Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

thunderclingAI and Robotics

Nov 13, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

237 views




Assistive Technologies and Inclusive
Solutions for All





















D
2
.
4
.
Intermediate report on open source AT software, and related
projects,

studies, papers, etc, categorised according the faceted
classification

developed in WP1.


Project Acronym

ATIS4all

Grant Agreement Number

CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

Project Title

Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All


Deliverable

No.

D
2
.
4

Work package No.

WP2

Work package Title

Compilation of items and categorisation

Authors

K Votis

(
CERTH/ITI
)

Status

Draft

Dissemination Level

Public

Delivery Date

3/1/2012

Number of Pages

49




i

European Thematic Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European

Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



Version History

Revision

Date

Author

Organisation

Description

1

5
/
10
/
2011

K Votis

CERTH/ITI

First ToC

2

15/11/2011

K Votis

CERTH/ITI

First Version with several
resources, tools ,
products and
projects.

3

28/11/2011

A Salmeron

TECH

Second revision with
comments

4

14/12/2011

A Salmeron

TECH

Second draft

5

20/12/2011

K Votis

CERTH/ITI

Updated version with
tools, projects, hardware,
software relevant to
Deliverable’s objectives.

6

3/1/2012

K
Votis

CERTH/ITI

Updated version with
standards and legislation
relevant to Deliverable’s
objectives.






ii

European Thematic Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European

Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



Table of contents

D2.4. Intermediate report on open source AT software, and related projects, studies,
papers, etc, categorised according the faceted classification developed in WP1.

.........

1

Project Acronym
................................
................................
................................
....

1

ATIS4all

................................
................................
................................
...............

1

Grant Agreement Number

................................
................................
......................

1

CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

................................
................................
.......

1

Project Title

................................
................................
................................
..........

1

Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

................................
...............

1

1

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

................................
................................
....................

1

2

INTRODUCTION

................................
................................
.............................

2

2.1

About this Deliverable

................................
................................
..............

3

2.2

Who is the Deliverable for?

................................
................................
.......

3

3

METHODOLOGY

................................
................................
.............................

4

4

SELECTED TYPE OF CONTENTS FOR ATIS4ALL R&D COMMUNITY

......................

5

4.1

Type of contents

................................
................................
......................

5

4.2

Classification of the contents

................................
................................
.....

6

5

CRITERIA TO SELECT THE SOURCES OF INFORMATION

................................
....

8

6

PROJECTS

................................
................................
................................
......

9

6.1

Hot R&D topics and trends

................................
................................
........

9

6.1.1

Adaptive Computer Technology

................................
..........................

9

6.1.2

Manipulation

................................
................................
....................

12

6.1.3

Social Networks

................................
................................
................

16

6.1.4

Mobility

................................
................................
...........................

17

6.1.5

Employment

................................
................................
.....................

19

6.1.6

Public services

................................
................................
..................

22

6.1.7

Home

................................
................................
..............................

23

6.1.8

Media

................................
................................
..............................

28

6.2

Technological trends

................................
................................
...............

31

6.2.1

Virtual user
-
models

................................
................................
...........

31

6.2.2

Virtual reality

................................
................................
...................

32

8

PUBLICATIONS

................................
................................
..............................

34



iii

European Thematic Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European

Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



9

SOFTWARE

................................
................................
................................
...

34

9.1.1

Embedded AT (i.e.: in browsers)

................................
........................

34

9.1.2

Portable ATs

................................
................................
....................

34

9.1.3

Systems of systems: systems (ATs) build upon the integration of smaller
systems

35

9.1.4

ATs in the cloud

................................
................................
...............

35

10

SERVICES

................................
................................
................................
..

36

10.1

AT Events

................................
................................
...............................

36

10.2

AT Training and Courses

................................
................................
..........

36

10.3

Job vacancies in AT sector

................................
................................
.......

37

11

LEGISLATION & STANDARDS

................................
................................
......

38

11.1

Legislation

................................
................................
..............................

38

11.2

Analysi
s of standards in assistive technology

................................
.............

38

12

CONCLUSIONS

................................
................................
...........................

43

13

REFERENCES

................................
................................
.............................

43


List of Figures

Figure 1:
Set of features for EASTIN 2.0 portal highlighting “R&D community” section

2

Figure 3: EZ Access keypad to the right of the keyboard
................................
..........

15

Figure 4: The IBM Accessible Travel Self
-
service Kiosk

................................
............

15

Figure 5: Web
-
based interactions in sign lan
guage

................................
..................

16

Figure 6: Car support strap

................................
................................
...................

17

Figure 7: Wheelchair babycarrier

................................
................................
...........

17

Figure 8: Football player

................................
................................
.......................

18

Figure 9: SMILING’s motorized shoes

................................
................................
.....

18

Figure 10: A Harlequins rugby league player being analysed with the SMART system

.

19

Figure 11: Video interpretation

................................
................................
..............

21

Figure 12: LIREC’s digital and interactive companions

................................
.............

24

Figure 13: Telehealth product


Blood pressure monitor

................................
..........

25

Figure 14: MonAMI’s services

................................
................................
................

27

Figure 15: Cogknow Day Navigator

................................
................................
........

27

Figure 16: Accessible bathroom

................................
................................
.............

28

Figure

17: Robotic Nabaztag rabbit

................................
................................
........

31

Figure 18: Czech companion demonstration

................................
...........................

32

Figure 19: Virtual environment

................................
................................
..............

32

Figure 20: Haptic device for hand rehabilitation

................................
......................

35




iv

European Thematic Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European

Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



List of Tables

No se encuentran elementos de tabla de ilustraciones.




European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



1

1

EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY

[CERTH]

ATIS4ALL requires a report to be laid before M12 describing the research activity
Europe has funded to improve equipment for disabled and older people, known as
Assistive Technology.

The definition for assistive technology is as follows: “Assistive Technol
ogy is any
product or service designed to enable independence for disabled and older people.”
This broad definition means that a wide range of products and services are eligible
for inclusion in the report, both high and low tech. Technological advances me
an
that the breadth of work covered is constantly expanding. The research covers not
only specific products, but also systems, combinations of technologies, and
interfaces to new mainstream technology, for example the internet.

This Deliverable aims to
reflect research and development activity in relation to a
wide range of impairments and health conditions and also to reflect the range of
funding programmes across health, social care, education, housing and
employment. The Deliverable covers any aspect
of research and development work
in assistive technology, including service provision, research on motivation, cost or
patterns of use, as well as technological development.



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



2

2

INTRODUCTION

[CERTH, TECH]

ATIS4ALL thematic network is working to establish an
o
pen, collaborative portal
offering

reliable information
on ICT
-
based AT products, inclusive solutions and
R&D initiatives in this field and
fostering online discussion, exchange of
knowledge and expertise
,

and sharing of information
among key actors and
en
d users. In order to reach this objective, ATIS4all is working in collaboration with
another Thematic Network (namely, ETNA). Both thematic networks belong to the
cluster ETNATIS.

Both networks will work to set up the “EASTIN 2.0” portal, a reference onli
ne portal
providing a seamless access to:


A “Search Engine” area resulting from ETNA network.


A “Community” area from ATIS4ALL network.


Figure
1
:
Set of features for EASTIN 2.0 portal highlighting “R&D community” section


The bas
ic idea behind the integration is to give end users of the EASTIN 2.0 portal not
only the option to get information from an specific ICT
-
based AT product, but also the
possibility of expressing and receiving their opinion and experience on ICT
-
based ATs
pr
oducts and services through a community. And this additional information should be
the core of the “R&D community” area of the ATIS4ALL Community.

The “R&D community” term refers to an online meeting point for key actors interested
in interacting, and prov
iding and accessing to relevant information in the field of ICT
ATs, inclusive solutions, and related services, and R&D and cutting edge technologies
applied to them.



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



3

2.1

About this Deliverable

This deliverable contains the first results of a selection of rel
evant information on ICT
-
based ATs that should be supported by this “R&D community” area at the ATIS4ALL
Web Community.

The deliverable is the final result of the joint work of the ATIS4ALL consortium in task
T2.2.
2

“Gathering of information on R&D and cut
ting edge technologies applied to ICT
ATs and inclusive solutions (1st part)”
.

The general objective of task T2.2.2 was to collect relevant information on R&D and
cutting edge technologies applied to ICT ATs and inclusive solutions, according to the
subjec
t heading classification defined in WP1. This task will continue also in WP3.
When finished, it will provide valuable input to the “R&D community”.

The activities in T2.2.2 have included:


Analysis and priori
ti
zation of the type of contents
1

for the “R&
D community”.


Selection of those that should complement the contents provided by ETNA
network.


Identification of an initial set of available
sources of information

of the selected
type of contents of the “R&D community”.

It is important highlight the fact that
the present document has been elaborated
taking in account in all moment, the work developed by the thematic
network ETNA, with the main objective of not duplicate information
. In this
sense is important to mention t
hat the thematic network ETNA includes in its proposal
of search engine, not only ICT based AT products, but also, sources of information.

2.2

Who is the Deliverable for?

