Physics Grade 11 University Preparation

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Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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St. Andrew’s College Course Outline

Science Department


Physics Grade 11 University Preparation

SPH3U


Credit Value:


1.0


Prerequisites and Co requisites:

Science, Grade 10, Academic


Resources:

Locally designed and online resource text


Curriculum
Policy:


The Ontario Curriculum, Science, Grades 11 & 12

(2009)

The Ontario Curriculum, Grade 9
-
12 Program Planning and Assessment (2000)

(Program Planning Sections only)

Environmental Expectations: Scope and Sequence of Expectations (2008)

Growing
Success: Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting in Ontario's Schools
, First Edition, Covering Grades
1 to 12

(2010)


Developed by:

Jon Butcher & Jamie Inglis


June 2004



Revised by:

Jamie Inglis


June 20
12



Course Description/Rationale:

This course
develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an
emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and
sound; and electricity and mag
netism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics.
In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of
technological applications of physics on society
and the environment.


Overall Curriculum Expectations:

Kinematics



Analyse technologies that apply concepts related to kinematics, and assess the technologies’ social and
environmental impact;



Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, uniform and
non
-
uniform linear motion, and solve related
problems;



Demonstrate an understanding of uniform and non
-
uniform linear motion, in one and two dimensions.


Forces



Analyse and propose improvements to technologies that apply concepts related to dynamics and Ne
wton’s
laws, and assess the technologies’ social and environmental impact;



Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, net force, acceleration, and mass, and solve related
problems;



Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between changes i
n velocity and unbalanced forces in one
dimension


Energy in Society



Analyse technologies that apply principles of and concepts related to energy transformations, and

assess the
technologies’ social and environmental impact;



Investigate energy
transformations and the law of conservation of energy, and solve related problems;



Demonstrate an understanding of work, efficiency, power, gravitational potential energy, kinetic

energy,
nuclear energy, and thermal energy and its transfer (heat).


Waves a
nd Sound



Analyse how mechanical waves and sound affect technology, structures, society, and the environment and
assess ways of reducing their negative effects;



Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, the properties of mechanical waves and
sound, and solve
related problems;



Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of mechanical waves and sound and of the principles
underlying their production, transmission, interaction, and reception.


Electricity and Magnetism



Analyse the social, econ
omic, and environmental impact of electrical energy production and technologies
related to electromagnetism, and propose ways to improve the sustainability of electrical energy production;



Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, magnetic fields

and electric circuits, and solve related
problems;



Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of magnetic fields, the principles of current and electron flow,
and the operation of selected technologies that use these properties and principles to produ
ce and transmit
electrical energy.



Outline of the Course Content:


Strands

Big Ideas

Kinematics



Motion involves a change in the position of an object over time.



Motion can be described using mathematical relationships.



Many technologies that apply
concepts related to kinematics have
societal and environmental implications.

Forces



Forces can change the motion of an object.



Applications of Newton’s laws of motion have led to technological
developments that affect society and the environment

Energy
and Society



Energy can be transformed from one type to another.



Energy transformation systems often involve thermal energy losses
and are never 100% efficient.



Although technological applications that involve energy
transformations can affect society and
the environment in positive
ways, they can also have negative effects, and therefore must be used
responsibly.

Waves and Sound



Mechanical waves have specific characteristics and predictable
properties.



Sound is a mechanical wave.



Mechanical waves can affe
ct structures, society, and the environment
in positive and negative ways.

Electricity and Magnetism



Relationships between electricity and magnetism are predictable.



Electricity and magnetism have many technological applications.



Technological
applications that involve electromagnetism and energy
transformations can affect society and the environment in positive
and negative ways.


Teaching Learning Strategies used in this Course:

The strategies used are varied to meet the needs and the range
of learning styles encountered and include the
following:

Socratic Dialogue


Homework

Knowledge Building

Problem

Solving

Graphing

Experimentation

Discovery Activi
ties


Computer Simulations

Performance
-
based Labs

Challenge questions

“Reach Ahead” Assignment
s”

Case Study Analysis

Data Analysis

Co
-
operatve Learning


Assessment and Evaluation of Student Achievement:

Assessing, evaluating, and reporting on the achievement of curriculum expectations and on the demonstration of
learning skills and work habits is
done separately, apart from when learning skills and work habits may be included as
part of a curriculum expectation.

