CURRICULUM OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.Sc.) PROGRAMME IN MECHATRONICS

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Oct 31, 2013 (4 years and 12 days ago)

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CURRICULUM OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.Sc.)
PROGRAMME IN MECHATRONICS


Ewald
MACHA, Jaroslav BERAN, Riza GÜRBÜZ, Vytautas BUČINSKAS







Opole University of Technology

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

Department of Mechanics an
d Machine Design







Opole, Poland, November 2009



2






Author
s:


Prof. Ewald MACHA, Opole University of Technology, Opole, Poland


Prof.

Jaroslav BERAN, Technical University of Liberec, Czech Republic


Prof.

Riza GÜRBÜ
Z, Cankiri Karatekin University
,

Turkey


Prof. Vytautas BUČ
INSKAS, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Lithuania





With the support of the Commission of the European Communities under
the Leonardo
da Vinci Programme


Project
UPT
R
ONIC
.




The Polish Programme Agency does not held responsibi
lity for any part of this
publication.




























3

Mechatronics engineering degree programmes and courses have been rapidly
increasing in many higher
-
education institutions in various countries around the world
(Kaynak, 1996; Isermann, 1997;
Acar, 1997; Habib, 2004; Harashima, 2005



after Habib,
2008
). The most common features that describe these degrees programmes are simply
collecting and gluing together components of mechanical, electronics and computer without
establishing the coherent th
eme and identity. The most common pattern of such degree
programmes is that the Mechatronics courses have their origin in mechanical engineering.
Courses in electrical engineering, computer science, material, and control engineering have
been added to/or i
ntegrated with the currently available mechanical engineering curriculums.


However, Mechatronics curriculum and the associated courses should emphasise a
balance of the content between technology, methodology, and knowledge of theoretical
science

(Habib 2
008)
. The degree programme should not focus only on the design process and
building up practical skills and neglect the potential role of the scientific issues along with the
associated theories.
Thus
, the students need to increase concurrently their under
standing and
knowledge of basic engineering knowledge and theories that help to
enhance innovative

design

skills. This implies that, to a reasonable extent, the students should work with real
industrial product development design cases in which the learnin
g activity is organised in a
form similar to professional industrial product development. Going beyond the team
-
based
systems approach to design, the Mechatronics engineer must be individually competent in
multiple interdisciplinary areas: physical and
mat
hematical

modelling, analysis, control
design and implementation, and experimentation and hardware implementation. Industrial
demand for Mechatronics engineers who understand computer, measurements, and
mechanical systems as well as their interactions is h
igh and continues to grow.



An excellent understanding of the basic technologies forms the foundation for
Mechatronics design. However, system design and integration, teamwork, and creativity are
highly important issues for successful product design and i
nnovation. To attract and retain a
new generation of learners, engineering curricula need to be renovated and associated with
innovation to optimise
the process of building up persistently knowledge and skills that are
relevant to today and modern technolo
gies. High on the list are Mechatronics engineering
knowledge, thinking and practical skills that span and go across multiple disciplines. As a
background for formulating the aims and objectives for a Mechatronics degree programme,
one should consider the
balance between technology, design methodology (synthesis and
analys
is), theoretical science, practical engineering developing team
, and individual skills,
and reliable assessment of students learning performance.


The growing demand for Mechatronical des
ign innovation to enable empowerment
of
developing communities requires new and creative educational initiatives. Any curriculum
related to an engineering degree programme should be designed to fulfil the accreditation
requirements to assure that a program
me has met quality standards set by the profession, and
signifies adequate preparation for entry into

the profession.



Accordingly and based on
the presented vision

by Habib, 2008
,
t
he desired outcome of
the curriculum development effort will be engineers

who are educated in the theories,
principles and applications of Mechatronics while improving their competencies in innovative
thinking, communication skills, teamwork, leadership, and project management.





4

Mechatronics engineering education should focus

to produce engineers, who can,

1.

Work in a
high
-
technology environment, and emphasise on real
-
world hands
-
on
experience.

2.

Engage challenging problems, complex tasks, and situations with initiative, innovation
and
enthusiasm
.

3.

Reason
effectively
, accurately, a
nd creatively from an integrated, flexible, usable
knowledge base.

4.

Have skills of free enquiry and be able to solve complex and large
-
scale problems
from a systems perspective.

