Student Guidelines for Physics AP B 2013-2014 Dr. Norman J. LaFave 832-484-4577 nlafave@kleinisd.net Contact anytime during the school day

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Oct 31, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Student Guidelines for Physics AP B 20
1
3
-
20
1
4


Dr. Norman J. LaFave

832
-
484
-
4577

nlafave@kleinisd.net

Contact anytime during the school day


1.

Class Rules


1.

Follow School Rules!

2.

Respect
---

Respect your teacher and fellow students; Listen when others are pres
enting, no
disrespect, no profanity, no fighting, no negative attitudes.

3.

Responsibility
---

Complete all assignments with care and pride; Meet deadlines, bring materials
to class, take responsibility for actions.

4.

Integrity
---

Hold yourself to high ethical

and moral standards; No cheating or plagiarism, ever!


2.

Grading




Major grades are 60%
---

Tests, major labs, projects.



Daily grades are 30%
---

Quizzes, class activities, minor labs.



Other 10%
---

Homework and small assignments.


3.

Test Days

are Monday and
W
ednesday
.


4.

Tutoring




Tutoring is right after school on any day except Wednesday and PISA meeting day (to be
announced). Friday tutoring is by appointment only.


5.

Make
-
up Work




Students are responsible for seeking work and notes they may have missed for abs
ences of any
type the day they get back to class. Tests and labs are made up by appointment with the teacher.


6.

Late Work




Assignments may be turned in at any time after the due date. However, there will be a 10%
deduction in grade for each day that it is

late, up to 4 days.


7.

Second Chance




Following the three week test and six week test, students may receive tutoring within one week for
the purpose of doing test corrections by appointment. The tutoring session is a requirement to be
allowed to do the test

corrections. Upon successful completion of the test corrections, the student
will receive one
-
half of the lost credit back from the original examination.


8.

Tardiness and Passes




Students must be in their seat ready to begin lessons
before

the bell rings to

start class.




Passes are given for emergencies or at the discretion of the instructor. Take care of getting water
and going to the restroom before class begins if possible. Take care of other business before or
after school, during passing periods, or d
uring lunch when possible.


9.

Materials




Students need to obtain the following supplies for the course:


o

3 spiral notebooks

o

pencils, regular or mechanical

o

pens, blue or black

o

highlighter

o

eraser

o

50 sheets of mm division graph paper

o

colored pencils

o

tablet comp
uter




Students are responsible for bringing notebooks, paper, pencils/pens, highlighters, erasers,
textbook, lab notebook (on lab days), and tablet computer to class on a daily basis.


10.

Semester
Labs




Each semester will have at least
three

major laborator
ie
s
. The labs will be a major grade and
require a typed laboratory report that follows correct scientific method. Specific instructions for
these labs will be giv
en before the lab is conducted.


Syllabus

Course:

AP
®

Physics B


Course Overview:


The main obj
ective of the course is to develop the student’s physical intuition, creativity, problem
-
solving skills and
analytical skills in pursuit of a passing grade on the Physics B AP examination. Specifically, students should be able
to (at the time of the examin
ation):


1.

Read, understand and interpret physical information presented to them as a written document or produced
in a laboratory.

2.

Analyze a physical phenomenon or problem using the scientific method.

3.

Apply mathematical tools to the solution of physics prob
lems from the full range of unit topics.

4.

Perform laboratory investigations, interpret and analyze the data (including errors and uncertainties),
communicate results and produce reasonable conclusions based on your data and analysis.

5.

Design a laboratory to
measure a given quantity or discover a relationship between quantities.


In addition, the course is designed to give the students the study and organizational skills necessary for success in
their college programs.


