AP Physics C Mechanics Syllabus and Course Guidelines

testybelchMechanics

Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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AP Physics C Mechanics
Syllabus

and Course Guidelines



Text:


Fundamentals of Physics
,

9
th
Edition, by
Halliday, Resnick, and

Walker


Necessary Items:



A graphing calculator is highly recommended, but any scientific calculator may be used.
Pencil,
protractor and graphing paper, textbook, notebook, and folder will also be
required.


Course Description:


AP Physics C

Mechanics

is a weighted course intended for the student planning on
entering the fields of physical sciences or engineering. The subject

matter is taught from
a calculus based mathematical approach.

S
tudents must have
successfully completed
Physics 1 or Physics 1

Honors and be concurrently enrolled in Calculus. Due to the
advanced nature of the material, it is recommended that only seriou
s students of
science enroll.


Students will spend an average of at least one day a week on hands on laboratory
activities.
The remaining class time will be split between interactive lectures over key
topics and student centered problem solving where stud
ents will work individually or in
groups on homework problems or problems relating to real world situations. Students
will often be asked to share their solutions with the class to foster discussion about
all
the concepts in
volved in a complicated problem

and about
alternate

approaches to
finding a solution
.


Evaluation:


Students’ final grades for each
quarter

will be determined based on the following:


Tests:



5
0%



Homework:


25
%






Lab:



25
%




Grades for the semester will be based on the usual Q1
40%
-

Q2 40%
-

Exam 20% if
students take the final exam, and on Q1 50%
-

Q2 50% if they do not.


Course Outline:


This syllabus closely follows the Content Outline for AP C Mechanics provided by The
College Board. Refer to
http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/sub_physc.html


The schedule on the fol
lowing page is only approximate. Refer to my website for
current schedules:
http://staffweb.brownsburg.k12.in.us/~mariaward/

Semester 1:


Topics

Chapters
in Text

Approx.
Number
of days

Unit 1

Mathematical Background



Vectors



The Calculus



Measurement

1, 3

1
0

Unit 2

Kinematics



Motion in One Dimension



Motion in Two
Dimensions

o

Projectiles, Circular and Relative Motion

2,4

2
5

Unit 3

Newton’s Laws of Motion



Newton’s 3 Laws



Equilibrium



Free Body Diagrams



Types and applications of forces

5,6

30

Unit 4

Work, Energy and Power



Work by constant and varying forces



Types of
energy



Work
-
Energy Theorem



Conservation of Energy



Power

7,8

20



Semester 2:


Topics

Chapters
in Text

Number
of days

Unit 5

Impulse and Momentum



䍥C瑥爠r映ma獳



䥭pu汳l
-
Momentum⁔ eo牥m



䍯C獥牶a瑩tn映L楮ear⁍ men瑵m⁩ ‱ and′
䑩men獩sns

9

1
5

Unit 6

Rotational Mechanics



䍥C瑲tpeta氠fo牣敳rand a捣c汥牡瑩tns



副Ra瑩tna氠l楮ema瑩捳



副Ra瑩tna氠䑹nam楣i



Angu污爠䵯浥ntum⁡nd⁩瑳 捯n獥牶a瑩tn



Equ楬楢物um

10ⰱ1ⰱ2



Unit 7

Oscillations



S業p汥⁈ 牭on楣⁍o瑩on



Sp物ng⁍ 獳⁓y獴sm



S業p汥⁡nd⁐hy獩捡氠sendu汵l





Unit 8

Gravitation



佲O楴i氠lo瑩tn

and
Kepler’s Laws







Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation


Additional time in Semester 2 will be spent reviewing for the AP test itself or discussing
topics beyond the scope of the AP C Mechanics course
,
including the completion of an
end of course project
.


Please note that there may be more than one test given for some of the longer units.


Laboratory:


Students will spend at least 20% of class time
performing hands
-
on

laboratory
experiments. Most of th
ese labs will be open ended where a problem will be posed to

the students and they will

have to design an experiment to explore the problem. They
will then have to form conclusions based on the data they collected in their experiments.


Students will work

in small groups on the labs, but will be expected to write up their own
lab reports. Students will also keep a portfolio of all their lab investigations and reports.


Specific lab topics may include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following:

1.

Unc
ertainty of measurements


based on measurements of the size of a
classroom

2.

Motion with Uniform Acceleration


including Motion graphs

3.

Measuring the Acceleration Due to Gravity

4.

Projectile Motion 1


Determine the in
i
tial velocity of a projectile

5.

Projectile

Motion 2


Determine how to hit a specific target

6.

Atwood’s Machine


exploring Newton’s Laws

7.

Hooke’s Law Lab


Exploring spring forces, may include rubber bands for non
-
linear forces

8.

Meas
uring the Coefficient of

Friction

9.

Uniform Circular Motion


determining the relationship between force and radius

10.

Conservation of Energy in a Mass
-
Spring System


Using motion sensors and
force probes

11.

Energy Lab


Transfer of potential energy to kinetic energy as ball rolls down a
track and off a table. Predict wh
ere it will land and determine how much energy
is transferred to the track.

12.

Collisions


Projectile is fired at a target, both fall from a table. Predict where the
projectile would land if the target was removed from its path.

13.

Conservation of Momentum in
2 Dimensions

14.

Ballistic Pendulum Lab


using conservation of linear momentum

15.

Center of Mass


determine location of center of mass of flat objects of various
shapes

16.

Rotational Motion


use pulleys and weights to investigate moment of inertia and
angular mom
entum

17.

Rotational Equilibrium


using a meter stick supported by spring scales, students
predict then test what the spring scale reading would be when different masses
are placed at different locations

18.

Physical Pendulum


explore the relationship between
period and length