COURSE DESCRIPTION GUIDE

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Nov 13, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Vision

Heritage Hills High School will educate all students through challenging learning experiences enabling
them to become successful and productive citizens.















COURSE DESCRIPTION GUIDE






Revised February 2012


2




TABLE OF CONTENTS



Mission

Statement ………………………………………………………………………………..



3

Nondiscrimination Statement……………………………………………………………………..


3

Scheduling policies……………………………………………………………………………….



4



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Agriculture………………………

……………………………………………
……
….


5

Business Technolog
y Education..........................................
.........................…………
..


7


English Language Arts.....................................................
.......................……………




9



Family and Consumer Sciences
............................................
...
.................……………
.


11




Fine Arts




Visual Art …………
…………………………………………………………
.



13




Vocal Music…
………………………………………………………………..



13




Instrumental Music ……………………………………
……………
………..


13




T
heatre ………………
………………………………………………………..


15



Health And Wellness and Physical Education ………….....
....................…………….
.


15




Mathematics .......................................................................
...................
.………………


16

Science .............................................................................
.
.....................……………….


18



Social Studies ...................................................................
.
.....................……………….


20





Engineering and
T
echnology
E
ducation....................................................
…………….


21



World Languages
………………………………………………………………………


23




Multidisciplinary Elective...................................................
..
.
................……………….


23




Interdisciplinary Cooperative Edu
c
a
tion……………………………………………….


25




Vocatio
na
l
Classes……..
………………………………………………………………..


25









A course title that is preceded by an asterisk (*)
is a one
-
semester course.



A course title that is followed by the word ‘odd’ indicates the class is taught during school years beginning with an
odd number.


A course title that is followed by the word ‘even’ indicates the class is taught during school y
ears beginning with an
even number.


3

HERITAGE HILLS MISSION STATEMENT



The school community of Heritage Hills pledges the following:



To provide a positive, safe environment



To provide programs and activities that meet the needs of all students



To
encourage all students to aspire to excellence



To encourage all students to think critically and be creative problem solvers



To teach the social and educational skills necessary to become productive citizens and life
-
long learners


To this mission we
commit our resources.

Purpose

The primary purpose of Heritage Hills High School is to educate, challenge, and prepare all students to become life
-
long learners
and responsible citizens. The opportunities and challenges presented while attending Heritage H
ills High School will enable
students to achieve their goals.


HERITAGE HILLS HIGH SCHOOL


We are proud to have you as one of our students. Our school mission is based on the premise that all students are entitled t
o the
very best education possible.

We believe in you, and we believe you want and need the school experiences which will enable you to
learn, grow, and be successful in reaching future goals.



For your consideration, the courses are listed with a brief description. Should you have

a question about any course, conta
ct your
counselor immediately.
The courses in each department are of varying degrees of difficulty and are designed to help you in developing
your interests, needs, and abilities.



ADMINISTRATION


Nick Al
corn


Principal


Jeff Cochren


Assistant Principal




GUIDANCE


Kathy Wilmes

Counselor


Todd Wilkerson

Education and Career Services Coordinator


Connie Lynam

Guidance Secretary



NONDISCRIMINATION
STATEMENT


All courses at Heritage Hills Junior/Senior High School are open to all students regardless of age, race, color, national ori
gin, sex, and
handicapped condition.


Educational services, programs, instruction, and facilities will not be denied to anyone in Heritage Hills High School as the

result of
his or her age, race, color, national origin, sex, or handicapped condition. For further information, clarification, or

complaint, please
contact the following person:


Title IX Coordinator

Section 504 Coordinator

Ben Lawalin

North Spencer County School Corporation

Lincoln City, Indiana 47552

(812) 544
-
2929



4

SCHEDULING POLICIES

Heritage Hills High School has seven class pe
riods per day. Each student must select a minimum of six subjects each semester.
Students are encouraged to take advantage of the opportunities available by selecting seven classes each semester. Those stu
dents
selecting only six classes will be assig
ned to a study hall to complete their schedule.


A schedule change may be made under the following circumstances:


1. Need of a class previously failed


2. Time schedule does not allow the class


3. With a teacher recommendation for

dropping a class


4. Scheduling error


STUDENT REQUESTS FOR SCHEDULE CHANGES MUST BE PRESENTED PRIOR TO THE START OF
EACH SEMESTER
OR NO LATER THAN
THE FIRST FIVE DAYS OF THE SEMESTER.

Since a student's subjects are selected after the student, the

parents, and counselor have agreed, there should be few instances when it beco
mes necessary to drop a course.

In any case, this may
be done only after consultation with the

teacher,
counselor and the parent and a
pproval of the administration.
A teacher
re
commendation may be honored to remove a student from class after following procedures as outlined by the administration.
A
student may be withdrawn from class for disciplinary reasons, excessive tardies, or absences. Under such circumstances the s
tudent
will receive an "F" and be placed in a study hall


A student enrolled in physical education may be withdrawn from class due to an injury that prohibits participation in class.

Every
effort will be made to devise alternative physical activities so that the

injured student may receive credit. If the injury circumstances
do not allow a suitable alternative, the student will be withdrawn from physical education. Under these circumstances, the s
tudent
does not receive an “F.”

All students will participate in
gym PE and pool PE unless a doctor’s excuse is on file in the guidance
office by the beginning of the semester.

SCHEDULING PROCEDURES

Each year in February, March, and April, students' schedules are decided for the following year. Because one's educational
background is such a significant determinant for his or her future, much time is devoted to the scheduling process. Printed
informa
tion is given to each student regarding requirements and electives for the coming year. Students are encouraged to discuss
their choices with their parents. The counselors then assist each upcoming sophomore, junior, and senior student individuall
y in
pl
anning next year's courses.


Because freshmen are allowed fewer choices in their schedules, a slightly different method for planning next year is used. I
ncoming
freshmen and their

parents are urged to attend an evening meeting where high school requirements are explained, with particular
emphasis on freshman requirements and electives. This arrangement offers both parents and students the opportunity to ask qu
estions
and choose th
e student's schedule for the following year.

Occ
asionally a course that is offered is dropped due to insufficient
enrollment. In other cases a second choice has to be made due to a conflict of two or more course requests meeting at the sa
me time.
Vocatio
nal courses, generally open to juniors and seniors have a limited number of class spaces available. If a selection process i
s
necessary to determine which students are enrolled in a particular program, that selection is based upon student's (1) senior
ity,

(2)
attendance records, and (3) background courses with satisfactory grades. When possible, students are given
their first choice in
electives.

PARENTS

Parents are encouraged to make an appointment with the guidance office to assist your student in the s
election of classes in order to
plan for the future. Please call 937
-
4472, and we will be happy to set up an appointment with you.


POLICY FOR RETAKING
A CLASS AT HERITAGE
HILLS

A student may retake a class for the purpose of improving the understanding o
f the subject.

W
hen a student retakes a class, the
student will not receive an additional credit. The class will be listed on the transcript
both

time
s

the class is taken
,

and
the average of
both

grades will be calculated into the cumulative GPA.


POLI
CY FOR EIGHTH GRADERS TAKING HIGH SCHOOL CREDIT

The grade, for any class that counts toward a high school diploma, earned in the eighth grade will be recorded on the transcr
ipt and
will count in the cumulative GPA unless the student retakes the class durin
g the freshman year of high school.




5

AGRI
CULTURE

Students must be enrolled in one of the classes below to be a member of FFA.


5056


INTRODUCTION TO AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND NATURAL RESOURCES

(9
-
10)
(year)


2 credits

(formerly
Fundamentals of Agricultural Science and Business
)
This

is a yearlong course that is highly recommended as a prerequisite
and foundation for all other agricultural classes. The nature of this course is to provide students with an intro
duction to careers and the
fundamentals of agricultural science and business. Areas to be covered include: agricultural literacy, its importance and car
eer
opportunities, plant and soil science, environmental science, horticulture and landscape management,

agricultural biotechnology,
agricultural science and business tools and equipment, basic principles of and employability in the agricultural/horticultura
l industry,
basic agribusiness principles and skills, developing leadership skills in agriculture, and

supervised experience in
agriculture/horticulture purposes and procedures. Student learning objectives are defined. Instruction includes not only agri
culture
education standards but many academic standards are included through the use of “hands
-
on” proble
m
-
solving individual and team
activities.


5170
PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCE

[ODD]

(10
-
12) (year)



2 credits

P
rerequisite:
Intro to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources


Plant and Soil Science is a yearlong course that provides students with opportunities to participate in a variety of activiti
es including
laboratory work. Topics covered include: the taxonomy of plants, the various plant components and their functions, pla
nt growth,
plant reproduction and propagation, photosynthesis and respiration, environmental factors affecting plant growth, integrated
pest
management plants and their management, biotechnology, the basic components and types of soil, calculation of ferti
lizer application
rates and procedures for application, soil tillage and conservation, irrigation and drainage, land measurement, grain and for
age quality,
cropping systems, precision agriculture, principles and benefits of global positioning systems and n
ew technologies, harvesting, and
career opportunities in the field of plant and soil science.





5180



NATURAL RESOURCE
S

[EVEN]


(10
-
12) (year)



2 credits


T
his course is a
yearlong course

that provides students with a background in natural resource management. Students are introduced to
career opportunities in natural resource management and related industries, understanding forest ecology importance, recogniz
ing
trees and t
heir products, tree growth and development, forest management, measuring trees, timber stand improvement and urban
forestry, soil features, erosion and management practices, conservation practices, water cycles, uses, quality standards, red
ucing water
poll
ution, conducting water quality tests, watersheds, and its importance to natural resource management, hazardous waste
management, native wildlife, waterfowl, wetlands, and fish management, topography map use, management of recreational areas,
game bird and

animal management, outdoor safety, and weather. “Hands
-
on” learning activities encourage students to investigate
areas of environmental concern including: identification and management of ecosystems, natural succession identification, nat
ural
communities,

recycling and management of waste in the environment, soil conservation mana
gement practices, land uses,

air quality.






5008


ANIMAL SCIENCE




(10
-
12)


(year )



2 credits

P
rerequisite:
Intro to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources


This course is a yearlong program that provides students with an overview of the field of animal science. Students participat
e in a
large variety of activities and laboratory work including real and simulated animal science experiences and projects. Areas
that the
students study may be applied to both large and small animals. Topics to be addressed include: anatomy and physiology, geneti
cs,
reproduction and biotechnology, nutrition, aquaculture, careers in animal science, animal health, meeting environmenta
l requirements
of animals, and management practices for the care and maintenance of animals.


5088
AGRICULTUR
AL POWER, STRUCTURE AND TECHNOLOGY

(11
-
12)


(year)

2 credits

P
rerequisite:
:
Intro to Agriculture,
Food and Natural Resources


(formerly
Agricultural Mechanization
)

is a yearlong, lab intensive course in which students develop an understanding of basic
principles of selection, operation, maintenance, and management of agricultural equipment in concer
t with utilization of safety and
technology. Topics covered include: small and large gas and diesel engine repair, power transfer systems including hydraulic,

pneumatic and robotic systems, arc, metal fabrication such as MIG, TIG and SMAW welding, concrete
, wood, metal, electricity and
electronics, recirculating aquaculture systems, hydroponics systems, surveying, precision farming equipment, remote sensing
technology and global positioning systems equipment, building agriculture related buildings and struc
tures including greenhouses,
tillage, planting, irrigation, spraying, grain and forage harvesting, feed and animal waste management systems, agricultural
industry

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communications and customer relations, safety and safety resources, career opportunities in t
he area of agricultural mechanization and
employability skills.















5136

LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT


(11
-
12) (year)



2 credits

Landscape Management is a yearlong course that p
rovides the student with an overview of the many career opportunities in the
diverse field of landscape management. Students are introduced to the procedures used in the planning and design of a landsca
pe using
current technology practices, the principles
and procedures involved with landscape construction, the determination of maintenance
schedules, communications, management and employability skills necessary in landscaping operations, and the care and use of
equipment utilized by landscapers. Upon comple
tion of the program plus learning and demonstrating other skills, students have the
opportunity to receive an industry approved State Certificate of Mastery in Landscape Management.




5002




*
AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT


(12)

(semester
)




1 credit

P
rerequisite:
Intro to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources


Agribusiness Management is a semester long course which presents the concepts necessary for managing an
agriculture
-
related
business from a local and global perspective.

