers, TV, and many other products and services in the process of coming on t
he market,
will help you make your voice known. That’s the purpose in becoming computerized. To
make your voice heard.


7

Please make sure everyone in your world is computerized to the best of your ability.
There is no excuse for illiteracy any more. Comp
uters can teach folks how to read, write,
etc.
No excuse.

We are on our way to the
Promised Land

of safe, effective computerization.
This course is a basic introduction to computing and the process of computerizing your life.
It is designed to help you,

or who you are teaching, become computer literate within 10
weeks, 4
-
5 hours a week. The lesson plans / study notes are a guideline. Cover what you
can then move on to the next. Let the process be as comfortable as possible.

H
ow To Compute is
cover
ed

in 5 lessons and 5 computer time workshops.

Lesson
One is a basic overview of the computer, how to handle your equipment and what is where.
Lesson Two is about Windows and the Web, which you use to look into the different
programs, and to be on the Intern
et. Lessons Three and Four are about Word Processing,
and Lesson Five Desktop, print oriented and Website (web oriented) publishing. The
recommended schedule is one week of class and one week of review, completing the
program in ten weeks. At the beginni
ng of each lesson is a bit of prose
reflecting or
revealing the author’s point of view as a human
who’s

been on computers since 1977. The
pieces reflect her point

of view on the beauty of the c
omputerization process. “Lord
,”

“God” and “Jesus” are used t
o
reflect the
power that

tells our hearts how to beat and our
lungs how to breathe when we are asleep, while coordinating the rest of the universe. ‘By
any other name still smells as sweet.” Insert and delete the words as your heart guides. By
the end o
f this training you will be able to reproduce those documents,

and do better
, with

your words and pictures so you can let the world know what’s really on your mind.

Throughout this study guide, you will see words, web addresses with an underline,
usually i
n a different color than the regular text. This is a link. When you put the mouse
pointer over the characters in a “link” and click, it will take you to a page (or on the web, or
someone’s e
-
mail address, or bring down a file from the web, or to a differ
ent place in the
document) with more information about the point made.

Computerizing a life is a radical change, so take it slow. As you begin to work with
the Insert and Delete keys, you will find yourself inserting more good and deleting the
unnecessa
ry drama in your life. The CTRL (control) and ALT (alternative or alternate) keys
can set your mind to new possibilities. You are limited only by your imagination. The
information is here.

Reading
,

both on screen and in books is encouraged.
Throughout

this
document are traditional and non
-
traditional books linked to Amazon.com. None are
required reading for this line of study to complete the work. For example, the 1921 classic
by

Henry Thomas Hamblin,
Dynamic
Thought
, is recommended, not required. Follow your
inner wise guide.

As Anthony Robbins says in his book
AWAKEN THE GIANT WITHIN
…”I can’t
overemphasize the power and value of gaining even one, single distinction


a sole piece of
information


that can be used to change the course of your life. Information is power
whe
n it is acted upon, and one thing is that you never know when you’re going to get it.”

We must

use

technology wisely. Thinking through a computer helps sharpen your
thoughts simply by recording and conveying. Thank you for making the decision to free
y
ourself and others. We are in the
Promised Land
. The Lord has provided computer angels
for us all. We just have to pay attention. You got it now. Enjoy the journey.

J. Nayer Hardin

-

Computer Underground Railroad Enterprises


C.U.R.E. Publishing

8

PRODUCTION DOCUMENTS


HOMEWORK


Lesson I



Review the lesson, computer pa
rts, keys on the keyboard, etc.

Ope
n and
close the

internet program.
Play
'
follow the cords
'

to see where each part of your computer
connects with the CPU.
Click around on the web.

Lesson II
. Review the lesson. Do the Windows Tutorial that comes with the
edition of W
indows on your compu
ter.
ACCESSORIES


then find the tutorial (Tour
Windows). Each version of Windows is different, which is why you should do the tutorial
for the version you are working on. Check your

e
-
mail
. Look at web pages.

Do

t
he

Yahoo
E
-
Mail Tutorial.

Lesson III

-

Review the lesson. Create letterhead and a letter


write a letter to
someone you have not communicated with for awhile. Fill out web forms. Go to
Ebay
www.ebay.com

. Click around.
C
reate a card

or go to
Yahoo Greetings

and send a
n e
-
card
to an on

line

friend
.

Lesson IV

-

Review the lesson. Sketch out a flyer on a piece of paper.
Picture here,
headline there,

whatever looks right to you
.
Then, on your computer create a flyer
expressing your personal interests


Whatever is your passion, create a

flyer about it using
words, pictures, centered and bold text in different sizes,
and then

put it in a page or text
border.
Start with
Geocities
to build your first web page.
Just click around there and s
ee
what they have to offer. You are not limited to the free website. Geocities offers great
e
-
commerce sites too

and have

for a long time.

Lesson V

-

Review the lesson. Create a mail merg
e on an issue you feel passionate
about to the president, congressperson, senators, mayor etc. Remember to copy your

friends when you mail it out.

Begin with TOOLS


MAIL MERGE and follow the yellow
brick road…a wizard that will guide you through the pro
cess
.

Do the same letter on line to
your elected and appointed officials.
Most have websites with contact information.

Create a table, like in your checkbook
-

as a 4 column (Date
-

Item
-

Amount
-

Balance)
. If you’re on a public computer don’t use mean
ingful numbers. Like in the real
world, thieves are on the web too. Pay attention.

Polish your webpage

and publish

on geocities

.

For more training in Microsoft Office, in the Appendix is a list of Microsoft tutorials
on line to explore Excel, Access, Pu
blisher and other Office Programs.
If the links are old,
go to the main

microsoft.com

site and ask questions in the
ir

search engine

(type what you
are looking for in the search box and hit GO or SEARCH
.

On the l
esson number sheets are material that can be used for practice. It is only art
by the author of this material. Don’t freak if you don’t agree. Just insert your own.


Enjoy your tools.
The links in this e
-
book may expire so if a link does not work, do
a

web search on the subject.

L
ike the old Macintosh commercial said in the 1980’s “It’s an exciting time to be
alive.”


H A P P Y C O M P U T I N G


9

LESSON ONE


INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS


ONE MORE SOUL GOT SA
FE©


The freedom point

on Moses' train to Can
ada was
the middle of the bridge


The journey was long

and the pain was real,

they were finally reaching the end.

As the train passed over Niagara Falls,

their thoughts were of

a Friend of a Friend.

They were reminded of their blessings,

which came like t
he spray in the air.

