05/19/07 - Chemistry Department - chem.usu.edu

toadspottedincurableInternet and Web Development

Dec 4, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

96 views

For students and

faculties:

Nanotechnology

timelines and mapviews in Google Experimental

Live Webcast Of New Report On
Nanotechnology

Wednesday, May 23, 2007,
10:00
-

11:00 a.m.

Three days of
nanotechnology

bootcamp

Sept 2007

NIST
Nano

Center Ac
cepting Proposals


Shared
-
use facility

:
The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology consists of a
Research Program and the Nanofab, a shared
-
use facility providing economical access to state
-
of
-
the
-
art nanofabrication and nano
-
measurement tools. The
CNST Nanofab is
now available for
use by non
-
NIST users
. See "What we do", to the left, for a description of CNST and its Research
Program and the CNST Nanofab and its use po
licies.


Global News:

Nanotechnology

water desalination for Australia

Australia's Leading
Nanotechnology

Education Centre Opens at St Helena

UK publishes report on environmental bene
fits of
nanotechnology

Kalam for speedy commercialisation of
nano
-
tech

India

ISRAEL PLANS
NANO
-
SATELLITE LAUNCH

Recommendatio
ns for European
nanotechnology

transfer from lab to fab

Nanotechnology

In China Is Focusing On Innovations And New
...

Anna Univarsity introduces course in
nanotechnology

Chennai, India


US Statewide News:

International SEMATECH agrees to locate headquarters at UAlbany
...

Mapping the New US “
Nano

Metro” Economy


Journal

and Book
:


Nano
-
Products:

Nanofactory Product Examples

Creative announces player to rival iPod
Nano

CAS reports progress in developing
nanotechnology

data storage

New
nano
-
glue withstands high temperatures: First of its kind

Advanced Ceramics and
Nano

Ceramic Powders market report just
...

Nanotechnology

is now used in nearly 500 everyday products

Nanotechnology

Restores Art Masterpieces

Third
-
Order Nanotechnologies Achieves Major Technical Breakthrough
...

Nexus
Nano

E
lectronics to Provide Circuit Board Assemblies for
...

Nanopackaging Is Intelligent, Smart And Safe Life. New World Study
...


Research News:

Analysis: Cancer in
nano's

crosshairs

british take focus on small
-
plot gardening techniques to the ‘
nano

...

UK:

Nanotechnology

could help reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Chemists Use
Nanotechnology

to Penetrate Plant Cell Walls

Nanotechnology

fingerprint analysis could replace blood sample

Nano

Bandage Stops Blee
ding

Computer simulation studies of three dimensional magnetic
nano

...

Scientists target cancer cells with
nanotechnology

University of Southern California Gets

$2.7 Million Nanoscience Grant

Nano
-
pulses for computer memory


Business:

Does
Nanotechnology

need Venture Capital to be Successful?

Greenyarn partners NUS in creating innovative
Nanotechnology

products

Nano
-
Terra Inc.
Announces Multi
-
Year Development and Licensing
...

UWP to offer minor in MEMS/
Nanotechnology

Aggressive Stock Alert: TDON! May 17, 2007

Profit From
Nanotechnology's

Dream Material

TSMC to fab up Spansion 40
nano

flash

BioForce Nanosciences Reports Record Revenues, First Quar
ter 2007
...


Articles & Reports:

Nanotechnology

for drug detection

Nanotechnology

supercomputing center

Nanotechnology

pasta: Toward nanoscale electronics

The science at
nano

level

Big future described for
nanotechnology

Silent Growth Of
Nanotechnology

Application In Every Industry
...


