Marketing Among Small Law Firms

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©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc. All rights reserved.

Marketing Among Small Law Firms



May 2008

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

2

Table of Contents

Objectives and Methodology
3

Executive Summary
4

Key Findings

Marketing Responsibility
10

Marketing Spend
13

Time Spent on Firm Marketing
24

Utilization of Marketing Tactics
27

Significance of Internet Marketing
35

Detailed Methodology and Demographics
41







©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

3

Objectives and Methodology


In conducting this research, LexisNexis seeks to understand the marketing that small law firms
undertake.


This study is a duplicate of a previous study conducted by Harris Interactive in 2005 for
comparative purposes.


Harris Interactive conducted an online study among employees of small law firms (defined as
having 20 or fewer attorneys) between August 30 and September 27, 2007.


Twenty
-
eight respondents who are employed by firms with 21
-
50 attorneys were removed for analytic
purposes.


All qualified respondents were either solely or partially responsible for the decision
-
making
process of marketing their firms.


Sample of current subscribers, past subscribers and non
-
subscribers was provided by
LexisNexis.


A total of 908 interviews were completed


The survey was approximately 15 minutes in length.


Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding, or because “don’t know/not sure” responses
are not shown.

Executive Summary

4

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

5

Executive Summary

Responsibility for Marketing the Firm


Partners continue to have primary responsibility for planning and executing
marketing plans.


More office managers and assistants are taking an active role in marketing
decisions.


In 9% of firms, outside sources (marketing consultant, marketing service provider,
outside agency) have primary marketing responsibility, unchanged from 2005.


Solo practitioners have increased the use of outside consultants by 29% and staff
members other than a partner by 60% from 2005.


Mid
-
size firms (2
-
5 attorneys) increased their reliance on other staff members by
17% from 2005.


Larger firms (6+ attorneys) tend to rely less on a marketing consultant and more on
other staff members, including marketing managers, in 2007 than they did in 2005.


©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

6

Executive Summary
(cont.)

Marketing Spend


Percentage revenue allocated to marketing activities has increased slightly over the past two years.
Overall, firms are spending at a consistent dollar level between 2005 and 2007.


Solo practitioners:


Increased their spending of 5% or more of revenue from 2005 (39% vs. 26%), and more than
tripled their spending of 5% or more from 2002 (39% vs. 12%).


Are spending at a consistent dollar level as compared to 2005.


2
-
5 attorney firms:


More than doubled in their spending of 5% or more of revenue over the past five years (27% vs.
12%).


Decreased their spending of over $10K (30% vs. 33%) since 2005.


6
-
10 attorney firms:


Slightly increased their spending of 5% or more (14% vs. 12%) from 2005 and more than
doubled from 2002 (14% vs. 6%).


Decreased their spending of over $10K (39% vs. 46%) since 2005.


11
-
20 attorney firms
:


Followed the same pattern in allocating revenue to marketing activities in 2007 as in 2005.


Increased their spending of over $50K (19% vs. 13%) since 2005.


©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

7

Executive Summary
(cont.)

Time Spent on Firm Marketing


There have been no significant changes in 2007, as practicing law remains the primary activity of the firm, while
marketing remains an important “non
-
law” activity.


Firms with fewer than 10 attorneys report no change from 2005 as to how much time they spend on marketing
activities.


Firms with 11
-
20 attorneys report a slight decrease from 2005 in the percentage of time they spend per week on
marketing. This may be due to assigning these duties to others within the firm, thereby freeing up their time to focus
on practicing law.

Utilization of Marketing Tactics


While firms still utilize proven marketing tactics such as yellow pages, legal listings, and client entertainment, they are
increasing the use of firm Web sites and are embracing emerging technologies, such as blogs and paid placements
on search engines to grow their practice.


The size of the firm determines to what degree various marketing tactics are utilized. Smaller firms are most likely to
use yellow pages and legal listings, whereas larger firms utilize client entertainment to a greater extent. However,
while client entertainment is still the leading choice among firms with 11
-
20 attorneys, it shows a significant drop from
2005 (23% vs. 32%).