The course is designed to have weekly ha
nds
-
on, open
-
ended laboratories with the laboratories structured to allow
the students to “self
-
discover” the relationships between, and properties of, physical quantities and concepts. There
is a significant laboratory design component built into the labo
ratories. Graphical methodologies are stressed in the
analysis. Students will keep a portfolio of laboratory investigation reports which will be assessed each six weeks.
Every laboratory report will include:


o

A descriptive title

o

A problem statement

o

An hypo
thesis

o

A procedure with a materials list

o

A data presentation and analysis

o

A conclusion including proper error analysis and topics for further analysis.


Students will gain an understanding of the purpose and importance of laboratory investigations in scien
ce while
developing an understanding of the methods for performing proper laboratory activities and the proper presentation
of results.


The course will have two to three major projects that require the students to apply their learned knowledge in a
creati
ve and analytical fashion. These projects require the student to combine concepts they have learned to either
solve a complex problem or engineer a device. The projects will also require the students to do library and on
-
line
research as part of the prepar
ation.


The promotion of problem solving skills using mathematical tools will be stressed throughout the course. Students
will be introduced to systematic methods for approaching physics word problems and will be expected to master the
methodology through
consistent application to the assigned problems. These problems will be assigned on a daily
basis for class work and homework.


Students are expected to keep a proper notebook using the Cornell notes technique. These notebooks will be
checked each six week
s. They are also required to keep a binder for handouts, returned work and worksheets.


Students will be encouraged to formulate study groups for peer tutoring, peer review and group projects.


Each 6 weeks grade will consist of the scores on four in
-
class
/take
-
home tests plus the laboratory notebook check
and projects (70%), and daily assignment grades and notebook check (30%).



Textbook:

Giancoli, Douglas C.,
Physics
, Prentice Hall, 1998, Fifth Edition.

Course Outline:


I. Newtonian Mechanics (12 weeks
)

Major Unit Concepts:

Week 1

A.

Laboratory Safety


Students will be knowledgeable of safety issues and procedures in the laboratory;
Students will be familiar with the location and proper operation of safety equipment.

B.

Problem Solving Methodology
; Systemati
c

Approach to Problem Solving


Students will master a
systematic process for solving numerical and algebraic problems.

C.

Laboratory Methodology
; Scientific

Method, Measurement, Analytical Thinking and Data Analysis,
Conclusions


Students will be familiar w
ith the importance of laboratory investigations in scientific
learning; Students will know and apply proper laboratory processes to the conduct of laboratory
investigations; Students will understand the correct processes for data analysis and error analysi
s;
Students will employ proper scientific method in the writing of laboratory reports.

Week 2,3

D.

Kinematics

(Ch. 2
,3
)



Displacement, Velocity and Acceleration Definitions; 1
-
D Vectors; Graphs and Tables


Students will know and understand the definitions of
displacement, velocity, and acceleration;
Students will employ these definitions for producing tables and graphs.



1
-
D Kinematics Equations


Students will employ the kinematic equations to calculate motion
in 1
-
D.

o

Lab: Inertial
Balance
--

Measure mass inde
pendently of the earth's gravitational force

o

Lab: 1
-
D Kinematics Equations (CBL)


Self
-
discovery of 1
-
D kinematics equations
using Vernier motion sensors, carts and track.



P
g
. 41
-
45: Q 1
-
19; P
5,17,25
,
29
,37, 41
,49,57



Vector Mathematics; Definition, graphi
cal form, component forms, magnitude
-
direction
forms, addition, subtraction, multiplication by a scalar, scalar products, vector products


Students will master the mathematical manipulation of vectors.

o

Lab: Force Tables and Vector Addition by Components


Use of force tables to learn
vector addition by sine/cosine law and by components.



2
-
D Kinematics; Projectiles
-

Students will employ the kinematic equations to calculate
projectile motion in 2
-
D.

o

Lab: Projectile Motion (CBL)


Use of Vernier motion senso
rs

or camera

to study
the motion of a projectile.



Pg.
70
-
7
5: Q 1
-
1
5
; P
11
,
21,23
,31,35,37,39,43

Week
4,
5

E.