Nano
-
Risks:

NRDC Sounds Alarm On Risks Of
Nano
-
Scale Chemistry

EPA and
Nanotechnology
: Oversight for the 21st Century a New Report

Nanotechnology
, nanoregulation

New
Nanotechnology

Database for Societal and Ethical Implications


Awards:

Pioneer In
Nanotechnology

To Receive $500000 Waterman Award

University of Southern California Gets $2.7 Million Nanoscienc
e Grant


Jobs:

Nanotechnology Job Center


-

http://understandingnano.tinytechjobs.com/


Conference:

Productive Nanosystems Conference


Education &
Outreach:

U
WP to offer minor in MEMS/
Nanotechnology




HEADLINES
-

Week 20: nanotechweb.org News


1. Business briefs

A round up of this week's nanotech news featuring Nano
-
Terra, BioForce, Nanocyl and more See
http://nanotechweb.org/articles/news/6/5/18?alert=1


2. NanoTech 2007
-

show preview

NSTI's NanoTech 2007 show is billed as the largest international nanotechnology conference and
trade show in the world. Now in its 10th year, the event boast
s around 1000 presentations and
brings together more than 3000 scientists and business leaders. Michael Doyle, NSTI's marketing
director and strategic consultant, speaks with James Tyrrell.

See
http://nanotechweb.org/articles/news/6/5/17?alert=1


3. Nanospears strike at gas detection

Spear
-
like In
-
O
-
N nanostructures created in China could be ideal for gas sensing applications
such as NO2 and alcohol detection as well as the measurement of a
ir humidity. Thanks to their
high surface area, nanospears have the potential to outperform simpler structures including
nanowires, nanobelts and nanotubes say scientists.

See
http://nanotech
web.org/articles/news/6/5/16?alert=1


4. Beetles turn to nanotechnology

A South American beetle with an unusual shell made up of stacked nanolayers could provide the
inspiration for making tuneable micro
-
mirrors for optical applications, say physicists
in the UK.
Sharon Jewell and a colleague at the University of Exeter have shown that the beetle's novel
microstructure can control both the polarization and wavelength of light reflected


a first in the
animal world.

See
http://nanotechweb.org/articles/news/6/5/15?alert=1


5. Porous nanoparticles deliver chemicals into plants

Although nanoparticles can be used to deliver DNA, drugs and other molecules into animal cells,
this is not so easy

to do in plants because of their cell walls, which act as barriers. Now,
researchers at Iowa State University in the US have succeeded in overcoming this problem by
using silica nanoparticles with a honeycomb shape. The nanoparticles have pores measuring
just
3 nm across and can transport DNA and chemicals into isolated cells and intact leaves. The
breakthrough result could find applications in plant biotechnology and might even be used to
improve crops in the future.

See
http://nanotechweb.org/articles/news/6/5/14?alert=1


6. New look for optical data storage

Physicists in the UK have made the first optical memory element with information encoded in the
structural phase of a single gallium

nanoparticle. The new memory element is about the same
size as bit cells in next
-
generation hard disks, but requires much less energy to switch from one
state to another than current DVDs or DVRs.

See
http://nanotechweb.org/articles/news/6/5/13?alert=1


Nanogirl News

-

brought to you by Nanotechnology Industries
www.nanoindustries.com/

Issue May 19, 2007


Nanotechnology is showing promise in treating spinal cord injuries and could
conceivabl
y reverse paralysis, according to a report on the future of the emerging
technology in medicine. The report, released at a Washington forum this week, said
nanotechnology
--

or the use of materials on the scale of atoms and molecules
--

may also
help cure
other ailments believed to be intractable by repairing damaged organs or tissue.
This suggests damage from heart attacks or strokes, bone or tooth loss or ailments such as
diabetes and Parkinson's disease could be treated with nanotechnology, researchers s
aid.