5.

Promote interest in lifelong learning in practicing engineers with ability to m
onitor
and assess their own adequacy in knowledge and skills to achieve a desirable outcome
given a challenge.

6.

Carry out subject
-
specific and interdisciplinary projects, and collaborate effectively as
a m
ember of a team across disciplines on Mechatronics p
rojects. The area of
Mechatronics provides an excellent basis for the meaningful integration of
applications across different disciplines.

7.

Have confidence to take responsibility in making decisions throughout the
development process of new products and pro
jects.

8.

Address industrial and end
-
user needs and be knowledgeable of computer and
information tools used in industry
.

9.

Have competence in communication, teamwork, and project management with
essential managerial
personal
skills needed to design and produce
modern day
Mechatronic products, processes and systems, and build up confidence in negotiation
and presentation.


To support the process that can achieve such requirements and enhance the outcomes, the
following issues must be considered:

1.

Provide enriched
degree programmes with modified curricula and high technology
laboratory facilities, software, networking, and other supporting tools.

2.

Create an integrated degree programme, rather than teach courses as separate entities.

3.

Develop degree programme that teac
hes engineering as knowledge and practical skills
while building up communication and teamwork skills.

4.

Carefully balance skill
-
preparation with solid concept and engineering science
learning process. This requires to have suitable medium for mixing theory
with
practical training.

5.

Teach principles and ensure learning of engineering knowledge while emphasising on
lifelong learning.

6.


Assure that engineering education keeps side by side with technological
developments to produce engineers who are able to use kn
owledge and skills to create,
operate or maintain efficient machines, systems and processes.


Mechatronics engineers may be employed as leading engineers in a wide range of industries
and project areas of jobs involving, but not limited to, the following.

1.

Play a major role in the design process of a wide range of systems, devices,
equipment, robots, etc.

2.

Design, and lead to develop intelligent product, for example ‘smart’ cars and
automation for household, office, entertainment, transportation and industri
al
applications, and other services.

3.

Industrial automation and control engineer to plan, design, and schedule factory
automation
.


5

4.

Design, implement, and maintain data acquisition instrumentation and computerised
machine tools.

5.

Design and implement self
-
dia
gnostic intelligent machines that detect, fix and repo0rt
any problems on their own.

6.

Biomedical devices such as life
-
support systems, scanners, DNA sequencing
automation, testing, diagnoses, rehabilitation systems, monitoring, and microsurgery
equipment.

7.

D
esign, implement and use robots (industrial, service and intelligent personal robots)
including that for space, sea/underwater, medical, mining exploration equipment, etc.

8.

Design, implement and supervise the development of smart domestic consumer goods,
su
ch as VCRs, cameras, washing machines and dishwashers, air conditioners,
microwaves, etc.

9.

Develop and supervise remotely controlled systems over the vast distances and enable
telecooperation among the people and machines supported by information, multimedi
a
and communication technologies.

10.

Supervise the process from the design to the integration of all forms of transport
vehicles.

11.

Automation and control in petrochemical, chemical and biotechnology industries.

12.

Making machines and putting intelligence into the
m.

13.

Develop computer software for real
-
time control industries.

14.

Design, model, evaluate, identify and control computer integrated manufacturing
systems.

15.

Design, implement, integrate, and use monitoring security systems.


The foundational and core knowledge
that are necessary for preparing and featuring the
graduate of Mechatronics engineering degree progr
amme are highlighted in Table 1

and Table
2
.


The structure of curricula is based on education standards set out by the Polish Ministry of
Science and Highe
r Education in the Act of 12.07.2007 and on the following assumptions:


1.

Studies of the 1
st

level last 7 semesters.

2.

Number of hours is 2610.

3.

Required no. of ECTS points 210.

4.

Recommended duration of student placement

in
enterprises
: 4 weeks.

5.

Curricula shoul
d contain no less than 60 hrs of humanistic subjects .

6.

At least 50% of the programme should be composed of
classes, laboratory classes
,
projects and seminars.

7.

Students are obliged to pass 4 out of 8 offered
facultative
subjects.













6

Tab. 1
Programme

structure of 3.5 years B.Sc, Full
-
time studies (W
-
lecture
s
, C
-
c
lasses
,

L
-
laboratory classes, P
-
projects
, S
-
seminar
s
)


No.

