Large-scale Integrated Project (IP)

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Oct 21, 2013 (4 years and 11 months ago)

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Future Internet Core Platform




Private Public Partnership Project (PPP)

Large
-
scale Integrated Project (IP)




D.11.2.2
: FI
-
WARE Exploitation plan including IPR Management



Project acronym:

FI
-
WARE

Project full

title:

Future Internet Core Platform

Contract No.:

285248

Strategic Objective:

FI.ICT
-
2011.1.7 Technology foundation: Future Internet Core Platform

Project Document Number:

ICT
-
2011
-
FI
-
285248
-
WP11
-
D.11.2.1b

Project Document Date:

2013
-
04
-
30


Deliverable Type and Security:

PP (Private)

Author:

Juan Bare
ñ
o

Contributors:

FI
-
WARE Consortium



Future Internet Core Platform


1.1

Executive Summary
(to review and complete)

In this deliverable FI WARE partners define
the most promising GEs and Instances
, leveraging on Platform
Market

analysis (D11.1.2
)
, UC Feedback and Product Vision description and

settle the basis to prepare
an

initial overall Go to Market plan

through the initial definition of the Open innovation Lab. Accordingly the
individual exploitation plans from main industri
al partners
are updated
in the Annex I
.


-

FI WARE Positioning:

o

Analysis per Building Block (Product Vision), and Business Canvas

o

To capitalise on the most promising developments



Identity Management



Interfaces to networks



Standards for M2M



Framework for
IoT



Architecture to deliver Big
-
Data services over the internet

-

Use Case feedback and Industry research from 11.1.2

o

Use Case GEs questionnaire

o

CONCORD

o

11.1.2


-

GEs and Solutions Matrix:

o

Most demanded according Use Cases (
See UCs questionnaires
)

o

Roadmap or T
imeline

-

OIL definition:

o

Business Model

o

IPRs implementation
-

Terms and Conditions

Beyond de PPP and Patent Legislation

1.2

About this Document
(to review and complete)

This document uses the market and competition analysis of
D

11.1
.2

as a basis for preparing an overall
strategy for the exploitation of the project’s results. This strategy is
essential

to coordinate the exploitation
of the individual partners’ achievements and results.

This deliverable
also
matches the periodic release

of exploitation plans, including the overall approach of
the project as well as individual exploitation plans.

Final part of the exploitation strategy is
the setting up of an Open Innovation Lab around the FI
-
WARE
Test bed, and secondly analysis and defi
nition of sustainability models for FI
-
WARE beyond the
boundaries of the PPP.


1.3

Intended Audience

As this deliverable contributes to defined FI
-
PPP Programme level activities the perspective and needs of
FI
-
WARE and the FI
-
WARE consortium and related stak
eholders are the addressed audience. As the
dissemination level is "PP" (FI
-
PPP private) there is no plan to release this document to external parties.

1.4

Context of Chapter WP11 Exploitation

This work package focuses on a series of activities that identifi
es, create and work towards the exploitation
and standardization opportunities of the FI
-
WARE project results. This work package approaches
Future Internet Core Platform


exploitation of the FI
-
WARE results from the point of view of the partners of the FI
-
WARE consortium,
both individua
lly and as a project. It does not intend to replace or overlap exploitation activities at the
Future Internet Public Private Partnership Programme level, but to complement in a synergetic way the
work that other projects within Usage Areas will do in terms

of take up of the generic enablers provided by
FI
-
WARE., therefore complementing the perspectives of the partners of this project and the related
stakeholders in the ecosystems they represent.

The exploitation of FI
-
WARE results is not based on a purely
technological approach (technology push)
but on the needs and requirements of the future “customers” and “users” of FI
-
WARE enablers. As a result,
both supply and demand are meet within this WP.

With that in mind the project’s exploitation activities have

as main objectives the:




Definition of project outcomes from an exploitation point of vi
ew, including identification of
stakeholders and different typologies of users that will make use of FI
-
WARE



Systematic analysis and continuous monitoring of market
situation and trends



Definition of overall and individual exploitation plans



Definition of a framework for IPR and licensing management



Definition of a Sustainability Plan for FI
-
WARE results



Policy and Regulation Considerations



Feedback of adjustments to project plan if necessary and promotion of the FI
-
WARE
Testbed

as an
Open Innovation Lab



Business oriented communication and training activities to increase market awareness and impact



Definition and implementation of a standardization strategy that will enable adoption and
achievement of the project goals and ambitions



Definition of impact indicators and management of those along the project duration

This WP also supports and runs the

project
-
level Standardization Committee that is in charge of the overall
strategy, planning and execution of the Standardization activities.

1.5

Structure of this Document
(to review and complete)

The document is compiled in MS word and was prepared in the p
rivate wiki of the exploitation work
package; eventually this will be uploaded to the
fi
-
ware
-
review

FI
-
WARE wiki

D.11.2.1b FI
-
WARE Exploitation plan including IPR Management


1.6

Acknowledgements

The current document has been elaborated using a number of co
llaborative tools, with the participation of
Working Package Leaders and as well as those industrial partners’ business people in their teams they have
decided to involve.

Future Internet Core Platform


1.7

Keyword list

FI
-
WARE, PPP, Market Analysis, Generic Enabler, I2ND, Cloud, IoT, Dat
a/Context Management,
Applications/Services Ecosystem, Delivery Framework , Security, Developers Community and Tools ,
ICT, IPR, Sustainability, Exploitation, Business

1.8

Changes History


Release

Major changes description

Date

Editor

0.1

Initial ToC

15
/
04
/201
3

Atos

0.2

First Version

24/04
/201
3

Atos


0.3





Future Internet Core Platform


1.9

Table of Contents

1.1

E
XECUTIVE
S
UMMARY
(
TO REVIEW AND COMPLE
TE
)
................................
................................
................................
.......

2

1.2

A
BOUT THIS
D
OCUMENT
(
TO REVIEW AND COMPLE
TE
)

................................
................................
................................
....

2

1.3

I
NTENDED
A
UDIENCE

................................
................................
................................
................................
........................

2

1.4

C
ONTEXT OF
C
HAPTER
WP11

E
XPLOITATION

................................
................................
................................
.................

2

1.5

S
TRUCTURE OF THIS
D
OCUMENT
(
TO REVIEW AND COMPLE
TE
)

................................
................................
.......................

3

1.6

A
CKNOWLEDGEMENTS

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....................

3

1.7

K
EYW
ORD LIST

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.

4

1.8

C
HANGES
H
ISTORY

................................
................................
................................
................................
...........................

4

1.9

T
ABLE OF
C
ONTENTS

................................
................................
................................
................................
........................

5

1.10

T
AB
LE OF
F
IGURES

................................
................................
................................
................................
...........................

6

2

FI
-
WARE OVERALL EXPLOIT
ATION PLAN

................................
................................
................................
..................