Concepts covered in the course include: exploring careers in agribusiness, global
visioning, applying E
-
commerce, risk management, understanding business management and structures, entrepreneurship, the
planning, organizing, financing, and operation of an

agribusiness, economic principles, credit, computerized record keeping,
budgeting, fundamentals of cash flow, federal, state, property and sales tax, insurance, cooperatives, purchasing, the utiliz
ation of
information technology in agribusiness, marketing

agricultural products, developing a marketing plan, advertising and selling products
and services, understanding consumers and buying trends, agricultural law applications and employability skills.




5228


SUPERVISED AGRICULTURAL EXPERIENCE








1
-
3 credits

Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) is designed to provide students with opportunities to gain experience in the agricul
ture
field(s) in which they are interested. Students should experience and apply what is learned in the classroom, l
aboratory, and training
site to real
-
life situations. Students work closely with their agricultural science and business teacher(s), parents, and/or employers to
get the most out of their SAE program. This course can be offered each year as well as during
the summer session. SAE may be
offered as a Cooperative Education Program. Curriculum content and competencies should be varied so that school year and summ
er
session experiences are not duplicated.






5102

*

FOOD SCIENCE

[EVEN]

(11
-
12)


(semester)



1 credit

P
rerequisite
:
Intro to Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources


This course is a yearlong program that provides students with an overview of food science and it importance. Introduction to
principles of food processing, food chemistry and physics, nutrition, food microbiology, preservation, packaging and labeling
, food

commodities, food regulations, issues and careers in the food science industry help students understand the role that food sc
ience plays
in the securing of a safe, nutritious, and adequate food supply. A project
-
based approach is utilized along with labor
atory, team
building, and problem solving activities to enhance student learning.












5132


*
HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE

[ODD]

(10
-
12)

(semester)




1 credit

P
rerequisite:
Intro to Agriculture, Food a
nd Natural Resources


Horticultural Science is a yearlong course designed to give students a background in the field of horticulture and its many c
areer
opportunities. It addresses the biology and technology involved in the production, processing, and m
arketing of horticultural plants
and products. Topics covered include: reproduction and propagation of plants, plant growth, growth media, hydroponics, floric
ulture
and floral design, management practices for field and greenhouse production, interior plant
scapes, marketing concepts, production of
herbaceous, woody, and nursery stock, fruit, nut, and vegetable production, integrated pest management and employability skil
ls.
Students participate in a variety of activities including extensive laboratory work u
sually in a school greenhouse.


5074


ADVANCED LIFE SCIENCE, PLANTS AND SOIL
S

(dual credit course)
[EVEN]

(11
-
12)

(year)

2 credits

Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry I

Advanced Life Science, Plant and Soil, is a standards
-
based, interdisciplina
ry science course that integrates the study of advanced
biology, chemistry, and earth science in an agricultural context. Students enrolled in this course formulate, design, and imp
lement
agriculturally
-
based laboratory and field investigations as an essen
tial course component. These extended laboratory and literature
investigations focus on the chemical reactions of matter in living and nonliving materials while stressing the unifying theme
s of
chemistry and the development of physical and mathematical mod
els of matter and its interactions. Using the principles of scientific
inquiry, students examine the internal structures, functions, genetics and processes of living plant organisms and their inte
raction with

7

the environment
. Students completing this
course will be able to apply the principles of scientific inquiry to solve problems related to
both biology and chemistry in the context of highly advanced agricultural applications of plants and soils.


5070


ADVANCED LIFE SCIENCE, ANIMALS

(
dual credit
course
)

[ODD]


(11
-
12)

(year)

2 credits

Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry I

Advanced Life Science, Animals, is a standards
-
based, interdisciplinary science course that integrates biology, chemistry, and
microbiology in an agricultural context. St
udents enrolled in this course formulate, design, and carry out animal
-
based laboratory and
field investigations as an essential course component. Students investigate key concepts that enable them to understand anima
l growth,
development and physiology as

it pertains to agricultural science. This course stresses the unifying themes of both biology and
chemistry as students work with concepts associated with animal taxonomy, life at the cellular level, organ systems, genetics
,
evolution, ecology, and histor
ical and current issues in animal agriculture. Students completing this course will be able to apply the
principles of scientific inquiry to solve problems related to biology and chemistry in highly advanced agricultural applicati
ons of
animal development.



B
USINESS TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

(
Computer Applications

required)



4530


*
BMF
-
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

(IT ESSENTIALS)


(9
-
10)


(semester)


1 credit

This course uses
word processing techniques and introduces database and spreadsheets. Students will learn to use the various
commands, in a step
-
by
-
step method, from the simple to the complex. They will also be allowed to apply their learning in a hands on
business orien
ted environment through the use of many different applications. Software used: Microsoft Office: Word, Excel,
Access, and PowerPoint. Additional concepts and applications dealing with software integration, Internet use, and informatio
n about
future tech
nology trends are included.


4528



*
BMF
-
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS, ADVANCED

(dual
-
credit

course)


(10
-
12)

(semester)


1 credit

Prerequisite: Computer Applications

Computer Applications, Advanced, is a one semester, single period course. It bu
ilds upon previously learned computer skills to
develop occupational competencies. Software taught will be advanced Word features (i.e. graphics, mail merge, columns, table
s, etc.),
Excel (i.e. extensive use of graphs, advanced features of spreadsheets, e
tc.), PowerPo
int, and the integration of these

software
s
.
Instructional strategies will include project
-
oriented assignments.



4524

BMF
-
ACCOUNTING



(10
-
12)



(year)


2 credits


Accounting

provides basic instructions for the mechanics of keeping accurate financial records, both in business and personal use.
Accounting moves from simple concepts and procedures of accounting that every student must understand to have a maximum
opportunity wh
en entering the world of business. Accounting is a system of expressing, in clear logic patterns, the operation of
business activities carried on in private enterprise, government, farms, institutions or home. Practice sets and problems pr
ovide
opportuni
ty for students to apply the skills learned. Accounting is required for college business sequence as it provides terminology

and procedures basic in understanding the business system. Computer accounting will be introduced using accounting software
from

South
-
Western.



4522




BMF
-

ACCOUNTING II

(11
-
12)




(year)





2 credits

Prerequisites: Accounting I, Algebra, and Computer Applications

Accounting II, an advanced
-
level business course, builds upon the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAA
P) and procedures
learned in Accounting I. Emphasis is placed on managerial decisions made in corporate accounting, including in
-
depth analysis of
financial statements. Instructional strategies include the use of spreadsheets, word processing, and accoun
ting software. Projects,
simulations, and case studies are used to apply accounting theories and produce appropriate financial reports. Computerized

accounting software is predominantly used.
This course can be
taken

dual (college) credit.



4534

*
BMF
-
COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

(10
-
12)

(semester)



1 credit


Prerequisite: Enrolled in or having completed Algebra II and having completed some computer courses.

Computer Programming is a programming
course using a modern programming language

called Vi
sual Basic.

Students will follow a
step
-
b
y
-
step guide that instructs them

on how to design and write a program.
These programs can be used on computers, mobile
devices, and web applications.
It involves

problem solving applications in mathematics, science, and business. A brief introduction to
game design is also included in the class.


8


4518



*

BMF
-
BUSINESS, MARKETING AND ENTREPREUNERSHIP

(9
-
12) (
semester)
1 credit

(formerly
Busines
s Foundations
)

is an introductory business course that provides the framework for pursuing additional business
courses. This core course acquaints students with economics, entrepreneurship, management, marketing, law, risk management,
banking, personal fi
nance, and careers in business. The importance and application of business etiquette and ethics are included.



4520




*

BMF
-
PRINCIPALS OF
MARKETING


(10
-
12)



(semester)


1 credit

Marketing is a business course that provides a basic introduction to the scope and importance of marketing in the global econ
omy.
This class will not only follow the standards for Marketing but will also incorporate standards from Entrepreneurial class.
Emphasis is
placed on oral and written communications, mathematical applications, problem
-
solving, and critical thinking skills as they relate to
advertising/promotion/selling, distribution, financing, market
-
information management, pricing, and product/se
rvice management.
Instructional stra
t
egies may include computer/technology applications and projects focused on the marketing functions.








BMF


SPORTS MARKETING

(11


12)



(semester)


1 credit

Sports and Entertainment Marketing focuses on the real
-
world business perspective by using the sports and entertainment arena to
teach marketing strategies. This is a subject that you can relate to and make it your own as we discuss how sports, racing a
nd concerts
are marketed. The sports and entertainment i
ndustries are two of the most profitable industries in the US. Marketing sports and
entertainment products is also a global business.


4512





BUSINESS MATHEMATICS

(11
-
12)



(year)


2

credits

Prerequisite: Completion
of Algebra I

Business Math

is a business course designed to prepare students for roles as entrepreneurs, producers, and business leaders by
developing abilities and skills that are part of any business environment. The content includes mathematical operat
ions related to
accounting, banking and finance, marketing, and management.
This class explores math skills needed for students to function in
today’s personal/business worlds

by covering the following topics: figuring gross and net pay, banking services
, loans and cr
e
dit
cards, spending wisely, owning a home or car, insurance and investments, and managing people and inventory
.
This class fulfills the
Personal Finance requirement.


5244

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY LAB I


(1
1
-
12)

(year)





2 credits

Prerequisite: Computer Applications

In this course,

students will learn a variety of job skills such as filing, handling mail, preparing
office

documents, and recordkeeping.
In addition, they will learn to use an add
ing machine, printers, and copiers. Proper typing techniques and computer skills are
necessary.
It is highly recommended that students

join Business Professionals of America and pay the pre
-
determined dues.






5240


BUSIN
ESS
TECHNOLOGY LAB II

(12)


(year)



4 credits

This is a double period, senior level, two semester course
. This class is a

vocational business program. Students have an
opportunity
to develop their skills in an office
-
like atmosphere. The lab materials are actual tasks enco
untered in business stations.
Students will
be involved
in the production of documents for North Spencer schools and the community
.
S
tudent
are

invol
ved in selection of
products and clothes to be sold in the bookstore.
It is highly recommended that students join
the Business Professionals of
America and pay the pre
-
determined dues. As a member of this club, students may attend business contests, and
participate
in fundraisers, the style show, and other activities.


4516




*
COMPUTER ILLUSTRATION/GRAPHICS

(10
-
12
) (
semester)

1

credit


(formerly Desktop Publishing) is a business course designed to allow students to develop proficiency in using desktop publish
ing
software to create a variety of printed publications.


Students will incorporate journalistic principles in design and layout
of print and
Web publications including integration of text and graphics and use of sophisticated hardware and software to develop and cre
ate
quality materials for business
-
related tasks.


Students will analyze the information and the audience and combine
appropriate text,
graphics, and design to communicate the desired message effectively.


Planning and design principles are used to analyze and organize
information, set up a design structure, and select or create appropriate visuals.


Instructional strateg
ies may include
computer/technology applications, teacher demonstrations, collaborative instruction, interdisciplinary and /or culminating pr
ojects,
problem
-
solving and critical thinking activities, simulations and project
-
based learning activities.






9

4574







*
W
EB DESIGN

(10
-
12)


(semester)


1 credit


Web Design is a class that deals with computer graphic software and the design of Internet web pages. Students will learn
Dreamweaver

and

Fireworks
. Students will have access
to scanners, digital camera, and to the Internet for use in the development of
their personal web pages. All students will have the opportun
ity to design their own website
. Prior knowledge of this software is not
necessary, but a basic understanding of g
eneral computer functions wo
uld be helpful.








*
INTERACTIVE MEDIA

(11
-
12)


(semester)


1
-
2 cr
edits

This is dual
-
credit course
with the potential of 12 credits in

web design offered by IUPUI and Heritage Hills High School
. This class
is an on
-
line course with the instructor from IUPUI and the facilitator from Heritage Hills High School. This class requires tuit
ion to
be paid to IUPUI as well
as textbooks being purchased. Students should expect to do work outside of thei
r high school class periods
in order to complete assignments and p
rojects.



ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

Four years of English

credits r
equired

The r
e
commendation of previous teacher

and ISTEP/ECA scores determine

English

placement



10021





ENGLISH 9





(year)



2 credits

English 9 provides students with the opportunity to improve and expand their skills in grammar, usage, vocabulary, compositio
n,
literat
ure, critical thinking, and communication. Students will explore the writing process and hone their ability to develop an id
ea
and communicate it effectively. Students will discover global perspectives and encounter multiple points of view by analyzin
g a
nd
evaluating a variety of nonfiction and literary texts. This class will also introduce students to the rigors of high school
curricula by
focusing on the reading comprehension, academic writing, and study skills students will utilize throughout their ac
ademic career.

