Technical Note 961113 Page 1 of 2

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Oct 27, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Technical Note



961113



Page
1

of
2


10/27/13

Jeff Bowser
tastefulsaintregis_25140e7d
-
82fc
-
462d
-
8502
-
0587ed3e0e5e.doc




I.

Product Affected

NetOp for OS/2 versions 5.4 and up



II.

Purpose

The purpose of this note is to briefly outline distribution possibilities for a large
-
scale roll
out of NetOp Hosts in a networked environment. This is not meant to be a comprehensive
documen
t, and there will be other distribution methodologies not mentioned here.



III.

Release Date

November 13, 1996

Updated March 3, 1997

Updated August 24, 1999



IV.

Problem

The setup program for NetOp automates the installation process for individual
workstations. T
his method of installation does not lend itself well to a large
-
scale roll out
of the product, since visiting hundreds or thousands of workstations is impractical and
time
-
consuming. There needs to be a method for distributing NetOp Hosts in an
automated f
ashion in the absence of an application distribution mechanism already in
place at the customer site.



V.

Solutions

1.

Outline:

Under OS/2 1.3 and up, the NetOp installation program does nothing more than
expand the program files and insert the appropriate devi
ce drivers in the
config.sys. With this information known, it is possible to create a login script
which will simply copy down the NetOp files to the local drive, edit the
config.sys to insert the device drivers, and add the command line to
automatically s
tart the Host on bootup. The next time this workstation is
rebooted, the NetOp Host will then be active. The creation and implementation
of this script is left to the network administrator(s)


2.

Method:

A default installation must first be created. This is d
one by simply installing a
NetOp Host to a typical workstation from the floppy. All configuration
information is setup and network protocol selected. At this step, the name field
must be left blank. The host is started and then stopped and exited. This cre
ates
the NetOp configuration files. The contents of this directory are then copied to a
public directory on the file server, where they can be copied down to individual
workstations at login. By leaving the name field blank at this step, we are
ensuring th
at we do not have hundreds or thousands of NetOp Hosts all trying to
use the same name when the code is distributed. This is of concern only under
IPX or NetBIOS, since TCP/IP uses the IP address of the machine for its Host
ID.





Technical Note



961113



Page
2

of
2


10/27/13

Jeff Bowser
tastefulsaintregis_25140e7d
-
82fc
-
462d
-
8502
-
0587ed3e0e5e.doc



3.

Device Drivers

The OS/2

config.sys must be modified to include one or two device drivers. The
exact location of these drivers is not important. Add
DEVICE=
(path)
NHOST2.SYS. If you require full screen WINOS2 support also
add DEVICE=
(path)
NHOST2W.SYS, then modify the WINOS2 WIN.IN
I file
to include RUN=
(path)
NHOST2W.EXE.

The actual location of NetOp will be substituted wherever you see
(path).


4.

Running Host on Startup

To have NetOp automatically run at startup, you need to simply add the
command line to the startup.cmd. the syntax i
s RUN=
(path)
NHOST2.EXE /L
/R:NAME=
name
where
name

is the NetOp name for this machine.


Naming is principally a concern under NetBIOS and IPX. This name can be
trapped during login and fed to NetOp via an environment variable.
If you enter
a host ID that st
arts with %, then the following is considered an environment
variable. Eg. if you enter %HOST as ID, then the program will look for HOST
in the environment variable. Here it could be defined as JOHN, eg. by the
command SET HOST=JOHN in the CONFIG.SYS file
.


Under IBM TCP/IP, the Host ID field will be left blank, since the machine’s
NetOp name will usually be its IP address, although the same method as for IPX
and NetBIOS may be used. The Guest may call the Host by its DNS alias, if a
name server is in plac
e on your network, but its NetOp name (if broadcast
packets can reach the PC, or by its IP address.


5.

Alternate method (section 2.4 of the manual)

If you need to install NetOp on many PCs, you can automate the installation
with the "silent install" feature.

Copy all the files from the NetOp diskette to a
directory on a hard disk and make one "normal" installation of NetOp. The
install will now contain the serial number, and you can begin the silent
installation.

Now activate the silent install by starting t
he setup program with the command
line argument “S”


OPTION

DESCRIPTION

S


Activate silent install.

P=xx


Install to this path

L


Add host to STARTUP.CMD.

B


Boot the PC after the installation


Example:



A: SETUP S P=C:
\
NETOP L B


This line will install N
etOp in the directory C:
\
NETOP and load the host at
startup. It will also boot the machine after install.