1

2.1

FI
-
WARE

IN THE CONTEXT OF TH
E
E
UROPEAN
F
UTURE
I
NTERNET
P
UBLIC
P
RIVATE
P
ARTNERSHIP
(FI
-
PPP)

P
ROGRAM

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
........................

3

2.2

FI
-
PPP

E
XPLOITATION
P
LAN ADVANCES SO FAR

................................
................................
................................
.............

4

3

FIWARE

ECOSYSTEM MODELLING

................................
................................
................................
................................

6

3.1

F
UTURE
I
NTERNET
B
USINESS
E
COSYSTEM
M
ODELLING

................................
................................
................................
..

6

3.2

O
PPORTUNITIES AND
B
ARRIERS

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......

7

3.2.1

Infrastructure Operators

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

7

3.2.2

Usage terms and conditions of Open Specifications and FI
-
WARE GEis, including Open Innovation Lab

................

9

4

FI
-
WARE PRODUCT
VISION BY DOMAIN: ID
ENTIFY THE MAIN GENE
RIC ENABLERS+ FI
-
WARE
INSTANCES WITH MOST
MARKET POTENTIAL

................................
................................
................................
.................

10

4.1

C
LOUD

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
............

10

4.1.1

Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

15

4.1.2

Use Scenarios Business Analysis

................................
................................
................................
...............................

16

4.1.2.1

Setting up the virtual computing infrastructure to host applications

................................
................................

16

4.1.2.2

Using Cloud Object Storage

................................
................................
................................
.............................

18

4.1.2.3

Deployment of distributed applications

................................
................................
................................
............

18

4.2

D
ATA
C
ONTEXT
M
ANAGEMENT

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....

18

4.2.1

Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

22

4.2.2

Use Scenarios Business Analysis

................................
................................
................................
...............................

23

4.2.2.1

Developing Context
-
aware/SMART Applications

................................
................................
.............................

23

4.2.2.2

Supporting and Open Data approach

................................
................................
................................
...............

23

4.3

I
NTERNET OF
T
HINGS

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....................

24

4.3.1

Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

28

4.3.2

Use Scenarios Business Analysis

................................
................................
................................
...............................

29

4.3.2.1

Capturing data from the IoT and making it available as context information

................................
..................

30

4.3.2.2

Hiding the complexity of managing the IoT

................................
................................
................................
......

31

4.4

A
PPLICATIONS
S
ERVICES
E
COSYSTEM

................................
................................
................................
...........................

33

4.4.1

USDL Service Descriptions

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......

37

4.4.1.1

Users of USDL

................................
................................
................................
................................
..................

37

4.4.2

Generic Enablers of the Business Framework

................................
................................
................................
............

38

4.4.3

Generic Enablers for Composition and Mashup

................................
................................
................................
.........

40

4.4.4

Generic Enablers for Mediation

................................
................................
................................
................................
.

44

4.4.5

Generic Enablers for Multi
-
channel and Multi
-
device Access

................................
................................
...................

45

4.4.6

Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

47

4.4.7

Use Scenarios Business Analysis

................................
................................
................................
...............................

48

4.4.7.1

Monetizing applications

................................
................................
................................
................................
...

48

4.4.7.2

Revenue sharing

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

49

4.4.7.3

Monetizing data. Creating a sustainable ecosystem around open data

................................
............................

49

4.4.7.4

Supporting service composition and
crowd
-
sourcing

................................
................................
.......................

49

4.5

I
NTERFACE TO THE
N
ETWORK

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......

50

4.5.1

I2ND high
-
level Architecture

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....

52

4.5.2

Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

56

4.5.3

Use Scenarios Business Analysis

................................
................................
................................
...............................

57

4.5.3.1

CDI

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
...

57

4.5.3.2

Cloud Edge

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......................

57

4.6

S
ECURITY

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
........

58

4.6.1

Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

60

4.6.2

Use Scenarios Business Analysis

................................
................................
................................
...............................

62

Future Internet Core Platform


4.6.2.1

Monitoring security of applications

................................
................................
................................
..................

62

4.6.2.2

Identity Management and Controlled Access to APIs

................................
................................
.......................

62

4.7

FI
-
WARE

I
NSTANCES WITH MAJOR
MARKET POTENTIAL

................................
................................
.............................

63

4.7.1

Data Analytics as a Service: unleashing the power of Cloud and Big Data

................................
...............................

63

4.7.2

How M2M and Big Data will combine to produce everyday benefits

................................
................................
.......

63

4.8

FI

WARE

M
ARKET
P
OSITIONING
:

GE

D
EVELOPMENT

P
RIORITIZATION
M
ATRIX

................................
......................

64

4.8.1

Market Analysis

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

64

4.8.2

UC feedback on these GE and Instances

................................
................................
................................
....................

64

4.8.3

Individual Exploitation Plans from FI WARE partners

................................
................................
..............................

65

4.8.4

GE/Instance Prioritization Matrix

................................
................................
................................
..............................

65

5

ECOSYSTEM STRATEGY:
OIL

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........

68

5.1

T
HE
FI
-
WARE

T
ESTBED

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

68

5.2

O
PEN
I
NNOVATION LAB

................................
................................
................................
................................
..................

69

5.3

E
COSYSTEM
A
NALYSIS AND
FI

WARE

OIL

A
PPLICABILITY

................................
................................
........................

70

5.4

P
LAN TO ATTRACT COMMU
NITIES OR DEVELOPERS
................................
................................
................................
........

70

6

BUSINESS MODEL OPPOR
TUNITY

................................
................................
................................
................................
.

71

6.1

FI
-
WARE

B
USINESS
M
ODEL BUILDING BLOCKS

................................
................................
................................
...........

71

6.2

B
USINESS
C
ANVAS
................................
................................
................................
................................
...........................

73

6.3

E
COSYSTEM
B
USINESS
M
ODEL
A
NALYSIS

................................
................................
................................
......................

73

7

IPR MANAGEMENT

................................
................................
................................
................................
............................

75

7.1.1

Key Principles

................................
................................
................................
................................
............................

75

8

CONCLUSIONS

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.....

77

9

ANNEX

1 INDIVIDUAL
EXPLOITATION PLANS

................................
................................
................................
..........

78

9.1

T
ELEFONICA
I
NVESTIGACIÓN Y
D
ESARROLLO

................................
................................
................................
...............

78

9.2

SAP

AG

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
..........

86

9.3

IBM

I
SRAEL
-

S
CIENCE AND
T
ECHNOLOGY
L
TD

................................
................................
................................
............

92

9.4

T
HALES
C
OMMUNICATIONS
&

S
ECURITY
SA

(
EX
T
HALES
C
OMMUNICATIONS
SA)

................................
......................

93

9.5

T
ELECOM
I
TALIA
S.P.A.