The perceived value of Web sites as the highest valued marketing tactic, regardless of firm size, has not changed
over time.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

8

Executive Summary
(cont.)

Significance of Internet Marketing


Law firms continue to use the Internet to promote their practice, and are using the latest techniques to attract potential
clients.


Search engine optimization has increased from 2005 (55% vs. 50%), and slightly more firms in 2007 use online legal
sites to attract clients (14% vs. 12%).


Four times as many firms report the use of blogs in 2007 as compared to 2005 (8% vs. 2%), indicating the desire to
explore new methods in addition to traditional tactics to attract potential clients.

Perceived Value of Marketing Tactics


Networking and word
-
of
-
mouth continue to be integral to building a law practice; however, online activities are also
prevalent in integrated marketing campaigns.


Web sites are still considered a primary marketing tool for growing a firm’s practice, and more money is allocated
towards this tactic than in 2005.


Blogs are beginning to demonstrate value in attracting clients; however, it should be noted that very little revenue is
allocated towards this activity (1%).


While face
-
to
-
face interaction with potential clients is still important, client entertainment is decreasing in its value to
attract potential clients, and less money is being allocated towards it from 2005.


©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

9

Key Findings

9

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

10

Marketing Responsibility

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Partners continue to have primary responsibility for planning and executing marketing plans.


More office managers and assistants are taking an active role in marketing decisions, an increase of 27% from 2005
(14% vs. 11%).


In 9% of firms, outside sources (marketing consultant, marketing service provider, outside agency) have primary
marketing responsibility, unchanged from 2005.

10%
7%
3%
9%
14%
18%
69%
Partner

Member/associate/paralegal

Office manager/assistant/

secretary

Marketing consultant/

Marketing service provider/

Outside agency

Marketing manager/

director/officer

Other

None

Partners Drive Marketing Decisions

9%
11%
4%
9%
11%
17%
68%
2007

2005

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

12

Partner

Member/associate/paralegal

Office manager/assistant/

secretary

Marketing consultant/

Marketing service provider/

Outside agency

Marketing manager/

director/officer

Other

None

Marketing Responsibility By Firm Size

11%
9%
16%
25%
18%
14%
70%
4%
4%
4%
23%
10%
15%
86%
4%
3%
3%
14%
7%
24%
79%
18%
13%
1%
8%
9%
13%
51%
Solo
2-5
6-10
11-20

Solo practitioners

have increased the use of outside consultants by 29% (9% vs. 7%) and administrative staff
members (office managers, assistants and secretaries) by 60% (8% vs. 5%) from 2005.


Mid
-
size firms (2
-
5 attorneys)

also increased their reliance on administrative staff members by 17% (14% vs.
12%) from 2005.


Larger firms (6+ attorneys)

rely less on marketing consultants and more on other staff members, including
marketing managers, in 2007 than they did in 2005.


Firms with 6
-
10 attorneys increased their reliance on administrative staff members by 44% (23% vs. 16%).


Firms with 11
-
20 attorneys increased their reliance on marketing managers by 23% (16% vs. 13%).

7%
5%
13%
28%
20%
18%
72%
6%
6%
3%
16%
13%
20%
80%
5%
5%
3%
12%
7%
18%
78%
15%
22%
4%
5%
7%
13%
47%
2005

2007

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

13

Marketing Spend

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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28%
18%
31%
24%
43%
18%
11%
30%
9%
4%
22%
8%
6%
4%
7%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
0-1%
2%
3%
4%
5%+
2007
2005
2002
% of Revenue Spend on Marketing by Total Law Firms

% of Firms

% of Revenue

% Revenue Spend Among Total Law Firms


Revenue allocated to marketing activities increased in the 5%+ category and
decreased in the 2% category in 2007 as compared to 2005.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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$ Spend on Marketing by Total Law Firms

16%
28%
14%
28%
25%
25%
15%
9%
5%
5%
9%
18%
13%
6%
9%
19%
16%
4%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
$0 - $1K
$1,001 - $5K
$5,001-$10K
$10,001 -
$20K
$20,001 -
$50K
$50K+
2007
2005
2002
% of Firms