All curriculum expectations are accounted for in instruction and assessment.

Evidence
of student achievement for assessment is collected
over time from three different sources:

observations, conversations,
and student products

Learning Skills and Work Habits


The development, assessment, and evaluation of learning skills and work habits will occur in the following areas:

responsibility, org
anization, independent work, collaboration, initiative, and self
-
regulation.

Learning skills and work
habits, apart from when learning skills and work habits may be included as part of a curriculum expectation, will not be
considered in the determination o
f a student’s grade.




Categories of Knowledge and Skills; Levels of Achievement


Students will have numerous and varied opportunities to demonstrate the full extent of their achievement of the
content standards (curriculum expectations) and performance
standards (achievement chart) in a balanced manner
across all four categories of knowledge and skills:

knowledge and understanding, thinking, communication, and
application.

Four levels of achievement (levels 1
-
4) are identified on the achievement chart fo
r physics. Depending on
the task or activity, students may receive marks, achievement levels, or comments.


Assessment for/as Learning


Assessment is the process of gathering information from a variety of sources that accurately reflects how well a student

is achieving both specific and overall curriculum expectations in a course.

As part of assessment, teachers and peers will
provide students with descriptive feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement (assessment for learning) as
well as guides

them in assessing their own progress (assessment as learning).


Assessment of Learning


Evaluation is based on assessment of learning and focuses on students’ achievement of the overall expectations. A
single assessment of learning may include one or more

of the four knowledge and skills categories. Assessment of
learning in this course will be continuous throughout the year, will follow opportunities for students to improve their
understanding, and will include a variety of assessment methods.

Assessment
of each student’s learning is done
independently and by the teacher.


Strategies for Assessment of Student Performance


Teachers of this course will work collaboratively with colleagues to regularly review course content, instructional
strategies and asses
sment practices, and will make modifications to the program as needed to improve student
achievement.

Results from the AP, PSAT, SAT examinations, and province
-
wide assessments (OSSLT) will provide
additional information on program effectiveness to the sch
ool.


Sample Activity

Purpose

A
-
F
-
O (70%)

Who is completing

A
-
E?

Scoring Tool

Problem Solving

(In
-

class or assignment)

As Learning

For Learning

Of Learning

Self

Peer

Teacher

R
ubric

M
arking scheme

i
-
Clicker

Graphing

and Error
Analysis

As Learning

For
Learning

Of Learning

Self

Peer

Teacher

Rubric

Marking scheme

Exemplars

Homework

As Learning

Self

Peer

Teacher

Rubric

Checklist

i
-
Clicker

Teacher Led Review

As Learning

For Learning

Self

Peer

Teacher

Rubric

Marking scheme

i
-
Clicker

Knowledge Building

As
Learning

For Learning

Of Learning

Self

Peer

Teacher

Rubric

Marking scheme

Checklist

i
-
Clicker

Lab Activity

For Learning

Of Learning

Self

Peer

Teacher

Rubric

Marking scheme

Checklist

Performance Task

As Learning

For Learning

Of Learning

Self

Peer

Teacher

Rubric

Marking scheme

Checklist

Quiz

For Learning

Teacher

M
arking
S
cheme

Written Test

Of Learning

Teacher

M
arking
S
cheme

Reporting of Student Achievement:

The Final Grade:

The percentage grade represents an evaluation of the students’ overall
achievement with regard to both the content
standards identified by the curriculum expectations and the performance standards outlined in the achievement chart
for Grade 11 Physics. The distribution of marks into a grade is based on the departmental assess
ment and evaluation
policies for the course and will reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement where appropriate, with
special consideration given to more recent evidence
.

Comments on the development of learning skills and work habits,
alo
ng with general comments regarding student progress, wil
l also be provided on reports.
Evaluation from term
opportunities for assessment of learning will be 70% of the overall grade for the course; the final summative evaluation
,
incorporating a

lab activi
ty in April and a final written examination in June,

will be 30% of the overall grade and will
reflect all categories of learning and skills.