(Yahoo News 4.27.07)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/a
fp/20070427/ts_alt_afp/ushealthmedicinenanotechnology_0704
27074643


100% Biodegradable NANOIL Ready For Automobiles. Nano Chemical Systems
Holdings, Inc., announced recently their latest entry into the multi
-
billion dollar
performance chemical category, N
ANOIL, a "nano
-
enhanced" GREEN motor oil. Unlike
today's fossil and synthetic oils, NANOIL is non
-
toxic and bio
-
degradable, thus
eliminating the current disposal issues with present commercially available lubricants.
Nanochem will produce NANOIL utilizing
its nano
-
technology patent applications and
inventions that directly address bio
-
fuel production for a nano
-
enhanced line of "green"
bio
-
lubricants. Initial results indicate that these bio
-
lubricants can perform as well as
today's fossil and synthetic oils
. (Chemical Online 4.27.07)

http://www.chemicalonline.com/content/news/article.asp?docid=8a929e6c
-
ee2d
-
4523
-
9616
-
f1089c78c138&atc~c=771+s=773+r=001+l=a&VNETCOOKIE=NO


NIST Nano Center Accepting Proposals. Looking fo
r a state
-
of
-
the
-
art place to study
nanotechnology
-
related products? If yes, then the U.S. Commerce Department's National
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) may be able to help. (Industry Week
5.15.07)
http://www.industryweek.com/ReadArticle.aspx?ArticleID=14196


Finding by Rice University chemists could aid development of new nanodevices. Gold
nanorods ass
emble themselves into rings. Rice University chemists have discovered that
tiny building blocks known as gold nanorods spontaneously assemble themselves into
ring
-
like superstructures. This finding, which will be published as the inside cover article
of th
e March 19 international edition of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie, could
potentially lead to the development of novel nanodevices like highly sensitive optical
sensors, superlenses, and even invisible objects for use in the military.

(Rice Unive
rsity 3.9.07)

http://www.media.rice.edu/media/NewsBot.asp?MODE=VIEW&ID=9358&SnID=4
1579
3553
>


Engines of Creation 2.0: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology
-

Updated and Expanded
By K. Eric Drexler (father of nanotechnology) is available exclusively from WOWIO at
www.wowio.com and is free of charge to registered users.


Plenty of room for
MRIs at a nano scale... a research team now reports. Combining an
MRI with the precision of atomic
-
force microscopes, a team led by Dan Rugar of the
IBM Research Division in San Jose, Calif., unveiled MRI images 60,000 times smaller
than anything imaged by

MRI previously, down to 90 nanometer resolution
-

about 10
times bigger than your typical molecule and right in the range of the integrated circuits
doing all the calculations behind your computer screen. The result, the team writes in the
current Nature
Nanotechnology journal, "demonstrates the feasibility of pushing MRI
into the nanoscale regime." (USA Today 5.1.07)

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/columnist/vergano/2007
-
04
-
29
-
nano
-
mri_N.htm?csp=34


Iowa State scientists demonstrate first use of nanotechnology to enter plant cells. A team
of Iowa State Unive
rsity plant scientists and materials chemists have successfully used
nanotechnology to penetrate plant cell walls and simultaneously deliver a gene and a
chemical that triggers its expression with controlled precision. Their breakthrough brings
nanotechnol
ogy to plant biology and agricultural biotechnology, creating a powerful new
tool for targeted delivery into plant cells. (Iowa State University 5.16.07)
http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2007/may/nanotech.shtml



Super small nanoelectrodes can probe microscale environments. Investigating the
composition and behavior of microscale environments, including tho
se within living
cells, could become easier and more precise with nanoelectrodes being developed at the
University of Illinois. "The individual nanotube
-
based probes can be used for
electrochemical and biochemical sensing," said Min
-
Feng Yu, a U. of I. pro
fessor of
mechanical science and engineering, and a researcher at the university's Beckman
Institute. "The position of the nanoelectrodes can be controlled very accurately."