This
Deliverable

is of interest to a broad audience including:



members of Parliament, g
overnment decision makers and research funding
organisations who can assess the impact of the investment made in
research and development in this area and identify areas that may require
future funding;




1

The term “Type of content” will be used to describe any
“unit of content” made available
online through

the

thematic network.



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



4



the research community and industry who can identify

useful activity in their
area of interest and who may wish to use the links to
ATIS4ALL

website to
make contact with partner organisations and avoid duplication of effort;



service providers and people who use assistive technology or support others
to use

assistive technology and who wish to understand how advances in
technology can directly benefit disabled and older people living actively in
the community.


3

METHODOLOGY

[CERTH, TECH]


ATIS4ALL achieves its objectives by:



Working directly with academic re
searchers, industry, service providers, policy
makers and voluntary sector organisations to raise awareness of the crucial
importance of equipment to achieve independence
.



Documenting all of the current activity to research and design assistive
technology,

to reduce duplication and to highlight innovative and relevant
product development
.



Working with the sector on national level projects to focus efforts on producing
commercial products that are appealing and useful to disabled and older
people
.



Providing
expert analysis of research and development trends and service
provision challenges
.



Working with the research and design community to enable end users to play a
full role in the design of assistive technologies
.

The information provided in this Deliverabl
e is gathered by desk research, including
regular review of online information provided by research organisations, user
representative and funding organisations, as well as information from sector journals,
and information solicited directly from the resea
rch teams.

While all attempts are made to ensure that the information provided is comprehensive,
there may be projects which have not been identified and we would be grateful for
notification of any such projects.




European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



5

4

SELECTED TYPE OF CONTENTS FOR ATIS4ALL R
&D
COMMUNITY

4.1

Type of contents

[CERTH, TECH]

From the initial list of contents heading described in D1.5 [
15
], the work in WP2 has
been focused on the selection of a reduced set of contents that should be covered by
the R&D community. An initial discussion and selection activity was worked out in
wo
rking groups during the second ATIS4ALL workshop in Prague (8th and 9th
September, 2011) [
16
].

As a result, it obtained following list of type of contents relevant

for the “R&D
community” identified by the working groups during the workshop in Prague.

In this sense, the next topics were more mentioned by the different working groups
and were identified as a final selection done through discussion and consensus amon
g
the task leader and the project coordinator. The set of contents selected to be included
or supported by the R&D Community in this initial phase are seven summarized in:


Projects


Publications


Software
and hardware


Events and courses


Standards


R&D Europea
n strategy


Ideas

Following it describes more in detail each one:


Projects

This “type of content

consists of a link to an external source of information
about one specific project an information about it.

o

R&D projects in the market
. Necessary to include the

environment
of application (Media, home, Employment, Urban, Education, Culture
and Leisure, Public Service). Example:
[1]
.

o

Technological Trends:

R&D projects not yet in the market. Exa
mple:
[2]
.


Articles



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



6

Scientific research articles provide a method for scientists to communicate with
other scientists about the results of their research. A standard format is used
for
these articles, in which the author presents the research in an orderly,
logical manner. It could include also graphs, tables, figures..etc. Commonly the
format include a: Title, name of the authors and organization, abstract, body
text, and references to
help illustrate the points made in the text.

Other
possible articles could be related with divulgation, describing issues to be aware
of when using seeking for or developing an ICT AT solution in a specific field.
Example:
[3]


Software source codes

This “type of content” consists of a file or a set of files containing the source
code o
f a software application.

Example:
Aligned with ETNA work.


Events and courses

This “type of contents” gives information about the offer in ICT AT courses of
interest (e.g. degree, diploma and certificate courses, short and product
-
specific courses in the EU, other accredited courses) and other events of
interest (e.g. workshops, mee
tings, conferences) related with the field of
assistive technologies. Example for courses:
[4]
. Example for events:
[5]
.


Standard

This “type of contents” gives information about the standardization activities on
assistive technology. Standards can contribute to the accessible design of
products and services in several ways,
for example, by defining accessibility
requirements, by providing guidance on development or design methods, or by
providing evaluation methodologies. Example:
[6]
.


R&D European strategy

This “type of contents” gives information about strategies for people with
disabilities so they can take part in all aspects of daily life across the EU.
Example:
[7]
.



Ideas


This “type of contents” gives information about new ideas with the latest on
research

and development in the AT field. Aim is to help researchers stay up to
date with national developments, local initiatives and research projects relevant
to the AT community. There are also regular updates on sources of funding, AT
jobs, conferences and op
portunities to share knowledge about the AT sector.
Example:
[8]
.

4.2

Classification of t
he
contents

[
TECH
]

It is not the main objective of this report to establish a

final

classification of the
different type of contents, because of
this kind of job is align
ed

with the work


European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



7

developed by ETNA with the ontology of ICT
-
based assistive products
and
information
, in future deliverables.

However, it is possible, as we have done in the deliverable D2.3, to consider short
future classifications in order to categorize some type of content inside the R&D
community.

In the case, we are going to consider
a first classification for the type of content

projects
”, according to the time to market of R&D projects.

Note that inside the “Hot market oriented R&D topics” we have decided to do a
classification by environments. This classification is justified in b
ase of the results
obtained in the deliverable D1.5 [
15
]. This classification pretends to cover all the ambit
of technological application of ICT based ATs, inside

the cycle of life of a person.


Classification according to the time to market of R&D results

1)

Hot market oriented R&D topics

1.1)

Type of contents available to
Media

environment

1.2)

Type of contents available to
home

environment

1.3)

Type of contents available to
Employ
ment

environment

1.4)

Type of contents available to
urban

environment

1.5)

Type of contents available to
education

environment

1.6)

Type of contents available to
Culture and leisure

environment

1.7)

Type of contents available to
Public service

environment

2)

Technological Trends






European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



8

5


CRITERIA

TO SELECT THE SOURCES OF INFORMATION

[
TECH
]


After defining the “Type of contents” to include in the “R&D” community, it is
necessary to establish some criteria to select the sources of information to be included
in this first selection. The

idea is try to use criteria as simple as possible, to avoid
discussions within the community in this first phase in the selection, taking in account
(as we told in the introduction), that this is the first stage of a first task which should
be continue in

the next work packages. In this sense, based on the criteria described in
the public ETNA deliverable 3.2
2
, we have chosen our own inclusion criteria related
with the type of contents previously selected. Note that mostly of them are the same
that ETNA pr
ovides, because of the alignment of the “type of contents” in both
thematic networks.

Based on the first objective one of the ATIS4all project: “Creating a sustainable and
reference European network representing and involving key actors of the whole value

chain in the field of ICT AT, inclusive solutions and related services”, we can define our
first quality indicator as:
it is essential that the source of information is written in one
of the European Languages
. See the next link for a identification of th
e
European

languages
3
.

It is essential also that the source of information provides
up to date information
. It is
possible to check this monitoring the date of last modification. Note that this criteria is
relevant in function of the type of content.

Fina
lly we can consider as a quality indicator, the
accessibility standards in the portal
web pages and search interfaces
. We prefer to consider accessibility as a quality
indicator in order to don’t loss relevant information, which can happen if we consider
t
he accessibility like an exclusion criteria.

As a criteria relevant for the scientific information we consider the
scientific quality
. In
this sense the articles and scientific conferences provided must be included inside the
TOP
-
TEN in function of the to
pic selected. We'll use as a measure the index of impact
in scientific journals. Some interesting tools to check the index of impact in journals
and
conferences

are provided here:

[
17
], [
18
]
.

Following is listed the
criteria

detailed above:




2

http://www.etna
-
project.eu/ftp/ETNA_Deliverable_D3_2.pdf

3

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_the_European_Union



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



9



Area of influence Europe



Organization provides its sources of information in one of the
European languages: preferably in ENGLISH.



Up to

date information



Accessibility of the information



Quality of the scientific information


It is important remark that criteria mentioned above must to be tight in function of the
type of content. This exercise will be done in the next deliverable where
a final list of
sources of information will be provided.

6

P
ROJECTS

[
ALL
]

In this section, information about current and past
R&
D
projects in

the area of
accessible and assistive ICT

technologies

according to specific domains

is provided
.

6.1

Hot R&D topics an
d trends

6.1.1

Adaptive Computer Technology

A wide range of input devices exist that can replace or support the use of the standard
keyboard. These include: trackballs, key guards, alternate keyboards, touch screens,
voice input and various pointing devices.
This area of assistive technology is known as
"Adaptive Computer Technology".

Also in this area, a number of alternative output methods exist. Screen reading
software present the content of the computer screen to blind people through synthetic
speech, and
magnifying software can change the size and colour of the screen content
making it possible for the visually impaired to use their residual sight.

Adaptive computer technology is the basis of all computer use for a lot of people with
various disabilities b
ut requires applications and web pages to follow certain
accessibility guidelines in order to function properly.

6.1.1.1

Access to information

People with disabilities can have difficulty in learning using conventional classroom
based methods, because their
disability affects their ability to communicate and to
interact in social situations. They may find the unpredictable nature of classroom
events and the requirement to collaborate with their peers challenging. Technology
such as PCs and the internet may of
fer a way of encouraging them to learn, since the
learning can take place at their own pace and in a structured, unchanging, format.