‘Cause when the train passed the middle
of the bridge,

they knew freedom was there.

All but poor ole Joe.

He was freaked, ’cause as a slave

he never made no real cash.

And he was traveling with the real fear

of a two grand bounty on hi
s ass.

As the train reached

the middle of the bridge,

Moses ran over to Joe.

She shook him, looked him in the eyes

and said what she wanted him to know.

“Joe, you shook de Lion’s Paw!”

He didn’t understand what she said.

Moses shook him and nodded her head
.

“Joe, you’re in

Queen Victoria’s domains.


Joe, you are a Free Man.”

Joe looked up,

Raised his teary head,

Raised his hands with joy.


Then Joe began to sing and shout,

Praising God is what it’s all about.

“Glory to God and Jesus too
-

One more soul got
safe!

Oh, go and carry the news,

One more soul got safe!”

Then the group began to sing,


Joe come hear the falls
.”

But Joe was too busy praising;

he didn’t hear them at all, as he sang.

“Glory to God and Jesus too
-

One more soul got safe!”

The group calle
d out one more time,


Joe, this is your last chance
.”

But Joe didn’t care about none of that;

his song went on and on.

“Glory to God and Jesus too
-

One more soul got safe!

Oh go and carry the news
-

One more soul got safe.”

The train stopped on the other
side;

and the first feet to touch the ground,

were those of Free Man Joe
.

Poor ole Joe

transformed himself to

Free Man Joe
.

One more soul got safe.

One more soul got safe.

One more soul got safe.

Who’s next?


10


COMPUTER PARTS



“TRULY, “thoughts are things
,” and powerful things at that,
when they are mixed with definiteness of purpose,
persistence, and a burning desire for their translation into
riches, or other material objects.”

Think and Grow Rich


Napoleon Hill


There are many different styles and formats of computers you can use to express
your thoughts:


PC

or
Mac

(hardware),
Windows
or
Linux

(software),
Internet Explo
rer

or
Netscape

(windows


internet browsers) .


Any program worth its salt can be learned
through the tutorial.


Just be patient and ask for the keystrokes to accomplish what you want
to do.


Follow them like a re
cipe.



The computer discussed in this training is a personal computer (PC).


The operating
system is Windows by the
Microsoft Corporation
.


The word processing program we will be
discussing is
Microsoft Word
, part of the
Microsoft Office

product line.


The websites
where you will be setting up your e
-
mail accounts are on the World Wide

Web (www)
www.yahoo.com

and
www.hotmail.com
.


Use one for personal and one for business or
promotional mail.

This training is not intended to replace a formal education in compute
rs.


It just
covers the basics. Consider this a tool you and/or the people you love can use to get out of
the bondage of computer illiteracy
.




This conversation is about desktop computers. Another style of
computing is lap top computers. Laptops are w
onderful because they are
portable and take up less space.
Here are

a few things to consider when using
a laptop
.

1. People are getting sick because
of anything

electrical next to their vital organs for
a long time. For more information read
Currents of Death


by Paul Broder or
Electromagnetic Fields: A Consumer's Guide to the Issues and How to Protect
Ourselves


by B. Blake Levitt.

2. The temptation to use a laptop on lap

is too great. When keying, you’re

putting
chronic pressure on
your

thighbones, which can gently push t
hem out of their sockets over
the years. This is
noticeable

in big folks who hit the keys hard.

Especially, be careful with those cell phones too. Do a web search on “cell phones”
“cancer”. The
cell phone

industry is funding studies that say they are safe.


Like using any tool, l
et’s take a tour of its parts and what they are for.


11


COMPUTER TOUR


Central Processing Unit (CPU)

is the rectangular part of the
computer, where th
e machine does its ‘thinking’
-

Power On/Power Off.
Ones and zeros.


Floppy Disk:

A flat (round or square) disk that
allows information transfer from one computer to another.



CD:

Ro
und disk that holds information,
music, video, etc.


DVD
: Digital movie and video disks that makes your computer
look like a television screen.


Disk Drive:

T
his is the part of the CPU
that reads and displays what’s on your
disks.
Disk drives stand out

as t
he little ‘doorways’ on the CPU where you slide in your
disks and transfer information to your CPU.


Cables and Cords:

Connecting pieces that provide power and connect equipment
to the CPU (i.e. monitor, printer, and speakers.)


Monitor:

Looks and w
orks very much like a television set. It shows
what’s going on inside the soul of the computer, the CPU. Monitors come in
many different types of screens.


Keyboard:

Combination typewriter and calculator with directional and shorthand
keys included. I
t is the primary tool for data entry (entering data/information into a
computer) today.


Wrist

Rests, Natural Keyboard, etc.

Special
Interests

have recommended natural
keyboards and wrist rests when computing.

That’s
probably, based on results, not the b
est strategy. Wrist
rests have you putting most of your arm weight on the
wrists that house nerves being pinched during data entry.
Not even the U.S. government could come up with a
recommendation for the Natural
Keyboard
.


CompUrest
,
fully supports your
arms from

fingertips to shoulders
to
prevent computer induced repetitive stress injuries

like carpal tunnel syndrome
. The
lowered keyboard eliminates the need to bend your wrists, preventing you from pinching
ner
ves in your wrists

when keying
.

CompUrest healed one of
its

inventor’s injuries within 30
days in

1990. Since then, the injuries never returned.
Use a foot stool to make sure your
legs are not stretched to prevent leg pain

and a good chair that moves wit
h you
.


12


Mouse:

Pointing device that allows you to move the computer’s
attention quickly from one point to another.


Joystick:
Like in video games, the joystick is used
to get greater control with
more options when playing
games or

flying planes (you
gotta try Microsoft Flight Simulator if you’re
into flying or want to be.)


Printer:

Prints documents, letters, pictures, etc.
There are
different styles of printers including laser and ink jet. Laser printers
a
r
e faster, and tend to cost more, but wor
th the price.


Speakers &
Microphone
: Allows you to
record or hear what’s going on while surfing on the
Internet.
A
microphone is necessary

for modern
computing.


Digital Camera and Scanner:
A digital camera is designed to take pictures and
place t
hose pictures on your computer screen. Some cameras
record the pictures on floppy disks or CD’s. Some others plug
the camera into your computer; the pictures download (taken
from one source and placed on another) onto your computer for
reviewing, editing
, sending or printing.


All major camera makers either have or will have digital
cameras including

Sony
,

Kodak
,
Polaroid
,
Canno
n
,
Olympus
,
Nikon, Samsung, Fuji and Toshiba.