................................
................................
................................
................................
.................

96

9.6

F
RANCE
T
ELECOM
S
A

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....................

99

9.7

NOKIA

SIEMENS

NETWORKS

GMBH

&

CO.

KG,

NOKIA

SIEMENS

NETWORKS

KFT

AND
NOKIA

SIEMENS

NETWORKS

OY

................................
................................
................................
................................
....................

102

9.8

D
EUTSCHE
T
ELEKOM
AG

................................
................................
................................
................................
.............

104

9.9

T
ECHNICOLOR
R&D

F
RANCE
S
NC

................................
................................
................................
...............................

107

9.10

E
RICSSON
AB

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................

109

9.11

A
TOS

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.............

111

9.12

E
NGINEERING
-

I
NGEGNERIA
I
NFORMATICA
S
PA

................................
................................
................................
.........

114

9.13

A
LCATEL
-
L
UCENT
I
TALIA
S.P.A.

A
LCATEL
-
L
UCENT
D
EUTSCHLAND
AG

................................
................................
..

118

9.14

S
IEMENS
AG

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.

120

9.15

I
NTEL
P
ERFORMANCE
L
EARNING
S
OLUTIONS
L
IMITED

................................
................................
...............................

122

9.16

N
EC
E
UROPE
L
TD

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

125

9.17

U
NIVERSIDAD
P
OLITÉCNICA
D
E
M
ADRID

................................
................................
................................
.....................

127

9.18

U
NIVERSITA
D
EGLI
S
TUDI
D
I
R
OMA
L
A
S
PIENZA

................................
................................
................................
........

127

9.19

U
NIVERSITY
O
F
S
URREY

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

128

10

ANNEX 2 LICENSES

................................
................................
................................
................................
..........................

130

11

GLOSSARY

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
..........

131

12

REFERENCES (LAS DE P
RODUCT VISION)

................................
................................
................................
................

135



1.10

Table of Figures

Figure 1: Exploitation building blocks based on the business planning methodology

................................
....

1

Figure 2: Business Modelling Canvas

................................
................................
................................
.............

6

Figure 3: SaaS, PaaS and IaaS

................................
................................
................................
.......................

11

Future Internet Core Platform


Figure 4: Cloud Hosting Reference Architecture

................................
................................
..........................

14

Fi
gure 5: Cloud Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
..................

16

Figure 6: Data Element Structure

................................
................................
................................
..................

19

Figure 7: Context Element Structure Model

................................
................................
................................
.

20

Figure 8: High
-
Level view of GEs in the Data/Context Management chapter

................................
.............

21

Figure 9: Data Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
....................

22

Figure 10:
GEs of the IoT Service Enablement platform and its connections to other technical chapters

...

28

Figure 11:
IoT Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
....................

29

Figure 12:
High Level Architecture

................................
................................
................................
..............

34

Figure 13: Roles of participants in the Internet of Services Ecosystem

................................
........................

38

Figure 14: High
-
level architecture of the Business Framework*

................................
................................
..

38

Figure 15: High
-
level architecture of Aggregator and Mediator

................................
................................
...

41

Figure 16: Multi
-
channel / multi
-
device Access System

................................
................................
...............

46

Figure 17: Apps Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
.................

47

Figure 18:
Three strata model for communication in an IP driven oper
ator infrastructure

...........................

51

Figure 19:
Three strata model for communication extended by NGN principles

................................
.........

52

Figure 20:
Mapping of the Generic Enablers into the Communication Model

................................
.............

53

Figure 21:
General Architecture of Interface to the Network and Devices (I2ND)

................................
......

55

Figure 22: Interface to the Network Business Canvas

................................
................................
..................

56

Figure 23:
FI
-
WARE High
Level Security Architecture

................................
................................
...............

60

Figure 22: Security Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
............

61

Figure 25: Feedback by UC projects on your GE

................................
................................
.........................

65

Figure 8 FI
-
WARE Business Model Building Blocks

................................
................................
..................

72

Figure 24 FI
-
WARE Business Canvas

................................
................................
................................
..........

73




Future Internet Core Platform


2

FI
-
WARE
Overall
Exploitation
Plan

(to review and complete)

FI
-
WARE Exploitation Plan represents a comprehensive business plan beginning with a market
analy
sis leading to definition of FI
-
WARE market positioning (D11.1) and following with the
definition
of an exploitation strategy. FI
-
WARE Exploitation strategy describes the
key

exploitation
issues to assure the success of the platform launch
leveraging on Pl
atform Strategies Market analysis
(D11.1.b
)

and

settle the basis to prepare an initial overall Go to Market plan, based on individual
exploitation plans from main industrial partners defined in the Annex I, and concrete the initial
baselines for build up a

realistic business model during the next years of th
e project.

Additionally
,

we define the FI
-
WARE product strategy, relating Generic Enablers (potential customers,
solving problems, main target....) and
main FI
-
WARE Instances.

Although this document of F
I
-
WARE Exploitation Plan is due on M
24
, many as
pects of FI
-
WARE use
were not clear enough. The
se and some other aspects of FI
-
WARE exploitation should be performed
and concluded during the third year of the project.
We have started the process to involve our
marketing units. It will be accelerated when they see the
release of the Open Innovation Lab.

In this document we attempt not to forget anything important and to incl
ude all remarkable issues
in
to
FI
-
WARE exploita
tion
building blocks definition
.



Figure
1
:
Exploitation
building blocks

based on the business planning methodology





Future Internet Core Platform


(to review and complete)

Market analysis
research
: (D11.
2.2
)



Systematic analysis and continuous monitoring of

platform ecosystems battleground and
market situation and trends within the main domains of interest (Cloud, Data context,
IoT……..) based on the standard market analysis methodologies, e.g. analysis of trends, Value
Chain, Competitors, SWOTS analysis, lim
itations…).



FI
-
WARE Positioning



FI
-
WARE Value Proposition



FI
-
WARE Impact


FI
-
WARE
Platform
Strategy



FI
-
WARE
Platform
Strategy based in the initial Platform Market Research in D11.1



FI
-
WARE Product Strategy:
GE´s Business description in the main domains of

interest
(Cloud, Data context, IoT……..) based on the standard product management methodologies,
e.g. Added Value, Tar
get, Legal and standard issues) and
Instance concept definition



Initial Marketing Plan



Initial Business Model definition



IPR management o
f Generic Enablers implementation in
Testbed

v1



Test bed

description for the second year



Sustainability


Business Plan



Identify
revenue sharing business models regarding aggregation, composition, bundling, and
mash
-
ups.