Guided Learning Centre policies will apply for major projects that are overdue (see
Parent & Student Handbook
),
Departmental policy for non GLC assignments permits their submission with a 15% deduction
until the work has been
returned or taken up in class
, after which a mark of zero will be assigned.


SPH3U
-

Mark Breakdown / KuTiCa Considerations


TERM

(70%)

Daily
Work

(0%)


“AS” Learning




Completion of homework



Self assessments



Peer assessments



Lab
c
hecklists



Learning skills and essential lab
skills



Group problem solving activities



Diagnostic assessments at the
beginning of new concepts

Consideration of KuTiCA

categories
with respect to assessment and
evaluation:


Although the mark categories are
not broken down into the Ministry
categories, these categories will be
incorporated into all assessments
and evaluations.


i
-
Clicker Quizzes and Assignments



Knowledge and Understanding,
and Application


Tests



Knowledge and
Understanding, Application, and
Communication


Labs



Knowledge and
Understanding, Thinking and
Inquiry, Communication, and
Application


Assessment

(10%)


“FOR” Learning

i
-
Clicker
Quizzes
and Assignments

(10%)



Concept i
-
Clicker mini
-
tests



Quizzes / pre
-
tests



Concept lab ‘activities’



Worksheets



Challenge / reach ahead
assignment

Evaluation

(60%)


“OF” Learning

Tests

(25%)

5 evaluations (one per unit)



Tests

Labs

(35%)



Formal
lab reports and hands
-
on
assessment in the lab

SUMMATIVE

(30%)

Summative Lab

(10%)


“OF” Learning

Application Lab
(10%)

Summative Lab will incorporate a
number of essential skills and
theoretical concepts presented
throughout the year

KuTiCA Categories
:

Summative Lab



Knowledge and
Understanding, Thinking and
Inquiry, Communication, and
Application


Written Exam



Knowledge and
Understanding , and Application


Final
Examinations
and Review
Notes

(20%)


“OF” Learning

Written Exam

(20%)

Comprehensive
written examination
covering the 5 major strands of the
course






Taken from The Ontario Curriculum, Science, Grades 11 & 12 (2009)



Program Planning Considerations:


Teachers who are planning a program in Physics must take into
account a number of considerations in a number of
important areas
.
The areas of concern to all teachers include the following:




types of secondary school courses



education for exceptional students



fostering critical thinking skills



the role of technology
in the curriculum



English as a second language and English literacy development



career education



cooperative education and other workplace experiences



health and safety


Essential information that pertains to all disciplines is provided in Program Planning

and Assessment, 2000.

Considerations related to the areas listed above that have particular relevance for program planning in physics are
noted here.


The Importance of the Study of Current Events


The study of current events forms an integral extension o
f the expectations found in the curriculum, enhancing both
the relevance and the immediacy of the program.


Education for Exceptional Students


In planning instruction, activities
and developing course materials
, consideration will be given to take into
account the
strengths, needs, learning expectations, and accommodations identified in the student’s IEP.

The most appropriate
methods and materials will be used to help students to achieve the expectati
ons as outlined in their IEP.


Antidiscrimination
Education


The curriculum is designed to help students acquire the “habits of mind” essential for citizens in a complex democratic
society characterized by rapid technological, economic, political, and social change.

Students are expected to
demonstrate an

understanding of the rights, privileges, and responsibilities of citizenship, as well as willingness to show
respect, tolerance, and understanding towards the environment.


The Role of Technology in the Curriculum


The use of laptop technology, has given
students access to addi
tional and powerful resources.
Use will be made of
computer assisted instruction both through local software and on
-
line text book related resources, as well as extensive
use of Java applets and other on
-
line simulations.

Many lab
activities will make use of computer based data acquisition
tools and analysis software.

The course
does not

rel
y

on a textbook, rather, a comprehensive, locally designed E
-
Text
will be used
. Students will use the functionality of their tablet computer to
make annotations in their
E
-
Text. In addition,
all
of the student

E
-
Texts will be backed up on a server and the instructors will have the ability to monitor the
completion
of various assessments

as learning assignments.