English 9 is designed for students who would benefit from a modified curriculum. The content follows the Indiana English 9
Standards, but the instruction and materials have been adapted to meet the needs of these students.


1002
2







ENGLISH 9
ADVANCED




(year)




2 credits

English 9 Advanced provides students with the opportunity to improve and expand their skills in grammar, usage, vocabulary,
composition, literature, critical thinking, and communication. Students will explo
re the writing process and hone their ability to
develop an idea and communicate it effectively. Students will discover global perspectives and encounter multiple points of
view by
analyzing and evaluating a variety of nonfiction and literary texts. This

class will also introduce students to the rigors of high school
curricula by focusing on the reading comprehension, academic writing

with research
, and study skills students will utilize throughout
their academic career.


10023





ENGLISH 9 HONORS





(year)




2 credits

The content of English 9 Honors is the same as English 9 Advanced
, however English 9 Honors is the most rigorous and challenging
course in the freshman English curriculum
.
It

is de
s
igned for students who are competent writers and
responsible workers. Critical
reading, extensive writing and further development of vocabulary and communication skills are expected of the students. Succ
ess in
this course will require strong study skills and a high level of self motivation.



10041





ENGLISH 10



(year)



2 credits

English 10

builds on the skills students developed during English 9. Grammar, usage, vocabulary, composition, critical thinking, and
communication
skills, as well as use of the writing process, will continue to be studied. Literature will include a variety of texts,
including fiction, nonfiction, and drama. This class will focus on increasing student efficacy in reading comprehension, aca
demic
writ
ing, and study skills.


1004
2


ENGLISH 10

ADVANCED




(year)



2 credits

English 10
Advanced
builds on the skills students developed during English 9. Grammar, usage, vocabul
ary, composition, critical
thinking, and communication skills, as well as use of the writing process, will continue to be studied. Literature will incl
ude a variety
of texts, including fiction, nonfiction, and drama. This class will focus on increasing s
tudent efficacy in reading comprehension,
aca
demic writing, and study skills.



10043



ENGLISH 10 HONORS



(year)



2 credits


10

The content of English 10 Honors is the same as English 10
Advanced, however English 10 Honors is the most rigorous and
challenging course in the

sophomore

English curriculum. It is de
s
igned for students who are competent writers and responsible
workers. Critical reading, extensive writing and further developme
nt of vocabulary and communication skills are expected of the
students. Success in this course will require strong study skills and a high level of self motivation.


10061





ENGLISH 11




(year)




2 credits

English 11

will be a combination of vocabular
y, grammar, composition, and literature. The vocabulary section will incorporate
techniques for systematic vocabulary growth. The grammar emphasis will be on writing complete sentences and subordinate clau
ses.
Essays of narration, exposition, persuasion
, description and analysis will be explored. Various genres will be studied in the American
literature section: documents, essays, short stories, and poetry. A research paper is required. English 11 is designed for s
tudents who
would benefit from a modif
ied curriculum. The content follows the Indiana English 11 Standards, but the instruction and materials
have been adapted to meet the needs of these students.



10062


ENGLISH 11

ADVANCED





(year)


2 credits

English 11
Advanced
will be a combination of vocabulary, grammar, composition, and literature. The vocabulary section will
incorporate techniques for systematic vocabulary growth. The grammar emphasis will be on
writing

complete sentences and
subordinate clauses. Essays of narration, exposition, persuasion, description and analysis will be explored. Various genres

will be
studied in the American literature section: documents, essays, short stories, and poetry.
Moby Dic
k

and
Fahrenheit 451

will be studied.


1058

A
P ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION




(11)





(year)


2 credits

AP English Literature and Composition course has a dual focus:

preparing for the AP English Literature and
Composition exam and
exploring American Literature.

In keeping with College Board’s AP ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTION, our readings will include
essays, novels, speeches, poems, and personal narratives by a diverse group of American authors who were writing f
or varied
purposes and audiences.

In r
eading and analyzing these non
-
fiction, fiction, and poetry texts, our focus will be on both textual detail
and historical context to provide a foundation for interpretation. An emphasis on relevant critical concepts
and vocabulary will allow
students to exercise these in verbal and written responses, textual analyses, and interpretations.

Writing assignments and

projects will be varied and will enable students to develop proficiency in the expository, argumentative,

and persuasive modes.

A
research paper will be assigned.

A book
report will be required every four

weeks. A study of Shakespeare’s HAMLET is included.


AP students should have the maturity, the skill, and the will to seek the larger meaning through tho
ughtful research.




1030





*
ENGLISH

LITERATURE

(12)


(semester)


1 credit

English

Literature
is a s
urvey

of representative works of the English
-
speaking authors. Students examine a wide variety of literary
genres that reflect the English
-
speaking peoples from the Anglo
-
Saxon Period to the present. Students analyze how the ideas and
concepts presented in th
e works are both interconnected and distinctly reflective of the cultures and the countries in which they were
written.


1076





*
SPEECH

(dual credit course)

(12)


(semester)


1 credit

This course provides the study of and practice in the basic principles

and techniques of effective oral communication. Students will
receive instruction in how to adapt speech to different audiences and purposes, and they will have several opportunities to p
ractice
their presentation skills and become a more effective speak
er. Presentations will include the following: (1) a personal experience
speech, (2) a demonstration speech, (3) an interview speech, (4) a survey speech, (5) a persuasive speech, (6) impromptu spee
ches,
and (7) book talks. Research using technology and c
areful organization will be emphasized. This course also attempts to sharpen
students’ skills in note
-
taking, listening, and critical thinking.

This course may be taken for dual (college) credit.


1096



*
TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION
S

(12)


(semester)



1 cre
dit

Technical writing provides instruction in the processes and conventions of effective technical writing
-
communication. The course
uses a process approach to writing including strategies for: (1) audience analysis, (2) prewriting, (3) drafting, (4) peer

sharing, (5)
revising, (6) editing, and (7) formatting. Other important processes taught in this course are: (1) gathering, using, and do
cumenting
data from primary and secondary sources, (2) adapting technical information to both technical and nontechni
cal audiences, and (3)
recording and reporting technical information clearly and accurately. Students produce technical reports of varying lengths
and
complexities. The final draft of these reports should follow accepted conventions of language, style,
mechanics, and format. Students
will also present oral presentations on different topics based on individual occupational interest. It is recommended that w
ord
processors be used to support the writing instruction in this course.

(
NOT an approved NCAA c
ourse)


11



1056


AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION
(dual credit course)

(12)

(year)



2 credits

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition is a course which follows College Board Entrance Examination guidelines.

The pu
rpose of this course is to enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of sufficient richness

and
complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers. Through the process of reading, writing, and discussing texts, st
u
dents
will become skilled in composing for different audiences and purposes. Students will learn to understand and appreciate the
diverse
ways that authors make meaning in both oral and written texts. They will identify literary structures and convention
s and effectively
use them in their own writing. Many opportunities to develop speaking skills will also be incorporated into classroom activi
ties and
assignme
nts. This course may be taken

for dual (college) credit.





1086



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS


(11
-
12)


(year)




2 credits

(This course does not fulfill the
English
credits
requirements
.)

Yearbook is open to any student who loves to write, take pictures and be involved in school activities. To apply to
take this class,
students must complete an application, have teacher recommendations, and write an essay. Enrollment i
s limited. Students will study;
Vocabulary for journalism
,
Copywriting
,
Layout design
,
Advertising/marketing
,
Budgeting
,
Photography
, a
nd
Computer processing
in Adobe Pagemaker 6.5+. Students begin working on yearbook in July and complete the yearbook the following June. Students a
re
required to attend meetings and athletic events before school, after school, on weekends, and during the
summer.


FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES



5364

*
INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

(9
-
12)

(semester)




1 credit


Interpersonal Relationships addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors all students nee
d to participate in positive,
caring, and respectful relationships in the family and with individuals at school, in the community, and in the workplace. To
pics
include components of healthy relationships, roles, and responsibilities in relationships; funct
ions and expectations of various
relationships; ethics in relationships; factors that impact relationships (e.g., power, conflicting interests, peer pressure,

life events);
establishing and maintaining relationships; building self
-
esteem and self
-
image thr
ough healthy relationships; communication styles;
techniques for effective communication, leadership, and teamwork; individual and group goal setting and decision making;
preventing and managing stress and conflict; addressing violence and abuse; and rela
ted resources, services, and agencies.
Applications through authentic settings such as volunteer experiences, and service learning are encouraged.







5342


*
NUTRITION AND WELLNESS

(10
-
12)


(s
emester)


1 credit

Nutrition and Wellness enables students to realize the components and lifelong benefits of sound nutrition and wellness pract
ices and
empowers them to apply these principles in their everyday lives. Topics include: impact

of daily nutrition and wellness practices on
long
-
term health and wellness; physical, social, and psychological aspects of healthy nutrition and wellness choices; planning for

wellness and fitness; selection and preparation of nutritious meals and snacks
based on USDA Dietary Guidelines including the Food
Guide Pyramid; safety, sanitation, storage, and recycling processes and issues associated with nutrition and wellness; impact
s of
science and technology on nutrition and wellness issues; and nutrition and

wellness career paths. Laboratory experiences that
emphasize both nutrition and wellness practices are required components of this course. Field trips and guest speakers may b
e used to
supplement the curriculum.
A dual credit may be earned in this clas
s.


5340 *
ADVANCED NUTRITION AND
WELLNESS

(10
-
12)
(semester)



1 credit

Prerequisite: Nutrition and Wellness

Advanced Nutrition and Foods is a sequential course that addresses more complex concepts in nutrition and foods, with emphasi
s on
contemporary economic, social, psychological, cultural, and global issues. Topics include: nutrition and wellness for indiv
i
duals and
families across the life span; community and world food concerns, including hunger; impacts of technology on nutrition, foods
, and
related tools and equipment; management of food
-
related resources;
c
areers in all aspects of the food industry. Laboratory
experiences that emphasize advanced experiences, and service learning activities are recommended.



5380
*
TEXTILES & FASHION FOUNDATIONS I

[EVEN]

(10
-
12)

(semester)




1 credit

Textiles and Fashion Foundations I addresses knowledge and skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distributio
n in the
textiles and fashion arenas. To
pics include: textiles principles and applications; social, psychological, cultural, and environmental
aspects of clothing and textile selection; critical thinking applied to consumer options for fashion, textiles, and related e
quipment and
tools; care and

maintenance of textile products, equipment, and tools; contemporary issues. Work
-
based, entrepreneurial,

12

experimental, laboratory, and/or service learning are to be included. Portfolio activities are required. Students experienc
e garment
making in a l
ab setting. Field trips, where appropriate, will be a part of this course.


5380



*
TEXTILES & FASHION FOUNDATIONS II

[ODD]

(10
-
12)

(semester)


1 credit

Prerequisite: Textiles and Fashion Foundations I

Textiles and

Fashion Foundations II is a continuation of Textiles and Fashion Foundations I. The course addresses knowledge and
skills related to design, production, acquisition, and distribution in the textiles and fashion arenas. Topics include: expl
oration of
tex
tiles and fashion industries; elements of science and design in textiles and apparel; textiles principles and applications; s
ocial,
psychological, cultural, and environmental aspects of clothing and textile selection; critical thinking applied to consumer
options for
fashion, textiles, and related equipment and tools; care and maintenance of textile products, equipment, and tools; impacts o
f
technology; construction and alteration skills; contemporary issues, including global applications. Work
-
based, entr
epreneurial,
experimental, laboratory, and/or service learning are to be included. Portfolio activities are required. Students experienc
e garment
making in a lab setting. Field trips, where appropriate, will be a part of this course.


5362




*
CHILD DEVELOPMENT

(10
-
12)

(semester)




1 credit

Child Development and Parenting addresses the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors associated with supporting and prom
oting
optimal growth and development of infants and

children. The focus is on research
-
based nurturing and parenting practices and skills
that support positive development of children. Topics include: consideration of the roles, responsibilities, and challenges

of
parenthood; human sexuality; adolescent

pregnancy; prenatal development; preparation for birth; the birth process; meeting the
physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and cultural growth and developmental needs of infants and children; impact
s of
heredity, environment, and family and
societal crisis on development of the child; meeting children’s needs for food, clothing, shelter,
and care giving; caring for children with special needs; parental resources, services, and agencies; and career awareness. A
pplications
through authentic se
ttings, such as volunteer experiences, internships, and services learning are encouraged. Students are required to
participate in the “Baby Think It Over” project. Field trips may be scheduled for this course. A community service project
is
required.
I
n order to take a baby home, the student must be passing the class with an 80% or better.