Does a web search

on each
company.


A Scanner is like a copy machine. You put the material on the scanner screen and
import the information
. Different scanners work in different ways.


Modem:

Either inside or outside of the computer, a
modem connects your computer with the internet either
through
a

phone line, a cable line or wirelessly. There are phone modems,
digital modems, wireless m
odems and Lord knows what’s coming
next.


Please note that the technology is changing radically from
when this material is written and when you read it. Do a web
search to be up to date on each of the items, and what’s new.

13


HARDWARE, SOFTWARE, PORTS AN
D MEMORY


Hardware

-

Physical parts of a computer. If a piece of equipment is hard, the
monitor, CPU, keyboard, mouse, printer
,

floppy disks, DVD, it’s

hardware.


Software
-

If it’s soft, like the electronic, digital or laser instruction transmitted in
power
-
on, power
-
off format, it’s software.

i.e. Pro
grams
(Microsoft Word
,
Corel
WordPerfect
).


Computer Ports

-

Located in the back (and sometimes in the front) of the
computer, ports are where all aspects of the computer are plugged into the main brain,
central processing unit. Think of a ship coming into port.


DRIVES

Different machines have different set ups,
but generally
speaking:

A Drive


3 ½” Floppy Disk

C Drive


Hard Disk

D Drive


CD Rom


Read Only Memory

B, E or F Drive


Writable CD



Recording CD, DVD (movies), music

To find out how your machine is set up click on
START, MY COMPUTER. In the frame
on the right hand
side is a list of the drives, what type of drive and the folders on each one that is active.
Double click on the drive and see the list of files.

To be up to date do a web search on “computer disks.”


There’s a question

running around th
e Internet that asks what does your past and
Jimmy Hoffa have in common. You know the answer is neither are here. The technology
available changes daily and it’s good not to make today’s decisions based on yesterday.
As
of 2005 the best way to stay up
to date with what’s going on is by being on the Internet.

When you get on the web, do a
web search

for the latest technology and how it is
being used.

Additional software is required for you to be on the web. AOL, Juno and others will
send you a disk wi
th their software or you can bring it down onto your computer from the
web, called downloading.


If at any point in this training you feel overwhelmed, relax, make a cup of tea or hug
someone you love who loves you back. Then return to the task at hand.
Y
ou are at the
beginning of learning how to use a computer.

When you’re feeling lost just acknowledge
where you are and go forward from there. There is a book

ca
lled
The Original Handbook
for the Recently Deceased
.
In it is an exercise to help get to defining the real issues at hand
called YOU ARE HERE. Whenever you feel lost, remember YOU ARE HERE (with this
hardware, in this software
, in
this room, whatever), really think
ing about

how to get to yo
ur
next HERE, nothing to fear.


14


MEMORY


Computer memory
-

the ability of the computer to
recall correct keystrokes
, images and sounds

broken down to
bits and bytes. Memory is measured in bytes.

A byte is one
keystroke. Every time you press a key on the keyboard, the
part that looks like a typewriter, you create one series of power
on power off signals (bits) in the computer. The system is
much like Morse Code’s dots and dashes, only with comp
uters
it’s on and off. A bit is 1/8th of a keystroke, one power
-
on
-

power
-
off signal.

Memory comes in two forms;
ROM

that is read only
memory
and
RAM


which is random access memory. Your thoughts that you key into the
computer will be taking up memory, programs, which are thought systems in the computer,
take up memory and information that you get off the Internet and disks takes up memory.
So

the higher the number the better off you are.

Hard Disk

-

Inside the computer is a part called the hard disk
, the computer’s soul
.
Think of it like a pie that has the computer’s memory.

The pie is cut into slices, called
folders. One folder is called Programs, another called Windows. Sometimes when you
install programs the program names a folder on your machine. Other times, you will create
your own folders to keep a project easy to
cross reference, like a folder for an account
named Jo
nes, another folder for Smith, another for Politics
, etc.

The hard disk works

in power on / power off logic. Everything is broken down into
bits of information, which, like drops of water in a sea, can

become words, pictures and
sounds.

Think of (or look at) a digital number 8

with it's on and off lines
.

Bit
-

One of eight units of information that makes up a letter, number, etc. The
number 8 in digital format has seven segments (bits) that display th
e letter or number, plus
one invisible bit called the controller bit, which tells the others what to do. Each line plus the
controller bit is one bit

of information
, totaling eight bits.

Eight bits equals one byte.

Byte:

Eight bits, eight sequence combi
nations of power on
-
power off signals, equals
one byte. A byte is a keystroke (letter
-
number
-
space between words).

Kilobyte
-

1,000 keystrokes (thousand)

Megabyte
-

1,000,000 keystrokes (million)

Gigabyte

-

1,000,000,000 keystrokes (billion)

Terabyte
-

1,
000,000,000,000 keystrokes (trillion)

ASCII

-

(American Standard Code for Information Interchange) the language that
resembles Morse Code for the computer. Power on/power off combinations.





15


HOW TO ASSEMBLE A
COMPUTER

HARDWARE


When assembling a computer, it is wise to let
common sense be your guide. Everything that the computer
uses gets plugged into the back of the Central Processing
Unit (CPU).
The different
'
plug in sockets
'

are called ports.


Most ne
w computers have good connection
diagrams. Use it like a map. The monitor, printer, speakers,
etc., have at least two cords. They
attach to

the central
processing unit and a power source. The ends of the cords
are male or female and in the case of compu
ters, opposites
attract. Male plugs into female. A way to tell what gets
plugged in
where

is by the shape of the plug. The phone
cord will not fit into the printer port, nor will the printer fit
into the port where the monitor is plugged into. A good g
uideline to follow when plugging
in your computer is “if it don’t fit, don’t force it.” In new computers, the ports have
an

icon
of the item to be plugged into the appropriate slot.
Most are also color coordinated so the
purple
keyboard

cord plugs into th
e purple port.



ACCESSORIES


As in your wardrobe, you want to make your computer environment reflect who you
are. Must have accessories these days include speakers, microphone, disk holders, and a
comfortable chair. For extra protection, use a
computer armrest

and footstool.


B
e careful of the environment you create. Millions of people are suffering from
carpal tunnel syndrome, back problems and exposure to electro
-
magnetic frequencies that
could be causing tumo
rs. A guideline to follow is to make sure to provide adequate support
wherever there is stress when on a computer.

If you’re on a computer you regularly use,
dress up the area to reflect who you are with a stone, a piece of wood, a toy or pictures of
peo
ple or things you love.