I
-
Clickers will also be used regular
ly to monitor progress of
students. These assessments for learning will be conducted on a regular basis to determine co
mprehension of the
material.


Career Education


The knowledge and skills that students acquire in physics are useful in preparation for a

variety of fields in post
-
secondary education.

References are made throughout the course to applications in engineering, computer related
areas, mathematics, chemistry, and medicine / biophysics.

Students are made aware of these options and are
encouraged

to investigate areas of interest to them.


Health & Safety


Safety is the primary concern in all lab activities.

Safety equipment (including goggles, gloves & protective clothing),
safe practices (including handling techniques, use of barrie
rs and shields), and safety procedures (including lab activity
design, appropriate use of equipment,

evacuation routes, and power shut off) will be taught and implemented as
appropriate throughout the course.

SPH3U STSE A


Scientific Investigation Skill
s and Career Exploration






























Scientific Investigation Skils


Initiating and Planning [IP]

A1.1
-

Formulate relevant
scientific questions about observed relationships, ideas, problems, or issues, make informed predictions, and/or
formulate educated hypotheses to focus inquiries or research.

A1.2
-

Select appropriate instruments (e.g., probeware, calorimeters, pendulums,
solenoids) and materials (e.g., drag sleds, electric bells, balls,
ramps), and identify appropriate methods, techniques, and procedures, for each inquiry.

A1.3
-

Identify and locate a variety of print and electronic sources that enable them to address rese
arch topics fully and appropriately.

A1.4
-

Apply knowledge and understanding of safe laboratory practices and procedures when planning investigations by correctly inter
preting
Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) symbols; by using appr
opriate techniques for handling and storing
laboratory equipment and materials and disposing of laboratory materials; and by using appropriate personal protection.


Performing and Recording [PR]

A1.5
-

Conduct inquiries, controlling relevant variables, ada
pting or extending procedures as required, and using appropriate materials and
equipment safely, accurately, and effectively, to collect observations and data.

A1.6
-

Compile accurate data from laboratory and other sources, and organize and record the data
, using appropriate formats, including tables,
flow charts, graphs, and/or diagrams.

A1.7
-

Select, organize, and record relevant information on research topics from a variety of appropriate sources, including electro
nic, print,
and/or human sources, using

suitable formats and an accepted form of academic documentation.


Analysing and Intrepreting [AI]

A1.8
-

Synthesize, analyse, interpret, and evaluate qualitative and/or quantitative data; solve problems involving quantitative data
; determine
whether the e
vidence supports or refutes the initial prediction or hypothesis and whether it is consistent with scientific theory; identif
y
sources of bias and/or error; and suggest improvements to the inquiry to reduce the likelihood of error.

A1.9
-

Analyse the infor
mation gathered from research sources for logic, accuracy, reliability, adequacy, and bias.


Communicating [C]

A1.11
-

Communicate ideas, plans, procedures, results, and conclusions orally, in writing, and/or in electronic presentations, using
appropriate
language and a variety of formats

(e.g., data tables, laboratory reports, presentations, debates, simulations, models).

A1.12
-

Use appropriate numeric (e.g., SI and imperial units), symbolic, and graphic modes of representation for qualitative and quan
tit
ative data
(e.g., vector diagrams, free
-
body diagrams,algebraic equations).

A1.13
-

Express the results of any calculations involving data accurately and precisely, to the appropriate number of decimal places
or significant
figures.

Career Exploration


A2.1
-

Identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields
of science under study
(e.g., theoretical physicist;
communications, networks, and control systems professional;
engineer; metallurgist) and the education and training
necessary for these careers.

A2.2
-

Describe the contributions of scientists, including Canadians
(e.g., Richar
d E. Taylor, Leonard T. Bruton, Willard S. Boyle,
Martha Salcudean, Harriet Brooks, Louis Slotin), to the fields
under study.






All of the expectations in
this STSE will be applied to
the deconstructions in each
unit.


Set the Context

Using STSE Deconstruction to Plan

A1.

D
emonstrate scientific investigation skills (related to both inquiry and research) in the four
areas of skills (initiating and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting,
and communicating).


A2.