5360

*

ADVANCED

CHILD DEVELOPMENT


(10
-
12)

(semester)




1 credit

Prerequisite: Child Development and Parenting

Advanced Chi
ld Development is a sequential course that addresses more complex issues of child development and early childhood
education with emphasis on guiding physical, social, emotional, intellectual, moral, and cultural development throughout chil
dhood,
including
school age children. Topics include positive parenting and nurturing across ages and stages; practices that promote long
-
term well
-
being of children and their families; developmentally appropriate guidance and intervention strategies with individuals and
groups of children; accessing, evaluating, and utilizing information, including brain/learning research and other research re
sults;
meeting needs of children with a variety of disadvantaging conditions; and, exploration of “all aspects of the industry” for

selected
child
-
related careers. Authentic applications are required through field
-
based or school
-
based experiences with children in locations
such as observation/interaction laboratories, preschools, elementary schools, or daycare settings. Service lea
rning experiences are
highly recommended. A thoroughly documented student portfolio is required. A child
-
care business project is required. Hands
-
on
experience caring for small children will be a part of this course. A community service project is requ
ired.








5330




*
ADULT ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES



(11
-
12)

(semester)




1 credit

Adult Roles and Responsibilities builds knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors students will need as they prepare to tak
e the next
steps toward adulthood in today’s ever
-
changing society. The focus is on becoming independent, contributing, and responsible
participants in family, community, and career settings. Topics include: living independently and family formation; an
alysis of
personal standards, needs, aptitudes, and goals; integration of family, community, and career responsibilities; consumer choi
ces and
decision making related to nutrition and wellness, clothing, housing, and transportation; financial management; r
elationship of
technology and environmental issues to family and consumer resources; and community roles and responsibilities of families a
nd
individuals. Applications through authentic settings such as volunteer experiences, internships, and service lea
rning are encouraged.
Basic survival garment repair and cooking will be a part of lab.

This class fulfills the Personal Finance requirement.


5350 *
HOUSING AND INTERIORS DESIGN FOUNDATIONS



[EVEN]
(11
-
12) (semester)


1 credit

Housing and Interiors addresses selecting and planning living environments to meet the needs and wants of individuals and fam
ilies
throughout the family life cycle, considering a broad range of economic, social, cultural, technological, enviro
nmental, maintenance,
and aesthetic factors. A project
-
based approach that utilizes higher order thinking, communication, leadership, and management
processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study of individual and family is
sues. Topics include:

13

evaluation of housing styles, locations, zones, restrictions, and ownership options; managing resources to provide shelter fo
r
individuals and families, including financing options and tax considerations; contemporary housing issues,

including homelessness;
environmental and energy issues; impacts of technology; housing to meet special needs; elements and principles of design rela
ted to
interiors, housing, and architecture; blueprinting and floor planning skills; creating functional,
safe, and aesthetic spaces; historical
aspects and contemporary trends in housing, interiors, furniture, and appliances; and, exploration of housing
-
related careers.
Applications through authentic settings such as work
-
based observations, internships,
and service learning experiences (e.g., Habitat
for Humanity) are appropriate. Direct, concrete appliances of mathematics proficiencies in projects are encouraged. Draftin
g a house
plan and interior design is required of all students. Field trips, where

appropriate, may be a part of this course. A community service
project is required
.



FINE

ARTS

VISUAL ART

All Art courses refer to sequential learning experiences that encompass art production, history, criticism and aesthetics. T
he second
year of Art
class is built on experiences gained from the first year of Art class, and so on.

Only one Art class may be taken per
semester.


4000

*
INTRODUCTION TO TWO
-
DIMENSIONAL ART (L)

(9
-
12) (semester)





1 credit

Experiences include contour lin
e drawings of still
-
life, collage (design), painting collage using acrylic paints, art
history and writing.


4002

*
INTRODUCTION TO THREE
-
DIMENSIONAL ART (L)


(9
-
12)

(semester)





1 credit


Prerequisite: Introduction to Two
-
Dimensional
Art

Experiences include potter
y
, clay sculpture,
Styrofoam sculpture,
3
-
D reflective lettering us
ing colored pencil, pointillism,

and
scratchboard.



4004



*
ADVANCED TWO
-
DIMENSIONAL ART (L)


(10
-
12)

(semester)



1 credit

Prere
quisite: Introduction to Two
-
Dimensional Art, Introduction to Three
-
Dimensional Art with a C or better.

Experiences include shading with pencil (spheres), floating objects

(black and white on gray)
, spirals, flames and monograms, animal
portrait (colored p
encil shading), computer graphics
Surrealism using
Photoshop
, and
matting and
display of art work
.










4006



*
ADVANCED 3
-
DIMENSIONAL ART (L)


(10
-
12)


(semester)



1 credit

Prerequisite:
Introduction to Two
-
Dimensional Art, Intro
duction to Three
-
Dimensional Art, Advanced Two
-
Dimensional Art with a C
or better.

Experiences include landscape painting in acrylic
, computer graphics using Photoshop,

small pap
er mache sculpture
,

matting and
display of art work.








4060






*
DRAWING I



(
11
-
12)


(semester)



1 credit

Prerequisite: Introduction to 2
-
D and 3
-
D Art, Advanced 2
-
D and 3
-
D Art, with a C or better

Experiences include shaded shapes, Made of Spheres (6B pencil renderings), caricature (Photoshop),

collage (Photoshop), colored
pencil still
-
life, colored

pencil self
-
portrait
, mating and display of art work
.


4064






*
PAINTING I



(11
-
12)


(semester)




1 credit

Prerequisite: Introduction to 2
-
D and 3
-
D Art, Advanced 2
-
D

and 3
-
D Art, Drawing I, with a C or better

Experiences include architectural painting in acrylic
s
, polychrome papier

mache sculpture, CD cover (Photoshop, digital camera) with
digital portfolio
, and display of art work
.




*
PAINTING II




(12)

(semester)




1 credit

Prerequisite: Introduction to 2
-
D and 3
-
D Art, Advanced 2
-
D and 3
-
D Art, Drawing I, Painting I, with a C or better

Experienc
es include painting with no brushes, custom painting (individual project), painting that include an attachment and murals.


4044



*
SCULPTURE




(12)

(semester)



1 credit


Prerequisite: Introd
uction to 2
-
D and 3
-
D Art, Advanced 2
-
D and 3
-
D Art, Drawing I, Painting I, Painting II, with a C or better

Experiences include a miniature sculpture or a small object done as a large sculpture, sculpture using non
-
traditional material, custom
sculpture (
individual project), and mobiles.




14

VOCAL MUSIC



4182





BEGINNING CHORUS (L)

{Sound Unlimited}



(9
-
12)

(year)

2 credits

Beginning Chorus provides students with opportunities to develop musicianship and specific performa
nce skills through ensemble and
solo singing. The chorus is a mixed group. Activities create the development of quality repertoire in the diverse styles of

choral
literature that is appropriate in difficulty and range for the students. Instruction is de
signed to enable students to connect, examine,
imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas. Experiences include but are not li
mited to,
improvising conducting, sight
-
reading and Kodaly. Students have the oppor
tunity to experience live performances by professionals
during and outside of the school day. A limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal
and
music goals. Students will be required to participate in performances
outside of the school day that support and extend learning in the
classroom.
This is a non
-
audition choir.



4186




INTERMEDIATE CHORUS (L)

{Patriot Vibe}

(9
-
12)

(year)


2 credits

Intermediate Chorus provides students with opportunities to develop musicianship and specific performance skills through ense
mble
and solo singing. The chorus may be composed of: (1) female chorus, or (2) mixed chorus. Activities create the development

of
quality repertoire in the diverse styles of choral literature that is appropriate in difficulty and range for the students.
Instruction is
designed to enable students to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study
into other subject
areas. Chorus classes provide instruction in creating, performing, conducting, listening to, and analyzing, in addition to f
ocusing on
the specific subject matter. Students develop the ability to understand and convey the composer’s in
tent in order to connect the
performer with the audience. Students also have the opportunity to experience live performances by professionals during and
outside
of the school day. A limited amount of time, outside of the school day, may be scheduled for
dress rehearsals and performances. A
limited number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and music goals. Students will participa
te in
performance opportunities, outside of the school day, that support and extend learning
in the classroom.
This is an audition choir.

Choral repertoire should be developmentally appropriate. Additional emphasis is placed on sight
-
reading, critical listening skills, and
vocal technique.


4184






VOCAL JAZZ I (L)

(9
-
1
2)




(year)



2 credits

Students in this course develop musicianship and specific performance skills through group and individual settings for the st
udy and
performance of the varied styles of vocal jazz. The instruction includes the study
of the history and formative and stylistic elements of
jazz. Students develop their creative skills through improvisation, composition, arranging, performing, listening, and analy
zing.
Instruction is designed so that students are enabled to connect, exam
ine, imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study
into other subject areas. Students have the opportunity to experience live performances by professionals during and outside
of the
school day. A limited amount of time, outside of the s
chool day, may be scheduled for dress rehearsals and performances. A limited
number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and music goals. Students must participate in
performance opportunities, outside the school day, that

support and extend learning in the classroom. This course will also
incorporate show choir material.
This is an audition choir.

Choral repertoire should be developmentally appropriate. Additional
emphasis is placed on sight
-
reading, critical listening
skills, and vocal technique.



4184






VOCAL JAZZ II (L)


{Mixed Jazz}

(10
-
12)


(year)

2 credits

Students in this course develop musicianship and specific performance skills through group and individual settings for the st
udy and
performance of the varied styles of vocal jazz. The instruction includes the study of the history and formative and stylis
tic elements of
jazz. Students develop their creative skills through improvisation, composition, arranging, performing, listening, and analy
zing.
Instruction is designed so that students are enabled to connect, examine, imagine, define, try, extend, refi
ne, and integrate music study
into other subject areas. Students have the opportunity to experience live performances by professionals during and outside
of the
school day. A limited amount of time, outside of the school day, may be scheduled for dress r
ehearsals and performances. A limited
number of public performances may serve as a culmination of daily rehearsal and music goals. Students must participate in
performance opportunities, outside the school day, that support and extend learning in the cla
ssroom.
This is an audition choir.

Choral repertoire should be developmentally appropriate. Additional emphasis is placed on sight
-
reading, critical listeni
ng skills, and
vocal technique.


INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC


4168



INTERMEDIATE CONCERT BAND (L)

(9
-
12)


(year)



2 credits

Prerequisite: Students must have been in middle school band.


15

Students taking this course are provided with a balanced comprehensive study of music through the concert band, which develop
s
skills i
n the psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains. Instruction is designed so that students are enabled to connect, examin
e,
imagine, define, try, extend, refine, and integrate music study into other subject areas. Ensemble and solo activities are d
esi
gned to
develop elements of musicianship including, but not limited to: (1) tone production, (2) technical skills, (3) intonation,

(4) music
reading skills, (5) listening skills, (6) analyzing music, and (7) studying historically significant styles
of literature.

Experiences include, but are not limited to, improvising, conducting, playing by ear, and sight
-
reading. Students develop the ability to
understand and convey the composer’s intent in order to connect the performer with the audience. Stude
nts also have opportunities to
experience live performances by professionals during and outside of the school day. Time outside of the school day may be sc
heduled
for dress rehearsals and performances. A limited number of public performances may serve as

a culmination of daily rehearsal and
musical goals. Students are required to participate in performance opportunities, outside of the school day, that support an
d extend
learning in the classroom.

In addition, students perform, with expression and techni
cal accuracy, a large and varied repertoire of
concert band literature that is developmentally appropriate. Evaluation of music and music performances is included.




4200

APPLIED MUSIC

(L
)


(9

12) (
semester

or year
) 1

or 2

credit
s

Applied Music is based on the Indiana Academic Standards for High School Instrumental Music. Applied Music offers high schoo
l
students the opportunity to receive small group o
r private instruction designed to develop and refine professional skills. A variety of
music methods and repertoire is utilized to refine student’s abilities in performing, creating, and responding to music.