If you are into games, consider a joystick, which is an accessory for the keyboard. It
looks like the shift in a standard car.


Power surge protectors are used to keep the current running smoothly in your
machine.

Do a compute
r web search for “computer accessories” to see current options.


16


TURNING THE COMPUTER ON AND OFF


Different computers turn on and off in different ways. When turning a computer
on, there are at least two items, the monitor and CPU that you have to look
and find the
switch or button for. When the computer is in the off position, it is a safe guideline to
follow that you should try the largest switch or button on each piece of equipment. If that
one doesn’t work, try another. Turn on the Central Processi
ng Unit first because sometimes
the monitor is already hooked into its power supply.


1.

Central Processing Unit.

Switches on the front, side and back of various
CPU’s. When you flip the correct one, a light appears on the front of the computer and you
h
ear a sound, usually a mild hum. As
A Course In Miracles

says “There Is Nothing To
Fear.”


2.

Monitor
-

Same as the CPU except there is not

a
humming sound...just a
light up front.


3.

Printer
-

This switch is generally on the side and again, when the light is on,
the printer is on.


4.

Speakers
-

The on
-
off button is the largest here too, generally. T
he volume
and treble on the front. Y
es, you can play musical CD’s and movie DVD’s

on modern

computer. Many computer users have had epiphany experiences at the machine with Marvin
Gaye or Billie Holiday crooning through the computer.


5.

Internet


There are many different ways to turn th
e Internet on. If you are
using someone else’s computer, ask them to show you how to connect. If it’s your
computer, get the Internet turn on instructions from your Internet Service Provider (ISP).
It’s usually START


INTERNET

EXPLORER or NETSCAPE.


T
o be on the Internet you will need an

Internet Service Provider, an ISP
. An ISP
is a booster from your computer onto the web. The information is delivered in many ways
including, but not limited to over phone and cable lines, wirelessly, paid for and fre
e.

When you get on the web, you begin on a Home Page on the Internet. Your Home
Page is a designated place where you want to start your Internet experience. Some
keyboards have an Internet key on them that you push and it brings up the Internet for yo
u.




17


KEYS ON THE KEYBOARD


One of the ways you talk to your computer is through the keyboard. Some call
it
typing, others, keying, m
akes

it feel more like a piano
. If you can’t type, don’t sweat it.
There are a lot of good typing tutorials. Or con
sider "voice activated computers". {Do be
up to date, do a
web search

on the topic
.
}


Here’s an overview of the keys on the keyboard plugged into the back of the CPU.


Start Key:

Between the Ctrl and Alt keys is a key with 4 boxes, as if on a
flag. Lik
e the keys to your car, this is the key to turn on and off the computer. It
is also the keys to the
World Wide Web

when you press “Start” “Internet.” It
shows you what programs are on a

computer and lists programs
and
information

features
like the Control

Panel, Search feature, what’s on My Computer, a list of documents and
under programs, the list of programs.



Ctrl


Alt

-

The control and alt keys are magical keys. They
give many other keys on the keyboard a third and fourth level of
meaning. For exa
mple, if you press the letter S key, you get a small
s. If you press the shift key then hit the letter s you get a capital S.
While holding down the control key if you press the letter s, the
program you are working in may save your work. (Save means
mo
ve something from the temporary keyboard memory into the
more permanent hard disk memory). Alt S may give you a list of
files. Key usage depends on the program.

F1
-
F12 or 12+
-

These are called function keys. Back in
the old days of computers, before th
e mouse, many of the features
in a program could be used by pressing one of these keys. Some function keys ar
e still
active
including

F1 for HELP, F5 for Go To, Find and Replace, and F7 for a spell check.
However, future programs may find a use yet for t
hese shorthand marvels of modern
computerization.


Esc: Escape Key.

Located in the upper left hand
corner of the keyboard, this key will help you escape from
many of the dead end trails you may come across as you go
through your computerization process.
For example, if you
find yourself in a box, (called a dialogue box in Windows)
where the computer is trying to have a conversation with you,
hitting the escape key will more times than not make the box
go away, for now.


18



Numbers Keys

-

With

the set lo
cated above the letter keys, if you want to type out
the number just hit the key straight. If you want to type the symbol on top of the number,
hold down the shift key then press the appropriate number key. For example to type a
dollar sign, hold down th
e shift key then press the number 4 key toward the top of the key
board and the dollar sign will appear on the screen. There is also a calculator pad style of
number keys on the right hand side of the keyboard. To turn on numbers hit the Num Lock
key. T
o use the arrows and directions, turn Num Lock key off the same way.

@
Key



Called the at key, it’s a notation in an e
-
mail address. It’s located over the
number 2 with a Shift Key


capital.

Letter Keys


Like a typewriter.

Tab
-

Use this key if you wan
t to indent one line at a time, like when you are typing
a paragraph in a traditional format, indented five spaces. This key is also used when moving
from one column in a table (a box with numbers or information in it, like a calendar or a
budget.) to ano
ther.

Shift Key

-

This button changes

letter
keys
to

capital letters. It transforms all letters
it types to upper case or capitals normally. When the shift key is used, it causes these letters
to appear as lower case, or small letters. The shift key giv
es you one capital letter at a time.

Caps Lock
-

If you want to type in all capitals, press the Caps Lock key.
While the
Caps Lock key is

on, if you want a letter in a lower case, just press the shift key.

Delete


Insert


Backspac
e
-

The delete and
insert keys, located to the right of the
Backspace key, are about putting things in and taking them out. Just like the backspace key
works as an eraser key in the direction of the arrow, the Delete key takes material out in the
opposite direction from the

one pointed by the arrow on the backspace key. The Insert Key
either allows you to put in additional material. The computer assumes Insert is on. If you
want to type over material already on the screen, press the Insert key and you will be typing
over
what is on the screen. In Microsoft Word three letters at the bottom of the screen
OVR (
which stands for overtype) will appear when you are typing over.

Home


End



Takes you to either the beginning or the end of a sentence. “Shift”
“Home” highlights
from the beginning of the line you are on to where your blinking light is.
“Shift” “End” highlights from where your blinking light is to the end of the line.

Page Up


Page Down



Scroll you through what you are working on one screen
at a time.

Space Bar
-

The space bar, the biggest key on the keyboard, located at the bottom,
places one space and is usually used between words.

Enter
-

This key is equal to the return key on a typewriter. You use this key when
you want to either insert a line between para
graphs, move to the next line or answer
questions your computer poses to you.

To go down just one line use SHIFT
-
ENTER.


