Wellness and Agriculture for Life Advancement (WALA)

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Wellness and Agriculture for Life Advancement (WALA)






A GUIDE TO
WALA M&E SYSTEM


(Abridged Version)








Prepared By


Monitoring
,

Evaluation and Knowledge Management Unit

Consortium Administration and Technical Capacity Hub (CATCH)














JANUARY
,

2012


M&E System
Abridged
Guide
:
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2


TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

................................
................................
................................
................

2

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

................................
................................
................................
.........

3

LIST OF
FIGURES

................................
................................
................................
........................

4

1.0.

INTRODUCTION

................................
................................
................................
...............

5

1.1.

The WALA Program

................................
................................
................................
........

5

2.0.

WALA M&E SYSTEM

................................
................................
................................
.......

5

2.1.

WALA SMILER IN BRIEF

................................
................................
.............................

6

2.2.

GETTING ORGANIZED

................................
................................
................................

7

2.2.1.

WALA M&E Purpose Statement
................................
................................
..............

7

2.2.2.

CRS M&E standards

................................
................................
................................
.

7

2.2.
3.

Stakeholder Analysis

................................
................................
................................

8

2.2.4.

M&E Technical Working Group

................................
................................
..............

8

2.3.

THE SET UP

................................
................................
................................
....................

8

2.3.1.

Results

Framework

................................
................................
................................
...

8

2.3.2.

Indicator and Performance Tracking Table (IPTT)

................................
................

10

2.3.3.

Indicator Tracking Table (ITT)

................................
................................
...............

10

2.3.4.

Performance Management Plan

................................
................................
..............

10

2.3.5.

Detailed Implementation Plan
................................
................................
.................

11

2.4.

REPORTING FORMS AND REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS

................................
..

11

2.4.1.

Data Flow Maps

................................
................................
................................
......

11

2.4.2.

Communication and Reporting Maps

................................
................................
.....

13

2.4.3.

Data Gathering Forms

................................
................................
.............................

15

2.4.4.

Reports (monthly, quarterly, annual)

................................
................................
......

15

2.4.5.

Consortium Management Information System (C
-
MIS)

................................
........

15

2.4.6.

Evaluations (Baseline, Midterm, Final)

................................
................................
..

18

2.4.7.

Knowledge management and learning

................................
................................
....

18

2.4.8.

Data Quality Assessments (DQAs)

................................
................................
.........

18

2.4.9.

Quality Improvement Verification Checklist (QIVC)

................................
............

18

3.0.

FURTHER READING

................................
................................
................................
......

19











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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

ACDI/VOCA

Agricultural Cooperative Development International/Volunteers in
Overseas
Cooperative Assistance

ARR


Annual Results Report

CATCH

Consortium Administration and Technical Capacity Hub

C
-
MIS


Consortium Management Information System

CRS


Catholic R
elief Services

DEC


District Executive Committee

DIP


Detailed Implementati
on Plan

DQA


Data Quality Assessment

EI


Emmanuel International

FFP


Food for Peace

I
-
LIFE


Increased Livelihoods through Increased Food Security Program

IPTT


Indicator Performance Tracking Table

IR


Intermediate Result

ITT


Indicator Tracking Table

M&E


Monitoring and Evaluation

MCHN

Maternal and Child Health and Nutrition

NGOs


Non
-
Governmental
Organizations

PCI


Project Concern International

PMP


Performance Management Plan

PVO


Private Voluntary
Organizations

QIVC


Quality Improvement Verification Chec
klist

RF


Results Framework

SAPQ


Standardized Annual Performance Questionnaires

SMILER

Simple Measurement of Indicators and Learning for Evidence Based Reporting

SO


Strategic Objective

SSI


Small Scale Irrigation

TA


Traditional Authority

TLC


Total Land

Care

ToRs


Terms of Reference

TWG


Technical Working Group

USAID

United States Agency for International Development

VS&L


Village Savings and Loans

WALA

Wellness and Agriculture for Life Advancement

WVI


World Vision International










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L
IST OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Diagrammatic presentation of SMILER set up

................................
...............................