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



10

The purpose of the “
Universal Design of Tactile Exhibits with Touch Activated
Descriptive Audio for Aquariums

4

project is
to develop strategies and technologies
that enhance the learning opportunities at aquariums for people who are blind or low
vision (B/LV). The project evaluates current aquarium exhibit strategies related to an
interpretive program and assesses barriers fo
r people who are B/LV that functionally
limit their participation in the critical learning opportunities extended to the general
public. The project identifies and develops universal design best practice strategies and
methodologies that enhance social int
egration and access to exhibit and interpretive
information for persons who are B/LV. The project develops cost effective technologies
to couple a user
-
directed tactile experience with audio descriptive information for
aquarium exhibits.

Apart from enhanc
ing learning opportunities to blind people, there are accessible tools
for people with learning disorders (difficulties in reading, writing, spelling, numeracy,
personal organisation and time
-
keeping). Such a tool was developed in

Accommodative Intelligen
t Educational Environments for Dyslexic
Learners

5

to help dyslexic children to improve their reading, by providing them with
personalised help and reading material. The personalisation is based on individual
profiles that are created by observing each chi
ld reading a text. Using image analysis,
the system can assess emotional and physical state and adapt the document
presentation accordingly.

Similarly, a project namely “
Developing educational software to assess if
autistic children can benefit from access

to open learner models and
emotional feedback on learning

6

develops and evaluates ways in which
technology can be used to help children with autism to learn. Researchers will also look
at whether learning in autistic children is facilitated by the presen
ce of an interface
persona displaying emotions whilst providing feedback and help on the children's
learning achievements.

The
DIADEM
7

project brings together seven research teams from three EU countries
(the UK, Norway and Italy). It mainly focuses online

forms and develops an assistive
web base technology. This technology employs Expert System techniques to analyse
older adult users’ behaviour when they interact with online forms. Using this analysis



4

http://www.rafmodels.com/

5

www.agent
-
dysl.eu

6

http://gow.eps
rc.ac.uk/NGBOViewGrant.aspx?GrantRef=EP/G031975/1

7

http://www.project
-
diadem.eu/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



11

the DIADEM technology adapts and personalises computer
interface so that they can
interact with online forms with fewer difficulties.

6.1.1.2

E
Learning platforms

In addition, deaf
people

are capable to learn to read due to BASE project.
BASE
8

is the
acronym for Basic Skills in English for

Deaf Adults. This project is

co
-
funded by
the

European Commission through the

Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive
Agency

in the frame of the

call 2008 of the

Life Long Learning Programme. This project
aims to give all profoundly Deaf people the opportunity to learn to read,
according to
the most recent insights of sign bilingual education. This means teaching entry level
literacy in English language to Deaf people in Europe whose first and only language is
Sign Language. This has meant designing a course of English as a Secon
d language,
with no reference to sound.


Moreover, the
Get Digital
9

programme helped users over the age of 65 in sheltered
housing without online access to become internet savvy and enjoy the wider social and
economic benefits of the digital world.

In addi
tion, The
AHEAD
-
EU
10

project seeks to promote the inclusion of disabled
persons (from Europe and third countries) into the European Higher Education system,
and to create a sustainable mechanism to reduce barriers to inclusion. T
he project
team develop
s

a s
eries of electronic tools which will: provide students with disabilities
with guidance on how to overcome the barriers in the European Higher Education
system; provide university administration and faculty with guidance on how to make
the necessary adaptat
ions in order to support students with specific classes of
disability; provide all stakeholders with information and case studies on specific
barriers to inclusion and on current activities and actions across Europe.

The

EU4ALL
11

project is focused on the c
oncept of Accessible Lifelong Learning (ALL).
It will investigate technology that accommodates the different ways in which people,
including those with disabilities, interact with technology, content and services. It aims
to find ways in which this technol
ogy can be used to bring support services to disabled
learners, and to provide the necessary support services and technical infrastructure so



8

http://www.base.gva.es/index.php?lang=en

9

http://getdigital.org.uk/

10

http://www.disabledstudents.eu/drupal/

11

http://www.eu4all
-
project.eu/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



12

that the teaching, technical and administrative staff of educational institutions can offer
their teaching and ser
vices in a way that is accessible to disabled learners.

6.1.2

Manipulation

Switches with special interfaces can be used to control anything electronic from toys to
televisions to computers. This area of assistive technology where switches provide a
means to inde
pendent control of electric or battery
-
operated devices is often referred
to as "Environmental Control Systems".

6.1.2.1

Safety using PDT (Public Digital Terminals)

The
SNAPI
12

project was launched at 2005. Partners have been working to engage
local authority serv
ices, central government, the financial services industry, the smart
card industry and assistive technology suppliers. A demonstration has been built for a
standard Windows XP terminal to show the key elements of the concept: the card
reading and configuri
ng accessibility options; when the card is removed the terminal
returns to its original state for the next user; the configuration of the card with
customised needs. Software evaluation by visually impaired volunteers is ongoing and
a number of pilot sites

are being set up.

6.1.2.2

ATMs

ATMs are one of the main ICT mediating the provision of services of the banking sector
to their clients. Nowadays ATMs are evolving from their old function as money
dispensers to a wider concept including other financial services
and acting as public
access terminals to a rage of product and services
.

The project

New approaches to banking for the older old

13

seek
s

to understand
several problems that old people face when

access
ing

conventional bank accounts and
provide
s

user
-
cent
e
r
ed solutions to these more practical problems. Researchers
are

looking to reconnect the digital and physical worlds in ways that solve these conceptual
problems. An example is a wallet shaped foldable display. One half would display
recent transactions wit
h dates and amounts, the other half the current balance, as a
figure and an analogue quantity. To keep the interface simple this device would only
be used to see the individual's account. The transactions themselves would be carried
out at an ATM, via the
telephone or whatever and would have immediate effects on
the displays.

6.1.2.3

V
ending machines

A vending machine can be defined as “'A device aimed for the self
-
service sale or
provision of goods and/or services that can be operated by entering a coin, a bank



12

http://www.tiresias.org/snapi/

13

http://www.cuhtec.org.uk/banking.php



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



13

n
ote, a token, a chip or other card/key or by other command. This does not cover
entertainment and gambling machines”
14
. Therefore, the main function of vending
machines is to sell products (e.g. drinks, food, snacks, etc.) as a self
-
service. The types
of pr
oduct that can be dispensed through these machines are wide and range from
soft drinks to DVDs.

The objective of
APSIS4all
15

is to overcome the existing accessibility barriers faced by
disabled people, older people and people who are not familiar with ICT w
hen
interacting with Public Digital Terminals (PDTs), such as Automated Teller Machines
(ATMs) and Ticket Vending Machines (TVMs). APSIS4all increase
s

user satisfaction,
regardless of disability, age or digital literacy, by providing new, customised intera
ction
modes, including adaptive interfaces and interaction through the user’s mobile, thus
offering users a truly personalised service adapted to their needs and preferences.

6.1.2.4

V
irtual kiosks

This technology includes those self
-
service terminals which main

function is to provide
access to information and a variety or services (in a self
-
service mode). The main
difference between virtual kiosks and vending machines in that the latter only requires
a commercial transaction to obtain a physical product, wherea
s virtual kiosks
commonly focus on electronic services (e.g. internet access, digital photo printing,
tourist information, ticketing, etc.) that require user interaction with information and
can be both free and pay services.

Several manufacturers


in and

outside the kiosk industry


have developed technology
to accommodate people with disabilities. Here are a few technologies that could be
used to make airport kiosks more accessible:

EZ Access
16

combines simple interactive techniques in ways that work together
robustly and flexibly to accommodate users. With the addition of just a few buttons
and speech output, the product becomes usable by people who cannot see, cannot
read, cannot reach the scr
een or cannot make fine movements with their arms, hands
or fingers. Speech output and button navigation gives complete access to any onscreen
controls and content (text, images and controls). Button help provides a way for users
to instantly identify any
button on the device and get information about it. System help
provides context sensitive information about using the device. Layers of help provide
extra help when people might be stuck or unsure of what to do next. Show captions



14

European Vending Association
http://www.vending
-
europe.eu


15

http://www.apsis4all.eu/

16

http://trace.wisc.edu/ez/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



14

provide a visual presenta
tion of any text or sound created by the device that is not
already visually displayed.

IBM has been researching and developing accessibility features for years. It already
has the following:



Headset jack with volume adjustment



Embedded ViaVoice text
-
to
-
s
peech output provides user assistance and reads
the content of all screens



Layered audio user assistance / system event sound effects



On
-
screen visual focus indicator that highlights the currently selected on
-
screen
content/control



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



15


Figure
2
:
EZ Access keypad to the right of the keyboard



Figure
3
:
The IBM Accessible Travel Self
-
service Kiosk


SeePoint

currently
has the option to swap out a regular kiosk keyboard and implement
a Braille and blind
-
friendly keyboard as well as inject a headset outlet for audio.
SeePoint is working to create a kiosk that integrates large Braille button and audio
activated kiosks.