$ Spent on Marketing

Dollar Spend Among Total Firms


Overall, firms are spending at a consistent level between 2005 and 2007.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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25%
13%
28%
22%
44%
17%
12%
39%
8%
5%
26%
11%
6%
5%
6%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
0-1%
2%
3%
4%
5%+
2007
2005
2002
% of Revenue Spend on Marketing by Solo Practitioners

% of Firms

% of Revenue

% Revenue Spend Among Solos


Solo practitioners have increased their spending of 5% or more by 50% (39% vs. 26%) since 2005.


This has more than tripled from 2002.


Spending of 2% or less has decreased by 24% (38% vs. 50%) while spending of 4% or more has increased
by 45% (45% vs. 31%) since 2005.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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$ Spend on Marketing by Solo Practitioners

25%
34%
22%
38%
39%
28%
13%
5%
1%
1%
5%
16%
11%
<1%
4%
19%
12%
1%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
$0 - $1K
$1,001 - $5K
$5,001-$10K
$10,001 -
$20K
$20,001 -
$50K
$50K+
2007
2005
2002
% of Firms

$ Spent on Marketing

Dollar Spend Among Solos


Overall, solo practitioners are spending at a consistent level between 2005 and 2007.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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28%
19%
31%
24%
40%
18%
7%
3%
12%
27%
11%
3%
22%
7%
6%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
0-1%
2%
3%
4%
5%+
2007
2005
2002
% of Revenue Spend on Marketing by 2
-
5 Attorney Firms

% of Firms

% of Revenue

% Revenue Spend Among 2
-
5 Attorney Firms


The amount of revenue allocated for firm marketing remains at a similar rate between 2005 and 2007.


Smaller firms have more than doubled their spending of 5% or more over the past five years (27% vs. 12%).

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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$ Spend on Marketing by 2
-
5 Attorney Firms

12%
20%
14%
10%
6%
12%
20%
16%
10%
7%
21%
27%
13%
10%
6%
4%
28%
26%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
$0 - $1K
$1,001 - $5K
$5,001-$10K
$10,001 -
$20K
$20,001 -
$50K
$50K+
2007
2005
2002
% of Firms

$ Spent on Marketing

Dollar Spend Among 2
-
5 Attorney Firms


Marketing dollars budgeted for 2007 have remained consistent to 2005.


Smaller firms have slightly decreased their spending of over $10K, down 9% in 2007 (30% vs. 33%).

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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33%
26%
38%
31%
49%
19%
5%
2%
6%
4%
4%
14%
4%
5%
12%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
0-1%
2%
3%
4%
5%+
2007
2005
2002
% of Revenue Spend on Marketing by 6
-
10 Attorney Firms

% of Firms

% of Revenue

% Revenue Spend Among 6
-
10 Attorney Firms


Since 2005 there has been relatively little change in marketing spend among firms with 6
-
10 attorneys.


Spending of 5% or more has increased slightly from 2005, up 17% (14% vs. 12%), and is up 133% from 2002
(14% vs. 6%).

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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$ Spend on Marketing by 6
-
10 Attorney Firms

5%
12%
8%
9%
18%
15%
13%
17%
21%
20%
9%
7%
19%
17%
20%
18%
18%
9%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
$0 - $1K
$1,001 - $5K
$5,001-$10K
$10,001 -
$20K
$20,001 -
$50K
$50K+
2007
2005
2002
% of Firms

$ Spent on Marketing

Dollar Spend Among 6
-
10 Attorney Firms


The firms marketing budget in 2007 has remained fairly consistent to 2005.


The exception is that smaller firms have decreased their spending of over $10K down 15% since 2005 (39%
vs. 46%).