Newton’s Laws of Motion

(Ch. 4)



Forces, Force Types and Free Body Diagrams


Students will be familiar with the common
types of forces and their charact
eristics; Students will be able to draw free
-
body diagrams for
given physical situations.



Newton’s First Law of Motion


Students will be able to apply Newton’s First Law to the
calculation of forces in 1
-
D and 2
-
D static situations.

o

Lab: Force Table
; Newt
on’s First Law



Newton’s Second Law of Motion
-

Students will be able to apply Newton’s First and Second
Laws to the calculation of forces and motion in 1
-
D and 2
-
D dynamic situations.

o

Demo: Newton’s Second Law

o

Lab: Atwood Machine (CBL
)
--

Demonstrate that
for a system of fixed total mass,
the ratio of the net external force to the acceleration is a constant using Vernier
motion sensors.

o

Lab: Acceleration Due to Gravity (CBL)


Measure the acceleration due to gravity
using a picket fence and Vernier photo ga
te.

o

Lab: Static and Kinetic Friction
--

Determine the difference between static and
kinetic friction between two different surfaces.

o

Lab: Air Friction (CBL)


Measure the motion of a falling coffee filter using a
Vernier motion sensor.

o

Major Lab: Rockets


Study the motion of model rockets; Altitude prediction.



Newton’s Third Law of Motion


Students will be able to identify force and reaction force
pairs in a variety of mechanical situations.

o

Lab: Newton’s Third Law Investigation (Spring scales and CBL)


Examine the
relationship of paired forces in pushing and pulling situations using spring scales and
Vernier force sensors.



Pg.
103
-
110
: Q 1
-
22
; P
7
,
21,
31,35,37
,61


Practice AP Exam


Week 6,7

F.

Circular Motion and Universal Gravitation, Oscillations

(Ch. 5)



C
ircular Motion
-

Students will understand the vector structure of uniform circular motion;
Students will be able to apply Newton’s Second Law for circular motion to determine radii
and speeds for uniform circular motion for a variety of centripetal forces.

o

Lab: Centripetal Force and Motion
--

Determine the relationship between centripetal
force and velocity.



Gravitation
-

Students will know and understand the Universal Law of Gravitation and F=mg
as a special case; Students will be able to calculate the gra
vitational force between two masses
a given distance apart; Students will be able to apply the Universal Law of Gravitation and
Newton’s Second Law for circular motion to the calculation of radii and speeds for circular
orbits.

o

Cavendish Experiment


Disco
ver the 1/R
2

form of gravitational force.



Springs and Pendulums; Hooke’s Law, Spring Oscillations, Pendulum Small Oscillations
-

Students will be able to calculate spring forces/spring constants using Hooke’s Law; Students
will be able to analyze the force
s for a simple pendulum; Students will be able to calculate the
frequency/period of small oscillations of spring systems and pendulums.

o

Lab: Hooke’s Law Experiment


Determine the relationship between the mass
hanging from the spring and the amount of stre
tch of the spring for various springs.

o

Lab: Spring Oscillations (CBL)


Determine the relationship between spring
constant, mass and the frequency of oscillations using a Vernier motion sensor.

o

Demo: Pendulum Motion (CBL)


Examine the relationship between

the bob mass
and the frequency of oscillation for small oscillations.



Pg. 138
-
143: Q 1
-
18
; P 5,1
1,17
,21,31,35
,
44
,61


Week 8,9

G.

Work, Energy, and Power

(Ch. 6)



Work and Power
-

Students will know, understand and be able to apply and calculate the
concepts o
f work and power.



Machines; Simple and Compound

o

Demo: Levers and Pulleys


Demonstrate the trade
-
off of work for force in simple
machines.



Kinetic Energy
-

Students will know, understand and be able to apply/calculate the concept of
kinetic energy.



Work En
ergy Theorem
-

Students will know and be able to apply the Work
-
energy Theorem
to the calculation of work, kinetic energy, and speed.



