Abstract - CASQA® Stormwater Conference

testyechinoidManagement

Nov 18, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Getting Ahead of the Wave


City of San Diego Watershed Asset
Management Planning

In 2008, the City of San Diego

re
-
organized its storm water functions
into
a unified Storm Water
Division

(
Division
)
to respond to
new and anticipated Total Maximum Daily Load regulations,
a new
National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit regulating discharges into and from its
Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System
, and to realize efficiencies from integrating its flood
con
trol and storm water quality protection functions
.
Staff identified several key business drivers
affecting the organization:

1.

Aging storm drain infrastructure;

2.

Increasing storm water quality regulatory requirements, including TMDLs;

3.

Budgetary constraints;
and

4.

Workforce constraints.

In response to this, the
Division

developed an asset management program for managing
its

activities.
The asset management program incorporates non
-
constructed assets as well as constructed
assets to develop appropriate levels of

service for both the water quality and watershed management as
well as for the drainage and flood control responsibilities of the Division.

The key questions that are
answered are:

1.

What do we own / manage?

2.

What is its required level of service?

3.

Which ass
ets are critical?

a.

Condition

b.

Business Risk Exposure

4.

What are my optimized management strategies?

a.

What needs to be done?

b.

When?

c.

Costs?

5.

What do I need to do to fund it?


Presented below is the process that was used to develop the plan.



Ultimately, the ass
et management program guides the
Division
’s development of its watershed
-
based TMDL implementation plans.
The asset management approach was incorporated into a
strategic business plan that became a compelling tool for communicating funding needs of the Di
vision,
tying those funding needs directly to regulatory requirements and desires expressed by citizens for the
services the Division was providing.
The application of asset management to storm water and
watershed management, based on this case study, is
a way to successfully optimize use of resources,
integrate municipal flood control and storm water quality management, transparently justify funding
requirements and management decisions, and build and transform an organization into one that can
sustainabl
y manage storm water quality and drainage on behalf of a municipality’s residents, businesses
and other customers. EPA’s Office of Wastewater Management Asset Management Program was
consulted during the process and endorsed the City’s process in applying
asset management to storm
water management.