Subject Name

Seme
-

ster

Total

h
rs

W

h
rs

C

h
rs

L

h
rs

P

h
rs

S

h
rs

ECTS

points

A


Comprehensive subjects


A
1


Physical Exercise
-

Sp
ort

3,4

60


60




2

A
2


Foreign Language
-
English

3,4,5,6

120



120



5

A3


Intellectual Property
Rights

7

15

15





1

A4


Ergonomics and
Safety in Industry

7

30

30





2

A5

Management and
Organization of
Labour

7

30

15

15




2

A6


Economy and
Marketin
g

7

30

30





2

A7

Law in Economy

7

30

30





2

B


Basic subjects


B1

Mathematics









B
1.1

Algebra
and
Geometry

1

75

45

30




5

B1.2

Mathematical Analysis

Differential and
Integral Calculus

1

1

60

60

30

30

30

30




5

5

B1.3

B1.4

Theor
y
of
Probability
and
Statistics

2

60

30

30




5

B2

Physics









B2.1

Applied Physics I

1

30

30





3

B2.2

Applied Physics II

2

45

15


30



4

B3

Materials Science

2

90

60


30



8

B4


Smart Materials and
Nanotechnology

3,4

45

30


15



3

B5


Automa
tics, Robotics
and Control Theory









B5.1


Fundamentals of
Automatics

3

60

30


30



4

B5.2


Manipulators and
Industrial Robots

5

30

15


15



2

B5.3

Control Theory

4

60

30

30




4

B5.4

Digital Control

5

30

15


15



3

B6

Information
T
echnology

1

45

15


30



4

C


Engineering subjects


C1

Fundamentals of
Mechatronics

3

60

30

15

15



4

C2

Mechanics and
Strength of Materials









C2.1

Mechanics I
-

Static
s

1

30

15

15




3

C2.2

Mechanics II
-

Kinematics and
Dynamics

2

60

30

30




5


7

No.

Subject
Name

Seme
-

ster

Total

hrs

W

hrs

C

hrs

L

hrs

P

hrs

S

hrs

ECTS

points

C2.3

Strength of Materials

3,4

75

30

30

15



5

C2.4

Computer Methods in
Mechanics

5

45

15


30



3

C2.5

Fluid Mechanics

3

30

15

15




3

C
3

Machine Design and
Engineering Graphics









C
3.1

Geometry and
Graphics

1

60

30

15

15



5

C3.2

Basics of Machine
Design

3,4

75

30

15


30


5

C3.3

Theory of
Mechanisms


4

60

30

30




4

C3.4

Hydraulics and
Pneumatics

5

30

15


15



2

C4

Manufacturing
Engineering









C4.1

Manufacturing
Process
es

2

45

30


15



3

C4.2


C5



C5.1

CAM


Computer
Aided Manufacturing

Electrical
Engineering and
Electronics

Electrical
Engineering and
Circuits

5





2

30





60

15





30






15

15





15



2





5

C5.2

Electrical Drives and
Electrical Machines

3,4

45

30


15



4

C5.3

Analogue Electronics

4

30

15


15



3

C5.4

Digital Electronics

5

60

30


30



4

C6

Information
Technology and CAD
in Mechatronics









C6.1

Computer
Programming

4

45

15


30



4

C6.2

Communication
Protocols and
Computer
Networking

3

3
0

15


15



3

C6.3

Interactive Modelling
and Simulation

4

45

15


30



4

C6.4

LabVIEW in
Mechatronics
Systems

6

60

30


30



4

C6.5

Microprocessors
Programming

5

30

15


15



2

C7

Metrology and
Measurement
Systems









C7.1

Measurement
Technology

3

30

15

15




2

C7.2

Sensors and
Measuring
Techniques

4

60

30


30



4

C7.3

Diagnostics and
Vibroacoustics

6

30

15


15



3


8

No.