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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26%
23%
39%
20%
11%
5%
35%
19%
4%
4%
36%
20%
2%
8%
7%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
0-1%
2%
3%
4%
5%+
2007
2005
2002
% of Revenue Spend on Marketing by 11
-
20 Attorney Firms

% of Firms

% of Revenue

% Revenue Spend Among 11
-
20 Attorney Firms


The percentage of firm revenue allocated to marketing activities in 2007 is following a consistent pattern with
2005.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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$ Spend on Marketing by 11
-
20 Attorney Firms

4%
11%
16%
19%
7%
20%
21%
20%
13%
13%
23%
11%
5%
7%
21%
7%
8%
20%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
$0 - $1K
$1,001 - $5K
$5,001-$10K
$10,001 -
$20K
$20,001 -
$50K
$50K+
2007
2005
2002
% of Firms

$ Spent on Marketing

Dollar Spend Among 11
-
20 Attorney Firms


Overall spending rate in 2007 has decreased from 2005.


The exception is larger firms have increased their spending of over $50K by 46% since 2005 (19% vs. 13%).

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Time Spent on Firm Marketing

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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1%
6%
8%
8%
62%
15%
Other
Professional/Personal
Development
Conducting Research
Marketing/Business
Development
Managing Practice
Practicing Law
2%
6%
8%
8%
63%
14%
Other
Professional/Personal
Development
Conducting Research
Marketing/Business
Development
Managing Practice
Practicing Law
Marketing Remains Among the

Top “Non
-
Law” Activities

2007

2005


There have been no significant changes reported in 2007, as practicing law remains the primary activity of
the firm, while marketing remains an important “non
-
law” activity.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Marketing/Business

development

Practicing law

Managing the practice

Conducting research

Professional/Personal

development

Other

Top “Non
-
Law” Activities By Firm Size

2%
6%
7%
15%
63%
7%
3%
9%
15%
62%
5%
6%
11
-
20 Attorney Firms

1
-
10 Attorney Firms

Time Spent in 2007

Time Spent in 2005

2%
6%
8%
14%
62%
8%
3%
12%
16%
58%
6%
6%
11
-
20 Attorney Firms

1
-
10 Attorney Firms


Firms with 10 or fewer attorneys report no change in 2007 in time spent on marketing activities.


Solo practitioners report an increase of 23% in time spent on managing their practice (16% vs. 13%).


Firms with 11
-
20 attorneys report a slight decrease from 2005 in the percentage of time spent on marketing.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

27

Utilization of Marketing Tactics

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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% Spend on Marketing Tactics

21%
19%
18%
16%
5%
4%
4%
3%
2%
2%
1%
22%
19%
20%
6%
5%
3%
1%
3%
1%
0%
7%
7%
13%
2007
2005
Directories and Client Interaction Remain the
Preferred Tactics


Over time, yellow pages, legal listings, client entertainment, and firm Web sites remain the top marketing
tactics utilized among law firms.


Spending on firm Web sites has increased 23% (16% vs. 13%) from 2005.


Attorneys are embracing emerging technologies (such as pay
-
per
-
click and blogs) in their marketing mix.

Yellow
pages

Client
entertainment

Legal

listings

Firm

Web sites

Event
sponsorships

Giving/

hosting
seminars

PR/

writing articles

Referral

services

Local

outdoor ads

Pay
-
per
-
click

placements

Sponsorships
on legal Web
sites

Blogs

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Smaller firms (1
-
5 attorneys)


Firms with 2
-
5 attorneys have increased their spending on their
Web sites

from 2005 by 64% (18% vs. 11%), but
have allocated less of their budget for
client entertainment,
down 21% (15% vs. 19%).


2
-
5 attorney firms have decreased their
yellow pages

spend by 16% (21% vs. 25%).


Solo practitioners spend more on
pay
-
per
-
click

than larger firms (4% vs. 1%); they have also doubled their
spending on
sponsorships on legal Web sites

(2% vs. 1%) since 2005.


Larger firms (6
-
20 attorneys)


Firms with 11
-
20 attorneys have decreased their spending on
client meals and entertainment

by 28% (23% vs.
32%) since 2005. However, it is still a primary activity within their budgets as compared to smaller firms.


Firms with 11
-
20 attorneys also tend to spend more on
event sponsorships,
than smaller firms.


