FIRST YEAR

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Nov 15, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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FIRST YEAR


FIRST SEMESTER


PHYS 105 GENERAL PHYSICS I

Credit (Theoretical
-
Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 4

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters


Course Objective

The goal of this course is to provide a calculus
-
based physics course to help students
pursuing advanced
studies in engineering develop conceptual understanding of physical principles, the ability to reason, and
gain skills for problem solving.

Course Content

Vectors; kinematics; particle dynamics work and energy; conservation of energy; sys
tem of particles;
collisions; rotational motion; oscillations.

Learning Outcomes

1) Understand how phycists approach and solve problems in mechanics, 2) Apply those methods to solve
problems of mechanics, 3) Use inductive reasoning and calculus level mathe
matics to solve problems in
mechanics, 4) Engage in independent and collaborative learning, 5) Identify, find, and use the tools of
information science as it relates to mechanics, 6) Critically evaluate both source and content of scientific
information.


C
HEM 107 GENERAL CHEMISTRY


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 4

Offered Semester: Fall and Spring Semesters.


Course Objective

Develop an understanding of atomic and molecular structure of matter, periodic properties of elements,
the int
eraction between the particles in liquid and solid phase, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and
bases, solubility, and relation between chemical reactions and work.

Course Content

(One term course for students of CE) Introduction to atomic and electro
nic structure, chemical bonding,
molecular structure and bonding theories, properties of liquids, solids and solutions, chemical
equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, metal complexes, organic compounds and nuclear chemistry.

Learning Outcomes

At the end o
f this course, students will have a general understanding of the structure of matter and its
interaction.


MATH 119 CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (4
-
0
-
2) 5

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters.


Course Objectiv
e

The sequence Math 119
-
120 is the Standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of
calculus. It is taken by all engineering students. The emphasis is on concepts, solving problems, theory
and proofs. All sections are given a uniform midterm a
nd a final exam. Students will develop their
reading, writing and questioning skills in Mathematics.

Course Content

Functions, limits, continuity and derivatives. Applications. Extreme values, the Mean value Theorem and
its aplications. Graphing. The defin
ite integral. Area and volume as integrals. The indefinite integral.
Transedental functions and their derivatives. L`Hopital`s rule. Techniques of integration. Improper
integrals. Applications


CE 101 CIVIL ENGINEERING DRAWING


Credit (Theoretical
-

Applica
tion
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall and Spring Semesters.


Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to enable the students to understand the general concepts of
engineering drawing and general principles on a CAD (particularly AUTO
CAD provided bu AUTODESK)and
extend this knowledge to general use of CADs.

Course Content

An introductory course to provide orientation to the language of engineering graphics and interaction
with integrated computer aided drafting. General Cad Terminology

and CAD User Interface and Drawing
Editor. Technical Drawing Concepts: Orthographic drawing, isometric and oblique projections and
sectioning, basic dimensioning techniques, plotting and printing techniques. Introduction to model space
and paper space con
cepts. Civil Engineering applications.

Learning Outcomes

This course is taught in the 1st semester and mainly aims to increase the students' ability to use IT, to
carry out teamwork and to communicate effectively and to enhance the students' sketching/draw
ing
skills. Following items are the outcomes of this course: Two
-
dimensional orthographic projection.
Principal and auxiliary views of solid objects. Sectional views of solid objects. Dimensioning rules and
preliminary annotation. Freehand sketching. Compu
ter
-
Aided
-
Design.


ENG 101 DEVELOPMENT OF READING AND WRITING SKILLS I


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (4
-
0
-
0) 4

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters


Course Objective

The overall aim of this course is to develop students' all four skills (read
ing,writing, speaking and
listening) in Academic English with a specific emphasis on reading. The specific objectives are to ensure
that students 1. use correct, appropriate language structures, vocabulary and discourse markers 2.
learn, internalize, accep
t and carry out the stages in a process writing approach, while writing
paragraphs and/and essays 3. understand key ideas in a text 4. recognize the relationship between ideas
in a text 5. read extensively 6. recognize the attitude of the writer 7. read wi
th reasonable fluency 8.
deduce the meaning in sentences and parts of a text 9. evaluate, synthesize and use information from
(multiple) texts 10. identify main idea(s) in spoken discourse 11. listen for a specific purpose to choose
relevant information 12
. initiate and maintain discussions 13. develop their critical thinking skills 14.
become autonomous learners and individuals

Course Content

The course reinforces academic reading skills (finding the main idea, skimming, scanning, inferring
information, gu
essing vocabulary from context, etc.) through reading selections on a variety of topics. It
also aims at developing critical thinking, which enables students to respond to the ideas in a well
organized written format. Other reading related writing skills s
uch as paraphrasing and summarizing are
also dealt with.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students 1. will have read numerous texts on several themes in and out of
class 2. will have written several paragraphs on the texts that they have read a
nd two essays, namely a
reflective essay and a reaction
-
response essay 3. will have learned how to apply reading strategies, such
as skimming, scanning, predicting, inferring, finding the main idea(s), finding the writer's attitude and so
on 4. will have l
earned some study habits, such as summarising, paraphrasing, note
-
taking 5. will have
practiced listening and speaking through various activities.


CENG 103 INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATICS, ALGORITHMS AND PROGRAMMI
NG


SECOND SEMESTER

PHYS 106 GENERAL PHYSICS I
I


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 4

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters.