Definition of cost structure,
according with the Testbed development


Market Plan



Open Innovation Lab definition



Partnership structure definition (legal, contractual, governance)



End Users and SMEs involvement



Sales deployment plan


Go To Market



Distribution policy
:
how will FI
-
WARE
partners distribute the GEs? Should we review
options here, for example:

o

Packaging

and selling subsets of GEs based on FI
-
WARE and in
-
house developments
to application or platform operators as single vendor (possibly sector
-
specific)
platforms?

o

Selling

ind
ividual GEs to system integrators who provide tailored platforms to
application operators, or providing system integration services based on GEs to
application operators?

o

Selling

individual GEs to application operators?



Open Innovation Release



Offers and p
rice descriptions

Future Internet Core Platform




Business SLA (violations and penalties)



2.1

FI
-
WARE in the context of the European Future
Internet Public Private Partnership (FI
-
PPP) Program

The FI
-
WARE project will design, develop and implement the so
-
called Core Platform within the
Eu
ropean Future Internet Public Private Partnership (FI
-
PPP) Program defined under the ICT FP7
Work Programme. More information about the Future Internet PPP initiative can be found at:

-

http
://
www
.
fi
-
ppp
.
eu

-

http
://
ec
.
europa
.
eu
/
information
_
society
/
activities
/
foi
/
lead
/
fippp
/
index
_
en
.
htm

The following figure illustrates the basic FI
-
PPP approach, where several partner Use Case projects
(eight in Phase 1 of the program) will cooperate with the FI
-
WARE project to provide requirements
about Gener
ic Enablers which are distinguished from Domain
-
specific Common Enablers (see previous
sections). The identified requirements from the eight Use Case projects provide part of the
requirements, which FI
-
WARE has to fulfil. Other requirements come from other

partner Use Case
projects that may arise during lifetime of the FI
-
WARE project or from the Business Units of the
partners in the FI
-
WARE Consortia.


A first release of the reference implementation of GEs in FI
-
WARE will be provided before the end of
pha
se 1 in the context of the European Future Internet Public Private Partnership (FI
-
PPP) programme
and can be integrated to setup FI
-
WARE Instances serving Usage Trial projects in phase 2 of that
programme
.

Future Internet Core Platform





2.2

FI
-
PPP
Exploitation Plan advances so far

The FI
-
PPP is delivering promising resul
ts our industry is ready to use:

-

More than 70 Generic enablers and XX many more use case sector specific enablers have been
produced developed in phase 1 of the programme.


-

The architectural principles and facilitated serv
ices have been validated in 8 use case sectors to
date :

o

Smart city services

o

New scenarios and use cases for the generation, delivery and consumption of digital
content,

o

Smart energy systems

o

Novel ICT solutions for optimized Transport & Logistics
services

o

New environmental monitoring and control services

o

Radical new personal transport and mobility services

o

Logistic services

o

ICT for Food: addressing smart farming, smart agri
-
logistics, and smart food
awareness

FI
-
PPP successfully managed cooperatio
n of partners coming from different communities, which did
not cooperate before to develop solutions for societal challenges by means of a common ICT platform

-

Impact on European standardization roadmaps by contributions from FI
-
PPP by the
identification of

relevant scenarios

-

Requirements on the ICT system from the use case perspective identified

-

Preparation of trials for Phase II

-

Interfaces between building blocks and generic enablers described for standardization

-

Regulatory environment for application sect
ors have to support an investment friendly
environment for positive business cases for new FI
-
solutions, identified barriers to be removed

-

In some cases high upfront investment required to provide necessary infrastructure for market
take
-
up

-

Efficient invol
vement of web
-
entrepreneurs and SMEs depends on the sector. The Core
platform provides the tool to develop web applications for certain sectors

Objectives and Commitment
:
To capitalise on the most promising developments

-

Identity Management

-

Interfaces to n
etworks

-

Standards for M2M

-

Framework for IoT

-

Architecture to deliver Big
-
Data services over the internet

However, economic exploitation depends on the economic perspective,

Future Internet Core Platform


-

whether research results will be turned into future business and

-

Whether identifie
d roadblocks in the regulatory environment can be removed to enable viable
business cases

Means for economic exploitation depend on the sector
.
In the example of smart cities there have been
important steps towards exploitation

-

Cities of Seville Malaga and

Santander have already shown clear commitment to the PPP plans

-

French partners have mobilised the Pole de Compétitivité in France for Call 3.

A large involvement of Telcos in XiFi (Capacity Building project)




Future Internet Core Platform


3

FIWARE
Ecosystem Modelling

Settle the basis
for settle up an Open Innovation Lab that we defined initially in the next section leverage
on previous Ecosystem analysis in Market Analysis document, 11.1.2

3.1

Future Internet Business Ecosystem Modelling

For the FI
-
PPP to achieve its goals, it is necessary

to bring together:

-

applications, e.g. service providers, consumers, sponsors and developers of the software they
use;

-

infrastructure capacity, e.g. networks, data
centers
, sensors and devices, connected to relevant
locations and/or communities, and their
operators and investors;

-

a platform, enabling the applications to access the infrastructure via commodity services in a
consistent, portable and easily programmed fashion.

Any successful Future Internet application will therefore exist within an ecosystem
of interconnected
actors. Each actor may be a provider and/or a consumer of services, and many actors will be intermediaries
who provide some services by composing other services provided to them. To avoid confusion, and better
denote the relationships inv
olved, we will introduce two terms:

-

a resource is a service seen from the perspective of its consumer, i.e. something that can be
composed and used;

-

a supplier is the provider of a service as seen from the perspective of the service consumer, i.e.
a provid
er of a resource.

Thus the most general type of actor therefore acts as an intermediary, providing services to its consumers
by composing resources from its suppliers. There are two aspects that must therefore be considered when
analysing Future Internet b
usiness models:

-

individual actor perspectives, reflecting their engagement as intermediaries with suppliers and
consumers;

-

the value network, reflecting actors and roles (and their interactions) in a FI ecosystem.

The first can be modelled using the busine
ss modelling canvas approach proposed by Osterwalder
[1]
,
which is summarised in
Figure
2
. This focuses on the relationships on each side with suppli
ers (partners)
and consumers (clients), and the associated business context and activities.


Figure
2
:
Business Modelling Canvas

:

Future Internet Core Platform



3.2

Opportunities and Barriers

Ultimately the key to success in the Future Internet will be to
identify value propositions that attract
consumers for profitable (or at least sustainable) services, where current business, operational or technical
barriers can be overcome through the use of Future Internet technology. Overcoming barriers should enable

value propositions that are novel and hence more attractive that existing ‘current Internet’ services. One of
the most important considerations is therefore to identify how FI
-
PPP participants will distinguish
themselves from current Internet businesses a
nd services, and what technical capabilities they need to
overcome barriers to achieving this.

3.2.1

Infrastructure Operators

Infrastructure operators own or control access to the physical resources needed by a Future Internet
application. These resources may
include communication networks, data centre facilities, sensor networks,
information repositories, and people.