(U of Ill at Urbana
-
Champaign 3.9.07)
http://www.news.uiuc.edu/news/07/0309nanoelectrodes.html


An Australian biotechnology firm said on Thursday it had developed a means of
delivering anti
-
cancer drugs
directly to cancer cells, which aims to avoid the debilitating
toxicity associated with chemotherapy. The method uses nanotechnology, which involves
molecules far smaller than a human cell. Direct targeting of chemotherapy drugs would
allow dosages thousan
ds of times lower than that in conventional chemotherapy and be
more easily tolerated by patients, said the firm. Writing in the May issue of U.S.
-
based
Cancer Cell journal, the biotech firm EnGeneIC said it had developed nano
-
cells
containing chemotherapy

drugs. (Yahoo 5.10.07)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070510/hl_nm/cancer_australia_dc_1


New JILA apparatus

measures fast nanoscale motions. A new nanoscale apparatus
developed at JILA
-
a tiny gold beam whose 40 million vibrations per second are measured
by hopping electrons
-
offers the potential for a 500
-
fold increase in the speed of scanning
tunneling microsco
pes (STM), perhaps paving the way for scientists to watch atoms
vibrate in high definition in real time. The new device measures the wiggling of the
beam, or, more precisely, the space between it and an electrically conducting point just a
single atom wide
, based on the speed of electrons "tunneling" across the gap. The work is
the first use of an "atomic point contact," the business end of an STM, to sense a
nanomechanical device oscillating at its "resonant" frequency, where it naturally vibrates
like a t
uning fork. (EurekAlert 3.16.07)
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007
-
03/nios
-
nja031607.php


A n
ew nano
-
insulin delivery pump for worry
-
free treatment for diabetics...In what may
be a sizeable breakthrough in medical technology (and quite a relief for diabetics),
medical device company Debiotech and Switzerland
-
based STMicroelectronics have
entered i
nto a strategic cooperation agreement to manufacture and deliver the award
-
winning miniaturised insulin
-
delivery pump. (Business Standard 5.1.07)

http://www.business
-
standard.com/common/storypage.php?autono=282949&leftnm=8&subLeft=0&chkFlg=


Top tiny creations. A recent story about 'microscopic alpha
bet soup' created at UCLA got
us thinking about all the quirky ways researchers have chosen to demonstrate new micro,
nano
-
scale technology. (New Scientist Technology Blog 3.22.07)

http://www.newscientist.com/blog/technology/2007/03/top
-
tiny
-
creations.html?DCMP=Matt_Sparkes&nsref=n
ano


Paralyzed Mice Walk Again. Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Mend Broken Spinal
Cords. Samuel Stupp has a bunch of mice that used to drag their hind legs behind them
when they crawled around his Illinois lab, but they have miraculously regained at lea
st
partial use of their rear legs. Astonishingly, their severed spinal cords have been repaired,
at least partly, without surgery or drugs. All it took was a simple injection of a liquid
containing tiny molecular structures developed by Stupp and his colle
agues at
Northwestern University. Six weeks later, the mice were able to walk again. They don't
have their former agility, but their injuries should have left them paralyzed for life...
Stupp's team concentrates on combining the incredibly small world of n
anotechnology
with biology, creating molecules that self
-
assemble into large molecular structures that
can literally "hug" around cells in the human body. (ABC News 5.1.07)

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=3102679&page=1&CMP=OTC
-
RSSFeeds0312


A Single
-
Photon Server with Just One Atom. Physicists at Max Planck Institute of
Qu
antum Optics have succeeded in turning a Rubidium atom into a single
-
photon server.
The high quality of the single photons and their ready availability are important for future
quantum information processing experiments with single photons. In the relative
ly new
field of quantum information processing the goal is to make use of quantum mechanics to
compute certain tasks much more efficiently than with a classical computer. (Max Planck
Society 3.12.07)

http://www.mpg.de/english/illustrationsDocumentation/d
ocumentation/pressReleases/200
7/pressRelease200703091/index.html


Magnetic tweezers unravel cellular mechanics. By injecting tiny magnetic beads into a
living cell and manipulating them with a magnetic 'tweezer', scientists of the University
of Twente, Th
e Netherlands, succeed in getting to know more about the mechanics of the
cell nucleus. (physorg 5.14.07)
http://www.physorg.com/news98378757.html