Potential Energy
-

Students will know, understand and be able to apply/calculate the concept
of potential energy, both gra
vitational and spring.



Conservative and Non
-
conservative Forces
-

Students will know the difference between
conservative and non
-
conservative forces.



Generalized Work Energy Theorem
-

Students will know and be able to apply the Generalized
Work
-
Energy Theo
rem to systems with non
-
conservative external forces.



Conservation of Mechanical Energy
-

Students will know, understand the criteria for, and be
able to employ the Conservation of Mechanical Energy to the calculation of motion.



Conservation of Energy
-

St
udents will know, understand, and appreciate the importance of
the Conservation of Energy.

o

Lab: Conservation of Mechanical Energy (CBL)


Examine the conversion of
gravitational potential energy/spring potential energy into kinetic energy during
motion usi
ng Vernier motion sensor.



Pg. 1
72
-
1
78
: Q 1
-
2
8; P
7,13
,27,
29,33,39
,45,
51,
53,
69

Week 10,11

H.

Momentum and Impulse

(Ch. 7)



Impulse and Impact Forces


Students will know, understand and be able to apply the concept
of impulse to physical situations with impact
forces.

o

Lab: Impulse (CBL)


Examine the relationship between impact force and change in
velocity for impacts using Vernier motion and force sensors.



Momentum


Students will know, understand and be able to calculate the concept of
momentum.



Impulse Moment
um Principle


Students will know, understand, and be able to apply the
Impulse Momentum Principle to problems with impact forces and/or mass changes.



1
-
D Collisions; Elastic and Inelastic


Students will be able to apply the conservation of
momentum and e
nergy to the calculation of 1
-
D collision results, both elastic and inelastic.

o

Lab: 1
-
D Collisions (CBL)


Examine the relationship between momenta before and
after collisions using Vernier motion sensors.



2
-
D Collisions; Elastic and Inelastic
-

Students w
ill be able to apply the conservation of
momentum and energy to the calculation of 2
-
D collision results, both elastic and inelastic.

o

Lab: 2
-
D Collisions


Examine 2
-
D Collisions and momenta before and after
collisions using air pucks.



Pg. 201
-
207: Q 1
-
20;

P 3,5,9,11,17,25
,
31,33,35,45

Week 12

I.

Rotational Kinematics and Dynamics

(Ch. 8
, 9
-
1 to 9
-
3
)



Rotational Kinematics


Students will know and understand the definitions of rotational
displacement, rotational velocity, and rotational acceleration; Students wi
ll know and be able
to apply the rotational kinematic equations to the calculation of rotational motion.



Rotational Newton’s Laws; Torque


Students will know and understand the concepts of
torque and moment of inertia; Students will know and be able to ap
ply the rotational
Newton’s Laws to the calculation of torques and rotational motion.



Rotational Work and Energy; Conservation


Students will know and understand the
rotational versions of work and kinetic energy; Students will understand how to formulate

the
total kinetic energy of an extended moving/rotating body; Students will understand how to
include rotation in conservation laws.



Angular Momentum; Conservation


Students will know and understand the concept of
angular momentum; Students will know, u
nderstand, understand the limitations of, and be
able to apply the conservation of momentum to rotation problems.

o

Major Lab/Project: Rollercoaster (CBL)


Construct a rollercoaster and
predict/measure the motion and various points along the track.

o

Lab: Rot
ational Motion (CBL)


Examine the relationship between angular speed
and radius using Vernier motion sensors.

o

Lab: Ladder Statics

o

Demo: Stability


Demonstrate the criterion for a standing object to be stable.



Pg. 233
-
239: Q 1
-
20; P
3,15,17
,23,27,31,3
3,45
,53
,69


Practice AP Exam


II. Fluid Mechanics & Thermal Physics (4 weeks)


Major Unit Concepts:



Week 13

A.

Fluid Mechanics

(Ch. 10)



Overview of Types of Fluids and Fluid Flow


Students will know and understand the types
of fluid flow and the complexities.