7

Figure 2: WALA res
ults framework

................................
................................
...............................

9

Figure 3: Results framework for SO2

................................
................................
.............................

9

Figure 4: WALA indicator performance tracking table

................................
................................

10

Figure 5: WALA
performance monitoring plan (PMP)

................................
...............................

11

Figure 6: Data flow map for SO1

................................
................................
................................
.

12

Figure 7: VS&L data flow map at PVO level

................................
................................
...............

13

Figure 8: Comm
unication and reporting flow map for CATCH

................................
..................

14

Figure 9: Example of communication and reporting map
-
PCI

................................
.....................

14

Figure 10: C
-
MIS log in screen

................................
................................
................................
....

16

Figure 11: WALA/IMPACT log in window

................................
................................
.................

16

Figure 12: WALA switchboard in CMIS
................................
................................
......................

17

Figure 13: Services and functions under WALA in the CMIS

................................
.....................

17





























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1.0.

INTRODUCTION

1.1.

The

WALA P
rogram

Wellness
and

Agriculture for Life Advancement (WALA) is
a Title II
five year (2009
-
2014)
food security program, funded by Food for Peace (FFP) of USAID.

The program targets
the
eight most food insecure distri
cts of
southern Malawi namely

Nsanje, Chikwawa, Thyolo,
Mulanje, Zomba, Machinga, Chiradzulu and Balaka.

WALA is implemented by a consortium of
eight Private Volunteer Organizations (PVOs) alongside
C
atholic
R
elief
S
ervices
/Malawi

(CRS)

as the grant holder
.
CRS
/
M
alawi

through the Consortium Administration and Technical
Capacity Hub (CATCH) leads the management and implementation of
the

program
.

The eight
PVOs are

ACDI/VOCA, Africare, Chikwawa

Diocese, Emmanuel International (EI), Project
Concern International (PCI), Save the Children, Total Land Care (TLC) and World Vision
International (WVI).


The goal of WALA is to improve the food security of 214, 974 chronically food insecure
households in

39 Traditional Authorities (TAs) in 8 districts in Southern Malawi by 2014.

This will be achi
e
ved through 3 strategic objectives (SOs) namely



SO1: 170,724 vulnerable households have impr
oved maternal, child health
and nutrition
status
.



SO2: 147,500 smallh
older farming households have improved livelihood status
.



SO3: 273 targeted communities have improved capacity to withstand shocks and stresses
.

Alongside these SOs, the program also addresses cross
-
cuttin
g issues namely, HIV and AIDs,
g
ender, governance a
nd environmental management.


In order to track progress and provide

benchmarks for program performance evaluation,
WALA
program

has a comprehensive M&E system

th
at

outlines
the programs monitoring tools,
resources
, procedures

and documents necessary for p
roviding programmatic direction towards
achievement

of its

objectives. The system has developed appropriate data collection and
compilation tools with attention to data quality and how to achieve the set quality standards
including sound data analysis and
reporting procedures. The
M&E
system is set up is such a way
that it serves the program managers with administrative reporting needs as well as helping
stakeholders to follow implementation progress, unearth bottlenecks and provide diagnosis of
the constra
ints and how to resolve them. At the same time, the system ensures accountability of
resource utilization while enhancing learning and knowledge management.

The system also
ensures uniformity in approaches of program implementation among all PVO
s

in the 8
districts.

2.0.

WALA M&E SYSTEM

WALA
M&E system
adopted

the CRS wide monitoring and evaluation standards

while mee
ting
the donor requirements and allowing the PVOs to incorporate some reporting requirements that
are specific to their organizations. This way, th
e system is acceptable to all partners and
stakeholder
s
.




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WALA adopted the Sim
ple Measurement of Indicators and Learning for Evidence
-
based
Reporting (SMILER)

approach in developing its M&E System.
SMILER is a comprehensive
approach to developing a projec
t monitoring and evaluation system that supports learning and
deci
sion
-
making based on evidence.

2.1.