19

Arrow keys
: To the right of the typewriter keys at the bottom are four directional
keys. These keys move you one line or one letter at

a time without impacting on anything it
passes.

Forward Slash:

/ The lower case of the question
mark key. This is a clue. The forward slash is the one used
on the internet when you type in a web address, a location
on the web with the information pre
sented. Talk about go
forward onto the internet, and beyond.

Back Slash:

\

The lower case of the | key used
mostly to signify a windows address on your computer.
Kind of like lean back and think about it on your PC.

S
ome keyboards have additional keys

that provide
short cuts for some of the tasks you want to perform. These
keys have icons (pictures) on them explaining what they do.


ERGONOMICS MADE SIMPLE


Ergonomics is the science of human interaction with computers.

In the 1970’s and 80’s a lot of

folks were getting injured from using computers. This
is because we treated computers like they were typewriters, without regard to the repetitive
stress we were putting on ourselves. The data entry jobs were the sweat shops of the day.

When a problem’s

cause is removed, the effect goes away. Repetitive stress injuries
are caused because the body is not adequately supported during computer use. The injury
usually heals within 30 days by placing adequate support where there is

stress when you are
comput
ing.

Some simple adjustments in how we communicate with computers can provide years
of comfortable computing.

Use a good chair that moves with you to support your back and thighs. If more
comfortable
,

use a foot stool or reclining chair.

Use your compu
ter where you have access
to a window to exercise vision. Listen to your body. Aches and pains are a warning. Put
extra support there.

To provide
support

where there was stress,
t
h
is author got rid of her extensive
computer injuries in 1990

with
patente
d
CompUrest
,
U.S. Patent No. 5,188,
321
. With
regular use, the injuries never returned.


The Secret of Comfortable Computing


CompUrest
, U.S. Patent No. 5,188,321


Supports your arms from fingers to shoulders
.


Keep
s

your elbows at a right angle
at your sides
.


Lower
s

you
r

keyboard to keep your wrists flat
,
relaxed

and straight

preventing carpal tunnel
syndrome

and other
repetitive

stress injuries
.


20


HOW TO USE A MOUSE




The connection between the mouse and the arrow on the screen is like a stee
ring
wheel and tires on the road. The mouse
-

the part of the computer used to point at what
you want to affect on the computer monitor
-

has a very basic design. On its underside is a
round ball, partially exposed, which when moved against a firm surfac
e, correspondingly
moves the arrow on the screen.

To use a mouse you want to have it with the ball side down, the cord pointing
toward the computer, with ample room to move in wide circles, left and right, away and
towards you. The mouse does not pick up
movement when not on a firm surface. There are
three mouse activators.


Single Click
-

Point the arrow on the screen in the middle of what you want to
effect and click once. This usually places the computer’s attention, the blinking line, on the
point whe
re you just clicked.


Double Click

-

Point the arrow on the screen in the middle of what you want to
affect and click twice, relatively quickly. Think of your favorite jazz drummer, then, double
-
click.


Drag and Drop

-

Point the arrow on the screen in the
middle of what you want to
affect and click, hold the mouse button down, pull the image across the screen. When the
mouse arrow you are moving is where you want it, let the mouse button go. The image will
follow the drag and stay where you stop.


The co
nnection between the mouse and the arrow on the
screen is like a steering wheel and tires on the road. The mouse has
two (sometimes three) buttons.

Generally, it is the left mouse button that you want to press
to move the computer’s attention and the rig
ht button is used
when you want a shortcut menu to appear.

If one mouse button doesn’t work, try the other.



Welcome to cyber space.


21


LESSON TWO
-

WINDOWS & THE WEB


COMPUTERS, THE KEYS OUT OF BABYLON
©


COMPUTERS GIVE US

THE ABILITY TO ALL SPEAK ONE LANG
UAGE

Genesis 11: 5
-
9
-

KJV


5.

And the Lord came down to see the city and the tower, which the children of men
built.

6.

And the Lord said, Behold, the people is one, and they have all one language and this
they begin to do,
and n
ow nothing will be restrai
ned f
r
o
m them, which they have
imagined to do.

7.

Go, let
us go down, and there confound

their language, that they
may not understand one another’s speech.

8.

So the Lord scattered them abroad from thence upon the face of all the earth, and they
left off t
o build the city.

9.

Therefore, is the name of it called Babel; because the Lord did there confound the
language of all the earth, and from thence did the Lord scatter them abroad upon to the face of
all the earth.


Through computers, with their
internati
onal language and
thought translation capabilities,
we have the keys to escape from
the land of Babel, as foretold in
Genesis.

Using computers, we can have
our ideas presented without
regard to race, color, creed,
religion or social order. Our
ideas must
then stand on
universal truth based on the highest good for all concerned.

THE TOWER OF
BABEL
, AS OF 2005 IS STILL STANDING


22



WINDOWS


Windows is made by the
Microsoft Corporation
, who has
been making the program

since the 1980’s. In the 1980’s we use to
have to talk to a computer’s disk operating system (DOS). Then
along came Windows and we could talk to Windows and Windows
would talk to DOS. It was an evolution
, MS
-
DOS
.

There have been many versions of this

program over the
decades but it is

basically a tool to allow you to look at, through different windows, what’s
going on in your computer’s soul.
Two good books to help you understand the impact and
importance of a soul are
The Seat of the Soul


by Gary Zuckoff and
Care of the So
ul
by
Thomas Moore.

Windows is the springboard that you jump off to get into programs, tell the
computer what you are thinking and a multitude of other great, mind expanding (or
contracting) things. It has you organize your work in folders which can ho
ld other folders
(section of the computer that holds related information) or files (specific piece your
computing with).

Now each program, like Microsoft Word or Excel or Adobe Illustrator can be open
in its own window at the same time another program, gam
e, video, whatever is open.
Windows is so awesome that it even runs programs in the background. There are other
operating systems, and word on the street is
Linux

is the bomb now. Get on the web and be
up to date.

This training is just a starting point. There is much more for us all to learn.

For a more detailed look into the version of Windows you are using, use the Help
function on the Start key.

The two versions of Windows I have are Windows ’98 and
Windows ‘XP
. To get to the introduction tutorial in XP click on START, go to
PROGRAMS, then go to ACCESSORIES. Go across and down to Tour Windows XP.
Windows 2000
,
START PROG
RAMS,
ACCESSORIES



SYSTEM TOOLS


WELCOME TO WINDOWS

Click here

for the list of

free

Microsoft training on line.