INFINITY is developing a roadmap for infrastructure sustainability. The first version of this roadmap was
completed in 2012, and identifies four
main challenges:

Increased usage of FI infrastructures
: currently most FI infrastructures are operating experimental
facilities with small numbers of users. To become sustainable, most FI infrastructures will need to attract
more users, which is likely to
depend on:




differentiating the offered facilities from current Internet equivalents, i.e. explaining why anyone
should use them instead of existing services like Amazon;



engaging with the relevant user groups to communicate the offer and involve them in i
ts
development if appropriate;



Clarifying

the benefits (and costs) to relevant stakeholders.

Addressing security concerns and building trust
: many existing FI infrastructures have little or no
security, and operate within small communities whose members tr
ust each other. This is not sustainable, so
FI infrastructure operators must find ways to defend their infrastructure from malicious attacks, and to
ensure legitimate users will not be harmed if they use the infrastructure (i.e. to make the infrastructure
secure and trustworthy).

Improved support for applications
: many existing FI infrastructures were designed for a single
application or class of applications. This places a limit on the value they can deliver. Infrastructures must
become easier for applicat
ions to use individually and in combinations. This requires greater levels of
interoperability so applications that work with one infrastructure can be ported and make use of others, and
so infrastructure can be composed to support applications requiring c
ombinations of facilities (e.g. sensors,
a data centre, a public data repository and a social network). It will also require more flexibility and
adaptability to ensure infrastructure can keep up with technology advances and emerging standards or
regulatio
ns.

Developing revenue streams
: many existing FI infrastructures were funded as research experiments, and
they need to develop alternative sources of funding for long
-
term survival. For some this may mean asking
users to pay for access, while others might
seek support from application providers or other stakeholders
such as advertisers. Some infrastructures may continue to be largely or wholly supported by public funds
where the need for them is clear but the market context makes commercial operation unfeas
ible.

It is convenient to divide infrastructures into
four

broad classes for analysis. In each class, one can identify
current Internet businesses and services from which FI
-
PPP stakeholders will need to differentiate
themselves, and specific barriers that

may need to be overcome:

Future Internet Core Platform




location
-
centric infrastructures: associated with physical structures or spaces, e.g. embedded sensor
nets, smart spaces, smart buildings, etc.



information
-
centric infrastructures: useful sources of data about particular phenomena
, e.g. data or
content repositories, linked open data sources, etc.



user
-
centric infrastructures: useful due to their engagement with specific user communities, e.g.
fixed or mobile social networks;



Resource
-
centric

infrastructures: provide a useful servic
e that can in principle be accessed from
anywhere, e.g. data storage and processing systems.

Each of these broad classes faces different challenges to overcome barriers and realise opportunities. For
example
, many

location
-
centric infrastructures and some
information
-
centric infrastructures will continue
to depend on public funding support, because what they provide is a common good whose costs cannot be
justified by any one value chain. For them the biggest challenge is to make their value and need for fun
ding
clear to government, which may require dramatic improvements in the range of applications and the
amount of usage they support. Conversely, many user
-
centric and resource centric infrastructures are
already operating on a fully commercial basis, susta
ined by user subscriptions or advertisers, etc. For them
the biggest challenge may often be to differentiate themselves from (often non
-
European) competitors
based on the added value of FI innovations.

A brief summary of the challenges so far identified fo
r each type of infrastructure is given in
Table
1
.

Challenge

Infrastructure type

Location
-
centric, e.g.
sensor
-
nets, smart
cities and spaces, etc.

Information
-
centric,
e.g. content libraries,
open data sources.

User
-
centric, e.g.
social networks

Resource
-
centric, e.g.
cloud data centres.

User
adoption

Need to address more
applications and scale
up facilities.

Need to support more
mass and
specialised
apps, and demonstrate
that open data doesn’t
mean low margins.

Need to promote FI
benefits: e.g. privacy,
reliability, trans
par
-
ency, etc. Consistent
cross
-
border content
regulation.

Often decided by
application providers,
not directly by the
end
users. Driven by price,
branding, jurisdiction,
etc.

Trust and
security

May lack basic security
to minimise threats to
user privacy or to resist
cyber
-
attacks.

Access control is not
an issue, but secure
value chains are not
well sup
ported.
Malicious
up
date is a
show stopper for open
data models.

Basic security is
mostly OK. User
privacy still a concern,
as is cyber
-
crime
against users.

Basic security is OK
but secure value chains
are not well supported.

Application
support

Need improvements in
appli
cation portability
between locations.

Technical access is not
a problem. Need to
show high added value
in more applications.

Technical access is not
a problem, but user
lock
-
in and monopolies
are a concern.

Cloud Computing
Strategy should help
normalise te
chnical
interfaces and business
terms and processes.

Revenue
streams

May depend on public
funding. Fragmentation
inhibits promotion and
recognition of common
goods.

May depend on public
funding, or make more
use of closed/hybrid
access and IPR models

Value often depends on
scale of use. Need to
differentiate from large
competitors. Special
-
purpose SNS need
bespoke models.

Commercial service
model could be used.
Need to differentiate
from large competitors.

Table
1
. Business Cha
llenges for Infrastructures


Future Internet Core Platform


3.2.2

Usage terms and conditions of Open Specifications and FI
-
WARE
GEis, including Open Innovation Lab


-

FI
-
WARE Open Specification Legal Notices
:

Final discussion involving all legal representatives
currently under way.

We have
to close this issue before publication of Open Specifications by
end of April.


-

Use Terms and Conditions of FI
-
WARE FI
-
WARE GEis beyond the FI
-
PPP
.

Few inputs pending
regarding date at which FI
-
WARE GEi owners commit to get it finalized at the following
s
hared spreadsheet:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqGGeaQGro3fdDdGQnl1eTRSLXdRSHd5cHd4LUh
nOFE#gid=0


-

Use Terms and Conditions
of FI
-
WARE OIL
:
Telefonica lawyer working on the matter with inputs
from SAP, TID on terms from similar environments as well as results of the brainstorming in
Rome.

Future Internet Core Platform


4

FI
-
WARE
Product Vision

by domain
:
Identify the
main
Generic Enablers+ FI
-
WARE Instances

with
most market potential


Define P
roduct Vision with Use Case Scenarios

Domain methodology description
:
After GE business description in the 11.2.b, the new approach will
focus on describe some scenarios, advantages and GE most promising combinations

by

d
omain
t
o
deliver an initial prioritization, matrix

4.1

Cloud

Cloud hosting is particularly appealing to SMEs and start
-
ups wanting to offer some new and
innovative service over the Internet.

Actually, it offers SMEs general purpose computing resources that
they can consume (and pay) according to their needs and capabilities, e.g. they can start small and grow as
the service they offer becomes successful. All this is achievable without the nee
d for large initial
investment in the infrastructure. This in turn gives the SMEs a possibility to competitively price their
offerings since there is no need to recover a huge initial capital investment in infrastructure and, in
addition, the on
-
going oper
ational expenses are lowered thanks to the pay
-
as
-
you
-
go model.