Course Objective

The goal of this course is to provide a calculus based physics course to help students develop conceptual
understanding of physical principles
, the ability to reason, and gain skills for problem solving.

Course Content

Electric charge; electric field; Gauss` law, electric potential; capacitance; current and resistance;
circuits; magnetic field; Ampere`s law; Faraday`s law of induction; electro
-
m
agnetic oscillations;
alternating currents.

Learning Outcomes

1) Understand how phycists approach and solve problems in electricity and magnetism; 2) Apply those
methods to solve problems of electricity and magnetism; 3) Use inductive reasoning and calculu
s level
mathematics to solve problems in electricity and magnetism; 4) Engage in independent and collaborative
learning; 5) Identify, find, and use the tools of information science as it relates to electricity and
magnetism; 6) Critically evaluate both sou
rce and content of scientific information.


MATH 120 CALCULUS FOR FUNCTIONS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (4
-
0
-
2) 5

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters.


MATH 119 should be completed before taking MATH 120 CALCULUS FOR F
UNCTIONS OF SEVERAL
VARIABLES


Course Objective

The sequence Math 119
-
120 is the Standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of
calculus. It is taken by all engineering students. The emphasis is on concepts, solving problems, theory
and
proofs. All sections are given a uniform midterm and a final exam. Students will develop their
reading, writing and questioning skills in Mathematics.

Course Content

Sequences, infinite series, power series, Taylor series. Vectors, lines and planes in spac
e. Functions of
several variables: Limit, continuity, partial derivatives, the chain rule, directional derivatives, tangent
plane approximation and differentials extreme values, Lagrange multipliers. Double integrals with
applications. The line integral.


CE 102 INTRODUCTION TO CIVIL ENGINEERING

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters.


Course Objective

To introduce the civil engineering profession and civil engineering department to first year students.

Course Content

An orientation course to provide counsel t
o the students on the major areas of Civil Engineering including
information on typical activity of civil engineers, integrated course sequences and content, and an
introduction of the faculty. Professional engineering practice. Oral and written engineerin
g
communication.

Learning Outcomes

The students will have a better opinion of what civil engineering is and where they will get a formal civil
engineering education.


GEOE 104 GEOLOGY FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall and Spring Semesters.


Course Objective

The objectives of this course are 1) To provide students the basic knowledge of the layers of the earth,
rocks and minerals, external and internal earth processes. 2) To introduce stude
nts the techniques used
in geological studies. 3) To develop students ability to visualize three dimensional nature of the
geological units. 4) To explain students the significance of the geological materials and processes in civil
engineering applications
. 5) To teach students the contemporary issues related to geological engineering.

Course Content

Structure of the Earth. Geological cycles, minerals and rocks. External processes on land and in the sea.
Internal processes, including deformation of rocks an
d earthquakes. Topics of interest to Civil
Engineering students.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, students are expected to determine the basic types of earth materials, earth
structures and earth processes and expected to link this information t
o Civil Engineering applications.



ENG 102 DEVELOPMENT OF READING AND WRITING SKILLS II


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (4
-
0
-
0) 4

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters.


Course Objective

The overall aim is to develop students all four skills (w
riting, reading, speaking and listening) in
Academic English. The specific objectives of the course are for students to learn ho

Course Content

The course reinforces academic writing skills. In this course students write different types of essays
based on
the ideas they are exposed to in the reading selections. The emphasis is on the writing process
in which students go through many stages from brainstorming and outlining to producing a complete
documented piece of writing.


SECOND YEAR

THIRD TERM

MATH 219
INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (4
-
0
-
0) 4

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters. MATH 120 should be completed before taking MATH 219
INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS


Course Objective

The objectives o
f this course are to introduce the student with the concept of a differential equation,
basic techniques for solving certain classes of differential equations, especially those which are linear,
and making connections between the qualitative features of th
e equation and the solutions. Connections
to problems from the physical world are emphasized. As well as ordinary differential equations, the
course aims to introduce the students to certain partial differential equations.

Course Content

First order equati
ons and various applications. Higher order linear differential equations. Power series
solutions: The Laplace transform: solution of initial value problems. Systems of linear differential
equations: Introduction Partial Differential Equations.

Learning Out
comes

At the end of the course the students are expected to: 1) Understand the concept of a differential
equation, the procedure of writing one when a system is described, and to interpret the solutions
correctly, 2) Be able to sketch direction fields and
read off the qualitative features of the solutions from
this, as well as to be able to use simple numeric solvers and interpret the solutions, 3) Understand the
theory of linear differential equations and systems in detail, to be able to use the various so
lution
methods presented comfortably (undetermined coefficients, reduction of order, variation of parameters,
annihilation, Laplace transform, series solutions, eigenvalues
-
eigenvectors), and to understand the
connections to the concepts from linear algebr
a, in particular to be able to carry out simple proofs, 4) Be
able to solve the heat, wave and Laplace equations using Fourier series expansions when these partial
differential equations have relatively simple boundary conditions, 5) Be able to use complex

numbers and
linear algebra in the process of solving differential equations in an effective manner.


ATB
2
93 PRINCIPLES OF KEMAL ATATURK I
(
NC
)



CE 221 ENGINEERING MECHANICS I



Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fa
ll Semesters. MATH 119 should be completed before taking CE 221 ENGINEERING
MECHANICS I.