WALA
SMILER
IN BRIEF

WALA
SMILER consists of a number of components that when put together, form a step by
step and systematic guide that constitute the entire

M&E system. The components provide
guidelines, instructions documents that have been put together with wider consultation with the
program stakeholders and using experience and learning from previous but similar programs in
order to have a comp
rehensive s
ystem.
SMILER
has three main components as follows
;

1.

Getting Organized

consists of documents that guided formulation of the M&E system
like the CRS wide M&E standards, CRS M&E standards support tool, Term of
References (ToRs) for M&E
Technical Working Group

(
TWG
)
, purpose of M&E and
stakeholders’ analysis. It also consists of the SMILER’s table of contents which
highlights all documents and necessary process
es

that constitute the M&E system
.

2.

Setting up

consists of the
Results Framework (RF),
indicator perfor
mance tracking table
(IPTT), performance management plan (PMP),

detailed implementation plan (DIP)

and
trigger indicators and threshold table.

3.

Designing Forms and Reports

comprises of
processes involved in designing different
standard reporting forms and p
rocedures for enhancing efficient data flows

report and
reporting relationships (data flow maps and communication

maps) and data gathering
forms, data management and analysis,
report

(monthly, quarterly, annual) and
Evaluations (baseline, mid
-
term and fina
l).
This is where data quality assessment
s

(DQA
s
)

and systems to verify quality of service delivery are

integral part

of
.


Figure 1 is a diagrammatic presentation of the SMILER approach as it was applied in
developing WALA M&E system.

















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Figure
1
: Diagrammatic presentation of SMILER set up


2.2.

GETTING ORGANIZED

2.2.1.

WALA M&E Purpose Statement

WALA M&E s
ystem is designed and implemented following CRS M&E Standards and
is
compatible with program’s data

and data

quality requ
irements and provides

other technical areas
with tools and guidance on how best they can collect and manage data that is useful for program
improvement and reporting. The WALA M&E has the following purposes;

1.

Strengthen M&E capacity of consortium members

2.

C
onsortium
-
wide
uniform
M&E system with
minimum
flexibility to
allow for other
partners’ reporting requirements

3.

Meet stakeholder

(within WALA and beyond)
information

needs

4.

Pilot and learn

from
M&E
innovations

5.

Monitor

service delivery and quality

6.

Establish knowledge management system and share lessons learned

7.

D
ata are used

by consortium partner staff and volunteers for decision
-
making and action

8.

Optimize linkage
s with other program

2.2.2.

CRS

M&E standards

CRS’ M&E Standards

are critically formulated to

enhance program or project quality. They are
critically formulated to provide quality standards that need to be adhered to in order to improve
effectiveness service quality and delivery at each stage of program formulation, implementation
and evaluation.
The Standards clearly
define the key elements of project
Design, Monitoring

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and Evaluation

(M&E) and an organizational environment in which M&E can improve
program quality an
d positively impact the people it

serve
s
. These standards reflect key
characterist
ics of high quality programs and agency culture that promote better learning and
strengthen accountabili
ty to stakeholders. The
M&E systems inform decisions at the field level
regarding progress and success of projects and programs
. These standards have be
en formulated
through learning and experience that CRS has had over many years of successful
implementation

of complex programs in multicultural environments which h
ave had immerse
positive impact

on people’s lives.

2.2.3.

Stakeholder Analysis

WALA stakeholder’s
analysis was done. These are stakeholders who have information needs
from the WALA program. WALA M&E system sets out a framework for communicating with,
and reporting to these stakeholders and ensuring that they have the information they need to
review pro
gress and support ongoing efforts.

These stakeholders range from government
ministries and departments, other NGOs, faith based organizations, district level structures and
community based organizations among others.

2.2.4.

M&E Technical Working Group

The WALA M&
E System has an M&E technical w
o
rking group

(TWG)

with well defined terms
ToRs
. Among others the, M&E TWG aims at reviewing PVO progress against targets,
developing data collection tools, periodic review of data collection tools and the M&E system
and prov
iding relevant feedback to other sector TWGs within the consortium.
The M&E TWG
comprises the Head o
f M&E and Knowledge

M
an
a
gem
e
nt
,

CATCH based M&E staff, one
M&E Officer from each PVO. At any given seating of the TWG, other technical staff may be
co
-
opted

into the meeting to if need arises.