DESKTOP


The opening screen is called the desktop. It has
pictures, icons, which serve as a
shortcut to where you’re going, i.e. the Internet Explorer “e” will open the program.

When you do the Windows tutorial during your practice time, it will review the
material we cover and show you the special features of t
he version of Windows you are
working on, like how to put your own picture as the computer’s desktop background.

Click on top of the START button, which is on the keys closest to
you,

they key with
4 small boxes on it looking like a flag waving.
The Window
s Task
Bar

will show up on the
monitor.

A drop down (or up) menu appears and will show you all the programs and tasks
you can access through windows on the computer. Of note are “My Computer” which
shows you in files and icons what is on your computer an
d your “Control Panel” which
allows you to add and remove programs, adjust web se
ttings and many other
maintenance

features like where to adjust the volume. “Help and Support” will answer just about any
question you have about Windows. “Search” or “Find”
will find files quickly and “Run” will
allow you to run a program from a disk or other source.


23


WINDOWS TOUR


Once the Windows program comes up and is ready to rock and roll, you wil
l
generally see a bar, the Windows Task Bar

with t
he Windows Flag on it.

It is your
START

Key
.
It can let you know what time it is, what programs you have open, and where you are
on the Internet.
If you don’t see
the Windows Task Bar with a START

key on your screen,

use the
keyboard

to bring it up. The START key is on

the r
ow of keys closest to you,
between the CTRL and ALT
.

It has a small icon on it with a small waving flag. There is
one on each side of the spacebar key. Pressing that button and using the arrow keys or
mouse will help you through the options on the STAR
T menu.

When t
he START

button is clicked, drag

your mouse

up to the position where it says
PROGRAMS
. Notice the little arrow to the right of the word Programs. That arrow is an
indicator of other programs or categories of programs. Staying within the
highlight of the
Programs spot, pull your mouse across and another box of words will appear. You’re
looking for Internet Explorer and click there.
Next, w
e’ll open a word processing

program
,
think of it as
writing
, program. Click on START, PROGRAMS, MICR
OSOFT OFFICE
(and/or) MICROSOFT WORD.)


Just like a house can have many windows, so can the program Windows. You can
tell a Window by a few standard features found in all. A thin frame surrounds ea
ch
Window.

The top bar of information, the title bar, h
as an icon of the program you’re
working in, the name of the document you are working on and the program’s name.

So let’s open up a
nother

window. This time with one window open FILE
-
NEW
-
WINDOW.
That gives you a duplicate Window to work from, while leavi
ng the original in
place.
It even remembers Internet FORWARD and BACKWARD keys.

On the right

hand side are three buttons, a minus sign, a box or two, and
an

X,
known in the trade as minimize, maximize and close.

When maximized, the button becomes
two box
es representing RESTORE to the Window'
s previous size and shape. You can
resize and shape a Window by clicking on RESTORE and going to the edges of a Window,
click on an edge, and move it where you want. You can move a whole window by clicking
on the Tit
le bar, holding your mouse button down, and moving the window where you want.


The minimize button
-

makes the whole window shift from visible to just a small
picture (icon) on the Start Bar. Maximize □ causes the window to take up the whole screen.
Once it is in that position, if you click the maximize button again (notice now the
re are two
boxes on that button


called restore) it window will shrink in size, though you can still work
in it. And finally the X
-
Button is to close the program. If you have any unsaved
information, it will ask you if you want to save it. {Note: To S
ave a file means to move
your keystrokes and mouse

clicks
onto a hard or floppy disk}
.

The next line down is
the main menu. Each of the word
s on that line has a drop
down menu that gives you your program’s options or choices. For example, File is about f
ile
management and printing, Edit is about cutting, copying or pasting, Format is about how
things look, View is about how you are seeing what you are dealing with
, and

Help is your
key to information. Below the menu line are little pictures and words. Th
ese are your
toolbars. They serve as short cuts and they impact on whatever is highlighted. As you move
your mouse slowly across each one it tells you what they are for, i.e. the scissors are to cut
something out of the document, the printer to print an
entire document or picture.


24

The large white or gray area is your workspace. To the right and bottom are scroll
bars. Up, down, left or right arrows move you through what you are working on.

Scrolling (moving) through documents is easy. To move a litt
le at a time keep on
clicking the arrow in the direction you want to move through. The box between arrows
assists in moving faster. Just click on the box and drag it to the location in the document
you want to go. Sometimes, other shortcut icons are loc
ated at the bottom of the screen
also.
Page Up and Page Down will also help you scroll through a document.

GETTING IN AND OUT OF PROGRAMS

ENTERING


TO OPEN A PROGRAM

1. Click on Start

2. Go to Programs

3. Staying in the dominant color straight
across;

go to the
program group you want, i.e. Microsoft Office. If a listing has an
arrow, move your mouse over the arrow and get more features to
choose from

4. Go to the program you want, i.e. Microsoft Word.

5. Click on the program you want to use.

6. Spend

time with the help menus.

ENJOY THE PROGRAM.


L
et’s open the Word processor we will be using, Microsoft Word. Click on START.
Then move your mouse pointer to PROGRAMS (or ALL PROGRAMS). Staying within the
color surrounding the word PROGRAMS, move your
mouse straight across and choose to
the words MICROSOFT OFFICE or MICROSOFT WORD from the list. Click on
MICROSOFT WORD and the program will open. Follow those steps for any program you
want to open or close.

Our word processing class will get into this
program deeper.

EXITING


Save your work by clicking on either the SAVE button (which looks like a small 3 ½
inch floppy disk) or hold down the Ctrl key then hit the letter “s”. Then click on FILE


EXIT.

Or if you’ve already saved your work
-

Click on the
menu bar

FILE


EXIT

If you have unsaved work, it will ask you if you want to save it. If so, click on YES,
give your file a name and change the location if you want to, then click O.K.

Another way to exit a program is by using the close button on the Ti
tle Bar. The
close button is located on the far right hand side of the top bar and is marked with the letter
X. If you click on the X the entire program will close.

Before it turns itself off, if some information has been entered since the last time the
document was saved, it will ask you if you want to save it. Decide for yourself.


25


WINDOWS LAYOUT


Let’s look deeper into Windows Explorer. Click on the main bar START, and go to
MY COMPUTER, or Windows Explorer (depending on the version of Windows you a
re
working with), click there. You are now looking at the structure of your computer. When
you “create a document” which means make a letter, picture, whatever, it is stored in the
computer under an address.

To the right you’ll see a box that has folde
rs in it. Think of folders as sections in the
file cabinet called your disk, either hard or floppy.