Course Objective

Civil engineering (like many others) is based on mechanics. Various branches of mechanics are treated in
three and four basic courses in the civil en
gineering curriculum. The major objectives of this course are:
1) To establish the concept of equilibrium , 2) To introduce the concept of structural analysis with
reference to statically determinate trusses and beams, 3) To introduce properties of surface
s used in
mechanics.

Course Content

Introduction to rigid body mechanics. Equivalent force systems: Concepts of moment, couple, resultant.
Equilibrium: Free
-
body diagram; equations of equilibrium. Structural analysis: Trusses; beams. Shear
force and
bending moment diagrams by method of sections and by method of integration. Properties of
surfaces: Area moment and centroid; moments and product of inertia; principal directions.

Learning Outcomes

An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering pr
oblems, an ability to use the techniques, skills,
and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice, and an ability to apply knowledge of
mathematics, science, and engineering.


CE 231 ENGINEERING ECONOMY

I


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
L
aboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters.


Course Objective

To introduce quantity measurement methods according to the Procedure of the Ministry of Public Works
and Resettlement. To discuss the time value of money and methods of comparing alt
ernatives from
economic point of view (rate
-
of return, PW, AE approaches). To introduce depreciation, replacement,
cost
-
benefit analysis principles. To enable students to make suitable decisions in their professional life
when they have to make a decision
on an economical basis.

Course Content

Introduction to engineering economy. Interest and money
-
time relationship. Depreciation, valuation
depletion. Basic methods for making economy studies. Risk
-
decision analysis. Selection between
alternatives and the re
placement problem. Applications related to various constructions projects.
Quantity measurement and cost estimating of a building project.

Learning Outcomes

The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and soc
ietal
context., an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering
practice, and a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life
-
long learning

Course Objective

s are significantly related with t
he following ABET outcomes: e. An ability to identify, formulate and solve
engineering problems. f. An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. h. The broad
education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global
and societal context.
k. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering
practice.


CE 241 MATERIALS SCIENCE


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall and Spring Semest
ers.


Course Objective

All engineers are concerned with the structural safety, serviceability and the economics of the
constructions with which they are involved. The successful approach to the problem can only be
established through a sound knowledge of c
omputational methods of engineering and a thorough
understanding of the properties and behavior of engineering materials. Without a proper knowledge of
materials neither the structural safety and serviceability nor the economics can be achieved in
engineer
ing projects. The purpose of this course is to emphasize the basic principles necessary for an
understanding of the fundamental nature and properties of engineering materials and to make clear the
significance of these principles in engineering practice. T
he objective has been to present a unified
treatment of a variety of materials, stressing the fundamentals which provide a common basis for
explaining the behavior of the varied materials. The organization of the course material is such that, first,
the el
ements of the atomic and electronic structure of matter is introduced and the structure types of
solids are explained. Then the physicochemical aspects of the colloidal material used in industrial practice
is covered. A sequence proceeds from atomic struct
ures to coarser structures, from the simple to the
more complex. Such a sequence from atoms to crystals, to phases, to microstructures and to
macrostructures is followed because the grosser structures and properties depend on the finer structural
character
istics. Considering the importance of the mechanical behavior of materials and the limitation of
the course period, emphasis is given to the phenomena associated with the mechanical behavior of the
materials and their structural characteristics. Elasticity
, plasticity and flow phenomena are explained by
reference to the main types of engineering materials and a discussion of the strength and other related
properties of the materials follows. Finally the effect of radiation damage on the mechanical propertie
s of
materials is briefly discussed. The course is already taught to the civil engineering and environmental
engineering students with the contents written in the "learn to how syllabus" section. It is believed that

Course Content

Engineering requirements
of materials; the structure of matter; atomic arrangements, structural
imperfections, atom movements. Mechanical properties. Concepts of force, stress, deformation and
strain; elasticity; elastic and plastic behavior; viscosity; rheological models. Creep,
relaxion, brittleness,
ductility, hardness, fatigue, toughness, resilience, and damping characteristics of materials.

Learning Outcomes

An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering, an ability to identify, formulate
and solve engi
neering problems, and an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.


ENG 211 ACADEMIC ORAL PRESENTATION SKILLS



Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters. ENG 101
-

ENG 102 should be completed
before taking ENG 211
ACADEMIC ORAL PRESENTATION SKILLS

Course Objective

choosing appropriate presentation topics reading extensively to gather relevant data sorting through
information expanding vocab and actively using topical words preparing and using
visual aids adjusting
language to spoken discourse using body lang effectively expressing and supporting opinions asking and
answering questions listening actively and responsively learning debating procedure learning discussion
management techniques carry
ing out field research and team work

Course Content

The course aims at developing oral presentation skills. To this end, students are engaged in classroom
discussions following advanced reading texts on a variety of topics. In the course students study ef
fective
presentation techniques, do extensive reading and carry out research to give presentations of different
functions with mature content and topical vocabulary.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the semester,sts will have performed 4 presentations; nam
ely, informative speech,
persuasive speech, audio
-
visual presentation and final project presentation.



NON
-
TECHNICAL ELECTIVE
(
NC
)

FOURTH SEMESTER

ATB
2
94 PRINCIPLES OF KEMAL ATATURK II
(
NC
)


MATH 202 MATHEMATICS FOR ENGINEERS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall and Spring Semesters.

Course Objective

This course is mainly designed to give sophomore engineering studrnts fundamental concepts of vector
spaces , vector calculus and linear

algebra relevant to their fields.