Identify and describe careers related to

the fields of science under study, and describe the
contributions of scientists, including Canadians, to those fields.


SPH3U
STSE B
-

Kinematics































How do you relate mathematics to everyday motion of objects?


B1.1

Analyse, on the basis of research,
a technology that applies
kinematics concepts.


B1.2

Assess the impact on society of a
technology that applies kinematic
concepts.

Investigating Basic Kinematic Theories

B2.1



Terminology [C]

B3.1



Distinguish

between basic terms

of kinematics

B3.2



D
istinguish between, and provide examples of,
scalar and vector quantities a
s they relate to
motion

B3.3



Describe he characteristics that give examples of
a projectile’s motion.












Assessment Tools:



I
-
Clicker Quizzes



Tests

Graphical
,
Diagrammatic
and Mathematical
Representation of Motion

B2.2



Analyse p vs. t, v vs. t and a vs. t graphs in one
dimension [AI, C]

B2.3



Use a v vs. t to derive equations and solve simple
problems [AI]

B2.5



Solve problems involving distance, position

and
displacement using scaled vector diagrams [AI,C]

B2.7



Solve problems involving
u
niform and
u
niform motion
using graphical analysis and algebra [AI, C]

E2.8



Use Kinematic equations to solve problems related to
horizontal and vertical components o
f the motion of a
projectile [AI, C]








Assessment Tools:



Student developed inquiry



Graphing
and Modeling
Motion

Activities




Real Time Data Collection

and analysis



Tests



Lab Reports

Observing Motion

B2.4



Conduct an inquiry

into the uniform and non
-
uniform
motion of an object [PR]

B2.6



Plan and conduct and inquiry into motion objects in
one dimension [IP, PR, C]

B2.9



Conduct an inquiry into projectile motion of an
objective and analyse its horizontal and vertical
components [PR, AI]













Assessment Tools:



Computer modeling exercises



Video Analysis of a moving object



Tests

End of Strand Test


Inquiries utilizing Labpros to
collect and analyse the motion of
a moving object (both graphically
and mathematically):



1D
motion;



Falling objects and the
acceleration due to gravity



Graphing motion using d/t, v/t
and a/t diagrams


Set the Context

Using STSE Deconstruction to Plan

B1.

Analyse technologies that apply concepts related to kinematics, and assess the
technologies’ social and environmental impact;


B2.

Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms, uniform and
non
-
uniform linear motion,
and solve related problems;


B3.

Demonstrate an understanding of uniform and non uniform linear motion, in one and two
dimensions.

SPH3U STSE C


Forces





























How does the
concept of force affect the motion of an object?


C
1.1

Analyse, with reference to
Newton’s laws, a technology that
applies these laws, and propose
ways to improve its performance.


C
1.2

Evaluate the impact on society
and the environment of
technologies that use the
principles of
force.

Investigate the
B
asic
P
rinciples of
Forces


C2.1
-

Terminology [C]

C2.4
-


A
nalyse the relationships between acceleration
and applied forces such as the force of gravity,
normal force, force of friction, coefficient of static

friction, and coefficient of kinetic friction, and solve
related problems involving forces in one
dimension, using free
-
body diagrams and
algebraic equations [AI, C]

C2.6
-


A
nalyse and solve problems involving the
relationship between the force of gravit
y and
acceleration for objects in free fall [AI]

C3.3
-


S
tate Newton’s laws, and apply them, in

qualitative terms, to explain the effect of forces

acting on objects

C3.4
-


Describe, in qualitative and quantitative terms, the
relationships between mass,
gravitational field
strength, and force of gravity




Assessment Tools:



I
-
Clicker Quizzes



Case Studies (i.e. car crashes, space travel and
freefall.