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



16

F
-
Origin, Inc. has developed a touch technology called
zTouch
17
, which is perfect for
kiosk applications, in general, but specifically for helping to make the vision impaired
user experience more pleasant and productive. zTouch is a force
-
based touch
-
screen
s
olution that uses a combination of hardware, software, firmware and custom
piezoresistive force sensors. The sensors, which are referred to as F
-
Origin Force
Sensing sensors, are placed behind the touch surface and are the key components
used for capturing

and measuring the applied forces.

The application of zTouch into a
kiosk solution's touch
-
user interface enables raised keypads, Braille symbols on keys
and virtually limitless variations to the surface characteristics depending upon the
desired usage mod
el. It can also provide varying touch thresholds to differentiate
between a lighter touch for "reading" the Braille text or locating a patterned button,
and then a firmer touch for "selecting" an option. In addition, zTouch is compatible
with audible and h
aptic feedback features, which complement the tactile surface
variability and can ultimately enhance the vision impaired user experience.

6.1.2.5

Digital information panels

6.1.3

Social Networks

Dicta
-
Sign
's
18

goal is to develop the necessary technologies that make Web

2.0
interactions in sign language possible
.

Users sign to a webcam using a dictation style.
The computer recognizes the signed phrases, converts them into an internal
representation of sign language, and then has an animated avatar sign them back to
the u
sers. Content on the Web is then contributed and disseminated via the signing
avatars. This way, the Dicta
-
Sign aims to solve both problems that sign language
videos have. The avatar is anonymous, and its uniform signing style guarantees that
contributions

can be easily altered and expanded

upon by any sign language user
.


Figure
4
: W
eb
-
based interactions in sign language





17

http://www.f
-
origin.com
/zTouch0153Technology.aspx

18

http://www.dictasign.eu/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



17

6.1.4

Mobility

This area of assistive technology is known as "Seating and Mobility" and includes a full
range of
positioning systems as well as mobility devices. Examples can be found below.

The
car support strap

from BIME [
1
] prevents a front seat passenger, with limited
uppe
r body strength, from falling towards the driver's seat. It fits most cars and is
easily attached with a wide plastic hook that fits over the passenger seat, and a toggle
that fits between the passenger door and the door
-
frame.


Figure
5
: Car support strap


BIME has also developed a
baby and toddler carrier

[
2
] that helps to make child
carrying a little bit easier for wheelchair users. The wheelchair carrier attaches to the
front of manual wheelchairs, with its own single wheel providing support an
d stability.
It uses a universal fitting that allows it to be attached to all manual wheelchairs, both
traditional and lightweight styles. The carrier is free standing when not attached to the
chair so that the child can be strapped in and out more easily
by the wheelchair user.
The Babycarrier folds flat for ease of storage and transportation.


Figure
6
: Wheelchair babycarrier




European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



18

Finally,
BIME

introduced innovative products, and games to allow children who use a
wheelchair to expres
s themselves as fully as possible. Two prototype devices [
3
] have
been developed, one for powered wheelchairs users, and one for manual wheelchairs
users. Both dev
ices actively trap an incoming ball and at the push of a button the ball
is fired out again.


Figure
7
: Football player


In the mobility domain we can categorised also the
SMILING
19

project. This project
aims to train older people

to change their gait patterns in order to reduce the risk of
falls. The SMILING solution, a wearable non
-
invasive computer
-
controlled system,
mimics the shifts in movement which happen naturally when people walk over different
surfaces.


Figure
8
: SMILING’s motorized shoes





19

http://www.smilingproject.eu/index.html



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



19

Gait trainer
20

developed an innovative gait system for people with abnormal gait. The
system consists of sensor modules with embedded software worn on the thigh and calf
of each leg, which calculates the stride rate and knee angle and displays this to the
user. The aim
was to provide a system which can measure people's movements in
their own environment, rather than in a specialist setting.


Figure
9
:
A Harlequins rugby league player being analysed with the SMART system


6.1.5

Employment

6.1.5.1

Intranets

There is one thing that employers need to give their attention to when it comes to
ensuring that their blind and sight impaired employees have equal access to
information; and that is accessible intranets. With more companies developing
intranets for their

employees, it is paramount to keep in mind that blind and sight
impaired employees need to be able to access them on an equal footing.

Intranets are becoming more popular and companies are using them to do such things
as: share information, ensure that e
mployees are kept abreast of company news, post
internal job postings, plus much more. Intranets are a great way to ensure that
communication remains open between management and employees and they are not
going to go away for the foreseeable future.

The m
ajority of intranet designers and developers may tend to forget from time to
time that their works of art need to be made accessible to all; especially so to blind



20

http://www.gait
-
analysis
-
uk.com/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



20

and sight impaired employees.
Intranets and accessibility have received less attention
than
websites in general. However, there is a legal requirement, as well as an equally
compelling business and moral case, for intranets to be accessible.

Employers have an obligation to enable employees to access the resources and
information necessary to do t
heir jobs. If information on an intranet is not accessible to
those with disabilities then the company may be in breach of the Equality Act 2010.
The Equality Act 2010, which replaces the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA), aims to
tackle the discriminati
on people with disabilities encounter. The employment element
of this Act, brought into force on 6 April 2011, focuses on discrimination in relation to
employment.

As a case study we can present here the RNIB’s accessible intranet.
The Royal National
Insti
tute of Blind People (RNIB) is the UK's leading charity offering information, support
and advice to over two million blind and partially sighted people. Among its many
services, RNIB offers accessibility consultancy and training and has pioneered
accredita
tion for websites that are accessible to blind and partially sighted users. As
part of RNIB's work to remove barriers to information for people with disabilities, they
wanted to provide improved services for customers and staff through their website and
in
tranet. RNIB wanted their intranet to serve as the
prime source of knowledge and
information

and a
key channel for internal communication
. The result was the
first
-
ever
SharePoint implementation with accessible content management features
,
iSite
21
.

iSite
us
ers can enjoy most of the benefits offered by SharePoint regardless of their
disability. This accessible platform provides RNIB with a central hub for communication
and knowledge sharing,
enabling all staff to support themselves in their daily work.

6.1.5.2

Enterp
rise systems

6.1.5.3

Systems providing access to the work place

6.1.5.4

Systems providing access to employment

Across Europe
,

governments are trying to develop more effective policies and
strategies to assist disabled people to cross the threshold from economic inactivity to
productive employment. To do so requires measures which impact directly on the
decision of a disabled per
son to seek and keep a job and which encourage individual
employers to recruit and retain disabled employees.

Opti
-
Work
22

was funded by the European Commission Framework 7 programme
and took place between January 2005 and October 2008. The project outcomes



21

http://www.rnib.org.uk/Pages/Home.aspx

22

http://www.optiwork.org/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



21

included the development of a Decision Support Tool which is an interactive table
summarising all relevant information found as a result of research carried out over
the course of the project. This included details of the effectiveness of various
employmen
t strategies, their accessibility and availability in a particular country and
whether or not they represent a facilitator or a barrier to the recruitment of
disabled people.

Video Interpretation is very suitable for conversations and meetings that occur h
ere
and now. A number of private and public companies already use video
interpretation at such short briefing and Instructions for new tasks, spontaneous
communication with colleague and bosses, to order goods from suppliers,
conversations with hearing out
side the company and conversations with institutions
or public authorities.

An efficient internet service with video and remote interpretation mean far greater
accessibility for deaf users of interpretation and ultimately great savings on the
field of int
erpretation, since the cost of the interpreters transportation and waiting
time can be reduced sharply.


Figure
10
: Video interpretation


The projekt
TegnKom
23

in Aarhus Municipality, Denmark, facilitates video
interpretation for d
eaf and hearing
-
impaired on the job market. Remote video
interpretation is easy to use. It takes place through PC with an Internet connection
and a videophone application. The hearing impaired person uses his sign language



23

http://www.epractice.eu/en/cases/tegnkom



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



22

to communicate with the interpret
er who will translate the sign into speak to a
hearing person.

6.1.6

Public services

6.1.6.1

Emergency services

REACH112
24

-

REsponding to All Citizens needing Help
-

will implement an
accessible alternative to traditional voice telephony that will be suitable for all.
While people with disabilities find it hard to communicate with the existing
solutions, REACH112 will provid
e modes of communication so that they will find a
way to communicate in each situation, may it be with a live real
-
time text
conversation, with sign language, with lip reading, with voice or with any
simultaneous combination of these modes described by the

concept of Total
Conversation. The service will be of benefit for all.

Meanwhile, there is an urgent need to improve access to emergency services for
people with disabilities in the EU. REACH112 will implement a 12
-
month pilot in
Sweden, the United Kingdo
m, The Netherlands, France and Spain allowing disabled
users to communicate at a distance with each other and directly with the
emergency services. IP devices will be provided in the homes, workplaces and on
the move, connecting the users simultaneously in

video, voice and text. Users will
be able to connect between countries and different service providers, on mobile
and fixed IP networks.

The service will be integrated with existing
telecommunication platforms and emergency service frameworks. The users
will
also connect through a third
-
party service (relay) with voice telephone users.
Additionally, a protocol for the exchange of information between emergency
services will be made available so that relevant data can be transferred to the most
appropriate
emergency service.