Course Content

Vector spaces, matrices, systems of linear equations, linear transformations, change of basis, eigenvalue
problems, quadratic forms and diagonalization. Vector calculus, line, surface, and volume integrals
.
Gradient, divergence, curl. Green, Gauss and Stokes´ theorems. Complex Numbers.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course ,students are expected to be able to use vector analysis and linear algebra to
formulate analytical and numerical modelling of var
ious engineering problems.Some examples are:
1)Structural mechanics and finite element method require a good knowledge of matrix algebra.
2)Eigenvalue analysis are needed in free vibration and stability analysis of structural systems,in
determining princip
al stresses,in finding principal directions of the cross section of a beam. 3)Integral
theorems(Green,Gauss,Stokes' theorems) are being used in fluid and solid mechanics. 4)Solution of
system of linear equations is encountered in all of the branches of eng
ineering analysis.etc.

CE 222 ENGINEERING MECHANICS II



Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters. CE 221 should be completed before taking CE 222 ENGINEERING
MECHANICS II.

Course Objective

The course pro
vides engineering students firm foundations in the study of motion, forces that cause
motion and their relationships for rigid bodies using Newton's Laws, energy and momentum principles
and introduces systems governed by ordinary differential equations.

C
ourse Content

Kinematics of particles and rigid bodies: absolute motion, relative motion. Kinetics of particles: equations
of motion, work
-
energy and impulse
-
momentum. Systems of particles. Kinetics of rigid bodies: Euler`s
equation, plane motion of rigid
bodies, kinetic energy of rigid bodies. Introduction to the dynamics of
vibrating systems.

Learning Outcomes

The students fullfilling the course requirements satisfactorily are expected to
-
Determine the kinematic
relationship for two dimensional (2
-
D)mot
ion of system of particles and rigid bodies.
-
Apply Newton's
equations to 2
-
D problems to determine forces resulting from a specified motion.
-
Analyze 2
-
D motion of
particles and rigid bodies using energy and momentum principles.
-
To study and discuss one
-
degree
-
of
-
freedom undamped free and forced vibrations of rigid bodies using Newton's equations of motion and
energy methods. CE 224 MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 4

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters. CE 221
should be completed before taking

CE 224 MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

.


Course Objective

The objective of this course is to teach students the fundamentals related with the mechanics of
deformable bodies.

Course Content

Simple stress and strain. Equilibrium,
compatibility and constitutive relations. State of stress and state of
strain with emphasis on two dimensional problems. Bending and shear stresses. Deflection of beams.
Torsion of circular shafts. Combined stresses. Buckling of columns.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course, the learner is expected to be able to perform calculations of stress and strain
on simple structural members. Be able to solve simple problems related with indeterminate structures.
CE 244 MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION

Credit (Theo
retical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 4

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters.

Course Content

Production, types, uses in construction, properties and related tests for the following materials are
covered: ferrous metal, bituminous materials, clay produc
ts, timber, building stones, mineral aggregates,
lime, gypsum, hydraulic cements and concrete. Constituents, theories of mix design, principal steps in
production, physical and mechanical properties of concrete.

CE 202 SURVEYING


Credit (Theoretical
-

Appli
cation
-
Laboratory): (1
-
0
-
4) 3

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters.


Course Objective

Civil engineers perform their construction and design activities on and for the surface of earth. They will
need information (in form of maps, plans, digital terrain models,
geographic information systems etc.)
about the location of the civil work. They will select the location of project and design the structure
accordingly. The project will be laid out and constructed by methods of surveying. The cost estimation,
quantity su
rveying and work planning will require geometric information and methods of surveying. The
students of civil engineering should be able; to use survey instrument, maps, plans, and computer
programs; to carry out office and field operations in order to dete
rmine geometry of natural and artificial
features on the surface of the earth in order to make maps and plans; to prepare the data for lay out
civil engineering structures in construction site; to communicate and use services of professionals in the
field
of surveying.

Course Content

Introduction. Distance measurement. Taping. Angle measurement. Errors. Direct, indirect and conditional
adjustment of observations. Differential leveling. Rise and fall. Height of collimation method. Traverse
surveys. Azimuth a
nd coordinate computations. Area computations. Stadia survey. Trigonometric
leveling. Contour lines. Curve layout. Remote sensing and photogrammetry.

Learning Outcomes

Geographic and interdisciplinary nature of surveying work and importance of effective co
mmunication
with professionals in other fields are emphasised. Concept based teaching and assessment of the course
help students to improve their communication skills. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics,
science, and engineering, an ability to de
sign and conduct experiments, as well as to analyse and
interpret data, and an ability to communicate effectively.


NON
-
TECHNICAL ELECTIVE NC

THIRD YEAR

FIFTH SEMESTER

STA 303 STATISTICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall and Spring Semesters. MATH 119 should be completed before taking STA 303
STATISTICAL METHODS FOR ENGINEERS.

Course Objective

This course is mainly designed to give undergraduat
es in engineering relevance and practical significance
of statistical concepts in their fields through essential mathematical principles and applications.

Course Content

Descriptive statistics, histograms, central tendency, dispersion and correlation meas
ures. Basic
probability concepts, random variables, probability density and mass function. Hypothesis testing,
confidence intervals. Law of large numbers and central limit theorem. Regression analysis. Applications in
engineering.