Tests

Laboratory Activities and Inquiry


C2.2
-

C
onduct an inquiry that applies Newton’s

laws to
analyse the forces acting on an object
;

use

free
-
body
diagrams to determine the net force

and the
acceleration of the object [PR, AI, C]

C2.3
-

C
onduct an inquiry into the relationship between the
acceleration of an object and its net force and mass
and analyse the resulting data [PR, AI]

C2.5
-

Plan and conduct an inquiry to analyse the effect

of
forces acting on objects in one dimension, using vector
diagrams, free
-
body diagrams, and Newton’s laws [IP,
PR, AI, C]










Assessment Tools:



Student developed inquiry



Quizzes



Video analysis of motion



Lab
activities and challenge labs

Applications of
Forces in Real World


C3.1
-


D
istinguish between,
and provide examples of, different
forces, and describe the effect of each type of force on
the velocity of an object

C3.2
-

E
xplain how the theories and discoveries of Galileo and
Newton advanced knowledge of the effects of forces on
the motion of objects
















Assessment Tools:



Case Studies



Web Assignments



Tests

End of Strand Test


Investigations using Labpros to
determine the principles of
forces;



The acceleration due to
gravity and air friction
(terminal velocity);



G forces and crashes
(including biological im
pact);


Set the Context

Using
STSE Deconstruction to Plan

C1
.

Analyse and propose improvements to technologies that apply concepts related to
dynamics and Newton’s laws, and assess the technologies’ social / environmental impact;



C
2.

Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms,
net force, a
cceleration, and mass, and
solve related problems;


C
3.

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between changes in velocity and
unbalanced forces in one dimension.

SPH3U STSE D


Energy and Society





























How do technologies rely on energy transformation or function?

How can we utilize different forms of energy to improve our everyday lives?

What steps must we take to mitig
ate environmental
impacts
brought on by
the
inefficient
use of
energy?


D
1.1

Analyse, using the principles of energy
transformations, technologies that
involve the transfer and transformation
of thermal energy.


D
1.2

Assess, on the basic of research, how
technologies related to nuclear,
thermal, or geothermal energy affect
society and the environment.

Understanding and Applying the Basics Concepts


D2.1



Terminology

D2.2
-

Solve problems relating to work, force,
and displacement along the
line of force [AI]

D2.3
-

Use the law of conservation of energy to solve problems in simple
situations involving work, gravitational potential energy, kinetic
energy, and thermal energy and its transfer (heat) [AI]

D2.5
-

Solve p
roblems involving the relationship between power, energy,
and time [AI]

D2.8
-

Investigate the relationship between the concepts of conservation of
mass and conservation of energy, and solve problems using the
mass


energy equivalence. [PR, AI]

D2.10
-
Solv
e problems involving changes in temperature and changes of
state, using algebraic equations. [AI, C]

D3.1
-

Describe a variety of energy transfers and transformations, and
explain them using the law of conservation of energy.

D3.2
-

Explain the concepts of

and interrelationships between energy,
work, and power, and identify and describe their related units.

D3.3
-

Explain the following concepts, giving examples of each, and identify
their related units:
thermal energy, kinetic energy, gravitational
potentia
l energy, heat, specific heat capacity, specific latent heat,
power,
and
efficiency

D3.8
-

Distinguish between and provide examples of conduction,
convection, and radiation.

D3.9
-

Identify and describe the structure of common nuclear isotopes.



Assessmen
t Tools:



I
-
Clicker Quizzes



Tests

Applications of Energy in Society


D2.7
-

Compare and contrast the input energy, useful
output energy, and per cent efficiency of
selected energy

generation methods. [AI, C]

D3.4
-

Identify, qualitatively, the relationship between
efficiency and thermal energy transfer.

D3.6
-


Describe and compare nuclear fission and
nuclear fusion.

D3.12

Explain the energy transformations that occur
within a nuc
lear power plant, with reference to
the laws of thermodynamics.














Assessment Tools:



Computer simulations



Class debates



Tests

End of Strand Test


Use of Labpros to investigate
varies
forms of energy:



Confirm the Law of
Conservation of Energy (“Toy
lab”);



Principles of nuclear energy:
ALARA and distance, shielding
effects;



Determining the identity of an
unknown
radioisotope;


Summative: Linked into last
question


Research paper
investigating the physics
behind new technology linked
to energy transformation.

Set the Context

Using STSE Deconstruction to Plan

D1
.

Analyse technologies that apply principles and concepts related to energy transformation,
and assess the tech
nologies’ social and environmental impact;



D
2.

Investigate

energy transformations and the law of conservation of energy and solve related
problems;

D
3.