THEATRE


4242
INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE ARTS

(9
-
12)

(year)




2 credits

This course is offered to students who wish to develop acting skills. The course covers acting experiences in depth and exam
ines
development of stage character through body, face, usage of props, gestures and other areas of dramatic study. This is a co
-
curricular
laboratory course for the exploration, development and synthesis of theatre. Practical hands
-
on experiences in acting, directing and
stage craft are provided through the preparation and public performances of one or more plays.This course cover
s the basic elements
of theatre: acting, voice, effects, costuming, technical theatre, as well as an introductory unit on the history of performan
ce. Students
move into a performance mode by completing preliminary work and producing a theatre presentation
. Introduction to Theatre is a
performance lab, and participants are
required

to be actively involved in the Heritage Hills Theatre program.


Students must
participate in the first semester play and the second semester musical.

The following areas will be

covered.



Using voice and body to communicate a message



Staging and blocking



The structure of a theatre



Critical viewing of theatre and film

o

Understanding and analyzing plot

o

Atmosphere and mood

o

Theme and moral

o

Understanding character



Various elements of
technical theatre such as

o

Designing and applying make
-
up

o

Designing and evaluating costume choices

o

The process of producing a play, from script to final performance



Using motivation to play a character effectively



Storytelling as an oral tradition that led
to theatre as an art form


4240



ADVANCED THEATRE ARTS


(10
-
12)


(year)




2 credits

P
rerequisite: Introduction to Theatre Arts

Advanced Theatre Arts is an advanced level of theater class for those students who have completed Introduction to Theatre

Arts and
desire to continue their theatre studies with an emphasis on technique.Instruction in this course enables students to: (1) im
provise and
write plays or scenes; (2) imaginatively express thoughts, feelings, moods and characters; and (3) apply tech
niques involving voice,
gesture, facial expression and body movement to reproduce the subtleties of language and voice inflection in conveying emotio
n and
meaning. Students develop skills enabling them to speak clearly and expressively with: (1) appropria
te articulation, (2) pronunciation,
(3) volume, (4) stress, (5) rate, (6) pitch, (7) inflection, and (8) intonation. Using knowledge gained through the study of

technical
theatre and script, students focus on solving the problems faced by actors, director
s, and technicians. They also refine their abilities to
collaborate on performances, and they learn to constructively evaluate their own and others’ efforts.


These students are required to
participate in several productions each year.

The following will
be studied.



Selecting, memorizing and performing monologues, writing scripts/screenplays



Directing, designing, building and painting scenery, making costumes and props



Genres and styles of drama, themes and mood’s effect on the viewing experience



Theatre’s

evolution through history, theatre as a significant persuasive medium, and its relevance to present day


16



Study dialects and improvisational acting



Plots as the backbone to all dramatic work and the characters as a driving force for the plot



HEALTH AND WE
LLNESS and PHYSICAL EDUCATION


3 credits required: 2 credits in Physical Education
and 1 credit in Health


3542




*
PHYSICAL EDUCATION I (L)


(9
-
10)



(semester)



1

credit

Physical Education I
emphasizes

health
-
related fitness and developing the skills and habits necessary for a lifetime of activity. This
program includes skill development and the application of rules and strategies of complex difficulty in at least three of the

following
different movem
ent forms: (1) health
-
related fitness activities (cardio respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance,
flexibility, and body composition), (2) aerobic exercise, (3) team sports, (4) individual and dual sports, (5) outdoor pursui
ts, (6)
aquatics,
recreational games. Ongoing assessment includes both written and performance
-
based skill evaluations. Classes are
coeducational.

Adapted physical education is offered, as needed, in the least restricted environment and is based on

individual
assessment
.

All students will participate in both gym PE and pool PE unless a doctor’s excuse is on file in the
guidance office by the beginning of the semester.


STUDENTS MAY EARN ONE OF THE TWO REQUIRED PE CREDITS
THROUGH
ADEQUATE PARTICIPATION IN
BAND,

DANCE OR
SPOR
T. ENROLLMENT FORMS
ARE IN GUIDANCE.


3506



*HEALTH AND WELLNESS EDUCATION

(9
-
12)


(semester)




1 credit

The objective of Health Education is to cause the student to see good health as a functional matter in his/her lif
e today rather than as a
delayed benefit. Healthful living must become a part of the experience of each student, and the classroom experiences are de
signed to
help develop his/her self awareness and value judgments. Meaningful activities are used to moti
vate students in making these
concepts a part of their lives.

The following content areas are included: growth and development, mental and emotional health,
community health, environmental health, nutrition, family life education, personal health, alcohol

and other drugs, intentional and
unintentional injury, and health promotion/disease prevention.


3508



*
CURRENT HEALTH ISSUES



(1
0
-
12)


(semester)




1 credit

Current Health Issues is an elective course which focuse
s on emerging trends in health including, but not limited to: (1) medical
technology; (2) local, state, and national health policy; (3) health care issues; (4) health careers; and (5) chronic and
communicable
diseases. The course is driven by student
selection of topics and emphasizes individual learning techniques.








MATHEMATICS





Four credits required, two credits in

Algebra I required

Core 40 requirement: Algebra I, Algebra II
/Algebra II Honors

and Geometry
/Geometry Honors


2560





M
ATH LAB


(9
-
12)


(semester

or year)


1
or 2
credit

(This course is not a core 40 elective.)

Math Lab is a class designed to help students improve their skills in
Math in order to be prepar
ed for Algebra or for students
who need
extra help and support in the

Algebra II
class
.
This class does not fulfill the math requirements for graduation.



2510





ALGEBRA ENRICHMENT


(9
-
10) (1 year)




2

credits

Algebra Enrichment is a mathematics support course for
Algebra

I
. The course provides students with additional time to build the
foundations necessary for high school math courses, while concurrently having access to rigorous, grade
-
level appropriate courses.
The five critical areas of
Algebra Enrichment

align with

the critical areas of
Algebra I
:

Relationships between Quantities and
Reasoning with Equations; Linear and Exponential Relationships; Descriptive Statistics; Expressions and Equations; and Quadra
tic
Functions and Modeling.
This course c
ounts as a Mathema
tics Course for the General Diploma only or as an Elective for the Core 40,
Core 40 with Academic Honors and Core 40

with Technical Honors diplomas.
Algebra Enrichment is designed as a support course for
Algebra I. As such, a student taking Algebra
Enrichment must also be enrolled in Algebra I during the same academic year
.


2520
1

ALGEBRA I


(9
-
12)

(year)




2 credits

Algebra I provides a formal development

of the algebraic skills and concepts necessary for students who will take other advanced
college
-
preparatory courses. In particular, the instructional program in this course provides for the use of algebraic skills in a w
ide
range of problem
-
solving situ
ations. Topics include all state standards, some of which are: (1) operations with real numbers, (2)

17

solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, (3) relations and functions, (4) solving and graphing systems of lin
ear
equations and inequaliti
es, (5) operations with polynomials and algebraic fractions, and (6) solving and graphing quadratic, cubic and
radical equations. A scientific calculator may be used often as well as the classroom set of graphic calculators.


2522

ALGEBRA II


(9
-
12)

(year)



2
credits

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Algebra II is a course that expands on the topics of Algebra I and provides further development of

the concep
t of a function. Students
are required to have a graphics calculator and will: (1) graph relations and functions and find zeros; (2) use function nota
tion and
combine functions by compositions; (3) solve systems of linear equations and inequa
lities to solve word problems; (4) solve quadratic
equations, including the use of complex numbers; (5) interpret maximum and minimum values of quadratic functions; (6) solve
equations that contain square roots; (7) use the binomial theorem, divide and fac
tor polynomials and solve polynomial equations; (8)
write conic equations and draw their graphs; (9) use negative fractional exponents; (10) solve problems of direct, inverse, a
nd joint
variation; (11) graph exponential functions; (12) solve exponential an
d logarithmic equations and inequalities; (13) define and use
arithmetic and geometric sequences and series; (14) compute combinations, permutations and probabilities; and (15) use a vari
ety of
problem solving strategies.






25221




ALGEBRA II HONORS


(9
-
12)


(year)





2 credits

Prerequisite: Algebra I

Algebra II Honors follows the same curriculum as Algebra II. However, Algebra II Honors explores each topic at a deeper leve
l and
requires the solution of more difficult problems that what Algebra II

requires. Students are required to have a graphics calculator.






2532

GEOMETRY


(10
-
12)


(year)



2 credits

Prerequisi
te: Algebra I and Algebra II

Geometry provides students with experiences that deepen the understanding of shapes and their properties. Deductive and indu
ctive
reasoning as well as investigative strategies in drawing conclusions are stressed. Properties
and relationships of geometric figures
include the study of: (1) angles, (2) lines, (3) planes, (4) congruent and similar triangles, (5) trigonometric ratios, (6)

polygons, and
(7) circles and spatial drawings. An understanding of proof and logic is dev
eloped. Use of graphing calculators and computer
drawing programs is encouraged.


25321


GEOMETRY/HONORS

(10
-
12)

(year)




2 credits
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Algebra II

Students will pursue a deeper study of theorems and postulates relating to two and three
-
dimensional objects. A greater understanding
of logic and its application to proofs and problem solving will be stressed. Properties and relationships of geometric o
bjects will
include the study of : (1) angles, lines, and planes; (2) congruent, similar, and right triangles (including trigonometry);
(3) polygons;
(4) circles; and (5) solids as they relate to the Indiana Standards. Technology used will include scient
ific calculators and computer
drawing programs.


2564
PRE
-
CALCULUS/TRIGONOMETRY

(dual credit course)

(11
-
12)


(year)

2 credits

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II

or Algebra Honors
, and

Geometry

or Geometry Honors

Pre
-
Calculus blends together all of the concepts and skills that must be mastered prior to enrollment in a college
-
level calculus course.
A functional approach provides for the integration of all of the concepts. Students wil
l: (1) analyze polynomial, rational, exponential,
logarithmic and algebraic functions and their graphs; (2) find inverse and transformations of the above functions; (3) defin
e
trigonometric functions using the unit circle with degrees and radians; (4)
solve problems using trigonometry; (5) prove
trigonometric identities; (6) define polar coordinates and complex numbers; (7) define and use arithmetic and geometric seque
nces
and series; and (8) model data with linear and non
-
linear functions. This course

may be offered for dual (college) credit.





2544




FINITE MATHEMATICS

(dual credit course)

(12)


(year)


2 credits

Prerequisite: Enrolled in or have completed Pre
-
Calculus

Finite Mathematics is a course that provides students with the content
of a freshman college mathematics course. The topics include:
(1) set theory, (2) linear systems, (3) matrices, (4) determinants, (5) probability, (6) linear programming, (7) mathematics
of finance,
and (8) statist
ics. This course may be taken

for dual (
college) credit.


2562


AP CALCULUS

(12)


(year)



2 credits

Prerequisite: Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, and Pre
-
Calculus


18

AP Calculus is a course that provides students with the content that has been established by the College Board. Generally, t
opics
include: (1) limits, (2) continuity, (3) derivatives, (4) definite integrals, and (5) techniques of integration involving rat
ional,
trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions. This course also includes applications of the derivative, the integra
l, and theory
of calculus. The use of graphing technology is required.


2546 *
PRO
BABILITY & STATISTICS

(11
-
12)



(semester)



1 credit

Prerequisite: Enrolled in or having completed Pre
-
Calculus

This course develops

skills in

applying statistical techniques in the decision
-
making process. Topics included are: (1) methods of data
collection, (2) organization of data, and (3) graphical techniques for exhibiting data together with measures of central tend
ency and
variation. Bas
ic laws of probability, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and making inferences from samples are also included.
Practical examples based on real experimental data are used throughout. The use of graphing calculators is encouraged.


SCIENCE

(
Four c
redits required, two credits of

Biology I required)

(Core 40 requirement: Biology I
/Biology I Honors
, and Chemistry I, Integrated
Chem/Phys or Physics, and another
Core 40 science)


3030
/30242





LIFE SCIENCE
/BIOLOGY I

(9
-
10) (

2 year)


4

credits


Life Science
/Biology I

is
a
two
-
year biology program. Life Science
will cover the first semester of the
biology I class
.
The Life
Science course is a non
-
Core 40 course. This two
-
year course

provides students with an introduction to biology based on the Indiana
Academic Standards. Standard I includes the study of molecules, cells, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Standard II includ
es the
historical perspectives of biology


mainly the cont
ributions of Gregor Mendel and Charles Darwin.