Learning Outcomes

1.to u
nderstand the basic concepts of Probability and statisticals and comprehend its importance in
different disciplines of Engineering. 2.To be able to organize data and use the tools of descriptive
statistics like histograms, frequency diagrams, etc, to show
the distribution and skewness of data. 3. To
be able to differentiate the different measures of central location and variability for a data with excel
applications 4. To understand basic probability concepts like possibilities and probability, axioms of
pr
obability, conditional probability, statistical independence, theorem of total probability and Bayes
theorem 5. To comprehend the concept of random variables and distributions, 6. To find the probability
mass density and cumulative distribution functions d
escriptors of a random variable. 7. To understand
and compare some useful distributions, uniform, binomial, negative binomial, Poisson, geometric,
hypergeometric, normal, lognormal and exponential. 8. To analyze the joint mass density and cumulative
distri
butions, marginal densities of multivariate distributions. 9. To know the concept of Independence,
covariance, correlation, conditional mean and variance for joint distributions 10.To solve the problems
related to functions of random variables, sum and dif
ference of normal variates, mean and variance of a
general function 11. To describe Statistical inferences, estimation of parameters, properties of
estimators, 12. To understand the necessity of central limit theorem 13. To make interval estimation for
the

mean, 14. To comprehend how to use hypothesis testing for the mean and testing validity of
assumed distribution,, 15. To learn alternative nonparametric methods: Wilcoxon signed Rank Test 16.
To develop least squares estimation, lack of fit for regression

and correlation analyses of data 17. To
learn residual analysis and residual plots) 18. To dseing One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for data.

MATH 305 COMPUTING METHODS IN ENGINEERING

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Se
mester: Fall and Spring Semesters. MATH 119
-

INF 230 should be completed before taking
MATH 305 COMPUTING METHODS IN ENGINEERING

Course Content

Numerical solution of linear and nonlinear systems of equations. Interpolating polynomials. Numerical
different
iation and integration. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. CE 300 SUMMER
PRACTICE I NC

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters

Course Objective

This course is intended to provide students an exposure to the practice of engineering in real wo
rld.

Course Content

Subjects that are acceptable for summer practice: Surveying, time
-
keeping, checking and testing
construction materials, assisting resident engineers. Preparing quantity and cost estimates, unit price
estimates, civil engineering drawin
gs and graphs. Use of computational machines, taking part in
construction work. The department may organize a compulsory, collective Summer Practice Program in
place of the above. (30 working days).

Learning Outcomes

It provides the students with valuable

on
-
the
-
job practical experience which enhances the educational
experience received in the undergraduate CE program.

CE 323 INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURAL MECHANICS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters CE 22
4 should be completed before taking CE 323 INTRODUCTION TO
STRUCTURAL MECHANICS.

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to broaden the knowledge of the students in strength of materials by
introducing special topics like unsymmetrical bending a
nd shear centre, and also to master the
fundamental concepts and principles in structural analysis. Hence the student will be capable of using
these tools in intermediate and advanced structural analysis courses. The emphasis is attributed to work
and ener
gy principles, by applying them to the solution of numerous examples. Force method of
structural analysis also constitutes a major part in the course.

Course Content

Unsymmetrical bending, shear center. Definition, classification, idealization and modelin
g of structures.
Analysis of statically determinate structures, including beams, frames and arches. Analysis of cables.
Work and energy principles and their application in deformation analysis of structures. Force method of
structural analysis.

Learning O
utcomes

At the end of this course, the students are expected to: a) integrate the previous strength of materials
background with the advanced topics presented in this course, b) be able to identify the general
characteristics of simple structures and ideal
ize them by selecting appropriate analytical models, c)
understand how an engineering structure (truss, frame, arch, cable, etc.) behaves when subjected to
different types of effects (external load, thermal changes, settlement, etc.), d) solve for unknown
forces
and displacements in determinate and indeterminate (to few degrees) structural systems by using the
methods and principles presented throughout the course.

CE 353 PRINCIPLES OF TRANSPORTATION AND TRAFFIC ENGINEERING

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 4

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters

Course Objective

The aim of the course is to get acquainted all civil engineering students with geometric elements of
highways to be used in highway design first, and then provide the basic determi
nants of traffic system to
alleviate traffic problems.

Course Content

Introduction to transportation systems. Vehicles, network and terminals as components of transportation
systems engineering. Design of transportation facilities emphasizing land transpo
rtation. Operations
planning of transportation systems and traffic engineering. Models of traffic flow. Traffic analysis at
intersections. Basic definitions and computations of level of service. Planning and management
techniques.

Learning Outcomes

The st
udents would be capable to carry out a highway design project starting with route location and
continuing with all phases of the design by considering those geometric elements conformal with the
economical mass distribution, and would be able to search sol
utions to traffic problems with analytical
methods of traffic engineering taught at an introductory level.

CE 363 SOIL MECHANICS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 4

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters

Course Objective

To introduce the st
udents to the fundamental principles of soil mechanics and behavior of engineering
soils.

Course Content

Introduction: engineering problems involving soils. Basic characteristics of soils, classification and
compaction of soils. Principle of effective str
ess. Permeability and flow of water (seepage) in soils. Shear
strength of soils. Slope stability. Lateral earth pressure theories. Consolidation theory.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, the students will be able to *** perform the tests and ope
rations needed to
classify soils; *** perform the necessry tests, and evaluate seepage losses through and beneath dams;
*** perform the necessary tests, and analyse the stability of slopes; *** Perform the necessary tests,
and apply simple calculations for

the estimation of settlements beneath uniformly loaded soil layers; ***
Perform the necessary tests, and estimate the earth pressure on earth rataining structures.