Spending on
event sponsorships

among firms with 11 to 20 attorneys has increased by 18% (13% vs. 11%) since 2005.


Firms with 6
-
10 attorneys have decreased their spending on
outdoor advertising

by half (2% vs. 4%) since 2005.


With regard to live networking opportunities, 6
-
10 attorney firms have increased spend on
event sponsorships

by
25% (10% vs. 8%), but decreased
client entertainment

by 10% (27% vs. 30%) since 2005.


How Size Affects Choice of Marketing Tactics

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Current % Spending On Marketing Tactics Among
Solos

22%
22%
18%
15%
5%
4%
4%
4%
3%
2%
1%
1%
23%
21%
5%
5%
2%
0%
5%
6%
1%
16%
2%
14%
2007
2005
Current % Spending on Marketing Tactics
Among Solos

Client
entertainment

Legal
directory

listings

Firm

Web sites

Event
sponsorships

Giving/

hosting
seminars

PR/

writing articles

Referral

services

Local

outdoor ads

Pay
-
per
-
click

placements

Sponsorships
on legal
Web sites

Yellow
pages

Blogs


Over time, yellow pages, legal listings, client entertainment, and firm Web sites are still top marketing tactics
utilized by solo practitioners.


Spending on yellow pages listings has decreased slightly from 2005, while spending on legal directories,
client entertainment, and firm Web sites have experienced a slight increase.


Spending on online tactics has doubled, with both pay
-
per
-
click (4% vs. 2%) and sponsorships on legal Web
sites (2% vs. 1%) increasing by 100% from 2005.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Current % Spending On Marketing Tactics Among
Firms with 2
-
5 Attorneys

21%
18%
7%
3%
2%
1%
19%
19%
7%
4%
4%
0%
15%
3%
18%
3%
5%
4%
3%
25%
11%
2%
2%
5%
2007
2005
Current % Spending on Marketing Tactics
Among Firms with 2
-
5 Attorneys

Client
entertainment

Legal
directory

listings

Firm

Web sites

Event
sponsorships

Giving/

hosting
seminars

PR/

writing articles

Referral

services

Local

outdoor ads

Pay
-
per
-
click

placements

Sponsorships
on legal
Web sites

Yellow
pages

Blogs


Yellow pages, legal directory listings, firm Web sites, and client entertainment are still important tactics
among firms with 2
-
5 attorneys.


Spending on firm Web sites is up 64% (18% vs. 11%) from 2005.


Spending on yellow pages listings, legal directory listings, and client entertainment decreased from 2005 to
2007, while spending on firm Web sites has increased.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

32

Current % Spending On Marketing Tactics Among
Firms with 6
-
10 Attorneys

16%
15%
10%
4%
1%
0%
14%
8%
6%
5%
0%
3%
27%
16%
2%
1%
5%
15%
2%
30%
15%
4%
1%
2%
2007
2005
Current % Spending on Marketing Tactics
Among Firms with 6
-
10 Attorneys

Client
entertainment

Legal
directory

listings

Firm

Web sites

Event
sponsorships

Giving/

hosting
seminars

PR/

writing articles

Referral

services

Local

outdoor ads

Pay
-
per
-
click

placements

Sponsorships
on legal
Web sites

Yellow
pages

Blogs


Client entertainment, yellow pages, legal directory listings, and firm Web sites are still the preferred marketing
tactics among firms with 6
-
10 attorneys.


There is less spending on client entertainment in 2007 than in 2005, although spending on yellow pages and
legal directory listings has risen slightly.


Spending on firm Web sites remains unchanged from 2005.

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

33

Current % Spending On Marketing Tactics Among
Firms with 11
-
20 Attorneys

16%
13%
10%
6%
1%
32%
14%
11%
10%
11%
11%
7%
1%
1%
2%
1%
0%
13%
1%
23%
13%
1%
1%
1%
2007
2005
Current % Spending on Marketing Tactics
Among Firms with 11
-
20 Attorneys

Client
entertainment

Legal
directory

listings

Firm

Web sites

Event
sponsorships

Giving/

hosting
seminars

PR/

writing articles

Referral

services

Local

outdoor ads

Pay
-
per
-
click

placements

Sponsorships
on legal
Web sites

Yellow
pages

Blogs


Client entertainment, firm Web sites, event sponsorship, legal listings, and yellow pages are still important
marketing tactics to larger firms.