Density and Pressure in Fluids


Students will know, understand, and calculate the concepts
of density and pressure.



Pascal’s Principle


Students will know and understand Pascal’s Principle.



Pressure Measurement; Barometers and Gauges


Students will kno
w and understand the
methods for measuring pressure of fluids in a laboratory.



Archimedes Principle and Buoyancy


Students will know, understand, and apply Archimedes
Principle to problems involving submerged and floating objects.



Fluids in Motion; Flow R
ate, Continuity Equation, Bernoulli’s Law and Torricelli’s Principle;
Viscosity


Students will know, understand, and be able to apply Bernoulli’s Principle and the
Continuity Equation to static and moving fluid problems; Students will understand the role
of
viscosity in fluid flow problems.

o

Lab: Venturi Tube


Determine the relationship between pressure and flow rate.

o

Lab: Torricelli Bucket (CBL)


Examine Torricelli’s Principle by finding the
relationship between flow velocity from a hole in the bucket an
d the height of the
water above the hole using Vernier motion sensor.



Pg. 302
-
306: Q 1
-
2
7
; P
11,13,15,17,19,25,31,33,37,43

Week 14

B.

Temperature & Heat

(Ch. 13
,14
)



Heat and Temperature; Definitions


Students will know and understand the concepts of heat
and

temperature and the relationship between them.



Relationship Between Heat and Temperature; Calorimetry


Students will know and
understand the concept of thermal equilibrium, and its application to calorimetry for
measuring heat capacity.

o

Lab: Calorimetry
and Heat Capacity (CBL)


Find the relationship between heat
conduction and temperature change using a Vernier temperature sensor.



Heat Transfer; Conduction, Convection and Radiation


Students will know and understand
the three types of heat transfer and
how to calculate rates of heat transfer.

o

Demo: Conduction, Convection and Radiation

o

Lab: Energy, Heat and Convection


Examine the properties of heat and its transfer
by motion of matter.



Effect of Heat on Substances; Kinetic Theory and Gas Laws, Thermal E
xpansion of Solids,
Phase Changes


Students will know and understand thermal effects on various types of
matter.

o

Lab: Boyle’s Law Lab
--

Determine relationship between Pressure and Volume for a
gas.

o

Demo: Ball and Loop; Thermal Expansion of Solids



Pg.
411
-
415
: Q 1
-
2
4
; P 13,23
,31,33,35,37,39,41



Pg. 438
-
441: Q 1
-
28; P 7,15,17,25
,33,
39

Week 15,16

C.

Thermodynamics and Thermodynamic Processes

(Ch. 15)



Thermodynamic Work


Students will know, understand, and be able to calculate the concept
of thermodynamic work.



Zeroeth Law of Thermodynamics and Thermal Equilibrium


Students will know and
understand the importance of equilibrium in thermodynamic processes.



First Law of Thermodynamics and Thermodynamic Processes


Students will know,
understand and be able to appl
y the First Law of Thermodynamics to terminal and cyclic
thermodynamic processes.



Second Law of Thermodynamics and Process Direction
-

Students will know, understand and
be able to apply the Second Law of Thermodynamics to terminal and cyclic thermodynamic

processes.



P
-
V Diagrams and Thermodynamic Processes (equilibrium); Isobaric, Isochoric, Isothermal
and Adiabatic
-

Students will be able to represent thermodynamic processes on P
-
V diagrams
and employ it to thermodynamic process problems.



Heat Engines and

Cyclic Processes; Efficiency


Students will know and understand some
common thermodynamic engines and their cycles; Students will be able to calculate the
efficiency of these cycles.

o

Demo: Steam Engine and Hero’s Engine Operation

o

Pg. 471
-
415: Q 1
-
22; P
1
,3,5,7,9,11,13,17,21,25,31,35,37,39,41



III. Electricity & Magnetism (8 weeks)


Major Unit Concepts:



Week 17

A.