CE 371 FLUID MECHANICS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered S
emester: Fall Semesters CE 221 should be completed before taking CE 371 FLUID MECHANICS

Course Objective

The objective is to introduce the students the fundamental principles of fluid mechanics and to form a
background for the courses in the field of hydr
aulics.

Course Content

Definitions, physical properties. Hydrostatics, forces on plane and curved surfaces, buoyancy,
hydrostatics in moving and rotating containers. Lagrangian and Eulerian descriptions, derivatives, rate of
deformation, flowlines. System

and control volume approach, Reynolds transport theorem, principles of
conservation of mass, momentum and energy, Bernoulli equation. Dimensional analysis, Buckingham pi
theorem, similitude.

Learning Outcomes

To increase the ability to apply knowledge of

mathematics, science and engineering, to identify,
formulate and solve engineering problems, and an ability to use the techniques, skills and modern
engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

T
D
B 10
3

TURKISH I NC

SIXTH SEMESTER

CE 332 CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters

Course Objective

To introduce the students a general picture of the construction industry together with the contemp
orary
management topics. To provide the students with basic information on principles of construction project
management and increase their awareness on major tasks of a construction manager. To present some
of the techniques and methods used during the ma
nagement of a construction project such as network
analysis, cost estimating techniques, hourly output estimation of equipment etc. To help the students to
understand the roles and responsibilities of all parties involved in a construction project, basic p
hases of
a construction project and the way different parties work together to increase performance in a
construction project. To give them brief information about the Turkish construction industry and Turkish
practice giving reference to current rules and

regulations (eg. Health and Safety Regulations for Public
Works). To increase the awareness of students on the issues of quality, health and safety, professional
responsibility, engineering ethics etc. and the environmental and economic impacts of the con
struction
industry.

Course Content

Profile of the construction sector; company and site organization and types of contracts. Construction
projects; estimating, tendering, planning and execution. Professional responsibility and engineering
ethics. Producti
vity, quality, health and safety issues. Construction equipment; selection criteria, hourly
cost determination and output analysis of excavators.

Learning Outcomes

The student will be furnished with the basic principles of construction project management,
project
delivery systems and contract strategy, cost estimating and tendering, construction planning, quality
management, health and safety and construction equipments. This course is designed to give an overall
introductory information in the field of con
struction management at the undergraduate level.

CE 366 FOUNDATION ENGINEERING I

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters CE 363 should be completed before taking CE 366 FOUNDATION
ENGINEERING I.

Course

Objective

The course is aimed at introducing the basic principles of foundation design of civil engineering structures
to civil engineering students. Some theoretical background information is also given in addition to the
fundamental concepts explained i
n CE 363 Soil Mechanics.

Course Content

Site investigations, retaining structures, excavations, dewatering, shallow foundation design, bearing
capacity, settlement, stress distribution in soils, initial settlement, consolidation settlement, permissible
se
ttlement, deep foundation design, bearing capacity, settlement, types of piles, ground improvement.

Learning Outcomes

To apply knowledge of mechanics; to gain an ability of engineering design and solving engineering
problems; understanding of professional

responsibility in the field of engineering; to gain an ability of
using the techniques and skills necessary for engineering practice CE 372 HYDROMECHANICS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
2) 4

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters CE 371
should be completed before taking


CE 372 HYDROMECHANICS

Course Objective

The aim of the course is to teach the basic concepts of flows in pipes and open channels; to apply
continuity, momentum and energy principles for the solution of various pipeline a
nd open channel
problems.

Course Content

Laminar and turbulent flows. Friction factor in pipe flow. Computation of flow in single pipes: Hydraulic
machinery: turbines and pumps. Pipeline systems and networks. General characteristics and
classification of
open channel flow: pressure and velocity distribution. Continuity equation. Energy
concept. Momentum principle. Uniform flow. Rapidly varied flow gradually
-
varied flow. Design of
nonerodible and erodible channels.

Learning Outcomes

To increase the ability

to use the basic fluid mechanics principles to solve pipe and channel flow
problems. Apply knowledge of mathematics and fluid mechanics to design and conduct experiments, to
analyze and interpret data. To analyze and design pipeline systems, open channel
systems.

CE 398 INT
RODUCTION TO COASTAL AND
ENGINEERING

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to enable the students to understand the basics of wat
er waves,
refraction, shoaling, diffraction and reflection of waves, wave breaking phenomenon. In line with these
topics wind waves and wave prediction, principles of coastal sedimentation, forces on massive structures,
breakwaters are also taught in order

to make the students to capture the basic concepts of coastal
engineering.

Course Content

Introduction to water waves, basic equations of wave motion, wave transformations, wave run
-
up and
overtopping, wind generated waves, coastal sediment problems, kin
ds and functions of coastal and
harbor structures, wave forces on vertical walls, stability and design of rubble mound breakwaters.

Learning Outcomes

The students are expected to understand the basic concepts of coastal engineering like wave breaking,
dif
fraction, refraction, shoaling etc. The students are also expected to know some preliminary design
concepts of rubble
-
mound breakwaters and vertical wall structures. CE 382 REINFORCED CONCRETE
FUNDAMENTALS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters CE 224 should be completed before taking

CE 382 REINFORCED CONCRETE FUNDAMENTALS.

Course Objective

The major objectives of this course are: To establish the basic principles of reinforced concrete structural
mem
ber and sytem behaviour and To introduce the basic principles of the analytical methods and design
procedures.