REACH112 will therefore become a blueprint for the extension of IP
-
based
communications, Total Conversation and emergency services in the EU. It will
guide the improvements of communication between all citizens
-

in particular those
with

disabilities
-

as well as the accessibility and call handling of all EU emergency
services.

6.1.6.2

E
-
government

The "
Study on Monitoring eAccessibility
"
25

general objective is to monitor the
status and progress made in eAccessibility in a series of selected coun
tries (EU



24

http://www.reach112.eu/view/en/index.html

25

http://www.eaccessibility
-
monitoring.eu/presentation.aspx



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



23

Member States and third countries), identifying the best practices in the fields of
legislation, policies and practices; ensuring a direct and active interaction between
the relevant actors involved in the implementation and assessment of actual
eAccessibility; defining, developing and applying a comparative analysis framework
within which to monitor progress made in eAccessibility over time and among
countries

This study is commissioned by the European Commission as a follow
-
up to the
MEAC "Measu
ring Progress of eAccessibility in Europe", developed during the
period 2006
-

2008, and aims to contribute to the development and
implementation of the European Union's policy of eAccessibility.

6.1.6.3

Public sector information

6.1.6.4

Health

The aim of
Bravehealth
26

pr
oject
is

to develop a wearable unit, which is a
miniaturised sensor which can monitor the required parameters to make sure someone
with cardiovascular disease remains healthy. The unit run
s

automatic scheduled
analysis of particular measurements, and
is
al
so able to screen specific vital signs on
request. This system communicate
s

information to clinicians and to a central
supervision unit where it can be assessed. The system also contact
s

users in real time
if anomalies are detected and make suggestions suc
h as a change of drug or activity.
The messages
are

sent by mobile phone, and the system also include
s

location
awareness information and provide
s

a mobile virtual community for education and
support.

6.1.7

Home

6.1.7.1

D
igital homes

Digital homes


also known as smart

homes
-

provide a network in which computers,
home appliances and/or consumer electronics interconnected for environmental control
and automat
ion. One of their main aims is
to improve the quality of life by making the
home environment a more comfortable p
lace to live
.
There is not a simple set of
products than can be considered as a digital home, and the digital homes market
includes a chain of suppliers, service providers, installers, and builders.

LIREC
27

is a research project exploring how
people could
live with digital and
interactive companions. Throughout the project
they a
re exploring how to design



26

http://infocom.uniroma1.it/crat/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=32&Itemid=49

27

http://www.lirec.eu/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



24

digital and interactive companions who can develop and read emotions and act cross
-
platform.

Work at the Robot House laboratory at the University of Hertf
ordshire has
demonstrated

in November 2011

the use of prototype robot companions in assisted
living scenarios.


Figure
11
: LIREC’s digital and interactive companions

6.1.7.2

T
elecare
and Telehealth

Telecare services allow users, via remote quality services, to be more independent,
assuring them that they will be attended without needing to leave their familiar
environment
-

the home, for instance


while at the same time relieving their carers of
som
e of the burden involved in care. Due to this, public administrations are
implementing measures aimed at care for dependent people, such as measures based
on telecare services. However, currently there is a lack of accessibility of these telecare
services,

highlighting the need to include them in this
Deliverable
.

The
Whole System Demonstrator

(WSD) programme [
4
] is the largest
randomised control trial of telehealth
and telecare in the world. It is
a two year
research p
roject funded by the Department
of Health to find out how technology
can help people

manage their own health while maintaining their

independence.

The study, which has been running since May 2008, will
also assess the impact of
these technologies on people’s well
-
being and independence.



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



25


Figure
12
: Telehealth product


Blood pressure monitor


The aim of
TV
-
based Video Telephony Platform for Assisted Living and Tele
-
Health
28

was to provide affordable two
-
way video technology in people's homes which
can be used to provide support, consultations with health professionals and to supply
health information.
The project started in July 2008 and has developed a
videoconferencing sys
tem that offers a low
-
cost way for clinicians and health
professionals to speak with and see people with chronic illness living in the
community, or people who have recently been discharged from hospital.

The aim of
TOPS
29

(
Technologies to support older peo
ple at home: maximising
personal and social interaction
)

project is to develop a device which can help older
people in rural areas living with chronic pain by giving them support and advice on, for
example, the exercise and activities they can do or the co
rrect way they should be
sitting so as not to aggravate their condition. As rural isolation, which can result in low
morale or depression, is a recognised issue, the device will be designed to retain rather
than remove personal and social interaction with
others. People who have chronic pain
may also have limited mobility, while some older people also experience a loss of
cognitive function, so researchers will design an interface which is easy to use and
which takes these additional factors into account.

T
he

project

CompanionAble
30

(
Integrated Cognitive Assistive & Domotic Companion
Robotic Systems for Ability & Security
)

aims to combine robotics with ambient



28

http://www.assistedlivingplatform.org.uk
/

29

http://www.dotrural.ac.uk/tops

30

http://www.companionable.net/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



26

intelligent technologies to deliver a mobile robotic companion which will work
collaboratively withi
n a smart home environment. Researchers have demonstrated one
such device, called Hector, helping an older person find things around the house and
set up video
-
conferencing and cognitive stimulation sessions.

The aim of
HAPPY AGEING

(
a Home Based APProach

to the Years of AGEING
)

project
was

to develop a user friendly device which can support older people in
performing some of their daily activities

[
6
]
. The system
has

three main functional
modules, which
were

developed in consultation with older people. The lifestyle monitor
is

capable of recording the main activities taking place in the home and comparing
them with the known habits of the person being monitored. Th
e navigation assistant is
designed to support mobility inside the home, particularly for people with visual
impairment or difficulty in orientation. The personal assistant
helps

with common
actions (such as dialling a phone number) and support searching fo
r personal items
lost at home (such as keys).

6.1.7.3

AAL

The European Union funded the
MonAMI
31

project under the FP6 programme in
order to demonstrate that accessible, useful services for supporting older and
disabled people living at home can be delivered via m
ainstream systems and
platforms at reasonable cost. The project team initially tested out in six usability
labs a mix of services that had been developed in previous and current ambient
assisted living (AAL) projects, plus existing hardware and software. A
fter evaluation
of this approach, the focus changed to building the MonAMI platform, which is
based on developing a core set of services and the use of mainstream technology
and open standards. The project has produced five publically available services.
A
MiSURE offers safety and security monitoring at home; AMiCASA is an
environmental control service which can be used from inside the home or when
away from home; AMiVUE provides status information about devices, the home
environment and an individual’s move
ments around the house; AMiPAL is a time
management system which gives prompts about appointments and medication;
and AMiPLAY provides accessible games to encourage physical activity and social
interaction.




31

http://www.monami.info/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



27


Figure
13
: MonAMI’s se
rvices

The
COGKNOW DayNavigator
32

is a holistic solution that assists persons with
dementia within their own homes and outside. It gives increased independence and
quality of life, while giving carers much needed relief not having to monitor the person
with

dementia so much. The service can easily


be customised to address the individual
needs of each person and their carers, for memory support, helping with daily
activities, maintaining social contacts and increased safety.


Figure
14
: Cogknow Day Navigator


The
Hearing at Home

(HaH)
33

project researches and develops next generation
assistive devices that allow the growing number of hearing impaired


which
predominantly includes the elderly


equal participation in communication. Th
e project
aims to empower the hearing disabled to play
their
own role in the information society.




32

http://www.cogknow.eu/

33

http://www.hearing
-
at
-
home.eu/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



28

6.1.7.4

Neighbors, nurses, social assistive technologies

6.1.7.5

House equipment

Researchers at Sheffield Hallam University worked on the
Future Bathroom
34

project to improve the quality and design of bathroom furniture with the goal of
producing products which all bathroom users would find acceptable while meeting
the needs of older and disabled people. The project was funded by the Engineering
and Physical

Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and took place between April 2008
and March 2011. Researchers worked with an industrial partner, Ideal Standard,
and the project had a strong commitment to involving older people in the design
process. Participants includ
ed people with common impairments associated with
age, such as arthritis, sight and hearing loss and disability after stroke.


Figure
15
: Accessible bathroom


6.1.8

Media

6.1.8.1

Analogue television

6.1.8.2

D
igital television

The coexistence of analogue and digital TV could create difficulties for the analyses
and comparisons, as each system requires different equipment and functionalities.

However, although there is accessibility barriers common to both platforms (lack of
sub
titling and audio description, etc.), digital television stands out because of its
interactive services. Furthermore, the existence of barriers to accessibility in the
navigation menus, for instance, could mean that certain groups of users find that
servic
es basic to their needs are unavailable to them, as is the case of visually
-
impaired
users who, if there is no voice synthesizer incorporated, would find difficulty in
activating the audio description for a film.




34

http://research.shu.ac.uk/lab4living/future
-
bathroom



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



29

Digital t
elevision projects
and AT ICTs and

accessibility products
are listed below
:

The aim of the
DTV4All
35

project was to facilitate the provision of access services
on digital television across the European Union. The work was funded by the
European Commission Competitiveness and Innovation Fram
ework Programme
(CIP) and began in July 2008, finishing in March 2011. The project's objectives
were to offer and evaluate subtitling, audio description, audio subtitling and signing
services in a minimum of four broadcast territories within the European U
nion for
at least 12 months. The project also sought to identify improvements to existing
access services and ways of addressing technical, organisational and legal
obstacles to the sustainable take
-
up throughout Europe of such services in the
timeframe 20
08
-
2010.