The
M&E
TWG meets regularly (quarterly)

to
discuss M&E and knowledge management issues with reference to its ToRs.

2.3.

THE SET UP

2.3.1.

Results Framework

The WALA Result
s

Framework (RF) is a logic model which sets out a logical sequence of activities
and outputs that will lead to short, medium and long term outcomes and objectives. It sta
tes how the
program’s activities will cause the desired outcomes. It is drawn based on

a solid and evidence based
theory of change which underlies the choice of the activities



The overall WALA

RF is diagrammatically

presented in Figure 2
;










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Figure
2
: WALA r
esults
f
ramework



Each intermediate result (IR) under the three SOs
including the cross cutting issues
has its
activities that if implemented will lead to
the realization of
that specific IR. For example, the
activities under SO2’s intermediate result
s

are presented as foll
ows in the RF;


Figure
3
: Results framework for SO2



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2.3.2.

Indicator and Performance Tracking Table (IPTT)

WALA program has an indicator performance tracking table (IPTT) which comprises performance
indicators at impact, outcome and
output levels. These indicators are linked to the program’s
objectives
. The direction of desired change (positive or negative) is indicated for each indicator.
Estimated baseline values for each indicator

are added in the IPTT.
Depending on the direction o
f
desired change for each indicator,
a target is set out for each implementation year.
Figure 4

is a
section of the IPTT.


Figure
4
: WALA indicator performance tracking table



The indicators in the IPPT have been carefully
formulated in order to conform to national and
international definitions and universal measurement standards.

Changes to the IPTT during the
implementation period can only be effected after thorough consultations have been made with
various stakeholders an
d concurrence has been sought from the donor of the program.

2.3.3.

Indicator Tracking Table (ITT)

While the IPTT condenses most of the indicator into composite formulations, the indicator
tracking table
(ITT) has been designed to capture minor and more detailed
process and input

indicators. Depending on the nature of the indicators, some are exactly captured in the ITT are as
they are in the IPTT. The ITT is accompanied by and definition of each and every indicator in
order to enhance uniformity in data capturing

across the consortium.

2.3.4.

Performance Management Plan

The Performance Management Plan (PMP)

contains

d
efinitions for ea
ch indicator listed in the IPTT
including
the data collection methodology

and sources, methods/approaches and instruments for data
collecti
on,

frequency

and responsible personnel for
data collection

and how the data is going to be
analyzed and used by stakeholders. The PMP sets out roles and responsibilities on collection and
who needs the data.
Figure
5

is
a formulation and and

examp
le of on
e of the indicators in
the IPTT.








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Figure
5
: WALA performance monitoring plan (PMP)



2.3.5.

Detailed Implementation Plan

At the beginning of each program implementation year, the M&E team prepares a detailed
implementation plan
(DIP) which describes activities that correspond to the resources requested in
the program proposal in order to achieve the proposed objectives and targets.

The DIP describes
each activity to be carried out during an implementation year including the gener
al location of the
activity; the intermediate result(s) (IR) that the activity supports and the timing of the activity by
month. This is done in order to estimate M&E activity requirement during the year.

2.4.

REPORTING FORMS AND REPORTING RELATIONSHIPS

This
section briefly explains how data flows from one level to the other beginning from the field
level program staff and village or community based volunteers. It also highlights the reporting
relationships among different levels in the hierarchy of the progra
m. These standard reporting
and data flow maps enhance easy communication and define responsibilities among program
staff and stakeholders.

2.4.1.

Data Flow Maps

Each SO has a set of data collection tools and reporting forms at various levels. In order to
facilit
ate easy flow of information from one level to another and provided evidence based
reporting, each SO has a data flow map that outlines how information and data is collected and
flow and who is responsible for collecting the data at each level. The map als
o provides the steps
and tools (forms) through which the data is collected and/or consolidated into one major report
for the program.
Figure
6

is a data flow map for SO1. There are similar data flow maps for other
SOs.