Demonstrate an understanding of work, efficiency, power, gravitational potential energy,
nuclear ene
rgy, and thermal energy.

Laboratory Activities and Inquiry


D2.4
-

Plan and conduct inquiries involving
transformations between gravitational potential
energy and kinetic energy to test the law of
conservation of energy. [IP, PR]

D2.6
-

Conduct inquiries and solve problems involving
the relationship between power and work. [PR, AI]

D2.9
-

Conduct an inquiry to determine the specific heat
capacity of a single substance (e.g., aluminum,
iron, brass) and of two substances when they are
mixed

together. [PR]

D2.11 Draw and analyse heating and cooling curves that
show temperature changes and changes of state
for various substances. [AI, C]

D3.5
-

Describe, with reference to force and
displacement along the line of force, the conditions
that are
required for work to be done.

D3.10
-

Compare the characteristics of and safety
precautions related to alpha particles, beta
particles, and gamma rays.

D3.11
-

Explain radioactive half
-
life for a given
radioisotope, and describe its applications and
their
consequences.




Assessment Tools:



Mini
-
Labs and visualizations



Lab investigation



Student developed inquiry

SPH3U STSE E


Waves and Sound






























How are the fundamental principles of sound related to energy?

What are some of the real world effects that occur
because of basic sound principles?

What types of technological devices are governed by sound principles?




E1.1

Analyse how properties of
mechanical waves and sound
influence the design of structures
and technological devices

E1.2

Analyse th
e negative impact that
mechanical waves and / or sound
can have on society and the
environment. Assess effectiveness
of technologies to reduce these
impacts.

Investigate
and Apply the P
rinciples of
Sound and
Waves


E1.1
-


Terminology. [C]

E2.4
-


Investigate the
relationship between the
wavelength, frequency, and speed of a wave, and
solve related problems [PR, AI]

E3.1
-


Distinguish between longitudinal and transverse
waves in different media, and provide examples of
both types of waves.

E3.4
-


Identify the pro
perties of standing waves, and, for
both mechanical and sound waves, explain the
conditions required for standing waves to occur.










Assessment Tools:



I
-
Clicker Quizzes



Tests

Laboratory Activities and Inquiry


E2.2
-


Conduct laboratory inquiries
or computer simulations
involving mechanical waves and their interference.
[PR]

E2.3
-


Plan and conduct inquiries to determine the speed of
waves in a medium; compare theoretical and empirical
values, and account for discrepancies [IP, PR, AI, C]

E2.6
-


Predict the conditions needed to produce resonance in
vibrating objects or air columns (e.g., in a wind
instrument, a string instrument, a tuning fork), and test
their predictions through inquiry. [IP, PR, AI]

E3.3
-


Explain and graphically illustrate the

principle of
superposition with respect to standing waves and beat
frequencies.

E3.5
-


Explain the relationship between the speed of sound in
various media and the particle nature of the media.






Assessment Tools:



Student developed inquiry



Labs

Applications
based on Sound Principles and Societal Impacts


E2.5
-


Analyse the relationship betw
een a moving source of sound
and the change in frequency perceived by a stationary
observer. [AI]

E2.7
-


Analyse the conditions required to produce resonance in
vibrating objects and/or in air columns (e.g., in a string
instrument, a tuning fork, a wind i
nstrument), and explain
how resonance is used in a variety of situations (e.g., to
produce different notes in musical instruments; to limit
undesirable vibrations in suspension bridges; to design
buildings so that they do not resonate at the frequencies
pr
oduced by earthquakes) [AI, C]

E3.2
-


Explain the components of resonance, and identify the
conditions required for resonance to occur in vibrating
objects and in various media.

E3.6
-


Explain selected natural phenomena with reference to the
characteristics and properties of waves.





Assessment Tools:



Case Studies (
Tacoma

Narrows and
Millennium

bridges)



FFT analysis of instruments

End of Strand Test


Multiple investigations using
Vernier Lab
p
ros and micropho
n
es:



Measuring
the s
peed of
s
ou
nd
via resonance and reflection



Beats and interference



Sound quality and FFT analysis



Mechanical resonance and glass
breaking; structural failure




Set the Context

Using STSE Deconstruction to Plan

E1
.