In addition, the EU’s ICT Policy Support Programme provided funding for the
T
-
Seniority
36

project to look at ways in which digital TV could be used to implement
telehealth and telecare in people's homes.
T
-
Seniority

objective
was

to significantly
i
mprove quality of life and ensure efficient health and social care for the
ageing
population

by specifying and demonstrating
innovative ICT enabled products and
services
.

The aim of
ASPIS
37

(
A Secure Platform for IPTV Systems
)

project
was

to develop a
technical solution that will allow users to share their personal details in an easy,
controlled and secure manner on an IPTV platform. This is significant in particular
for older people, who may not have any existing internet access or who ma
y not be
comfortable interfacing via a PC, but who will be able to make use of all types of e
-
services, from commercial to social, to government resources, using this system.

NCAM's
Access to Locally Televised On
-
Screen Information
38

project
explore
d

and pr
ototype
d

DTV solutions that enable local television stations to send
messages, warnings and alerts that meet the communication needs of people with
sensory disabilities. Project activities include
d
:



Create metadata schemes for linking text with graphics,
and for exporting
text to speech synthesizers.




35

http://www.psp
-
dtv4all.org/

36

http://tseniority.
idieikon.com/

37

http://iptv
-
aspis.com/index

38

http://ncam.wgbh.org/invent_build/analog/onscreen/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



30



Develop prototype software utilities that import data from various sources,
then extract, transform and prepare it for prioritized text display or for
speech output.



Create demonstration models within newsro
om facilities of partner television
stations.



Publish accessibility guidelines for local television stations which suggest
implementation schemes for various equipment configurations,



and provide recommendations for further study.

Similarly, t
he
VITAL
39

p
roject proposes a combination of advanced information and
communication technologies that uses a familiar device like the TV as the main
vehicle for the delivery of services to elderly users in home environments.
Conversely the project use standard mobile
phones for applications on the run. The
new services offer will depart from traditional assistance schemes in the sense that
it is not oriented to satisfying day to day subsistence needs but it considers other
important demands that has deserved little att
ention up to the moment, such as:
the need for information, the need for inter
-
personal communication, the need for
personal advice, the need for edutainment, the need to be able to move safely in
the physical environment and the need to integrate into the

mainstream society.

6.1.8.3

Newspapers


Access to information


projects (including those for alternative formats

such as
accessible newspapers
)
are

listed below
.

The
Digikrant
40

project aim
ed

to offer visually impaired people in Flanders

the
possibility to read a newspaper on an autonomous and daily basis. To reach this, the
VZW De Braillekrant has been established. The 'blind friendly' newspaper is published
in 2 formats: braille and electronic. Each evening, a selection of the most inte
resting
articles is made for the newspaper in braille version out of the next day's newspaper.
These articles are transferred to a format that is readable for a braille printer.
Overnight, this braille version is published and sent to all subscribers. The
electronic
version of the newspaper, the 'Digikrant', contains all articles, but in well defined
electronic format (Daisy/XML). A braille display or speech synthesizer attached to the
user's computer makes the electronic newspaper accessible.




39

http://www.ist
-
vital.org/

40

http://www.braillekrant.be/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



31


6.2

Technologica
l trends

6.2.1

Virtual user
-
models

The project
SERA
41

(Social Engagement with Robots and Agents) aimed to advance
science in the field of social acceptability of verbally interactive robots and agents, with
a view to their applications especially in assistive tec
hnologies (companions, virtual
butlers). To this aim, the project undertook a field study in three iterations to collect
data of real
-
life, long
-
term and open
-
ended relationships of subjects with a robotic
device, called

Nabaztag. This robot was placed on
a pedestal containing a small
computer, a connection to the internet, sensors to gather information about the
user’s proximity to the system, a microphone and a video camera to collect the
data.


Figure
16
: Robotic Nabaztag rabbit


In addition, t
he
COMPANIONS
42

project has developed virtual Companions for
conversation to change the way people think about the relationships of people to
computers and the Internet.

The project has developed two trial demonstrators. The
Senior Companion

engages the user in conversations relating to a set of photographs,
tells jokes and reads the news. The Health and Fitness Companion promotes exercise
and a healthy diet, and is embodied in a toy rabbit.




41

http://project
-
sera.eu/

42

http://www.companions
-
project.org/?p=home



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



32


Figure
17
: Czech compani
on demonstration

6.2.2

Virtual reality

The project

COSPATIAL
43

(
COmmunication and Social PArticipation: collaborative
Technologies for Interaction And Learning
)

aims at developing collaborative
technologies designed to promote the learning of social competence by

children who
are typically developing and those with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Researchers
are looking at two types of technology: virtual environments, which are 3D simulations
of everyday situations that can be accessed via a PC; and active sur
faces which are
shared co
-
located systems typically based on large interactive surfaces placed
horizontally ('tabletop' devices) or vertically ('wall displays')and used to encourage
pai
rs of children to work together
.


Figure
18
:
Virtual environment


The
inTouch

project brings together expertise in dementia, assistive technology,
virtual communication and user
-
engagement to develop a video link system for
enabling people with dementia to interact with relatives during virtual 'visi
ts'

[
7
]
. A key



43

http://cospatial.fbk.eu/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



33

requirement is that the person with dementia is able to operate the system
themselves, by using appropriately designed audio and visual cues and touc
h screen
interfaces. The two key aspects of the proposed system which set it apart from
existing video conferencing systems are that it will provide a wide view of the family
member's home, giving the feel of a 'visit' rather than just a video phone call,
and that
the system will not require the person with dementia to have any prior knowledge of
computers or other technology.

Researchers

in [
8
]

aimed to survey older people to capture their expectations for
virtual worlds and learn about the sort of environments and scenarios which interested
them. They also planned to develop an ag
e and culture
-
appropriate environment
within Second Life and to develop a gesture
-
based interface (based on 3D movement
tracking technology) to enable people to interact with the environment by intuitive
physical movement. Examples included walking on the
spot to move around, flapping
arms to 'fly', and moving the body to dance. Researchers then evaluated the system
with a cohort of older people, comparing their experiences using conventional
computer input with the novel gesture
-
based interface.

The
VERITA
S
44

(
Virtual and augmented Environments and Realistic user Interactions
To achieve embedded Accessibility designS
)

project aims to develop, validate and
assess tools for built
-
in accessibility support at all stages of ICT and non
-
ICT product
development, in
cluding specification, design, development and testing. The goal of
VERITAS is to introduce simulation
-
based and virtual reality testing, utilizing virtual
users, at all stages of assistive technologies product design and development.
Researchers will look

at a range of application areas: automotive, smart living spaces,
buildings and construction, workplace, e
-
health and infotainment.









44

http://veritas
-
project.eu/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



34

8

P
UBLICATIONS

[all]

<
Many research projects result in publications and these can be
included here
.

Please
provide any p
ublications about AT software/hardware.>

9

S
OFTWARE

Software developments can range from that developed to make a specific AT product
(
e.g.
Braille display) work with traditional non
-
AT products (a PC), as well as software
100% dedicated for specific AT use.

Specifically, a set of relevant AT software will be
considered: screen reader, screen magnifier, voice recognition and AAC software.

9.1.1

Embedded AT (i.e.: in browsers)

ATdementia.org.uk is a specialist website providing information about what AT can do
and w
hat products are available, but much of the current information is not in a format
which is accessible to people with dementia who want to make decisions for
themselves about whether or what AT to use. Thus, a new website called
AT Guide
45

that guides peopl
e with dementia and their carers through the process of finding the
right AT for them was developed. Instead of drilling down through complicated web
navigation, a series of questions will be used to guide people with dementia to a report
of tips, advice a
nd AT suggestions. The final stage of the project will be a training
phase where professionals and voluntary organisations will be encouraged to use the
tool as an aid to difficult conversations around the need for AT.

9.1.2

Portable ATs

Tactile gloves and sock
s are planned to be designed in the “
Creating artificial
sensation by tactile sensing and innervations through nerve endings

46

project.
The aim of this project is to provide augmented, replacement sensation to
patients with sensory loss.
These gloves and s
ocks

can sense and transmit touch and
force information to areas of skin with normal sensation, and use this as augmented
feedback to allow patients to learn to compensate for the areas of sensory loss. The
signal from the sensor to the area of 'normal' sk
in will be used to help people to learn
to reinterpret this as coming from their affected hand or foot.

During “
Design and Human Evaluation of Haptic Devices for Hand
Rehabilitation from Sensory Deficits due to Neurological Impairment

47

project
several tac
tile devices
have been investigated
for providing a realistic sensation
of interaction with virtual objects. Researchers investigated and designed three



45

http://www.atdementia.org.uk/

46

http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/research/

47

http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/research/projects/729



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



35

different tactile technologies


vibration, shape memory alloys, and a motor
-
driven
‘squeezer’. These w
ere iteratively developed through three rounds of human
evaluation, plus a further round of evaluation with participants recovering from stroke.