Electrostatics, Conduction, Induction

(Ch.16, 1
-
4)



Induction, Conduction and Charge Motion


Students will know and understand the motion
and i
nteraction of charges during conduction and induction processes.

o

Lab: Electroscope


Examine conduction and induction of charges.

o

Demo: Van de Graf Generator

B.

Electric Fields and Forces

(Ch. 16, 5
-
9)



Electric Field; Definition; Gauss’s Law


Students will k
now, understand, and be able to
calculate the electric field for systems of point charges; Students will know, understand, and
be able to apply Gauss’s Law to the calculation of electric fields for charge distributions.



Electric Force


Students will know,

understand, and be able to calculate electric forces on
charges from the electric field.



Electric Potential and Equipotential Lines
-

Students will know, understand, and be able to
calculate electric potential and equipotential lines for a given set of po
int charges.

o

Major Lab: Electric Field and Equipotential Line Mapping
--

Create the Electric
Field Patterns and Equipotential line Patterns for various configurations and
compare.



Pg. 496
-
499: Q 1
-
21
; P
1,3,11,13,15,17,19,29,33,
39

Week 18

C.

Capacitors

(Ch. 1
7)



Charging/Discharging Capacitors


Students will know and understand the operation of
capacitors in circuits; Students will be able to calculate the charge on a capacitor for a given
voltage.



Dielectrics


Students will understand the effect of a dielect
ric on the capacitance of a
capacitor.



Capacitors in Series


Students will be able to calculate the total capacitance of capacitors in
series.



Capacitors in Parallel
-

Students will be able to calculate the total capacitance of capacitors in
parallel.



Ene
rgy Stored in Capacitors


Students will know how energy is stored in a capacitor and
how to calculate it.



Pg. 522
-
525: Q 1
-
15
; P
3,5
,9,17,19,21,31
,39,41
,49


Practice AP Exam


Week 19,20

D.

Ohm’s Law and Electric Circuits

(Ch. 18
,19
)



Resistivity


Students wi
ll know how the resistance of a resistor is calculated.



Microscopic View of Current


Students will understand the statistical basis of the definition
of current.



Ohm’s Law


Students will know, understand and be able to apply the relationship between
volt
age, current, and resistance for a resistive device.

o

Lab: Resitivity and Resistance


Discover the factors that effect resistance and the
relationship between voltage, current and resistance; resistance in series and parallel.



Electric Circuits; Resistance
s/Batteries in Series and Parallel


Students will be able to reduce
and analyze a simple circuit.

o

Lab: Kirchhoff’s Rules (CBL)
--

Discover Kirchhoff’s Junction and Loop Rules
using the Vernier Voltage and Current sensors.

o

Lab: Resistances in Series and Pa
rallel


Find the relations for reducing groups of
resistors in both series and parallel configurations.



Power in Circuits


Students will be able to calculate the power generated/lost in a circuit.



Reducing Complex Circuits
-

Students will be able to redu
ce and analyze a complex circuit
using Kirchhoff’s Rules.

o

Major Lab: Build a circuit to periodically turn a light bulb on and off.



RC Circuits


Students will be able to determine the behavior of simple RC circuits.

o

Lab: RC Circuits
--

Determine the relati
onship between resistance, capacitance, and
the time constant of an RC Circuit.



Pg. 5
50
-
5
53
: Q 1
-
1
8
; P
7,9,
11,
13,15,17
,21,31
,
35,39



Pg. 579
-
584: Q 1
-
23; P 5,7,15,17,21,
29,35,
43,45,49

Week 21,22

E.

Magnetostatics

(Ch. 20)



Magnetic Fields; Current Carrying Wire,

Magnet; Amperes Law


Students will understand
the concept of a magnetic field and be able to calculate it for moving charges and systems of
current
-
carrying wire.

o

Lab: Magnetic Field of a Slinky (CBL)
--

Determine the relationship between the
magnetic fi
eld strength and the radial distance using the Vernier magnetic field
sensor and a compass.