Spending on client entertainment has decreased by 28% (23% vs. 32%) since 2005.


Spending on firm Web sites, event sponsorships, legal directory listings, and yellow pages has risen since
2005.

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*Top 3 box score (Very Valuable, Valuable, Somewhat Valuable)

Perceived Value of Marketing Tactics

27%
34%
35%
44%
51%
64%
63%
71%
76%
76%
89%
82%
Law firm Web sites

Printed/online legal directory/listings

Public/media relations/writing articles

Client meals/entertainment

Print/online yellow pages

Event sponsorships/community events

Referral services

Giving/hosting seminars

Sponsorship/placement on legal Web sites

Pay
-
per
-
click placements on search
engines

Local outdoor advertising

Writing/hosting a blog

30%
37%
46%
51%
68%
68%
75%
78%
79%
89%
85%

Networking and word
-
of
-
mouth tactics are still integral to building a law practice; however, online activities are
also prevalent in integrated marketing campaigns.


The perceived value of Web sites as a primary marketing tool for growing a practice, regardless of firm size,
has remained consistent over time.


Most other marketing tactics have slightly lesser perceived value than in 2005.

N/A

2007

2005

% Respondents that Indicated Tactic as Valuable*

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

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Significance of Internet Marketing

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Law firms continue to use the Internet to promote their practice and are using the latest techniques to
attract potential clients.


Search engine optimization has increased 10% from 2005 (55% vs. 50%), and slightly more firms in 2007
use online advertising to attract clients, up 17% (14% vs. 12%).


Four times as many firms report the use of blogs (8% vs. 2%) to attract potential clients, up 30% from
2005.

Internet Marketing Among Total Firms

78% of
firms
have a
Web site

22% of
firms do
not have a
Web site

80% of
firms
have a
Web site

20% of
firms do
not have a
Web site


8%

use blogs


55%

use search engine optimization


24%

use paid placement on search engines


14%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=690)

2007

2005


50%

use search engine optimization


24%

use paid placement on search engines


12%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=770)


2%

use blogs

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

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Search engine optimization has increased by 8% from 2005 (52% vs. 48%).


Four times as many solo firms report the use of blogs (8% vs. 2%) to attract potential clients.

Solo Practitioners

68% of
firms
have a
Web site

32% of
firms do
not have a
Web site

73% of
firms
have a
Web site

27% of
firms do
not have a
Web site


48%

use search engine optimization


28%

use paid placement on search engines


14%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=229)


2%

use blogs


52%

use search engine optimization


28%

use paid placement on search engines


15%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=225)



8%

use blogs

2007

2005

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

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Search engine optimization has increased by 20% from 2005 (60% vs. 50%).


More than four times as many 2
-
5 attorney firms report the use of blogs (9% vs. 2%) to attract potential
clients.

Firms with 2
-
5 Attorneys

80% of
firms
have a
Web site

20% of
firms do
not have a
Web site

80% of
firms
have a
Web site

20% of
firms do
not have a
Web site


50%

use search engine optimization


26%

use paid placement on search engines


12%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=372)


2%

use blogs


60%

use search engine optimization


25%

use paid placement on search engines


15%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=304)


9%

use blogs

2007

2005

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

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Search engine optimization and the use of blogs have remained consistent with 2005 (50% and 3%
respectively).


The use of paid placement on search engines and online advertising in 6
-
10 attorney firms have
decreased slightly since 2005.

Firms with 6
-
10 Attorneys

93% of
firms
have a
Web site

7% of
firms do
not have a
Web site

88% of
firms
have a
Web site

12% of
firms do
not have a
Web site


50%

use search engine optimization


18%

use paid placement on search engines


12%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=113)


3%

use blogs


50%

use search engine optimization


17%

use paid placement on search engines


10%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=105)


3%

use blogs

2007

2005

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

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Search engine optimization has declined by 9% from 2005 (50% vs. 55%).