Figure
19
: Haptic device for hand rehabilitation


The project
ENABLE
48

(
A wearable

system supporting services to enable

elderly
people to live well, independently and at ease
)
develop
ed

a wearable device that can
be used both within and outside of the home to support older people in their daily
lives. The device integrates a range of se
rvice capabilities and functions that are
configurable to meets the needs of older people, for example by providing
communication and alarm services; lifestyle monitoring and environmental control; falls
prevention detection monitoring, medication and acti
vity reminders etc.

9.1.3

Systems of systems: systems (ATs) build upon the integration of
smaller systems

9.1.4

ATs in the cloud

An innovative project is under way that may help librarians who struggle to provide
and understand the assistive technologies that disabl
ed patrons are entitled to by law.

The Global Public Inclusive Infrastructure (
GPII
)
49

move
s

everything to the cloud.

Right now, the burden lies on a disabled per
son to figure out his own needs
and to
fulfill those requirements on an office computer, home c
omputer, school computer, or
library computer.




48

http://www.enable
-
project.eu/

49

http://gpii.net/




European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



36

GPII is a software and service enhancement that allows users to use the access
features they need a
nywhere, anytime, on any device
.

GPII, which began development
about a year ago, use
s

the cloud to create a se
cure personalized interface for each
patron (a one
-
time only, Wizard guided process). Accessibility software and
information about a patron's devices
is
a part of that profile. This allow
s

any person to
access assi
stive technologies and extended
usability
features on any device connected
to the Internet.

Moreover, the
AT&T Speech Mashup

puts
AT&T WATSON(tm)

speech technologies

and
AT&T Natural Voices

text
-
to
-
speech synthesis technologies in the cloud.


Speech
technologies can greatly improve the accessibility of many applic
ations for people with
disabilities.


The cloud
-
based Speech Mashup enables anyone to easily create
innovative accessible services for a wide variety of internet connected devices including
smart phones, tablets, computers and television control boxes.


10

S
ERVICES

[
A
ll
]

Here,
the primary source of information about developments in assistive technology
(AT) such as:



A comprehensive list of AT events including workshops, conferences and
courses.



An index of current job vacancies in the AT sector, including
jobs in the
statutory and voluntary services, industry and research and development.



A guide to AT training and courses including degrees, diplomas,
certificates and
short courses.

10.1

AT Events

10.2


AT Training and Courses

The aim of the
ATIB
50

project

was

to crea
te an online resource that would bring AT
innovators, manufacturers and users together to lead to improved and increased AT
innovations being available in the market place. Consultation with stakeholders has
been employed to establish desirability and some

feature specification.

It consisted of
two categories, standard and power user.
A Standard user would only want to provide
feedback on other people’s ideas, ask questions, tell everyone else about a need they
know about; and, prefers fuller explanations.
A Power user would also want to : add
things like inventions they have created or new products; contact inventors to see if



50

http://www.atib.group.shef.ac.uk/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



37

the invention could be made into a commercial product; but have shorter explanations
perhaps because they already know a little or a

lot about innovation.

The

project
All about Equipment
51

is being carried out by the AT Alliance, which is a
network of organisations active in the AT field. The partners
were

working
collaboratively and sharing knowledge and ideas to create a one
-
stop
-
shop

source of
reliable information for users about assistive technology equipment.

This shop provides
q
uick and easy links to everything
users

need to know about equipment for older and
dis
abled people
-

all in one place.

Getting Equipped for Forgetfulness
’s
team

engaged with people with dementia
and their family and carers and used their experiences to inform the development of a
guide to AT choices

[
5
]
. Focus groups of people with dementia and their carers
provided input into the kinds of information required, and also reviewed the content of
the guide.
This project
was launched in March 2011 as an online resource and has
been disseminated widely to thi
rd sector organisations and others who work with
carers and people with dementia.

The
i
-
DEAL
52

(
Intelligent Design Engine for Assisted Living
)

projec
t focused

on
involving users, carers and health professionals throughout the design and
development cycle of

different assisted living technology
-
based products. This novel
approach aims to map technology requirements against end user needs and develop
user performance specifications for each product or concept put through the evaluation
cycle.

10.3

Job vacancies in
AT sector




51

http://allaboutequipment.org.uk/

52

http://www.hdti.org.uk/content.php?pgid=74



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



38

11

LEGISLATION & STANDARDS
[
All
]

11.1

Legislation

I
n some countries legislation require
s
the public sector to make some or all solutions
accessible following given

standards.

For example,
UK passed a law about accessibility in IT. It is the UK's
Disability
Discrimination Act

[
12
], which


in practice demands that websites are accessible to
the public and that intranets are accessible to staff. Equality Act 2010 aims to protect
disabled people and prevent disability di
scrimination. It provides legal rights for
disabled people in the areas of: employment, education, access to goods, services and
facilities

including larger private clubs and land based transport services, buying and
renting land or property functions of p
ublic bodies, for example the issuing of licences.

Moreover,

Standards for All

(
Stand4All
)
53

was based on the idea of
standards

and
standardization

that address
all

special needs. It promotes th
e use of Guide 6
(CEN/CENELEC). It
is a

project funded by the E
uropean
Commission with the main
goals of ensuring disability awareness by

Technical Committee members and
promoting the participation of

consumers/end
-
users in the standardization process.
These can be

achieved within the context of the CEN/CENELEC Guide
6 ‘Guidelines

for
standards developers to address the needs of older persons and

persons with
disabilities’.

In addition, there are several accessibility guidelines in Ireland

[
13
]

about smart cards,
public terminals that developers should follow during implementation
.

DPTAC
54
, the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory C
ommittee, has been in existence
for 25 years and played a key role in advising the Secretary of
State on a wide range

of transport issues including international transport by rail, air and sea. Most recently

DPTAC has been involved in the production of accessibility guidance for air and sea

transport, and the production by the Rail Safety Standards B
oard (RSSB) of

Guidance
to make level crossings safer and more accessible for disabled people.

11.2

Analysis of standards in assistive technology

The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and the European Committee for
Electrotechnical standardization (C
ENELEC) form the specialized system for European
standardization, together with the European Telecommunications Standards Institute



53

http://ftb
-
esv.de/stand4all/

54

http://dptac.independent.gov.uk/



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



39

(ETSI). Globally, the standards are developed by committees of the International
Organization for Standardization (ISO), the

International Electrotechnical Commission
(IEC), Joint Technical Committee (JTC) of the ISO & IEC, and coordinated with national
standards bodies (e.g. the BSi, ANSI, AFNOR, DIN…) and many other organisations.

The more active technical committees working
in the area of Assistive Technologies are
the following:



ISO/TC 173 Assistive products for persons with disability.



ISO/TC 22/WG 4 Accessibility of vehicles to the persons with reduced mobility



ISO/TC 59/SC 16 Accessibility and usability of the built envi
ronment



ISO/TC 168 Prosthetics and orthotics



CEN/TC 293 Assistive Products.



CENELEC/TC79/WG4 Alarm systems, telecare.



CENELEC/TC 205/WG 16 Home and Building Electronic Systems, domotics.

There are other groups that event do not directly generate norms, are

working in the
area of accessibility such as:




CEN/DATSCG. Design for All and Assistive Technologies Standardization
Coordination Group.



CENELEC/BTWG 101
-
5 Usability and safety of electrical products with reference
to people with special needs.



CEN/BTWG 1
13 Safety and usability of products by people with special needs.



CEN/BTWG 117 Revision of EN 175301
-
801:1999 and EN 175301
-
803:1999



ETSI/HF Ergonomics.

The recently published ISO standards related to mobility aids are:



ISO 11199
-
2:2005 Walking aids manip
ulated by both arms
--

Requirements and
test methods
--

Part 2: Rollators



ISO 11199
-
3:2005 Walking aids manipulated by both arms
--

Requirements and
test methods
--

Part 3: Walking tables



ISO 11334
-
1:2007 Assistive products for walking manipulated by one a
rm
--

Requirements and test methods
--

Part 1: Elbow crutches



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



40



ISO 23600:2007 Assistive products for persons with vision impairments and
persons with vision and hearing impairments
--

Acoustic and tactile signals for
pedestrian traffic lights.



ISO
24415
-
1:2009 Tips for assistive products for walking
--

Requirements and
test methods
--

Part 1: Friction of tips

Current international activities in the development of standards, technical reports and
guidelines that include accessibility requirements and

recommendations for ICT
products are collected in the periodic reports by tiresias.org. Some of the latest report
items (“9th Report on International ICT Accessibility Standards Proposed, Being
Developed and Recently Published”
[
14
]
) are:



Document Management
-

PDF/Universal Accessibility 1.0
. This new
proposed International Standard will specify h
ow to use the Portable Document
Format (PDF) to produce electronic documents which are accessible to users
with disabilities.



ISO/IEC Technical Report
-

Accessibility and usability of biometric
systems
. It is proposed that SC37 take on a new work item to e
stablish a
Technical Report for biometric system design and procurement to handle the
range of accessibility issues; providing quantification of inclusiveness.