Magnetic Force on Charges and Current
-
Carrying Wires; Vector Products


Students will be
able to calculate magnetic force on moving charges and current
-
carrying wir
es.

o

Demo: Magnetic Force Accelerator



Electric Motors


Students will understand the role of magnetic force in electric motors.



Pg.
614
-
619
: Q 1
-
30
; P 3,5,7,9,11,13,15,17,25,27,29,31,33,35

Week 23,24

F.

Magnetodynamics and Electromagnetism

(Ch. 21)



Faraday’s L
aw


Students will know, understand, and be able to apply Faraday’s Law to
calculate the induction of electromotive force in a wire loop.



Lenz’s Law
-

Students will know, understand, and be able to apply Lenz’s law to calculate the
direction of induced cur
rents in a wire loop.

o

Demo: Oersted Effect


Demonstrate that changes in a current cause the production
of a magnetic field.



Electric Generator
-

Students will understand the role of magnetic induction in electric
generators.



Electromagnetic Waves


Studen
ts will understand the field structure of an electromagnetic
wave and how it gives the waves their properties.



RCL Circuits


Students will know and understand the characteristics of a basic RCL circuit.



Pg.
652
-
619: Q 1
-
19
; P
1
,
3,5,7,9,11,13,15,17,31,33,3
9


Practice AP Exam


IV. Waves, Sound & Optics (4 weeks)


Major Unit Concepts:


Week 25,26


A. Waves and Sound

(Ch. 11,12)



Types of Waves; Examples


Students will know the two types of waves and their
characteristics.



Traveling Waves; Frequency, Period,
Wavelength and Speed; Displacement Formula;
Reflection


Students will know, understand, and be able to calculate the concepts of
frequency, wavelength, period, amplitude, and phase; Students will know, understand and be
able to determine the basic behavio
rs/characteristics of waves; Students will know and be able
to apply relationships between the basic characteristics of waves.

o

Lab: Speed of Sound (CBL)


Measure the speed of sound in air using the Vernier
sound probe.



Standing Waves; Resonance (Fundament
al, Harmonics); Open/Closed
-
End Pipes and Strings


Students will know, understand, and be able to calculate the fundamental and harmonics of
strings and open/closed
-
end pipes.



Sound Intensity; Decibels


Students will understand be able to express the lou
dness of a
sound in decibels.



Doppler Effect

o

Lab: Doppler Effect (CBL) Examine the Doppler Effect for moving sources and
detectors using Vernier sound probe.



Superposition; Constructive/Destructive Interference; Consonance (Intervals) and Dissonance
(Beats
); Spectrum


Students will understand the concepts of constructive and destructive
interference and its role in consonance, dissonance, spectrum, and musical intervals; Students
will know how the harmonic spectrum determines the sound character of a give
type of
musical instrument; Students will know how to calculate pipe lengths for a given
frequency/wavelength and the opposite, musical intervals, and beats.

o

Lab: Sound Waves and Beats (CBL)


Use Vernier sound probe to examine wave
form/spectrum of musica
l instruments; investigate the wave pattern of different
frequency tuning forks and the beat pattern they create.

Week 27


B. Physical Optics & Light

(Ch. 24)



Light Waves; Frequency/Wavelength/Speed of Light; Dispersion


Students should know,
understand,

and be able to calculate frequency, period, wavelength and speed for light;
Students should know and understand the concept of dispersion.



Color and Color Mixing


Students should understand the relationship between frequency and
color; Students should un
derstand the mechanisms for mixing colors and the difference for
mixing light and mixing paint.



Light Intensity; Luminous Flux, Luminance


Students will understand and be able to
calculate the intensity and flux of light.



Polarization


Students will know

and understand the mechanism of light polarization and its
relation to the fields of the light.