Students who complete Biology I
through the two
-
year course will have to obtain two more credits in science to meet the requirements for graduation.






3024
1





BIOLOGY I (L)


(9
-
12)


(year)



2 credits

Biology I provides students with an introduction to biology based on the Indiana Academic Standards. Standard I includes the

study
of molecules, cells, g
enetics, evolution, and ecology. Standard II includes the historical perspectives of biology


mainly the
contributions of Gregor Mendel and Charles Darwin.


30242





BIOLOGY I, HONORS(L)

(9
-
12)


(year)



2 credits

Biology I provid
es students with an introduction to biology based on the Indiana Academic Standards. Standard I includes the study
of molecules, cells, genetics, evolution, zoology, and ecology. Students will investigate biological questions and problems
related to
soci
etal issues. Standard II includes the historical perspectives of biology with emphasis on career opportunities using biologi
cal
skills
.


5276






ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY
(L)

(11
-
12)

(year)


2
credits

Prerequisite: Biology I,

and Chemistry I recommended

Anatomy and Physiology is a course in which students investigate and apply concepts associated with

human anatomy and
physiology. Concepts covered include the process of homeostasis and the essentials of human function at the level of genes,
cells,
tissues, and organ systems. Students will understand the structure, organization, and function of the va
rious components of the
healthy human body in order to apply this knowledge in all health
-
related fields. The course should include ample laboratory
experiences that illustrate the application of the standards to the appropriate cells, tissues, organs, an
d organ systems. Dissection is
both appropriate and necessary. Students should be able to use basis laboratory equipment such as microscopes, balances, and

pipettes.



3108





INTEGRATED CHEMISTRY/
PHYSICS (L)

(10
-
12)

(year)



2 credits

Prerequisite:

Algebra I

Integrated Chemistry
-
Physics is a laboratory
-
based course in which students explore fundamental chemistry and physics principles.
Students enrolled in this course examine, through the process of scientific inquiry, the structure and properties

of matter, chemical
reactions, forces, motion, and the interactions between energy and matter. Working in a laboratory environment, students inv
estigate
the basics of chemistry and physics in solving real
-
world problems that may have personal or social c
onsequences beyond the
classroom.


3064






CHEMISTRY I (L)


(10
-
12)


(year)



2 credits


19

Prerequisite: Algebra

I

and Biology Honors or recommendation from Biology teacher.

This class provides students with an introduction to
chemistry based on the Indiana Academic Standards. Standard I covers the
properties of matter, the nature of chemical change, the structure of matter, and the nature of energy and change. Standard
II covers
the historical perspectives of chemistry. Idea
s from four supporting themes will enable students to understand that science,
mathematics, and technology are interdependent human enterprises, and that scientific knowledge and scientific thinking serve

both
individual and community purposes. In additio
n, the student will explore the uses of chemistry in various careers and learn and
practice laboratory safety.


3060




AP CHEMISTRY (L)

(dual credit course)


(11
-
12) (year)



2 credits

Prerequisite: Chemistry I

Advanced Placement Chemistr
y is a two
-
period course that provides students with the content established by the College Board.
Topics include: I. Structure of matter


atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, molecular
models, and nuclear chemistry.

II.
States of matter


gas
es, liquids, solids and solutions. III. Reactions


reaction types, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics. IV.
Descriptive chemistry


chemical reactivity, periodic table trends, and organic chemistry. V. Laboratory


recording data, making
observat
ions, calculating and interpreting results, and communicating results effectively.

This course may be taken

for dual (college)
credit.



3084






PHYSICS I



(11
-
12)

(year)



2 credits


Physics is
the science of matter and energy. Physics I helps students analyze concepts and principles of matter and energy through
lecture and laboratory study of mechanics, fluid dynamics, heat, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism, and
atomic
and

nuclear physics. Students will acquire an awareness of the history of physics and how it affects our modern life, and they w
ill
explore careers involving physics.


3010


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, ADVANCED

(L)

(dual credit course)

(1
1
-
12)

(year)




2 credits

Prerequisite: Biology I or Biology I Honors

Environmental Science Advanced is an interdisciplinary course that integrates biology, chemistry, earth space and other disci
plines.
Students enrolled in this course conduct in
-
dept
h scientific studies of ecosystems, population dynamics, resource management, and
environmental consequences of natural and anthropogenic processes. Students formulate, design, and carry out laboratory and
field
investigations as an essential course compo
nent. Students completing Environmental Science Advance acquire the essential tools for
understanding the complexities of national and global environmental systems.










3044




EAR
TH AND SPACE SCIENCE I (L)

(10
-
12)
(year)




2 credits

Earth and Space Science I provides a study of earth’s lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and its celestial environment. Th
is course
emphasizes the study of energy at work in forming
and modifying earth materials, landforms, and continents through geologic time.
Students have opportunities to gain an understanding of the history of the development of the earth and space sciences, to ex
plore the
uses of the knowledge of the earth and it
s environment in various careers, and to cope with problems related to personal needs and
social issues.





3046



EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE II, General (L)

(11
-
12)

(year)



2 credits

Prerequisite: B or better average in
Earth /

Space Science I, completion of Algebra I, and/or background in Chemistry and/or Physics

Earth and Space Science II, General, provides for extended laboratory, field, and literature investigations
by means of planetarium
based projects. This course utilizes concepts from other scientific disciplines to assist students in synthesizing theoretica
l models of
the earth and beyond.



5218


PRINCIPLES OF

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES


(9
-
12)


(year)



2 credits




(Project Lead The Way)

Prerequisite: Biology I or concurrent enrollment in Biology I is required.

Principles of the Biomedical Sciences

provides an introduction to this field through “hands
-
on” projects and problems. Student work
involves the study of hu
man medicine, research processes and an introduction to bioinformatics. Students investigate the human body

systems

and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. A theme
through the course is to determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person. After determining the factors res
ponsible f
or
the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life.

Key biological
concepts included in the curriculum are: homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, and defen
se against disease.
Engineering principles such as the design process, feedback loops, fluid dynamics, and the relationship of structure to funct
ion will be

20

included where appropriate. The course is designed to provide an overview of all courses in the Bio
medical Sciences program and to
lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in the subsequent courses. Schools must agree to be part of the P
roject Lead
the Way network and follow all training and data collection requirements
.

This course c
ounts toward the 8
-
10 Career Technical credits
required for core 40 with Technical Honors.






5216




HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS

(Project Lead The Way)

(10
-
12)

(year)


2 cr
e
dits

Prerequisite: Principles of the
Biomedical Sciences

Human Body Systems

is a course designed to engage students in the study of basic human physiology and the care and maintenance
required to support the complex systems. Using a focus on human health, students will employ a variety of mon
itors to examine body
systems (respiratory, circulatory, and nervous) at rest and under stress, and observe the interactions between the various bo
dy systems.
Students will use appropriate software to design and build systems to monitor body functions. Sch
ools must agree to be part of the
Project Lead the Way network and follow all training and data collection requirements.

This course counts toward the 8
-
10 Career
Technical credits required for core 40 with Technical Honors.


5217


MEDICAL INTERVENTION

(Pr
oject Lead The Way)
(11
-
12)


(coming in ’13
-
’14)

(year)


2 credits

Prerequisite: Principles of

Biomedical Sciences and Human Body Systems

Medical Intervention

is a course that studies medical practices including interventions to

support humans in treating

disease and
maintaining health. Using a project
-
based learning

approach, students will investigate various medical interventions that extend and
improve

quality of life, including gene therapy, pharmacology, surgery, prosthetics, rehabilitation, and

suppo
rtive care. Students will
also study the design and development of various interventions

including vascular stents, cochlear implants, and prosthetic limbs.
Lessons will cover the history

of organ transplants and gene therapy with additional readings from
current scientific literature

addressing cutting edge developments. Using 3
-
D imaging software, students will design and

build a model of a therapeutic protein.
Schools must agree to be part of the Project Lead The

Way network and follow all training and
data collection requirements
. This
course counts toward the 8
-
10 Career Technical credits required for core 40 with Technical Honors.



SOCIAL STUDIES

5

credits required
:

2 credits in World History and Civilization, 2 credits in U.S. History, and 1 credi
t in Government

Core 40:

2 credits in World History and Civilization, 2 credits in U.S. History, 1 credit in Government, and 1 credit in Economics





1548



WORLD HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION



(9
-
12) (year) 2 credits

World History and Civilization provides for the study of selected world cultures and civilizations. This course provides a ba
sis for
students to compare and analyze patterns of cultures, emphasizing both diversity and commonality of human experience and be
havior.
Students will study the interactions of cultures and the connections among civilizations from earliest times to present. This

course is
designed to focus on the following areas: 1) prehistory; (2) early world civilizations of the Middle East and Af
rica; (3) classical
civilizations of Europe,
and

Africa, and (4) and the development of modern societies. Assigned readings are difficult.








1538

*
TOPICS IN HISTORY (
Late Twentieth Century American History
)

(11
-
12)

(semester)




1 credit







(dual credit course)

This is an adv
anced U.S. History class that

studies
U.S. History

from the Vietnam War on to present day
. This will be an in depth
study of the 1970’s to the present using historical research and primary

sources.

This course may be
taken

for dual (college) credit.



1542



UNITED STATES HISTORY

(dual credit course)


(11)


(year)


2 credits

Students in U.S. History build on concepts developed in their pre
vious studies of American History. Students will identify and review
significant events, figures, and movements in early American History. Major emphasis in this course will be on historical ev
ents in
the late 19
th

and 20
th

centuries and the geographical
, social, and economic influences in this time period. Students will demonstrate the
ability to trace and analyze chronological periods and relate significant themes and concepts to the time periods. Students w
ill be able
to sequence historical events, ex
amine cause and effect, identify different perspectives, and relate historical situations to current
issues. Students will read a variety of primary sources and secondary sources to develop skills in organizing and analyzing
information. Students are enco
uraged to practice problem solving techniques and citizenship skills in application to historical events
and current issues. This course can be
taken

as dual (college) credit.


1532
*PSYCHOLOGY

(dual cre
dit course)


(11
-
12)

(semester) 1 credit


21

Psychology provides an opportunity to study individual and group behavior. Content for the course includes knowledge and met
hods
of noted psychologists as well as insights into human behavior patt
erns and adjustments to social problems. The students will develop
a greater insight
into various mental disorders and then causes
. In addition, they will become aware of and more sensitive to the
feelings of others.
This course can be
taken

as dual (college) credit.



1534

*SOCIOLOGY

(dual credit course) (11
-
12)


(semester) 1 credit

Sociology deals with man in relation to society. Through an analysis of groups in socie
ty, such as education, economics, religion,
government and family, the role of the individual is clarified. In analyzing man's values and norms, students learn how the
rules
governing society are established. Much of the course is devoted to the study of

social problems and the role of the individual
regarding those problems. Prevailing social attitudes are analyzed objectively.






1514






*
ECONOMICS



(12)



(semester)


1 credit

Economics examines the

economic decision
-
making process from the viewpoint of the individual consumer acting as a voter in the
market place. Opportunity
-
cost is studied from a cost
-
benefit analysis approach. Alternative economic systems are examined to
expand the choice conce
pt of what, how, and for whom goods will be produced. Part of the course identifies how individual choices
affect supply and demand and how businesses are formed to supply goods and services to meet demand. Failures in the market p
lace
are also considere
d. Economics explores the relationships of economic decision
-
making and business cycles, monetary policy, and
fiscal policy. The role of decision
-
making in relationship to selected topics such as international trade and choices within the area of
policy
relating to energy, agriculture, and health are also emphasized.
This course fulfills the Personal Finance requirement.



1540 *
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

(dual credit course)

(12)


(seme
ster)



1 credit

United States Government provides an opportunity to explore governing processes, elements of political theory, and local, sta
te, and
national governmental structures. Opportunities should be provided for each student to examine
, evaluate, and make decisions
concerning the operation of our representative system of government. The content includes topics such as backgrounds and
foundations of our system with emphasis on
the United States Constitution
; legislative, executive, and
judicial functions at all levels
and in all units of government; government, finance, elections and political parties; and individual rights and responsibilit
ies.

This
course may be
taken

for dual (college) credit.