The use of blogs to attract potential clients in 11
-
20 attorney firms has increased by 40% since 2005 (7%
vs. 5%).

Firms with 11
-
20 Attorneys

98% of
firms
have a
Web site

2% of
firms do
not have a
Web site

92% of
firms
have a
Web site

8% of
firms do
not have a
Web site


55%

use search engine optimization


11%

use paid placement on search engines


4%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=56)


5%

use blogs


50%

use search engine optimization


18%

use paid placement on search engines


13%

use online advertising

Base: Have firm Web site (n=56)


7%

use blogs

2007

2005

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Detailed Methodology and
Demographics

41

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

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A study of small law firms was conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of LexisNexis. A total of 908 interviews
were conducted via an online survey between August 30 and September 27, 2007

among employees of small law
firms (defined as having 20 or fewer attorneys). The length of the questionnaire was approximately 15 minutes.


SAMPLE SELECTION

Sample of current subscribers, past subscribers and non
-
subscribers was provided by LexisNexis.


Qualified respondents for this study identified themselves as working as a solo practitioner or in a law firm with 20
or fewer attorneys and were either solely or partially responsible for the decision
-
making process of marketing
their firm.


ONLINE INTERVIEWING PROCEDURES

Interviews were conducted using a self
-
administered, online questionnaire, via proprietary, Web
-
assisted
interviewing software. The HPOL interviewing system permitted online data entry of interviews by the
respondents. Questionnaires were programmed into the system with the following checks:



1.


Question and response series

2.


Skip pattern

3.


Question rotation

4.


Range checks

5.


Mathematical checks

6.


Consistency checks

7.


Special edit procedures

Detailed Methodology

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2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

43

Detailed Methodology
(cont.)

ONLINE INTERVIEWING PROCEDURES
(cont’d)


To

maintain

the

reliability

and

integrity

in

the

sample,

each

invitation

contained

a

password

that

was

uniquely

assigned

to

that

e
-
mail

address
.

A

respondent

was

required

to

enter

the

password

at

the

beginning

of

the

survey

to

gain

access

into

the

survey
.

Password

protection

ensured

that

a

respondent

completed

the

survey

only

one

time
.



To

increase

the

number

of

respondents

in

the

survey

and

to

improve

overall

response

rates,

up

to

two

additional

reminder

invitations

were

typically

mailed

at

2
-
4

day

intervals

to

those

respondents

who

had

not

yet

participated

in

the

survey
.



All

data

were

then

tabulated,

checked

for

internal

consistency

and

processed

by

computer
.

A

series

of

computer
-
generated

tables

were

produced

for

each

of

the

key

sample

groups

that

showed

the

results

of

each

survey

question,

both

by

the

total

number

of

respondents

and

by

the

key

subgroups
.




©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Decline
to
answer
2%
Female
25%
Male
73%
7%
8%
9%
9%
22%
Criminal
Personal injury
Real estate
Family
General practice
Only responses of 5%
or more are shown.

Main Area of Practice

Size of Firm

Gender

15%
44%
28%
11%
60+
46-59
35-45
25-34
Age

Region

South
33%
East
23%
Midwest
24%
West
20%
Demographics of Respondents
-

2007

11-20
lawyers
6-10
lawyers
2-5
lawyers
Solo
38%

43%

13%

6%

©
2007, Harris Interactive Inc.

H A R R I S I N T E R A C T I V E

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Female
24%
Male
76%
5%
5%
7%
10%
10%
22%
Trusts & Estates
Criminal
Real estate
Personal injury
Family
General practice
Only responses of 5%
or more are shown.

Main Area of Practice

Size of Firm

Gender

12%
49%
27%
10%
60+
46-59
35-45
25-34
Age

Region

South
36%
East
20%
Midwest
22%
West
22%
Demographics of Respondents
-

2005

6%
13%
48%
32%
11-20
attorneys
6-10
attorneys
2-5
attorneys
Solo