Today, there are two clear trends in the cloud computing market:

-

G
rowing adoption of the full cloud computing paradigm, as exemplified by public clouds; and,

-

The

appearance of private clouds,
i.e., the adoption of the cloud ideas and technologies internally
within companies. The latter approach is especially appealing for large companies that are already
operating large data center infrastructures. On one hand, they are still reluctant to fully

adopt the
cloud hosting model and rely solely on external providers for their IT needs (due to various factors
such as security and privacy as well as performance and availability guarantees). On the other hand
they do want to benefit from advantages that

cloud computing paradigm introduces in terms of cost
and flexibility. Such a trade
-
off also introduces a hybrid approach where private clouds incorporate
facilities to burst workload on public clouds (
cloud bursting
), This approach is not only
fundamental

for large companies but is increasingly gaining momentum among SMEs who need to
gain the necessary confidence on the Cloud promise prior the full outsourcing of their computing
infrastructures.

However, as the IT infrastructure moves from being owned and
managed by the service providers to
being hosted on the cloud
, the cloud hosting companies become a critical part of their customers’
businesses This creates a dependency relationship that could even lead to unhealthy and undesirable
situations such as ven
dor lock
-
in, if the necessary safeguards in terms of technology, market offerings and
warranties are not in place.

Moreover, the cloud hosting market is still limited to a few, very dominant,
large companies with proprietary solutions
. The lack of a compet
itive and open market for cloud hosting
providers, in turn, slows down the adoption of the cloud paradigm and the economic benefits embodied in
it. For the success of the Internet
-
based service economy it is crucial that cloud hosting does not become a
mar
ket limited to a few strong players, and that future cloud hosting is based on open standards and support
interoperability and portability.

The FI
-
WARE project focuses a great part of its efforts on making sure that these standards
materialise and in facil
itating their adoption by providing open specifications and reference
implementations
. This standards
-
based and open approach will cover the fundamental technologies on
which the cloud paradigm is based, such a virtualization, as well as new emerging techn
ologies that will
differentiate FI
-
WARE also in terms of the functionality offered.

In the cloud hosting paradigm there are two main players:

Future Internet Core Platform


-

(1) cloud hosting providers,

i.e., FI
-
WARE Instance Providers that own physical infrastructure and
use it to host compute processes or applications; and

-

(2) cloud hosting users
, i.e., organizations or individuals that own the compute processes or
applications but do not own (or do n
ot want to own) the physical infrastructure to run them, hence,
they lease this infrastructure from cloud hosting providers. In a highly distributed cloud model, the
physical infrastructure is deployed very close to the end
-
user and can be controlled by th
e network
and platform provider or the end
-
user directly.

According to the needs of clients there are three well
-
defined Cloud Service offerings [NIST]:

-

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS):

in this model the client rents raw compute resources such as
storag
e, servers or network, or some combination of them. These resources become available on
the Internet (public IaaS Clouds) or on the Intranets (private IaaS Cloud) with capacities (storage
space, CPUs, bandwith) that scale up or down adapted to real demand
of applications that uses
them. The advantage of this model is that enables users to setup their own personalized runtime
system architecture. However it allows this at the price of still requiring system admin skills by the
user..

-

Platform as a Service (P
aaS):

in this model the clients, typically application developers, follow a
specific programming model and a standard set of technologies to develop applications and/or
application components and then deploy them in a virtual application container or set o
f virtual
application containers they rent. How these virtual application containers map into a concrete
runtime architecture is hidden to the application develper who doesn’t need to have strong admin
skills. However, this happens at the price of loosing
part of the control on how the system runtime
architecture is designed. This model enables fast development and deployment of new applications
and components. Usually, in addition to hosting, the PaaS providers also offer programming
utilities and librarie
s that expedite development and encourage reuse.

-

Software as a Service (SaaS):

in this model the client, typically end
-
users, rent the use of a
particular hosted Final Application, e.g., word processing or CRM without needing to install and
executed the application on top of equipments owned by the client (consumers) or assigned to
the
client (employees in a company). Applications delivered following a SaaS model are always
available so that clients get rid of maintenance tasks (including upgrading, configuration and
management of high
-
availability and security aspects, etc). Computi
ng resources needed to run
applications on owned/assigned clients get minimized since they are hosted on the
Internet/Intranet.

While it is possible to implement these models independently of each other, i.e.,
SaaS without PaaS or
IaaS, PaaS without IaaS,
the advantages offered by each of these models to its potential users are such
that we strongly believe that the
vast majority of the Future Internet services will be based on a
stacked implementation of these models as shown in The XaaS Stacked Model Figu
re below.



Figure
3
: SaaS, PaaS and IaaS

Future Internet Core Platform



In our vision, Application Providers willing to offer applications following a SaaS model will
typically opt to implement this model using the services of a PaaS or a IaaS Cloud provider
.

Usage of
a PaaS Cloud provider will mostly apply to Application Providers who a) have decided to adopt a defined
standard platform for the development of applications and b) wish to focus their skills in programming and
application architectural aspects w
ithout needing to hire experts who can deal with the design and fine
tuning of large system runtime architectures. However, Application Providers may have some special needs
that are not properly covered by the PaaS programming model and tools, or wish to
be able to design and
configure the system runtime architecture linked to their applications, based on raw computing resources
from an IaaS provider. Similarly, PaaS providers may rely on IaaS providers for leasing infrastructure
resources on demand. In th
is context a cloud hosting provider may serve the role of a PaaS Cloud provider,
or the role of an IaaS Cloud provider, or both.

The Cloud Hosting chapter in the FI
-
WARE Reference Architecture will comprise the Generic Enablers
that can serve the needs of
companies that may need IaaS Cloud hosting capabilities, PaaS Cloud hosting
capabilities or both, meeting the requirements for the provision of a cost
-
efficient, fast, reliable, and secure
computing infrastructure “as a Service”.

-

The basic principle to ach
ieve a cost
-
efficient infrastructure is the ability to share the physical
resources among the different users, but sharing needs to be done in a way that ensures isolation
(access, control and performance) between these users. These seemingly contradictory

requirements can be met by an extensive use of virtualisation technology.

-

Virtualization capabilities are the cornerstone of any IaaS Cloud Hosting offering

because
they enable both high utilization and secure sharing of physical resources, and create a v
ery
flexible environment where logical computation processes are separated and independent from the
physical infrastructure. FI
-
WARE’s base functionalities will include a virtualization layer that will
enable secure sharing of physical resources through pa
rtitioning, support migration without
limitations, and provide a holistic system
-
wide view and control of the infrastructure. Basic
management of the resulting virtualised infrastructure will automate the lifecycle of any type of
resource by providing dyna
mic provisioning and de
-
provisioning of physical resources, pool
management, provisioning, migration and de
-
provisioning of virtual resources, on
-
going
management of virtual capacity, monitoring etc.