Analyse how mechanical waves and sound affect technology, structures, society and the
en
vironment, and assess ways of reducing their negative effects,


E
2.

Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms,
the properties of waves and sound, and
solve related problems;


E
3.

Demonstrate an understanding of the properties of mechanical waves

and sound and of the
principles underlying their production, transmission, interaction, and reception.

SPH3U STSE F


Electricity and Magnetism





























How do the underlying principles of electromagnetism govern modern day technology?


F
1.1

Analyse the social and economic
impact of technologies related to
electromagnetism.


F
1.2

Analyse the efficiency and
environmental impact of one type
of electrical production.

Investigate

and Apply
the
P
rinciples of
Electromagnetism


F2.1
-

Terminology [C]

F2.2
-

Analyse diagrams of series, parallel, and mixed circuits with
reference to Ohm’s law (
V
=
IR
) and Kirchhoff’s laws. [AI]

F2.6
-

Solve problems involving energy, power, potential difference,
current, and the number of turns in

the primary and secondary
coils of a transformer. [AI]

F3.1
-

Describe the properties of magnetic fields in permanent
magnets and electromagnets.

F3.2
-

Explain, by applying the right
-
hand rule, the direction of the
magnetic field produced when electric c
urrent flows through a
long straight conductor and through a solenoid.

F3.3
-

Distinguish between conventional current and electron flow in
relation to the left
-

and right
-
hand rules.

F3.4
-

Explain Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s laws, Oersted’s principle, the
mot
or principle, Faraday’s law, and Lenz’s law in relation to
electricity and magnetism.

F3.5
-

Describe the production and interaction of magnetic fields,
using diagrams and the principles of electromagnetism.





Assessment Tools:



I
-
Clicker Quizzes



Tests

Laboratory Activities and Inquiry


F2.3
-

Design and build real or computer
-
simulated mixed
direct current (DC) circuits, and explain the circuits
with reference to direct current, potential difference,
and resistance. [PR, C]

F2.4
-

Conduct an inquiry to

identify the characteristics and
properties of magnetic fields. [PR]

F2.5
-

Investigate, through laboratory inquiry or computer
simulation, the magnetic fields produced by an electric
current flowing through a long straight conductor and
a solenoid. [PR]

F2.7
-

Investigate electromagnetic induction, and, using
Lenz’s law, the law of conservation of energy, and the
right
-
hand rule, explain and illustrate the direction of
the electric current induced by a changing magnetic
field.. [PR, AI, C]

F2.8
-

Construc
t a prototype of a device that uses the
principles of electromagnetism, and test and refine
their device. [PR, AI]




Assessment Tools:



Student developed inquiry



Circuit construction and analysis



Lab investigation

Applications of
Electromagnetism in
Society


F3.6
-

Explain the operation of an electric motor
and a generator, including the roles of their
respective components.

F3.7
-

Distinguish between alternating current (AC)
and direct current, and explain why
alternating current is presently used in

the
transmission of electrical energy

F3.8
-

Describe the components of step
-
up and
step
-
down transformers, and, using concepts
and principles related to electric current and
magnetic fields, explain the operation of
these transformers.

F3.9
-

Describe an
d explain safety precautions

related to electrical circuits and higher
transmission voltages.








Assessment Tools:



Analysis of modern technology



Tests and Challenge Tasks

End of Stran
d Test


Using the Veni
er

Labpro to
conduct investigations of the
properties of EM:



Electromagnet design lab


building the magnet to lift the
largest weight possible



Solenoid properties lab



Induction properties lab



Motor and generator
properties


Set the Context

Using STSE Deconstruction to Plan

F1
.

Analyse the social, economic, and environmental impact of electrical energy production and
technologies related to electromagnetism; pro
pose ways to improve sustainability of
electrical energy production;




F
2.

Investigate, in qualitative and quantitative terms,
magnetic fields and electric circuits, and
solve related problems;


F
3.

Demonstrate an understanding of
the properties of
magnetic fields, the principles of current
and electron flow, and the operation of selected technologies that use these properties and
principles