Diffraction and Interference


Students will know and understand the concepts of diffraction
and interference of light; Students will be able to calculate two
slit interference patterns and
thin film interference.

o

Demo/Lab: Diffraction/Two
-
Slit Interference


Determine wavelength using a
diffraction grating pattern/two
-
slit interference pattern.

o

Lab/Demo: Thin Film Interference and Newton’s Rings

Week 28

D.

Geometr
ic Optics

(Ch.

23
)



Ray Tracing


Students will know how to trace a beam of light interacting with optics.



Reflection


Students will know, understand, and be able to apply the law of reflection.

o

Lab: Reflection


Determine the Law of Reflection for planar
mirrors.



Speed of Light in Vacuum and Other Media



Refraction; Snell’s Law; Critical Angle
-



Students will know, understand, and be able to
apply Snell’s Law for refraction; Students will know how to calculate the critical angle for a
media interface and
its application in fiber optics.

o

Lab: Snell’s Law Lab
--

Determine the index of refraction/critical angle of various
transparent substances using ray box.



Mirrors and Lenses; Types; Ray Diagrams; Mirror
-
Lens Equation, Magnification, Mirror
-
Lens Formula


S
tudents will know how to make ray diagrams for various optical
arrangements of mirrors and lenses; Students will be able to calculate the
location/orientation/magnification of objects/images from simple optical arrangements.

o

Lab: Ray Tracing for Mirrors an
d Lenses


Use of ray box to trace the rays for
planar, circular concave, circular convex, and parabolic mirrors/convex and concave
lenses/glasses/compound lens system.


V. Atomic & Nuclear Physics (2 weeks)



Major Unit Concepts:



Week 29

A.

Quantum Mechan
ics

(Ch. 27)



Basic Principles


Discrete Properties, Probabilistic States, Wave/Particle Duality; Heisenberg
Uncertainty


Students will know and understand the aspects of quantum mechanics that
make it different than classical mechanics; Students will kno
w and understand how these
properties manifest themselves in atomic models.



Important Experiments


Planck Quanta, Photoelectric Effect, Rutherford Gold Foil
Experiment, Compton Scattering, Bohr Spectra
, Davisson
-
Germer Experiment



Students will
know and

understand the seminal experiments in the development of quantum theory.

o

Demo: Canal Ray Tube

B.

Atomic Physics

(Ch. 28)



Atomic Models


Dalton, Thomson/Plum Pudding, Rutherford, Bohr, Schrodinger


Students
will know and understand the evolution of atomic m
odels based on theory and experiment.



The Modern Atom


Students will know the characteristics of the Schrodinger atom.

C.

Nuclear Physics

(Ch. 30)



Types of Radioactivity; Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Neutrons


Students will know the basic types
of radiation and the
nuclear reactions that cause them.

Students will be able to balance nuclear
reactions.



Radioactivity Dynamics; Half
-
Life


Students will know how radioactive decays occur and be
able to calculate the decay rate and half
-
life.

o

Lab: Geiger Counter Examinatio
n of Nuclear Samples

Week 30 (?)

D.

Special Relativity (Extra Topic)

(Ch. 26)



Basic Postulates
--

Constancy of Speed of Light in Vacuum; Physics the Same in All Inertial
Frames, Lorentz Transformations


Students will know and understand the basic precepts of

special and general relativity.



Spacetime Effects


Distortions Observed by Stationary Observers of Moving Quantities;
Time Dilation, Length Contraction, Mass Increase


Students will know, understand, and be
able to calculate the effects of special relat
ivity on fast
-
moving objects.

o

Major Lab
: Boat Project (End of Year Major Project when time allows)
--

Build a
boat made of cardboard that will hold 3 lab partners and can be rowed across the
swimming pool.


Practice AP Exam


Review for AP Test:

o

Practice Pr
oblems

o

Practice Multiple Choice

o

Test Strategies

o

Practice Exams and Analysis

o

Refresher Review of Difficult Material