Stude
nt Creates Garment With Bacteria
-
trapping Nanofibers. Fashion designers and fiber
scientists at Cornell have taken "functional clothing" to a whole new level. They have
designed a garment that can prevent colds and flu and never needs washing, and another
that destroys harmful gases and protects the wearer from smog and air pollution. The
two
-
toned gold dress and metallic denim jacket, featured at the April 21 Cornell Design
League fashion show, contain cotton fabrics coated with nanoparticles that give the
m
functional qualities never before seen in the fashion world. (Science Daily 5.7.07)

http://www.sciencedaily.co
m/releases/2007/05/070506091754.htm


Inexpensive 'nanoglue' can bond nearly anything together. Researchers at Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute have developed a new method to bond materials that don't normally
stick together. The team's adhesive, which is
based on self
-
assembling nanoscale chains,
could impact everything from next
-
generation computer chip manufacturing to energy
production. Less than a nanometer
-

or one billionth of a meter
-

thick, the nanoglue is
inexpensive to make and can withstand tem
peratures far higher than what was previously
envisioned. In fact, the adhesive's molecular bonds strengthen when exposed to heat.
(EurekAlert 4.16.07)
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007
-
05/rpi
-
ic051507.php


Demand for nanotech
-
based medicine grows. U.S. demand for nanotechnology medical
products will increase over 17 percent per year to $53 billion in

2011, says The Freedonia
Group, Inc., a Cleveland
-
based industry research firm. Afterwards, the increasing flow of
new nanomedicines, nanodiagnostics, and nanotech
-
based medical supplies and devices
into the US market will boost demand to more than $110 b
illion in 2016. The firm reports
these and other findings in its new study, Nanotechnology in Healthcare. (SmallTimes
3.19.07)

http://www.smalltimes.com/articles/article_display.cfm?Section=ONART&C=Bio&ART
ICLE_ID=287462&p=109


Lighting the nanoworld with nanolamps. An interdisciplinary team o
f researchers at
Cornell University (CU) has built 'nanolamps.' These extremely small light bulbs are
made of light
-
emitting nanofibers about the size of a virus or the tiniest of bacteria. Using
a technique called electrospinning, the researchers spun the

fibers from a metallic
element, the ruthenium, and a polymer. These nanofibers "are so small that they are less
than the wavelength of the light they emit." Apparently, these nanofibers are easy to
produce. But before they can be integrated into our incre
asingly smaller electronic
devices, there still is a need to know how long these nanolamps can last.

(ZDnet 4.14.07)
http://blogs.zdnet.com/emergingt
ech/?p=542


Nanoparticles 'safe for soil bugs'. Ronald Turco at Purdue University in West Lafayette,
Indiana, and his colleagues have found that fullerenes, nanoscale carbon spheres, do not
harm microbes when released into the soil. Their study is the fir
st of its kind to focus on
soil microbes, which play a key role in recycling nutrients used by plants (Environmental
Science & Technology, DOI: 10.1021/es061953l).(NewScientist 5.5.07)

http://www.newscientisttech.com/article.ns?id=mg19426025.800&feedId=nanotechnolog
y_rss20


Nanorockets
-

the ultimate baby booste
rs? Brian Gilchrists. design for a rocket ship
sounds like a bad joke. For a start, its engine is about the size of a single bacterium. And
for thrust it relies on the equivalent of chucking microscopic beer cans out of the
spacecraft's rear window. Gilchr
ist, an electrical engineer at the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, is not joking though. He proposes to harness the latest nanotechnology to
create an engine that will make its way across the solar system by firing out minute metal
particles like so muc
h nano
-
sized grapeshot. (New Scientist 3.24.07)

http://space.newsc
ientist.com/article.ns?id=mg19325961.500&feedId=fundamentals_rss2
0