Virtualisation technologies, such as hypervisors or
OS
containers, enable partitioning of a physical resource into virtual resources that are functionally
equivalent to the physical resource. Moreover, virtualisation creates a very flexible environment in
which logical functions are separated from the physical

resources. IaaS Cloud hosting providers
can leverage this capability to further enhance their business. For example live
-
migration of virtual
resources, i.e., the capability of moving the virtual resource from one physical resource to another
while the vi
rtual resource remains functional; enable the cloud hosting providers to optimize the
resource utilization. However, running different workloads on a shared infrastructure, hosted by a
3rd party, introduces new challenges related to security and trust. FI
-
WARE will address these
challenges by leveraging generic enablers defined in the FI
-
WARE Security chapter.

In addition to virtualisation and the management of it, cloud hosting providers need a layer of generic
enablers that deal with the business aspects
of optimally running their operation. Existing IaaS Cloud
Hosting technologies and commercial offerings represent a big step forward in terms of facilitating
management of compute infrastructure by completely virtualising the physical resources used by sof
tware,
but still do not fully address all the needs of both IaaS Cloud Hosting Providers and Application and
Service Providers. IaaS Cloud Hosting Providers need grouping and elasticity, policy
-
driven data centre
optimisation and placement, billing and acc
ounting, more control over virtualised Network Resources.
Application and Service Providers need the infrastructure management decisions to be directly driven by
Service Level indicators and not compute parameters as is the case today.

Typically existing I
aaS Cloud Hosting solutions are based on a centralised infrastructure deployed usually
on a few data centres distributed geographically. However, some Future Internet applications may require
reduced latency and high bandwidth that this approach and curren
t network realities cannot always meet.
Future Internet Core Platform


This becomes especially problematic when the users of the hosted applications and services are using their
home broadband connections. Stricter privacy requirements that favour local
-
only storage of data may be
an ad
ditional obstacle to the current approach, as it would place data even further away from the
computational infrastructure. To address these challenges, FI
-
WARE will explore the possibility to extend
the reach of the IaaS Cloud Hosting infrastructure to the

edge of the networks by incorporating a device
located at the home of an end user, the Cloud Proxy that can host part of the virtualised resources,
applications and data, thereby keeping data closer to the user.

Application Providers may rent from IaaS Cl
oud providers dynamic infrastructure resources to deploy
service components, but they are on their own in terms of coming up with the deployment architecture,
managing and deploying enabling SW components, managing and maintaining the software stacks insta
lled
on each virtual machine and controlling the scalability of the virtualised infrastructure resources. FI
-
WARE
will build on top of robust virtualisation
-
based IaaS technologies to create a Platform as a Service offering
that provides a higher level of
abstraction for service provisioning where the platform itself provides
development tools, application containers, integrated technologies (libraries, APIs, utilities, etc.) and
automatic scalability tools, allowing the Application Providers to deploy appl
ications by means of
providing just the description of their Application Components. The delivery of standard interfaces and
reference implementations for the above elements are both in the scope of the FI
-
WARE.

In order to simplify management of hosted re
sources FI
-
WARE will provide a self
-
service portal
where Application and Service Providers will be able to select,

configure, deploy and monitor their
whole applications and services through graphical tools. Application Blueprints and Service Level
Agreeme
nts will be used by Cloud Hosting providers to drive automatic provisioning and dynamic
management of the virtualized resources.

Trust and consequentially security concerns are one of the top obstacles that hinder Cloud
Computing adoption today
. FI
-
WARE wi
ll work towards embedding security, privacy and isolation
warranties, which can be achieved through use of standard security techniques (authentication,
authorization, encryption, etc) and partitioning technologies that warranty isolation, to all layers of

its
Cloud Hosting platform.

Cloud Hosting will be an integral part of the FI
-
WARE platform and together with the
Apps/Services Ecosystem
, Data/Context Management Services, Internet of Things Service Enable and
Interfaces to the Network and Devices will of
fer a complete solution for: application development that
automatically resolves hosting, deployment and scalability, provides the necessary interfaces and services
so that applications can leverage the Internet of Things, provide intelligent connectivity
all through the
stack to guarantee QoS, resolve common needs like data storage and analysis, access to context and
monetization, allow the delivery of applications through a rich ecosystem that enables the implementation
of flexible business models and all
ows user driven process creation and personalization.


Building upon existing virtualization technologies, FI
-
WARE will deliver a next generation Cloud Stack
that will be open, scalable, resilient, standardised, and secure, and will enable Future Internet
applications
by providing service
-
driven IaaS and PaaS functionalities and extending the reach of the cloud
infrastructure to the edge of the networks, much closer to end users.

To better illustrate the FI
-
WARE proposition for Cloud Hosting let us take a
look at a typical
scenario for a cloud hosting company.


A start
-
up company has an idea for an innovative application to be offered as Software as Service (SaaS).
They can calculate pretty accurately how many servers and how much storage they will need to
support a
target number of end
-
users of their application, but giving that this is a totally new application they cannot
estimate whether they will reach this number or surpass it. To reduce the risk involved with a big initial
investment in equipment, the
y decide to lease resources on demand from a cloud hosting provider. They
Future Internet Core Platform


require of the cloud hosting provider to offer unlimited, on
-
demand and automated growth, i.e., they will
start with a minimum set of resources, and the provider commits to automatic
ally add more resources when
the service reaches a particular load, and when the load decreases, the additional resources will be released
again automatically. They also need from the cloud hosting provider isolation and availability guarantees
and they wa
nt the flexibility to painlessly switch providers in case of breach of contract or a provider going
out of business. Finally they would prefer a provider that can give them raw compute resources for those
tasks unique to their application, and also support
s composition and hosting of commonly used application
components, for example a web
-
based user interface to their application.

FI
-
WARE offers to Cloud Hosting companies the tools needed to answer these requirements from their
potential customers, in this
case the start
-
up company in need of a flexible on
-
demand infrastructure.

The following figure illustrates the Reference Architecture for the Cloud Hosting chapter in FI
-
WARE,
each box representing one of the Generic Enablers (GEs), which would be part of

it.



Figure
4
:
Cloud Hosting Reference Architecture


Herein we provide a brief description of the role each GE plays and their major interfaces with other GEs:

-

IaaS Data Center Resource Management



this GE provides VM hosting c
apabilities to the user,
and handles everything related to individual VMs and their resources


including compute,
memory, network and block storage. This includes provisioning and life cycle management,
capacity management and admission control, resource
allocation and QoS management, placement
optimization, etc.

-

IaaS Cloud
-
Edge Resource Management



this GE allows the application developer to design
and deploy the application so that it can leverage resources located at the cloud edge, close to the
end
-
user.