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Figure
6
: Data flow map for SO1



SO2 comprises of several components namely, agriculture, irrigation
and v
illage
s
avings and
l
oans. There are separate data flow maps for each component.
Figure
7

is a data flow map for
VS&L.


















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Figure
7
: VS&L data flow map at PVO level



2.4.2.

Communication and Reporting Maps

In order to provide for a structured and disciplined communication and reporting system, the
WALA M&
E system has defined communication and reporting map at CATCH and PVO level.
The map provides focal persons at each reporting level so that data and information users and
stakeholder are guided on where and from whom they can get relevant data. The communi
cation
and reporting map also reminds the responsible staff at each level their responsibility and
deadlines for data collection and reporting.
Figure
8

is a CATCH communication and reporting
map.














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Figure
8
:
Communication and reporting flow map for CATCH


Each PVO has a similar communication and reporting map. For instance,
Figure
9

is a
communication and reporting map for

PCI
.


Figure
9
: Example of communication and reporting map
-
PCI



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2.4.3.

Data Gathering Forms

Within each SO and within each IR, there are data gathering
forms
designed to collect adequate
data for assessing whether there is progress towards achieving the specific result
s
.

These data
collection forms are distributed to
relevant field staff. Once completed, they are returned to
appropriate sector coordinators and forwarded to M&E Unit within each PVO for capturing into
the Consortium Management Information System (C
-
MIS). However, not all data collection
forms are entered

into the MIS. Some are filed as hard copies and kept within their sector
offices.

2.4.4.

Reports (monthl
y, quarterly
, annual)

There are also specific standard reporting forms for monthly, quarterly, annual reports at
different levels.

These are standardized across the consortium in order to ensure uniformity in
reporting of key performance areas and allow easy consolidation.

2.4.5.

Consortium Management Information System (C
-
MIS)

The M&E

system has a comprehensive MS A
ccess based Consortium M
anagement Information
System (C
-
MIS). The C
-
MIS has been carefully designed to provide a consolidated data
management platform where routine data from all areas of the program is stored

and basic
reports generated
. Within the C
-
MIS, program staff and stake
holders can generate key reports
highlighting some of the program’s achievements at any point in time. The C
-
MIS
is
an
integration of WALA and IMPACT program both of which are running concurrently and share
many impact areas and beneficiaries. The system i
s also designed to show synergy between
WALA and IMPACT programs and also among components within WALA.

Therefore the C
-
MIS captures data from both WALA and IMPACT programs.


The C
-
MIS comprises of the data collection tools section where data capturing tak
es place, the
report generation section where the operator can generate various reports depending on their
need
s

and the administrative tools section which is restricted to the MIS manager for
modification of the system. The following section provides a br
ief overview of getting into the
MIS.

2.4.5.1.

CMIS Log in and Navigation

On any computer where the system i
s installed, it is advisable that there is a CMIS Shortcut on
the desktop. When you want to log in into the CMIS, double click on the s
hortcut located on the

desktop of
the computer. The

computer will

present a log in screen as in
Figure 10
.












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Figure
10
: C
-
MIS log in screen


The operator will be required

click on “Login Partner Name” combo box and selec
t the partner
name for
which they

want to log in as. Upon entering an appropriate password and clicking
“Login” the operator will be prompted into a home page as presented in
Figure
11.

This page
w
ill allow the operator

to choose wh
ich program (IMPACT or WALA) they

would like to

use
the MIS for.


Figure
11
: WALA/IMPACT log in window



The operator

can then c
lick on the logo

associated with the program of their interest.

For
example if they

want to

use the MIS for WALA, they

will be required to cli
ck on the WALA

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logo. To exit the MIS, click on the “EXIT” command button
and the system will exit. If the
operator

choose
s WALA, they

will be presented with
window that looks like
Figure
12
,

the
WALA switchboard.


Figure
12
: WALA
switchboard in CMIS



The switchboard will take you further into service
s

and functions available under
the
WALA
program

section in the MIS
. Click on the tabs (i.e. Data collection tools, report generation and
administrative tools)

depending on the functi
ons

or services

that you want to perform with the
MIS
.