CEN Working Group “Accessibility for All”
. A recent survey has indicated
that European standards

developers need a better understanding of
CEN/CENELEC Guide 6


Guidelines for standards developers to address the
needs of older persons and persons with disabilities.



ISO 9241
-
920
-

Guidance on tactile and haptic interactions
. This
standard (in developm
ent) will contain ergonomic requirements and
recommendations for tactile and haptic hardware and software interactions.



ISO 28803
-

Ergonomics of the physical environment

-

Application of
international standards for people with special requirements
. This i
nternational
standard (in development) provides guidance to people who use and apply
international standards concerned with the Ergonomics of the physical
environment. They include people who are involved in environmental design
and assessment.

Below, we p
rovide a complete summary of the new proposed standards and the
standards currently in development.

The proposed
new

standards are:




European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



41



ISO 9241
-
135


Natural language dialogues



ISO 9241
-
136


Voice/Auditory interaction



ISO 9241
-
152


Interpersonal communicat
ion


Usability and accessibility of
computer
-
based data and voice communication



ISO/IEC XXXXX


Enhanced Terminal Accessibility (ETA) using cardholder
preference interface



Document Management
-

PDF/Universal Accessibility 1.0



ISO/IEC Technical Report
-

Ac
cessibility and usability of biometric systems



CEN Working Group “Accessibility for All”

The standards currently in
development

are:



ISO 9241
-
210


Ergonomics of human
-
system interaction


Part 210: Human
-
centred design process for interactive Systems



ISO
9241
-
129


Guidance on software individualisation



ISO 9241
-
154
-

Ergonomics of human
-
system interaction


Part 154: Design
guidance for interactive voice response (IVR) applications



ISO 9241
-
910


Framework for tactile and haptic interactions



ISO 9241
-
920
-

Guidance on tactile and haptic interactions



ISO TR 22411
-

Ergonomic data and guidelines for the application of ISO/IEC
Guide 71 to products and services to address the needs of older persons and
persons with disabilities (Revision)



ISO 24500


Accessibl
e design


Auditory signals for consumer products



ISO 24501


Accessible design
-

Sound pressure levels of auditory signals for
consumer products



ISO 24502


Accessible design
-

Guidelines for specification of age
-
related
relative luminance contrast in vis
ual signs and displays



ISO 24503
-

Ergonomics


Accessible design
-

Using tactile dots and bars on
consumer products



ISO 28803
-

Ergonomics of the physical environment
-

Application of
international standards for people with special requirements



ISO/IEC 13
066
-
1
-

User interfaces
-

Information Technology
-

Interoperability
with Assistive Technology (AT)


Part 1 Requirements and recommendations
for interoperability



ISO/IEC 13066
-
2
-

User interfaces
-

Information Technology
-

Interoperability
with Assistive T
echnology (AT)


Part 2 Windows Automation Framework
accessibility API



ISO/IEC 13066
-
3
-

User interfaces
-

Information Technology
-

Interoperability
with Assistive Technology (AT)


Part 3 IAccessible2 accessibility API



ISO/IEC 24756
-

Framework for specif
ying a Common Access Profile (CAP) of
needs and capabilities of users, systems and their environments



ISO/IEC 24786


User interfaces
-

Accessible user interface for accessibility
settings



ISO/IEC 26511


Software and systems engineering
-

Requirements for

managers of user Documentation



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



42



ISO/IEC 26512


Software and systems engineering
-

Requirements for
acquirers and suppliers of user documentation



ISO/IEC 26513
-

Software and systems engineering
-

Requirements for testers
and assessors of user documentatio
n



ISO/IEC 29136


Hardware accessibility functions for personal computers



ISO/IEC TR 29138
-

Information technology
-

Accessibility considerations for
people with Disabilities



ETSI ES 202 076
-

Human Factors; User Interfaces; Generic spoken command
vocabul
ary for ICT devices and services



ETSI ES 202 975
-

Human Factors: Harmonised Relay Services



ETSI TR 102 612
-

Human Factors: European accessibility requirements for
public procurement of products and services in the ICT domain (European
Commission Mandate
M/376, Phase 1)



ETSI ES 202 746
-

Human Factors: Personalization and user profile
management; User profile preferences and information standardization



ETSI EG XXX XXX
-

Inclusive eServices for all: Optimizing the accessibility and
use of upcoming user
interaction Technologies



CEN/BT WG 185 PT
-

Report on Conformance schemes (Second report as
requested by M/376, Phase 1)



(BSi) New Web accessibility standard in development



British Standard (BS) to support “Readability”



JIS X8341
-
1: 2004
-

Guidelines for o
lder persons and persons with disabilities


information communication equipment, software and services
-

Part1: Common
Guidelines 2



JIS X8341
-
2: 2004
-

Guidelines for older persons and persons with disabilities


Information communication equipment and se
rvices
-

Part 2: Information
processing equipment



JIS X8341
-
3: 2004
-

Guidelines for older persons and persons with disabilities


Information communication equipment and services
-

Part 3: Web content



JIS X8341
-
4: 2005
-

Guidelines for older persons and p
ersons with disabilities


Information communication equipment and services
-

Part 4:
Telecommunications equipment



JIS X8341
-
5: 2005
-

Guidelines for older persons and persons with disabilities


Information communication equipment and services
-

Part 5: O
ffice equipment



TTAK.KO
-
06.0180
-

AD (Automatic Identification and Data Capture) 2D Bar
Code for Visually Impaired Persons



TTAK.KO
-
06.0181
-

2D Barcode for Printed Material Accessibility with Text to
Speech for Visually Impaired Person



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



43



12

CONCLUSIONS


This report has analyzed the current situation of the Assistive Technologies covering
both, on one side the novel research developments in the area and on the other side,
the market and industry trends.

Th
e public research programmes related to AT field are mainly concentrated in the
areas according to the subject heading classification from WP1. Latest developments in
the area of Information and Communication Technologies play an essential role in
supporti
ng daily life in today's digital society and will promote new solutions in the AT
field. Nevertheless, new technologies in other fields (for instance new materials,
sensors, electronics or robotics) will also bring innovation to the AT products.

The marke
t trends provide a different view on this evolution of AT. A technology push
approach to translate new concepts into AT products in the market has been revealed
not successful at all. More effort should be allocated to the proper identification of the
user
’s needs and the market opportunities to commercialize a particular technology.
Design for All as well as mainstream services and products are encouraged due to end
-
user interest and also because of public policy that promotes accessibility.


13

REFERENCES

S
mith, J. (2011). How can I write references?
Transactions on Software Engineering

,
50
-
62.

1.

Car Support Strap, Mobility product from BIME:
http://www.bath.ac.uk/bime/products/pdf/Car%20
strap.pdf

2.

Wheelchair babycarrier, Mobility product from BIME:
http://www.bath.ac.uk/bime/products/pdf/Wheelchair%20Babycarrier%20Infor
mation%20sheet.pdf

3.

Football player, Mobility product from BIME:
http://www.bath.ac.uk/bime/projects/ms_proj
ects.htm#ms1

4.

Leaflet: Whole System Demonstrators
-

An overview of Telecare and Telehealth,
http://www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/dh_digitalassets/documents/di
gitalasset/dh_100947.pdf

5.

Getting equipped to tackle forgetfulness AT guide report:
http://www.fastuk.org/pagedocuments/file/Getting%20equipped%20to%20tac
kle%20forgetfulness(1).pdf



European Themati
c Network on Assistive Technologies and Inclusive Solutions for All

European Commission, CIP
-
ICT
-
PSP
-
2010
-
4 Project 270988

www.atis4all.eu



44

6.

Happy Aging project overview slides:
http://www.ocg.at/AAL
-
F09/files/s1
-
marcellini.pdf

7.

inTouch project overview slides:
http://kt
-
equal.org.uk/uploads/dementiajan2011/hazel.pdf

8.

Second Lives for the third age slides:
http://research.shu.ac.uk/engineering
-
for
-
life/docs/SecondLivesfortheThirdAge.pdf

9.

Analysing and federating the European

assistive technology ICT industry” Final
report. March 2009. European Commission

10.

The Market for Accessible Technology

The Wide Range of Abilities and Its
Impact on Computer Use. Research about accessibility, available online at:
http://www.microsoft.com/enable/research/phase1.aspx

11.

Accessible Technology in Computing

Examining Awareness, Use, and Future
Potential. Research about accessibility, available online at:
http://www.microsoft.com/enable/research/phase2.aspx

12.

Equality Act 2010. Available online at:
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/conten
ts

13.

Irish Accessibility Guidelines
http://accessit.nda.ie/useandapply/ict/irishnationalitaccessibilityguidelines

14.

9th report on international ICT accessibility stan
dards,” Apr. 2009. Available
online at:
http://www.tiresias.org/research/standards/report_9.htm

15.


D1.5
:

Foundations of ATIS4all Subject Heading Classification, Key actors and
sources of

information
.

16.

D2.2
:

Minutes from the workshops and meetings
.

17.

http://sciencewatch.com/dr/

18.

http://wokinfo.com/

19.