1512


*
CURRENT PROBLEMS, ISSUES, AND
EVENTS


(11
-
12)

(semester)




1 credit

Current Problems, Issues, and Events gives students the opportunity to apply investigative and inquiry techniques to the stud
y of
significant international and domestic problems and issues. Students develop comp
etence in (1) recognizing cause and effect
relationships, (2) recognizing fallacies in reasoning and propaganda devices, (3) synthesizing knowledge into useful patterns
, (4)
stating and testing hypotheses, and (5) generalizing based on evidence. Problems
or issues selected will have contemporary historical
significance and will be studies from the viewpoint of the social science disciplines.


ENGINEERING AND
TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

Technology Education is primarily concerned with a study of industry which
involves the technical application and theory, tools,
machines, materials, operations used, the problems encountered, variety of occupations available, and contributions made to o
ur
present standard of living. Technology Education is the knowledge of effic
ient and appropriate action developed by humans to extend
their potential for controlling their environment.


Technology Education is known for its purposeful activity base which provides more meaningful and lasting learning experience
s than
do passive lea
rning models. Students can easily become involved in simulations, problem solving activities, and other laboratory
experiences that develop a wide variety of general understandings that relate to industry, technology, and society.


4812


INTRODUCTION TO E
NGINEERING DESIGN

(dual credit course)

(9
-
12)


(year)


2 credits




(Project Lead the Way)

Prerequisite: The student must have completed or is presently enrolled in Algebra I.

Introduction to Engineering Design is an introductory course which develops stu
dent problem solving skills with emphasis placed on
the development of three
-
dimensional solid models. Students will work from sketching simple geometric shapes to applying a solid
modeling computer software package. They will learn a problem solving des
ign process and how it is used in industry to manufacture
a product. The Computer Aided Design System (CAD) will also be used to analyze and evaluate the product design. The techniq
ues

22

learned, and equipment u
sed, is state of the art and is

currently bei
ng used by engineers throughout the United States.
This course can
be offered as dual (college) credit.



4814

PLTW:
PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

(dual credit course)

(10
-
12)


(year)


2 credits


Prerequisite:
The student must have
completed

Introduction to Engineering Design
.

Principles of Engineering is a broad
-
based survey course designed to help students understand the fi
el
d of engineering and engineering
technology and its career possibilities. Students will develop engineering

problem solving skills that are involved in postsecondary
education programs and engineering
related
careers. They will also learn how engineers address concerns about the social and
political consequences of technological change.
This course can be tak
en

as dual (college) credit.



4810

PLTW:
COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING

(dual credit course)

(1
0
-
12) (year)

2 credits

Prerequisite:
The student must have completed
Introduction to Engineering Desi
gn.



This
PLTW course applies principles of rapid prototyping, robotics and automation. Students use CNC equipment to produce actual
models of their three
-
dimensional designs. Fundamental concepts of robotics used in automated manufacturing and design analysis are
i
ncluded.


This course may be taken

for dual (college) credit
.


5698


PLTW :
ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

(dual credit course)


(
11
-
12)


(year)


2 credits

Prerequisite:
The student must have completed
Int
roduction to Engineering Design and

Principles of Engineering
.

Engi
neering Design and Development
requires students to formulate the solution to an open
-
ended engineering
design
question. With
a community mentor and skills gained in their previous courses, students create written reports o
n their applications, defend the
ir
designs
, and submit them to a panel
of outside reviewers at the end of the school year. The student has the potential to earn their first
legal design patent.



5640


COMPUTERS IN DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

(dual credit course)

(9
-
12)


(year)



2 credits

(formerly
Drafting and Computer Aided Design (CAD)
)

provides students with in depth instruction on computer aided design and
basic drafting skills. This class emphasizes neatness, accuracy, and precise me
asurements and is recommended for all students who
plan to work in the field of architecture, graphic design or technology. Students will learn AutoCAD and, upon course comple
tion,
will be permitted to take an AutoCAD certification exam. This certificatio
n is industry recognized and the student will have the
potential to upgrade his/her certification from Associate to Professional level with additional experience in the Engineering

department.




4784

*
INTRODUCTION TO ADVANCED MANUFAC
TURING AND LOGISTCS


(9
-
12) (semester)


1 credit

(Formerly Manufacturing Systems) This

course will provide an introduction to manufacturing design through blueprint reading.
Students will learn basic manufacturing skills as they manufacture products. The students will use a variety of materials an
d processes
to develop these skills. A go
od work ethic is essential in this class. A basic understanding of math principles is necessary
.


5644




ADV


MANUFACTURING I

(11
-
12)



(year)


2 credits

Prerequisite
11
th

or 12
th

grade student that has completed or is enrolled in Geometry.

The Engineering and
Manufacturing I class will consist of students using industry level training modules to learn multiple aspects of
engineering and advanced manufacturing. Student
s will encounter modules in the areas of:
Design Processes, Manufacturing
Processes, Quality Assurance, Automated Material Handling, Fluid Power, Electrical Systems, Mechanisms Computer
Control and Team and Corporate Concepts.
Students will be expected t
o complete

one large design project.

Students will learn by
doing computer simulations and following technical instruction manuals using a “hands
-
on


approach. This class was developed to
accommodate students considering a career in engineering/advanced m
anufacturing fields.



5651




ADV.


MANUFACTURING II

(12)


(coming in ‘13
-
’14)

(year)


2 credits

Prerequi
site:
Adv.


Manufacturing I

The
Engineering &

Manufacturing II class will be a continuation of
Engineering &
Advanced Manufacturing I
class.

Students will learn by doing computer simulations and following technical instruction manuals using a “hands
-
on approach. This
class was developed to accommodate students considering a career in engineering/advanced manufacturing fields. It is pos
sible for
students to qualify for industry recognized certification
.





5510
AUTOMO
TIVE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY


(
10
-
12)


(year
)

Grade 10

Auto I
-

2

credits

(1 per.)












Grade 11

Auto II
-

4

cr
edits

(2 per.)


23











Grade 12

Auto III


6 credits (3 per.)


*This class may count for twelve dual credits with Ivy Tech Community College. (The student must have no grade lower than a
B for
all four semesters.)

The purpose of this course is to provide

students with a core curriculum to enable them to obtain the knowledge
and skills to become technicians in the automotive industry. Having gained these basic competencies, the future technician w
ill study
five or more of the eight Automotive Service Exce
llence or A.S.E. areas:
Brakes, Electrical/Electronic Systems, Engine
Performance, Suspension and Steering, Engine Repair,
Automatic Transmission and Transaxle, Heating and Air Conditioning, and
Manual and Drive Train and Axles. Emphasis will be on prepa
ring the students for the technician certification through A.S.E. testing.
Included will be both classroom and hands
-
on job tasks. The student must
pass each semester

with a “C” or better average and
recommendation from the instructor in order to move to

the next semester in Automotive Service Technology. Class size is limited to
18 students and students will be selected
through an interview process.
Students must earn
a “C” or better average and
recommendati
on
from the instructor

to continue into the n
ext course
.




W
ORLD

LANGUAGES

The purpose of world language education is to prepare young people to become culturally sensitive and communicatively compete
nt
travelers, students, and/or workers in other societies and cultures

in the world, to interact positively and more effectively with the
native speakers they meet and work with in this country, and to develop more of those capabilities needed for productive citi
zenship in
Indiana, the United States, and the world.


2120





SPANISH I

(9
-
12)



(year)

2 credits

Spanish I provides an introduction to the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and to the specific reasons for studying Sp
anish. Students
are able to demonstrate an understanding of effective approaches to language learning and of many aspects of Hispanic culture
.
Students engage in both individual and group learning situations.
Students will be expected to participate in
individual and paired
speaking, and listening activities using laboratory software.
The major emphasis of this course is providing a foundation for further
study of Spanish. Spanish I allows students to:



read specific words and phrases within context,
such as weather forecasts, menus, and schedules;



understand the conj
ugations of regular and irregular
verbs in the present tense form;



comprehend brief written and spoken directions;



respond to oral commands using oral and non
-
verbal responses;



read short
texts on basic topics such as family, likes and dislikes, and entertainment;



ask and answer simple questions related to interests and needs, both orally


and in written form;



express physical characteristics and personality traits of themselv
es


and others;




become familiar with and practice the basic rules of Spanish pronunciation;




understand principal differences between the verbs "ser" and "estar".

In addition, students learn:




about the culture of various Spa
nish speaking countries;




the basic geographical locations and features of Mexico and Spain;




the major Hispanic holidays.

21
22




SPANISH II


(10
-
12)



(year) 2 credits

Spanish II is a continuation of Spanish I and therefore students are expected to recall and apply Spanish I material.
In Spanish II,
students participate in conversations that require more specific vocabulary and grammat
ical knowledge. An emphasis is placed on
both spoken and written communication. In this course, students expand their ability to express themselves by speaking about
the
present, the past and the future.
Students will be expected to participate in indivi
dual and paired speaking, and listening activities
using laboratory software.
Spanish II allows students to:



interact in various social contexts using appropriate vocabulary choices and sentence structure;



participate in conversations on topics such as
childhood, likes and dislikes, occupations,
etc.
;



deliver short, prepared presentations;



conjugate and apply rules for using the two past tenses;



demonstrate appropriate usage of direct and indirect objects;



use polite commands and review informal
commands;



distinguish between "por" and "para";



conjugate verbs in the future and conditional tenses;



become familiar with the use of negatives;



read aloud with appropriate pronunciation and intonation;



write reasonable responses to a given topic; and



sum
marize facts after reading short texts.

Additionally, students learn about:


24



the culture of selected Hispanic countries;



major Hispanic holidays.


2124






SPANISH III

(11
-
12)




(year)



2

credits

Spanish II
I

is a continuation of Spanish I
I

and therefore students are expected to recall and apply Spanish I
I

material.

Spanish III
allows students to develop their existing language skills through more extensive reading, speaking, and writing.
This course provides
instruction that enables students to better understand and appreciate Hispanic cultures and values.
Students will be expected to
participate in individual and paired speaking, and listening activities using laboratory software.


Studen
ts in Spanish III are able to:



read and comprehend short stories, poetry, news and magazine articles,
etc.
;



write summaries, short essays and compositions;



deliver prepared and impromptu presentations on familiar topics;



understand and apply rules for
pronunciation and intonation;



write well
-
planned, meaningful responses to various prompts;



understand isolated words and phrases from authentic spoken Spanish;



respond to factual and interpretive questions using a variety of grammatical structures;



conjuga
te verbs in the present subjunctive and command forms;



conjugate verbs in the present perfect and past perfect tenses;



listen, understand, and respond to short passages in the foreign language;



interact in short, meaningful conversations with native
speakers; and



discuss visual and performance artists of various Spanish speaking countries.

Additionally, students will



cook authentic Hispanic dishes;



continue to build on their existing knowledge of foreign cultures.


2126







SPANISH IV

(dual cr
edit course)


(12)


(year)



2 credits

In Spanish IV, a major emphasis is placed on review of previous knowledge and fine points of Spanish grammar. These students

are
willing to engage in conversations both inside and outside of the cl
assroom with their peers, as well as with native speakers.
Students
will be expected to participate in individual and paired speaking, and listening activities using laboratory software.

This course
enables the students to:



review verb tenses and vocabula
ry;



read longer authentic materials for comprehension and critical analysis;



express opinions and judgments appropriately;



explore complex points of Spanish grammar; such as past subjunctive



write well
-
organized compositions on prepared topics;



give oral p
resentations on cultural topics, such as historical and current events and major figures in Spanish and Latin American histor
y;



study

Spanish history;



discuss Hispanic music traditions;



interpret gestures and non
-
verbal communication;



listen, understand ,
and respond to short passages in the foreign language;



paraphrase what has been said or read; and



adapt language to specific social settings and audiences,



participat
e in cultural opportunities/experiences in authentic settings



explore artistic contributio
ns of Latinos,



focus on the use of Spanish in specific contexts, such as business, medical, etc.










2040









GERMAN I


(9
-
12)


(year) 2 credits

German I provides students with many exciting opportunities to learn German through various written, spoken, a
nd cultural activities.
Students engage in individual and small group situations in order to gain an understanding of basic German grammar and to dis
play
acquired speaking skills. With this in mind, the student should be able to:



introduce themselves an
d tell about their school, their home, and their interests and to ask questions about the same subjects;



make a distinction between the familiar and the polite forms of address and to use the appropriate forms in conversation and
writing;



ask and answer o
ther simple questions and statements;



read, write, and give brief directions of daily activities;



tell time and read simple time related aspects of the language



discuss topics of school, freetime, family, and friends




read simple readings and answer questions according to the text;



express physical characteristics and personality traits of themselves and others;



practice basic rules of German pronunciation; and



discuss activities using present tense and nominative and

accusative cases.