Course Content

Mechanical behavior of concrete in uniaxial and multiaxial states of stress. Time dependent behavior of
concrete. Mechanical beha
vior of reinforcing steel. Behavior and strength of uniaxially loaded members;
confinement. Behavior and strength of members in pure bending. Behavior and strength of members
under combined bending and axial load. Behavior and strength of members under com
bined shear and
bending.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the successful student is expected to be able to, To interpret indications of
different reinforced concrete structural behaviour types to a certain extent; To perform analysis and
design

computations for some basic structural members concerning some basic problems; To check the
the validity of computer outcomes using some simple manual approximate methods of computation. CE
384 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laborat
ory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters CE 323 should be completed before taking




CE 384 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS.

Course Objective

The major objective of the course is to give students the ability to analyze statically indeterminate
structures using classical methods of structural analysis (slope
-
deflection, moment
-
distribution and
matrix
-
displacement method). In addition, some commer
cially available programs (SAP2000, LARSA) are
introduced for demonstrating the computer analyses of such systems.

Offered Semester : MATH 202

should be completed before taking CE 3
84

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS.

Course Content

Introduction to structural analysi
s. Displacement methods: slope deflection, moment distribution, special
topics. Stiffness method, derivation of element stiffness matrices, assembly procedures. Computerized
implementation of the stiffness method and use of instructional programs. Large sc
ale structural
analysis. Influence lines and moving loads.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will comprehend the behaviour and general characteristics of statically
indeterminate structures analyze these structures using classical metho
ds of structural analysis (slope
-
deflection, moment
-
distribution and matrix
-
displacement) provide insight into the use and
implementation of some commercially available programs for computer analyses of such structures.

T
D
B 10
4

TURKISH II
(
NC
)

FOURTH YEAR

SEVENTH SEMESTER

CE 400 SUMMER PRACTICE II NC


Offered Semester: Fall Semesters

Course Objective

This course is intended to provide students an exposure to the practice of engineering in real world.

Course Content

Subjects that are acceptable for summe
r practice: quantity and cost estimates, application of plans to
site conditions, mix design, taking part in reinforced concrete work. Structural, highway and hydraulic
designs. Preparing standard engineering drawings (30 working days).

Learning Outcomes

It provides the students with valuable on
-
the
-
job practical experience which enhances the educational
experience received in the undergraduate CE program.

CE 4
09

CIVIL ENGINEERING DESIGN

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters

Course Objective

-
Introduce the students to professional practice.
-
Involve the students in open
-
minded design and
emphasize the importance of interdisciplinary planning, coordination, communication and technical report
writing.
-
Perform the tasks of a preliminary civil en
gineering design.
-
Prepare, submit and present civil
engineering deliverables.

Learning Outcomes

This course aims to provide a learning activity in which the analytical knowledge gained from previous
courses of different disciplines is joined with the pra
ctice of engineering in a final hands
-
on project. It is
hoped that the course will bring the practical side of engineering design in the classroom and provide
design experience for the students. CE 471 WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING

Credit (Theoretical
-

Appl
ication
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters CE 372 should be completed before taking

CE 471 WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING.

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to give basic concepts of water resources engineering and to
enable the
students to use basic information in design applications in this field.

Course Content

Introduction to water resources. Classification of dams; gravity dams, arch dams, fill dams. Failure and
rehabilitation of dams. Types of spillways, energy d
issipation facilities, crest gates. Water uses and
quantities, water characteristics and quality, water treatment, elements of water transmission and
distribution. Origin and collection of wastewater and strom water, design and construction of sewer
system
s. Land classification for irrigation, soil
-
water relationships, irrigation methods and structures,
design of classical irrigation networks. Characteristics of land drainage, design of surface and subsurface
drainage systems. Hydroelectric power plants, es
timation of hydropower potential, turbines.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course unit, the learner is expected to be able to carry out design and analysis of some
hydraulic systems.

CE 485 FUNDAMENTALS OF STEEL DESIGN


Credit (Theoretical
-

Applicati
on
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall Semesters CE 323 should be completed before taking CE 485 FUNDAMENTALS OF
STEEL DESIGN.

Course Objective

This course is one of the main courses in which design concepts will be introduced to the student. T
he
course will teach basic principles of design and fundamentals of steel structures. Students will utilise
their knowledge from mechanics, strength of materials and structural analysis to design a structure using
steel as a material.

Course Content

Gener
al concepts in design. Design methods, loads (dead, live, wind, snow and earthquake), codes,
safety serviceability. Behavior of steel structures. Tension members, compression members, beams,
beam
-
columns, types and behavior of connections in steel structur
es, bolted welded connections.

Learning Outcomes

The learner is expected to able to know the behavior and design of steel structural members, and
connections. Also learn to design according to Design Standards. In this course, the basic loads have
been te
ached including the earthquake forces.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE **

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE **

EIGHTH SEMESTER

FREE ELECTIVE

DESIGN ELECTIVE *

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE **

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE **

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE **

MUGLA UNIVERSITY ENGINEERING FACULTY DEPARTMENT OF C
IVIL ENGINEERING
DESCRIPTION OF ELECTIVE COURSES IN DEPARTMENT

CE
421

ENGINEERING HYDROLOGY

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Spring Semesters

Course Objective

To tackle and solve the problems in areas of water sc
iences considering the elements of the
HYDROLOGIC CYCLE.Namely Use of water ; control of water; and manage the quantity/quality of water
to Civil Engineering students. So the hydrologist and practitioners educated in this field must deal with
some of the o
bjectives as: Determine the amount of water for various needs; determine the amount of
available water; and use of water efficiently and effectivily.