-

IaaS Service Management



this GE provides hosting of compound VM
-
based services, including

their definition and composition, deployment and life cycle management, as well as monitoring and
elasticity. This GE uses the IaaS Resource Management GE to handle individual VMs and their
resources. This GE is also able to communicate with other clouds,

in scenarios of cloud
federations.

-

PaaS Management



this GE provides hosting of application containers, such as Web container,
database instance, etc. It leverages IaaS underneath, to automate the lifecycle of the underlying
infrastructure and OS stack.

Future Internet Core Platform


-

Object Storage



this GE provides the capabilities to store and retrieve storage objects
accompanied by metadata.

-

Monitoring



this GE will be responsible for collecting metrics and usage data of the various
resources in the cloud.

-

CMDB



this GE will be r
esponsible for storing the operational configuration of the Cloud
environment, used by the various other GEs. Due to scalability requirements, it is likely to be
implemented as a distributed service.

-

Data Warehouse



this GE will be responsible for storing

the historical data of the different
metrics and resource usage data of the Cloud environment, collected by the monitoring & metering
GE and consumed by the SLO management GE (to monitor SLO compliance), as well as by the
billing GE.

-

Metering & Accounting



this GE will be responsible for collecting and processing the data
related to usage and monetization of cloud services (via an external Billing system, which is not
part of this GE).

Each GE is described in more detail in Section 3.2.

Last but not least
, there are two main users of Cloud Hosting GEs:

-

Cloud hosting provider
: uses the provided capabilities to build a hosting offering, and to perform
ongoing administration tasks

-

Cloud hosting user
: e.g., a Application/Service providers who uses the provided

platform to
develop and/or test and/or deploy their applications.

Self
-
service interfaces will be provided so that different types of users would be able to interact with
the entire the FI
-
WARE cloud infrastructure in a common but unified fashion
. It shou
ld adapt to
different user mental models in order that it is easy to use. Applying techniques common in “Web 2.0” can
also help to make it more usable. It is foreseen that there will be different kinds of users with different
levels of expertise and adapta
tion to their expectations and needs should be a goal.

Our objective is that using this infrastructure is a positive, simple and easy experience for all the FI
-
WARE
and other Future Internet users. This will be a key requirement regarding self
-
service inte
rfaces. Different
users have varying requirements in how the interact with Information Technology devices and services. As
a result we foresee different types of support to satisfy these requirements. Amongst those are:

-

A portal,

-

A high
-
level toolkit that
may be integrated with management or development tools and

-

Scripts to automate the task are required.

Direct access to the underlying APIs will also be offered should the support listed above be insufficient.

4.1.1

Business Canvas

The Cloud Generic Enablers are
able to cater for the needs of companies that may require IaaS
Cloud hosting capabilities, PaaS Cloud hosting capabilities or both,

meeting the requirements for the
provision of cost
-
efficient, fast, reliable, and secure computing infrastructures “as a Ser
vice”.

Building upon existing virtualization technologies, the Cloud chapter provide next
-
generation Cloud
Hosting Services
that are open, scalable, resilient, standardized, and secure.

They ease the deployment of Future Internet applications and extend th
e reach of the cloud infrastructure to
the edge of the networks, much closer to end users.

Cloud computing is nowadays a reality. Cloud hosting companies, which can be considered as a particular
type of FI
-
WARE Instance Providers, are already delivering on

the promise of the Cloud paradigm. They
own and manage large IT infrastructures and offer their use as a service on a pay
-
as
-
you
-
go model.

Future Internet Core Platform




Figure
5
:
Cloud Business Canvas

Generally we can say that the
FI
-
WARE Cloud Services
reduce the following barriers for 3rd parties
:

-

The entrance
threshold for new players on the market, especially if they provide
applications and
services for smaller consumer groups

is reduced since the support of the
cloud enablement

supersedes the invest
ment into expensive infrastructure.

-

On the other hand,
a dynamic market for cloud services can provide a competitive
environment that encourages the development of new kinds of hosting services

for smaller
groups of services

providers with more specific ne
eds.


What is new or representative vs. competitors in the market?


4.1.2

Use Scenarios Business Analysis

Identify the main ecosystems to develop

4.1.2.1

Setting up the virtual computing infrastructure to host applications

Describe the steps followed by application
providers to deploy the virtual infrastructure (VMs,
VLANs, etc) on top of which to deploy their applications. Elaborate on how steps performed by a
user map into coordinated tasks performed by the different IaaS Cloud GEs

Benefits



Management of the servi
ce as a whole (considering virtual machines, networks and storage
support).



Management of the overall service lifecycle.



Scalability at the service level with powerful elasticity rules.

Future Internet Core Platform




Service monitoring not only at Infrastructure level but Service and

Software (installed in the VM)
KPI levels.



Interaction with different IaaS providers according to richer placement policies.



Multi
-
tenancy applied not only between different VM but also Virtual Data Centers and
Organizations



Implements open and standar
d API to clients (CDMI (Cloud Data Management Interface),
OCCI(Open Cloud Computing Interface), Openstack API)

Functions



Provisioning vApps and the configuration of each VM inside of each vApps(virtual appliance).



Managing life cycle of the provisioned vApps



Managing vLANs and Storage associated to a vApp (and of course linked to each or some of the
VMs contained in the vApp)



Resource monitoring of the VM associated to a vApp



Horizontal Scaling of VM based on Ela
sticity Rules and Monitoring Data.



Management of Virtual Data Centers and Organizations inside Cloud Service Provider

Business and Stakeholders relationships



Cloud Providers

are providers that offer clouds services to the customer e.g.: dedicated APIs
(Pa
aS), virtual machines and / or direct access to the resources (IaaS).



Cloud Resellers or Aggregators

aggregate cloud platforms from cloud providers to either provide
a larger resource infrastructure to their customers or to provide enhanced features. An ag
gregator
pulls together different services and systems to create a package of offerings for clients. It is also
known as “Cloud Broker.”



Cloud Adopters or (Software / Services) Vendors

improve their own services and capabilities by
exploiting cloud platfor
ms from cloud providers or cloud resellers. This enables them to e.g.
provide services that scale to dynamic demands


in particular new business entries who cannot
estimate the uptake / demand of their services as yet. The cloud enhanced services thus eff
ectively
become software as a service.



Cloud Consumers or Users

make direct use of the cloud capabilities. They do not improve the
services and capabilities they offer, but they make use of the direct results, i.e. either to execute
complex computations or

to host a flexible data set.



Cloud Tool Providers

do not provide cloud capabilities per se, but they provide cloud supporting
tools that lets other use cloud resources


Value of FI functionalities



Cost cuttings



Facilitate the deployment of complex services involving several VM in an easily and rapid way
through vApp description using OVF standard solution while also meeting the budget and time