Additionally, students learn:



similarities and differences between the German culture or landmarks in the surrounding area and the same aspect of our cultu
re or landmarks in
Germany;


25



customs related to holidays; and



the appropriate ways
to respond to introductions and use courtesy behaviors,



speaking and listening skills through the Foreign Language Lab and Genesis software.



2042








GERMAN II



(10
-
12) (year)



2 credit

Germ
an II
begins with a

review of grammar, pronunciation, and phrases

from
German I
. The students build their speaking skills
significantly by
recalling and applying previous knowledge and
learning more specific vocabulary and grammatical knowledge. This
knowledge

greatly expands the student’s ability to read and write in German II. Students should be able to:



understand main ideas and facts from simple materials over familiar topics;



develop and deliver short, prepared presentations in German;



discuss topics such as likes and dislikes,
health
, and travel (
friendship and fashion
);



write appropriate responses to a given situation;



demonstrate a more advanced grammar;



ask and give directions



demonstrate a knowledge of prepositions;



use verbs in pr
esent perfect and imperfect;



use present and past tense verbs; and



use appropriate pronunciation and intonation.

Additionally students learn:



about familiar landmarks and customs such as: castles, churches, zoos, festivals, and celebrations; and



different
aspects of the culture, including the visual arts, architecture, literature, and music using the target language,



speaking and listening skills through the Foreign Language Lab and Genesis software.


2044








GERMAN III



(11
-
12)

(y
ear) 2 credits

German III reinforces the grammar and vocabulary used in the first two years, and introduces finer points of grammar and some
what
more difficult vocabulary. The course is designed to compare cultures and values of people a
s well as further developing language
skills using the target language. Students should be able to:



talk about a trip to Germany, a long and interesting weekend, and transportation systems in more detail;



read short selections of poetry,
newspaper
, and
short stories;



write summaries and brief compositions;



Comprehend and compose fairytales, while focusing on present
perfect
and imperfect;



develop and deliver prepared and impromptu presentations on familiar topics;



use and understand passive voice; and



us
e appropriate pronunciation and intonation.



read, discuss, and write about competitions, history, the environment, why to learn a language and traveling

In addition, students explore in depth aspects of German culture and history. They will also acquire s
peaking and listening skills through the Foreign Language Lab and
Genesis software.


2046







GERMAN IV


(12)



(year)

2 credits

In German IV, a major emphasis is placed on reviewing previous knowledge and fine points of the German language. This

course
enables students to:



review all verb tenses;



comprehensively use knowledge acquired in 1
st
, 2
nd
, and 3
rd

year in written and spoken situations;



discuss current events in Germany



restate what someone else has said;



write well
-
organized compositions
or prepared material;



express opinions and judgments appropriately; and



read for comprehension from a variety of authentic materials

Students will also:



adjust speech appropriate to the situation and audience; and



participate appropriately in a variety
of specific circumstances,



practice their speaking and listening skills through the Foreign Language Lab and Genesis software.






MULTIDISCIPLINARY ELECTIVE
S/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION


0
590



BASIC SKILLS DEVELOPMENT


Reading & Writ
ing

(9
-
12)

(
semester or year
)1
or 2
credit
s

(This course is not a core 40 elective.)

Basic Skills Development is a course which provides students
with an IEP
continuing opportunities to develop basic skills including:
(1) reading


fluency, vocabulary development, comprehension strategies, (2) writing


development, language conventions, (3)
listening, (4) speaking, (5) study and organizational skills, and (8)
problem
-
solving skills that are essential for high school course work
achievement. Determination of the skills to be emphasized in this course is based on the Indiana State Academic Standards, a
nd

26

individual student needs. Skills selected will also assis
t in preparing students for success on the

Core 40 English 10
Graduation
Qualifying Exam.




0520


PEER TUTORING


(
11
-

12) (semester or year)


1 or 2 credits

Peer tutoring pr
ovides students with an organized experience to assist students in grades nine to twelve, through a helping relationship,
with their studies and personal growth and development.


5902






ICE CLASS
-
VOCATIONAL


(12)

(year)





2

credit
s

ICE class will cover a variety of topics including but not limited to the following: safety on the job, employer expectation
s, team
work, written and verbal communication, career research, application/interview process, diversities in the workplace, taxat
ion,
insurance, banking services, and computer skills. Students will go through a selection process before being permitted in the

ICE
program. This class must be taken in order to participate in the
On Job Training

part of the ICE program.
This class fu
lfills the
Personal Finance requirement.


5900




ICE
-
ON THE JOB TRAINING
-
VOCATIONAL

(1
2)



(year)



2


4
credits

Students enrolled in ICE class will have 1


2 periods of released time to gain job
-
site experience. They
will be placed on
-
the
-
job
under the direct supervision of experienced employers who serve as the on
-
the
-
job trainers in accordance with pre
-
determined training
plans and agreements. The trainer will assist in evaluating the student’s job performance. Stu
dents will

be required to

work

a
minimum of fifteen hours a week to receive two credits per semester.






Some

vocational classes are

offered at a local high school
-


other than Heritage Hills. Each student will

be

responsible for his/her
own transportation
and a
student
may

have to enroll in a study hall for transportation purposes
. Students must apply for
accep
tance into off
-
campus programs.

If the student chooses to withdraw from the program before its completion
, the student will
be required to reimburse the school corpo
ration for the program expenses, if applicable.



5408
EDUCATION PROFESSIONS I

(Heritage Hills)

(12)

2 period class (
year
)

2 credits

Education Pro
fessions

prepares students for employment in education and related careers and provides the foundation for study in
higher education that leads to teaching and other education
-
related careers. A project
-
based approach that utilizes higher order
thinking, communica
tion, leadership, and management processes is recommended in order to integrate suggested topics into the study
of education professions. The course of study includes, but is not limited to: planning and guiding developmentally appropria
te
activities for s
chool
-
age children; developmentally appropriate practices of guidance and discipline; application of basic health and
safety principles when working with children; overview of management and operation of teaching/learning centers in educationa
l
settings; I
ndiana state regulations and licensing requirements related to school
-
age children; and employability skills. Intensive
laboratory or field experiences in one or more classroom settings, resumes, and career portfolios are required components. A
standards
-
b
ased plan for each student guides the student's laboratory/field experiences. Students are monitored in their laboratory/fiel
d
experiences by the Education professions teacher. Articulation with postsecondary programs is encouraged. This course is
recommen
ded for students with interests in education and training career paths and provides the foundation for study in higher
education that leads to careers in education.


5580



CONSTRUCTION

TECHNOLOGY

(S
outhridge

or

Tell City
)

(12)

year



6 c
redits

Buildi
ng Trades Technology is a
three period

yearlong course, that includes classroom and laboratory experiences concerned with the
erection, installation, maintenance, and repair of buildings, homes, and other structures using assorted materials such as wo
od, m
etal,
stone, brick, glass, concrete, or composition substances. Instruction covers a variety of activities such as cost estimating
, cutting,
fitting, fastening, and finishing various materials; the uses of a variety of hand and power tools; and blueprint
reading and following
technical specifications. Knowledge concerning the physical properties of materials should be emphasized. Instruction in pl
astering,
masonry, tile setting, dry wall installation , plumbing, residential wiring and roofing should be c
overed in the course of study.
Addition areas of instruction can include operation and maintenance of heavy equipment used in the construction industry and
processes for digging, grading, clearing, and excavating. Students will develop accurate and preci
se measuring skills and an advanced
understanding of volume and area calculations as well as the advanced mathematical skills required for construction of rafter
s, stair
stringers, and complex angles. Estimation skills will be strengthened through activit
ies such as ordering materials and planning
construction jobs. Scientific principles will be reinforced through weight load exercises, span length determinations, and t
he study of
relative strength. Reading skills as well as oral and written communicatio
n skills will also be emphasized to ensure students abilities
to accurately interpret instructions and provide information to customers and colleagues.



27

5822




CRIMINAL JUSTICE

(Jasper)




(12)

year



4 credits

(Formerly law enforcement)
Criminal Justice

is a
two period

year long course that includes specialized classroom and practical
experiences related to public safety occupations such as law enforcement, loss protection services, and homeland security. T
raining is
based on standards and content simil
ar to that provided by officially designated law enforcement agencies. Instruction includes
procedures for patrolling on foot or in an automobile during the day or night; dealing with misdemeanors, felonies, traffic v
iolations,
and accidents; investigativ
e and evidence collection procedures; making arrests; and testifying in court. Students will have
opportunities to use mathematical skills in crash reconstruction and analysis activities requiring measurements and performan
ce of
speed/acceleration calcula
tions. Additional activities simulating criminal investigations will be used to teach scientific knowledge
related to anatomy, biology, and chemistry. Oral and written communication skills should be reinforced through activities th
at model
public relatio
ns and crime prevention efforts as well as the preparation of police reports.


5282



HEALTH CAREERS I

(Jasper

or

Tell City)
PRE
-
PHARMACY
(Jasper)

(12) year

4


6
credits

Prerequisites: Recommended Biology I and Chemistry

Health Careers I is a
two

or three
period

year long course. The course content includes a core of entry level skills common to one
specific health career such as patient nursing care, dental care, animal care, medical laboratory, and public health. Course

content
includes an int
roduction t health care systems, anatomy, physiology, and medical terminology. Also included are leadership skills
developed through membership in the student youth organization, Health Occupations Students of America. During the second
semester, instruc
tion is integrated with core entry
-
level skills. The concept of coping with illness is also introduced. In addition, this
course includes work ethics and job seeking skills such as job applications, resumes, and interviews. An in
-
school laboratory provi
des
hands
-
on, simulated experiences. An extended laboratory experience may also be used as method of providing clinical exposure to
the actual health care work setting.

In the extended laboratory, students have the opportunity to develop basic job skills
in a clinical
setting. It is an extension of the in
-
school laboratory.
Can be taken for dual credit


3 credits for course completion, plus 5 credits if
earn CNA and attend Ivy Tech. * CNA is an option at Tell City, but not Jasper.


5230





COMPUTER T
ECH SUPPORT


(Heritage Hills)

(
11
-
12)

year



4 credits

Prerequisites: Algebra I

and Computer Applications

This course
is a
two period

year long course that will prepare students for careers dealing with information technology deployment.
Students will gain the necessary skills to implement computer systems and software, provide technical assistance, and mange
information systems. Skil
ls needed to acquire certifications will be an integral part of this program. Essential skill areas include but
are not limited to: General Computer Usage Skills, Management Information Systems; Overall Use of Network System; Basic
Programming; Basic Soft
ware Development; Basic Interactive Multimedia Development; Business Skills; Management Skills.


5234




NETWORK FUNDAMENTALS

(Heritage Hills) (11
-
12) year

4 credits

Prerequisites: Algebra I and Computer
Applications

This course

is a career and technical education business and information technology course that will prepare students for careers in
business and industry working with network systems. Students will acquire skills needed to plan, design, install, maintain,
and
manag
e network solutions used in business and industry. Students will develop an understanding of IT professionalism including th
e
importance of ethics, communication skills, and knowledge of the “virtual workplace.” Skills acquired will assist students i
n
ob
taining related networking systems certifications; e.g., A+, Cisco CCNA and CCNP, Security+, Network+, Novell CNA and CNE,
Microsoft MCSE, etc. Essential skill areas include but are not limited to: Computer Hardware Maintenance; Network Operation
s;
Netwo
rk Administration; Basic Network Design Theory; Network Troubleshooting; Network Security; and Wireless
Communications.
Business Professionals of America (BPA) is the co
-
curricular organization associated with this course
and
integrates its programs and s
ervices into the business classroom.


5776


WELDING TECHNOLOGY

(Tell City)

(12)



year

4 credits

Welding Technology includes classroom and laboratory experiences that develop

a variety of skills detailed in American Welding
Society (AWS) Entry Level Guidelines and Certifications. Areas of study include electric welding and flame and plasma cutting
.
Instructional activities emphasize properties of metals, safety issues, bluepri
nt reading, electrical principles, welding symbols, and
mechanical drawing through projects and exercises that teach students how to weld industrial metals in four basic welding pos
itions.
Reinforcement of mathematical skills in geometry, precision measure
ment, and estimation will be part of the daily instruction.
Understanding the principles of metallurgy, gases, and materials science is integral to this course. Students may demonstrate

proficiency and earn certification(s) through AWS.