Growing Nerve Cells in 3
-
D Dramatically Affects Gene Expression. Nerve cells grown in
three
-
dimensional environments deploy hundreds of different genes compared with cells
grown in standa
rd two
-
dimensional petri dishes, according to a new Brown University
study. The research, spearheaded by bioengineer Diane Hoffman
-
Kim, adds to a growing
body of evidence that lab culture techniques dramatically affect the way these cells
behave. (Brown 5.
15.07)

http://www.brown.edu/Administration/News_Bureau/2006
-
07/06
-
156.html


The longest carbon nano
tubes you've ever seen. Using techniques that could
revolutionize manufacturing for certain materials, researchers have grown carbon
nanotubes that are the longest in the world. While still slightly less than 2 centimeters
long, each nanotube is 900,000 ti
mes longer than its diameter. The fibers
--
which have the
potential to be longer, stronger and better conductors of electricity than copper and many
other materials
--
could ultimately find use in smart fabrics, sensors and a host of other
applications. To gr
ow the aligned bundles of tiny tubes, the researchers combined
advantages of chemical vapor deposition (CVD), a technique for creating thin coatings
that is especially common in the semiconductor industry, with a novel substrate and
catalyst onto which the

carbon attaches. (EurkAlert 5.10.07)

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007
-
05/nsf
-
tlc051007.php


N
anoscale pasta: Toward nanoscale electronics. Pasta tastes like pasta
-

with or without a
spiral. But when you jump to the nanoscale, everything changes: carbon nanotubes and
nanofibers that look like nanoscale spiral pasta have completely different electr
onic
properties than their non
-
spiraling cousins. Engineers at UC San Diego, and Clemson
University are studying these differences in the hopes of creating new kinds of
components for nanoscale electronics. (physorg 5.18.07)

http://www.physorg.com/news98713032.html



-----------------------------------------------------

Foresight Nanotech Weekly News Digest: May 16, 2007

Health: Nanotechnology offers chemotherapy relief

Information technology: Electron microscope makes tiny devices

Foresight Events: Productive Nanosystems Conferen
ce

Advancing Beneficial Nanotechnology
-

Join Foresight

Conference

10th Annual NSTI Nanotech Conference a
nd Trade Show

Research: Magnetic sensors to stu
dy biomolecules


video

Research: DNA sieve


Nanoscale pores can be tiny analysis labs

News: Legal imp
lications of the nanotechnology patent land rush

Edit
or's Pick: Secrets of carbon nanotube formation revealed


video

Nanodot: Meet the Nubot: DNA nanotechnology robots


--------------------------------------------------------------

Nanoforum Newsletter No. 18, May 2007

Recent activities of the Nanoforum project



Identifying Nanotechnology related Skills and Training Needs for EU Industry




Nanotechnology in Europe
-

Ensuring the EU Competes Effectively on the World
Stage


News from th
e European Commission



Potocnik outlines balanced approach to devel
oping nanotechnology




The brochure:"Nanotechnology: Innovation fo
r tomorrow's world" is now
available in Finnish, Polish and Danish




Open Consultation on the Strategy on communication outreach in nanotechnology




U.S. and EU propose to increase nanotechnology cooperation




Public consultation on SCENIHR


Important news from Europe



NanoforumEULA releases preliminary programme workshop and fact finding
mission




Food nanotechnology and public acceptance




N
ew centre at York gives glimpse of sub
-
Angstrom world




EU funds n
ano packaging research




NANOFORUMEULA extends deadline Call for R
esearch Visit Grants




IEEE Completes Standards Roadmap for Emergi
ng Nanoelectronic Applications




Russia to invest $1B in nanotechn
ology


Event announcements



EuroNanoForum 2007




USNM
-

Utrecht Summer School in NanoMaterials




Summer school course on Nanobiotechnology and Nano
-
Medicine
-

Ethical,
Legal and Social Aspects




Acta Materialia Gold Medal Workshop Perspectives of nanoscience and
n
anotechnology




4M2007 Conference on Multi
-
Material Micro Manufact
ure




Nanoparticles for European Industry II


Measurement, Charac
terisation and
Standardisation; Manufacturing Scale
-
up and Processing; Regulations and
Potential Risks




9th Workshop NANOSCIENCE & NANOTECHNOLOGY