Subject Name

Seme
-

ster

Total

hrs

W

hrs

C

hrs

L

hrs

P

hrs

S

hrs

ECTS

points

C8

Mechatronics in
Vehicles

6

60

30


30



4

C9

Embedde
d Systems
and Microcontrollers

6

30

15


15



3

C10

Telemetric Systems
and Remote Control

6

30

15


15



3

C11

Identification of
Engineering Systems

5

30

15


15



3

C12

Reliability of
Mechatronic Systems

7

30

30





3

C13

Mechatronics Project

6

30




30


3

C14

Diploma Seminar

7

30





30

3

C15

B.Sc. Thesis

7







15


D


Facultative subjects


D1

Signal Processing

5

60

30


30



4

D2

FEM


Finite
Element Method

5

60

30


30



4

D3

Design of Hydraulic
and Pneumatic
Devices

6

60

30


30



4

D4

Contro
ller
Programming

6

60

30


30



4

D5

CAD and CAM

5

60

30


30



4

D6

CATIA in Design

6

60

30


30



4

D7

Industrial Data Buses

5

60

30


30



4

D8

Material Selection in
Engineering Design

6

60

30


30



4

Total

1
-
7

2610

1260

420

840

60


30

210

S1

Semester

1

360

195

120

45



30

S2

Semester

2

360

195

7
5

90



30

S3

Semester

3

435

225

120

90



30

S4

Semester

4

435

135

90

180

30


30

S5

Semester

5

435

195


240



30

S6

Semester

6

390

165


195

30


30

S7

Semester

7

195

150

15



30

30




.












9

Tab. 2 Di
vision of subjects into semesters

SEMESTER I



Hrs


ECTS points

No.

Subject Name

Total

W

C

L

P

S

W

C

L

P

S

1.1. (B1.1)

Algebra and
Geometry

75

45

30




3

2




1.2 (B1.2)

Mathematical
Analysis

60

30

30




2.5

2.5




1.3 (B1.3)

Differential and
Integral
Calculus

60

30

30




2.5

2.5




1.4 (B2.1)

Applied Physics

I

30

30





3





1.5
(
B6)

Information
Technology

45

15


30



1.5


2.5



1.6 (C2.1)

Mechanics I
-

Statics

30

15

15




1.5

1.5




1.7 (C3.1)

Geometry and
Graphics

60

30

15

15



2

1.5

1.5



Tota
l

360

195

120

45



30

SEMESTER II




2.1 (B1.4)

Theory of
Probability and
Statistics

60

30

30




2.5

2.5




2.2

(B2.2)

Applied Physics II

45

15


30



1


3



2.3 (B3)

Materials Science

90

60


30



5


3



2.4 (C2.2)

Mechanics II


Kinematics and
Dynami
cs

60

30

30




2.5

2.5




2.5 (C4.1)

Manufacturing
Processes

45

30


15



2


1



2.6 (C5.1)

Electrical
Engineering and
Circuits

60

30

15

15



2

1.5

1.5



Total

360

195

75

90



30


SEMESTER III




3.1 (A1)

Physical Exercises


Sport

30


30





1




3
.
2
. (A2)

Foreign Language


English

30



30





1



3.3 (B4)

Smart Materials and
Nanotechnology

30

30





2





3.4 (B5.1)

Fundamentals of
Automatics

60

30


30



2


2



3.5 (C1)

Fundamentals of
Mechatronics

60

30

15

15



2

1

1



3.6 (C2.3)

Strength of
M
aterials

60

30

30




2

2




3.7 (C2.5)

Fluid
Mechanics

30

15

15




1.5

1.5




3.8 (C3.2)

Basics of Machine
Design

45

30

15




2

1




3.9 (C5.2)

Electrical Drives
and Electrical
Machines

30

30





3





3.11 (C7.1)

Measurement
Technology

30

15

15




1

1




Total

435

225

120

90



30


10


SEMESTER IV


Hrs


ECTS points

No.

Subject Name

Total

W

C

L

P

S

W

C

L

P

S

4.1 (A1)

Physical Exercises
-

Sport

30

30






1




4.
2 (A2)

Foreign Language


English

30



30





1



4.3 (B4)

Smart Materials and
Nanotechnolog
y

15



15





1



4.4

(B5.3)

Control Theory

60

30

30




2

2




4.5 (C2.3)

Strength of
Materials

15



15





1



4.6

(C3.2)

Basics of Machine
Design

30




30





2


4.7 (C3.3)

Theory of
Mechanisms

60

30

30




2

2




4.8 (C5.2)

Electrical Drives
and Ele
ctrical
Machines

15



15





1



4.9 (C5.3)

Analogue
Electronics

30

15


15



1.5


1.5



4.10 (C6.1)