The above graphic shows a folder called fs2002 (for Flight Simulator 2002


'gotta
try the latest edition o
f that game

if you like to fly
). In a

pro
gram folder can be

other
folders. Files
also
go in the folders.
It’s like organizing papers and pictures in the real world.
Everything has an address.


For example, one folder would be New York City. A folder
inside would be Manhattan. A folder inside
Manhattan could be Harlem. And within the
folder of Harlem can be other folders and files like Sugar Hill.

This material is written with Microsoft Word 2003 and Window’s ’XP. However,
there are many versions of both, so the material is as generic as po
ssible. Your version

s
HELP

feature will

give you the right keystroke sequence for you.

Included are the basic
s
. For specifics on the program you are using,

use your

HELP

feature and ask for what you want to do
. P
rint it out


or
better yet
just read f
rom the
screen, and follow the instructions like a recipe.
It may take a few tries.

If you find a series of keystrokes that doesn’t work for you, go to HELP, INDEX
and type what you want to do, like open document. HELP will give you the step by step
ke
ystroke process that works for you in that edition of the program.


ENJOY THE MANY NEW WINDOWS OF OPPORTUNITY OPEN FOR YOU


26


SOFTWARE

Software is the thinking, organizing style and structure on your computer. In
Windows certain keystroke combinations
ar
e used in many types of software.

Ctrl X to cut
something out or delete it, Ctrl C for Copy, Ctrl V

for P
aste ,
Ctrl P for Print,
Ctrl A to
highlight everything in what you are working on, Ctrl
F to find a word or phrase,
Ctrl G to
go to a specific page an
d Ctrl S to save a file. On the menu bar, when there is a shortcut for
that task, it will tell you the keys.

Word Processing



writing letters, reports, mass mailings, tables, flyers, books, etc.
The word processor we are working with is Microsoft Word
. The word processing software
discussed here is Microsoft Office 2000, and Microsoft Office 2003

Professional
. To the
best of my ability, I have added words and phrases that will help you link through your
program’s help menu to find the keystrokes tha
t you want.

Spreadsheets



numeric calculations (numbers presented) logically explained.
Excel, Lotus 123, Project Manager.

Databases


used to sort large amounts of information (i.e. mailing lists and
customer information
, etc.
}


XML
,
Extensible Markup Language, is the database rage
because it can be used in many programs to convey database information.


Communications



helps your computer answer phones, take messages, send and
receive faxes/e
-
mail and get onto
the Internet.

Multi
-
media


makes your computer screen work like a television set


video,
pictures, sound, CD’s, etc.

Graphics



programs with the emphasis on drawing or placing pictures or other
images into what you’re working on. Graphics prog
rams, inc
luding Adobe’s Illustrator and
Photo Shop;

Microsoft’s
PowerPoint
, Paint and Photo Editor;

and Corel Draw also allow
you to turn your computer screen into a slide show stage.

Computer Aided Design CAD


style of programs that help in the design of
anything

from a room to an airplane. Used by many professions from gardeners to rocket
engineers.

There are also movie and music making programs.

Games



Played on a computer. Since what one affirms tends to be what one
creates, consider the value of negative p
rogramming, if any
. There is so much beauty in the
universe.

Microsoft Office
-

Includes Word for word processing, Excel for spread sheets
which lays out numbers and charts in columns and rows, Access for managing a large
amount of names, tasks, and other

information (like index cards), Outlook for schedule and
e
-
mail management, Photo Editor for taking pictur
es and making them look better,

and
Publisher that helps you make great flyers, invitations,

websites,

etc.

A strong web page
creation program sold s
eparately is Microsoft’s
Front Page which lets you create your
website using a simple
wysiwyg (what you see is what you get)
format
,

then translates your
images into internet code

for publishing your webpage. Start thinking about your webpage.
What do yo
u want to say?

Windows 3.1, 95, 98, 2000, ME, XP,

etc.


programs by Microsoft that serve as a
stage manager for what you se on the screen. Used to enter and exit many PC programs.

Internet


Think of Internet Software as your portal onto the Internet. I
t translates
Internet language (Hyper Text Markup Language


HTML) into pictures, sounds and words.


27

HOW TO LOAD SOFTWARE


Loading software means transferring a structure for a program from a disk, the web
or whatever source capable of direct communication
with your machine. For example,

Microsoft Reader

reads documents and e
-
books

over a

speaker. Microsoft Office, the
Adobe series, Corel, etc. are all software that needs to be loaded in order for it to work for
you.

To load software, p
ut the program dis
k (CD, 3 ½”) in the appropriate drive. Many
modern programs automatically open up a window with a wizard


a series of questions
whose answers help the computer do something


so just read the screen and follow the
directions.

If, when you put the disk
into the computer, nothing happens then, click on
;


START

-
CONTROL PANEL

-
ADD OR REMOVE PROGRAMS

(
Follow

the Wizard)

When downloading programs off the web, usually through a download button, just
follow the instructions.
Make sure the computer has virus p
rotection.

E
-
BOOKS AND E
-
DOCS


T
he next evolution in reading has begun. E
-
books and E
-
docs, electronic books and
documents, delivers an even more dynamic

reading

experience by allowing you to add your
notes, share them with others, and evolve t
hem into ne
w lessons

Underline, highlight, color,
add footnotes to other books you are working with…EXPAND
ING

YOUR THOUGHT.

If you don’t know what a word means, it’s easy to look it up and get updates on what’s
happening now.

For example, throughout this document
are links to more information
from other sources, like the

company who makes the program (
provides the software.
)

Everybody has a story to tell and it’s so much easier telling it in an e
-
book.

A big
layer of red tape, the publishing industry, has been rem
oved from the initial process of
getting published. They are upgrading their work to proven success titles. This gives
individual authors

and
publishers
more

room to present their work. With a com
p
uter, every
story can be told and learned from.

Modern

e
-
book formats include Adobe Reader, Microsoft Reader

which uses the
computer’s voice to read material to you
.
They are also available in .exe format.
E
-
docs are
the same material available in a word processing format which makes copy and paste into
oth
er things you are workin
g

on easy. Remember to credit the source of the material.

Anybody
with a computer
can be an e
-
book publisher. There is equipment to scan
material into the computer if you can’t type. Once you make your e
-
book or e
-
doc sell it o
n
the web.
Another market is to make your own CD’s of original material for sale.

Here are

three e
-
books C.U.R.E. Publishing has up now. They came
through folks
who are ‘working on the railroad
.
’ Life is full of great stories of overcoming adversity.