The data
collection tools section is div
ided into different WALA program areas and
depending on the data that you want to enter, you will be required to click on the appropriate
form. Similarly, if you

want to generate reports
or perform administrative functions, you will be
required to click on the appropriate tab and you will be prompted to navigation windows as in
Figure
13
.

You can choose the appropriate WALA program area and select

different report
s as
required.


Figure
13
: Servic
es and functions under
WALA in the CMIS





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Beside predefined reports in the CMIS, if the operator has basic MS Access skills, they can
generate various reports depending on their needs.

2.4.6.

Evaluations (Baseline, Midterm, Final)

WALA M&E systems complies with reporting standards for baseline, midterm and final
evaluations as prescribed by FFP. For example, WALA provides annual results reports (ARR) in
a standardized format and using the stand
ardized annual performance questionnaire (SAPQ).
Similarly, WALA intends to apply standard procedures and practices as provided for by FFP
when conducting its mid
-
term and final evaluation.

2.4.7.

Knowledge management and learning

With increasing realization of t
he importance of knowledge management and sharing as a key
element in success of programs, WALA has taken a deliberate step in incorporating
knowledge
management into its M&E system. Knowledge management was never considered as an
important aspect of progr
am and projects

before
. However,

k
nowledge

is now a treasured
resource and an important factor contributing to the success and effective performance of any
program or organization.


WALA’s knowledge management provides a platform for learning and sharing e
xperiences
whi
le at the same time prevents

repetition of mistakes and loss of valuable resources. Thus the
success and magnitude of impact of WALA’s development initiatives depend on the constant
renewal of the program’s knowledge assets to match the ever
changing global environment a
nd
community needs. Thus WALA has a
k
nowledge management strategy which is
envisioned to
guide and strengthen the process of capturing, documenting, sharing and applying knowledge in
the program. This is expected to help avoid
repeating past mistakes; highlight good practices;
make WALA’s work more relevant, effective and accessible; compare experiences and draw out
common issues and challenges; improve the documentation of lesson
-
learned; and help build
strong networks among pe
ople.

2.4.8.

Data Quality Assessments (DQAs)

Data Quality Assessment (DQA)

is an integral part of WALA M&E system.
It is done to
improve quality of data to enhance effective decision making at program level. The assessment
process facilitates learning and improve
s on M&E systems that
CATCH and
PVOs have in place
for collecting, reporting and using quality data.

While CATCH M&E team conduct DQAs in
PVOs, the PVO M&E Officer
s

and every staff

who are involved in data collection, compilation,
reporting and use

takes r
esponsibility
in conducting DQA.
However,
it is the
PVO
M&E
Officers’

primary responsib
ility

and
who is
accountable for DQA at PVO level.

In order to be
systematic there is a document which clearly stipulates how and who should conduct DQA.
Similarly, at C
ATCH level, there is a clear agenda for conducting DQA and a standard reporting
form for the same.

2.4.9.

Quality Improvement Verification Checklist (QIVC)

Another critical component of WALA M&E system is the Quality Improvement Verification

M&E System
Abridged
Guide
:
January 2012

Page
19


Checklist (QIVC). Thi
s is a system that is in place to check whether service
s

in each WALA
sector or component are delivered to program beneficiaries as per the preset quality standards. It
is expected that if service delivery is up to the prescribed standards, the program is
more likely
to have the intended project outcomes and/or impacts efficiently and effectively. This system
periodically

(six
-
monthly)
monitors if program services in key WALA program areas are
delivered in the program communities
.

Separate checklists with s
eparate instruction sheet
s

to
monitor service delivery and their quality standards of the following WALA program areas

have
already been developed
:

1.

M
aternal and
C
hild
H
ealth and
N
utrition (MCHN)

2.

Agriculture

3.

Small Scale Irrigation (SSI)

4.

Village Savings and
Loans

5.

Agribusiness

3.0.

FURTHER READING

For detailed expla
nation and understanding of the whole WALA M&E system the following
reading materials are recommended:

1.

WALA M&E operating manual

2.

WALA program proposal

3.

Sector specific QIVCs

4.

DQA guidelines

5.

CMIS User Guide

(under development)