Computer
Programming

45

15


30



1


3



4.11 (C6.3)

Interactive
Modelling and
Simulation

45

15


30



1


3



4.12 (C7.2)

Sensors and
Measuring
Techniques

60

30


30



2


2




Total


435


135


90


180


30



30


SEMESTER V

5.1 (A2)

Foreign Language

-

English


30



30





1



5.2 (B5.2)

Manipulators and
Industrial Robots

30

15


15



1


1



5.3 (B5.4)

Digital Control

30

15


15



1.5


1.5



5.4 (C2.4)

Comp
uter Methods
in Mechanics

45

15


30



1


2



5.5 (C3.4)

Hydraulics and
Pneumatics

30

15


15



1


1



5.6 (C4.2)

CAM


Computer
Aided
Manufacturing

30

15


15



1


1



5.7 (C5.4)

Digital Electronics

60

30


30



2


2



5.8 (C6.5)

Microprocessors
Programmi
ng

30

15


15



1


1



5.9 (C11)

Identification of
Engineering
Systems

30

15


15



1.5


1.5



5.10
(D1,D2,D5
or D7)

Facultative Subject I

60

30


30



2


2



5.11 (D1,
D2, D5 or
D7)

Facultative Subject
II

60

30


30



2


2



Total

435

195


240


30


11


SEMES
TER VI


Hrs


ECTS points

No.

Subject Name

Total

W

C

L

P

S

W

C

L

P

S

6.1


(A2)

Foreign Language
-

English

30



30





2



6.2 (C6.4)

LabVIEW in
Mechatronics

60

30


30



2


2



6.3 (C7.3)

Diagnostics and
Vibroacoustics

30

15


15



1.5


1.5



6.4


(C8)

M
echatronics in
Vehicles

60

30


30



2


2



6.5

(C9)

Embedded Systems

and
Microcontrollers

30

15


15



1.5


1.5



6.6

(C10)

Telemetric Systems

and Remote Control

30

15


15



1.5


1.5



6.7

(C13)

Mechatronics
Project

30




30





3


6.8 (D3, D4,
D6 or D
8)

Facultative Subject
III

60

30


30



2


2



6.9 (D3, D4,
D6 or D8)

Facultative Subject
IV

60

30


30



2


2




Total


390


165



195


30



30


SEMESTER VII


7.1 (A3)

Intellectual Property
Rights

15

15





1





7.2 (A4)

Ergonomics and
Safety in Indus
try

30

30





2





7.3 (A5)

Management and
Organization of
Labour

30

15

15




1

1




7.4 (A6)

Economy and
Marketing

30

30





2





7.5 (A7)

Law in Economy

30

30





2





7.6 (C12)

Reliability of
Mechatronic
Systems

30

30





3





7.7 (C14)

Diploma

Seminar

30





30





3

7.8 (C15)

B.Sc. Thesis










15



Total


195


150


15




30


30














12


References
:


Kaynak, O. (1996) ‘A new perspective on engineering education in mechatronics age’,
Proceedings of FIE 1996 Conference, Session 8b4:


M
echatronics Education, p.319.

Isermann, R. (1997) ‘Mechatronics systems


a challenge for control engineering’,
Proceedings of the American Control Conference
, pp. 2617
-
2632.

Acar, M. (1997) ‘Mechatronics challenges for the higher education world’,
IEEE
Tr
ansactions on Components, Packaging, and Manufacturing Technology


Part C,
Vol. 20, No. 1, pp 14
-
20.

Habib, M.K. (2004) ‘The challenge of mechatronics engineering discipline’,
Proceedings of
the 4
th

International Conference on Advanced Mechatronics (ICAM04)
, Asahikawa
-
Japan, pp.505
-
510.

Harashima, F. (2005) ‘Human adaptive mechatronics’,
Proceedings of the 10
th

IEEE
International Conference on Emergine Technologies and Factory Automation
, Italy.

Habi
b, M.K. (2008) ‘Interdisciplinary Mechatronics engineering and science: problem
-
solving, creative thinking and concurrent design synergy’, Int. J. Mechatronics and
Manufacturing Systems, Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 4
-
22.

Transfer of Innovation to the Interdisciplin
ary Teaching of Mechatronics for the Advanced
Technology Needs
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