Imagine
what
E
books
and E docs
you can do.

E
-
books can be done in your word processor. For more programs that allow you to
do more things, like insert movies, do a
web search

for “
E
-
books
.” and “
E
-
book

Reader”
for more information. Some are free, lik
e this e
-
book and some cost.


28


Healing History

Black People And Their Place In World History

©

E
-
book Edition


By:
Dr. Leroy Vaughn, MD, MBA


(Click Here For More Information)

Available in Word
-

.doc, Word Perfect
-

.rtf, Mi
crosoft Reader
-

.lit, Adobe
-

.pdf

Dr. Vaughn’s unique vision resulting from his 40 plus years of studying

Black

history is an “eye
-
opener.”

1.

Learn the rarely spoken political secret:


Who we
re the 5 Black United States
Presidents?



2.

Understand the root of a financial fear still affecting the African American
economy.


What was Black Wall Street, why did it happen, and what
happened

to the folks afterwards?

3.

Break through the lies about Black contributions to everyday life.

Who are
some of the Black patent holding inventors and what did they create?



more


29

Healing AIDS

Why I Survive AIDS
©

E
-
book Edition



By: Niro Markoff Asistent

with Paul Duffy

(Click Here For More Information)

Available in Word
-
.doc, Word Perfe
ct
-

.rtf, Microsoft Reader
-

.lit

Niro

was
HIV Positive,

moving into ARC (Aids Related Complex).


Facing what many saw as a death sentence at the time, Niro created her
own program of emotional therapy, daily meditation, healthy diet and
exerc
ise.


Niro’s program includes facing and healing fear, shame and
guilt; powerful daily meditations, productive journaling, reprioritizing your
life, and listening to your inner healer who will tell you what you need to do
to allow healing to flow through y
ou…yes you.


Since 1986, (until at least
1993, the last time I saw her) she has tested HIV negative.


She was
featured in Parade Magazine and appeared on Donohue on 7/13/93.

more


30

Healing Fossil Fu
el Dependency

DePalma, Free Energy &the N
-
Machine
©

E
-
book Edition



By:
Bruce DePalma

With Introduction B
y:

David Crockett Williams

(Click Here

For More Information)

“The only general principle this author is aware of is God.”


"Truth has a ring to it which is unmistakable to those in search of it.”

Available in Word
-
.doc, Word Perfect
-

.rtf, Microsoft Reader
-

.lit

non linkable Adobe
-

.pdf version available too.

T
he way we produce energy is killing us. War is justified because of it.
Pollution based illness is on the rise. There is a better way.

DePalma, Free Energy & The N
-
Machine is a compilation of papers and the
Patent Application by Bruce DePalma, Inventor
of the N
-
Machine which, with a
Faraday Motor, uses magnets and brushes to pull free electricity from the matter
surrounding us.



There is a model of his N
-
Machine in California

The result, free energy, like what Nick Tesla said could happen.

more



31


COMPUTER TALK


Cyber Space



the nation of imagine where ideas are presented without regard to
race, color or economic standing.

Files


a collection of related ideas (like a letter, report, computer ins
tructions) that
are held at the same address or location deep in the computer’s soul, the central processing
unit.

Folders or Sub
-
Directory


Locations in the hard disk where you or MS
-
DOS
has

placed the work. The program Window
s has its own folder.

Word Perfect

does too. You
can make folders in Windows Explorer which you will find on your start menu under
programs. They make it easier to tell the com
puter what you want to be on by telling it
where you put your work or games.

Disk Drive



Usually A= 3 ½” Floppy, C = Hard Disk, D = CD ROM

Programs


Thinking tools within folders that take your ideas and run them through
a logical thought process.

Hard D
isk



Located in your central processing unit, it holds all the information in
a power on/power off format.

C:
\
> called C Prompt


The computer’s signal that you are talking to MS
-
DOS,
the Microsoft Disk Operating System, the main traffic cop in your hard
disk.

Saving a File



recording your work into the computer’s deep memory, the hard
disk. Generally, click FILE, SAVE and give your work a name. DOS assigns folder unless
you tell it different. The program assigns an extension.
Files are

assigned extensions
based
on type when you save t
hem, i.e. Word
-

.doc, Excel
-

.xls, picture .jpg or .gif., internet .htm
or .html,
etc.

Icons


Pictures that represent different programs or files. Usually when you click
and/or do
uble click on an icon with a mouse, a program or feature runs on the computer.

Modem



A part of the computer, usually internal, that allows the computer to
answer the phones, take messages, send faxes and files and, most importantly, get onto the
Internet
.


GOOD COMPUTER LANGUAGE RESOURCES ON THE WEB.


Webopedia

whatis.com

A glossary of internet terms


So let’s look at the Internet Window


32


WELCOME TO THE WORLD WIDE WEB


Computer illiteracy is no longer a problem in your
life. You know the parts of the machine, how to turn it on
and off, how to open a window with
a specific program in it,
how to get on the Internet.
What are you going to say when
you get there and beyond?

The World Wide Web



www.
, sometimes referred
to as the Information Super Highway, is a world forum for
you to share ideas on, make money, play
games, do research
with, connect, whatever. If it’s in the world, you can
proba
bly find it on the web…
the good, the bad and everything else. The web is transforming
every day, with new dynamics added as fast as we breathe
, which is why every voice needs t
o
be expressed here too. Cross referencing ideas is a great and empowering upgrade
.

Be

careful what you put on your computer and the Internet
. Like in the real world,
actions have consequences. There are many stories from pre patriot act of the govern
ment
coming into people’s homes, reading their computers and making judgments. Next thing
you know private picture
s and thoughts

are posted on the web for the world to see. Folks
will tell you they secure your information. Don’t believe them. If the co
mpany is purchased,
or
when
the owner dies
,

information can slip out of a computer fast.
Identity

theft is real.
Do a web search to learn how to protect yourself.


We’ll cover more on Windows in the next lesson. But first,
let’s

stand on

cyber
wings an
d g
et you to the net.
Our final task for this first lesson is to

get you an e
-
mail
address
.

Click on “Start” “Internet” and a Window will open. You will see the computer’s
chosen home page come up on the screen. You’re looking through a “Window,” a vie
w into
the soul of the computer. The Window that you are looking through is showing you the part
of your computer that deals with the web.


INTERNET BASICS


There are a lot of similarities between the real world and the web. Each place on the
web has a
n address, like a street address, with a few differences. To find out where you are
look at the Address box, which has the internet address listed. There you will find the