Course Content

Hydrologic analysis in water resources: Precipitation, streamflow and hydrograph analysis.

Hydrologic
flood routing. Statistical analysis in water resources. Groundwater hydrology. Engineering applications.

Learning Outcomes

Thoretical and practical background on the subjects of Surface water hydrology (precipitation, infiltration,
runoff,sepa
ratrion techniques, unit hydrograph, channel and reservoir routing) Ground water hydrology
and hydraulics with confined and leaky aquifers, superposition techniques for multi
-
well; variable
discharge and boundary conditions. CE 411 ADVANCED SURVEYING AND G
EODESY

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Once in several years. STA 303 and MATH 305 should be completed before taking

CE 411 ADVANCED SURVEYING AND GEODESY .


Course Content

Earths gravity field and natural coordinate systems. Differential geometry of ellipsoidal datum: first and
second fundamental forms, normal sections, normal and principle curvatures. Least square adjustment:
Indirect model, observation equations, covarianc
e law, adjustment calculations. Geodetic vertical control,
precise leveling. Terrestrial methods of relative positioning: trilateration and precise traverse. Reduction
of observations. Introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS).

CE 413 INTRODUCTION
TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester:Fall or Spring Semester

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to enable the students to understand the fundemantal components of
GIS,
to learn data acquisition, data structures, database systems and concepts, raster and vector GIS
systems, integrated GIS analysis.

Course Content

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), basic GIS components, GIS technology, data
acquisition,

data structures, databases, database systems and concepts, vector and raster GIS systems,
GIS applications, error and uncertainty.

Learning Outcomes

The learner is expected to know the fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems,
familiarize a

GIS software,handle a problem within GIS framework.

CE 414 PHYSICAL GEODESY

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester:Fall Semester STA 303 and MATH 305 should be completed before taking CE 414
PHYSICAL GEODESY Review of p
otential theory: Vector fields, curvilinear coordinate systems, Laplace
equation, boundary value problems, Green's identities. Geodetic boundary value problems, Stoke's and
Vening
-
Meinesz's integrals. Gravity measurements and reductions: Free air, Bouguer
and isostatic
gravity anomalies. Practical methods of geoid computation: Quadrature and integral transform
techniques. Combination of satellite and terrestrial data for geoid determination. CE 418 DESIGN OF
TALL BUILDING STRUCTURES

Credit (Theoretical
-

Ap
plication
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 382, CE 384 and CE 485 should be completed before
taking CE 418 DESIGN OF TALL BUILDING STRUCTURES .

Course Objective

The main objective of the course is to teach the basic concepts of design and structural systems of tall
building structures with computer and design applications to undergraduate and graduate students.

Course Content

Examination of the methods of analysi
s and design criteria, behavior and modeling for tall buildings.
Cast
-
in place concrete in tall building design: high
-
strength concrete, concrete
-
filled steel tubes, ductile
structural walls. Steel in tall building design: steel moment resisting frame, ste
el braced frames, semi
-
rigid connections in steel frames, cold
-
formed steel in tall buildings. Mixed structural systems: tube,
braced tube in very tall buildings. Foundations for Tall Building Structures. Computer and design
applications.

Learning Outcome
s

An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering, an ability to design and conduct
experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data, and an ability to use the techniques, skills, and
modern engineering tools necessary for engin
eering design and practice CE 419 COMPUTER
APPLICATIONS IN HYDRAULICS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 372 and MATH 305 should be completed before taking

CE 419 COMPUTER APPLICATION I
N HYDRAULICS


Course Objective

The objective of the course is to enhance students' appreciation of the significance of computers in
solving engineering problems encountered in hydraulics. Furthermore, it is intended that the students will
get both "in dept
h" understanding of the selected topics and "hands on" experience on the related
computer software.

Course Content

Presentation of software and computer tools relevant to hydraulic engineering problems including design
of orifices and weirs, water level c
omputations, drainage inlet design, culvert hydraulics, pressure piping
systems and water quality analysis, storm sewer design and gravity piping systems and sanitary sewer
design.

Learning Outcomes

The students will have a good understanding of the role
played by computers and the software used on
computers in solving steady and transient flows in closed conduit flows, network analysis, gradually
varied flow in open channels, design of storm sewer systems, culvert hydraulics, etc. That, in turn, will
impr
ove their self confidence in tackling any new hydraulic problems they may encounter in their
professional careers.

CE 420 IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course
Content

The need for correcting the natural distribution of water. Irrigation systems: Rotation system, demand
system, limited demand system, unit area unit water system. Types of irrigation networks. Required
information for the design of irrigation proje
cts. General principles of system layout. Computational
principles for channel design. CE 421 APPLIED SURFACE HYDROLOGY

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 376 should be completed before
taking CE421 APPLIED
SURFACE HYDROLOGY.

Course Content

Hydrologic cycle and climate. Basin characteristics. Precipitation and streamflow data and their analysis.
Hydrograph analysis. Statistical analysis of hydrologic data. DAD and IDF curves. Application
s in all these
subjects.

CE 423 ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 224 should be completed before taking CE 423
ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS.

Course
Objective

This course is designed to teach carefully selected advanced topics in mechanics of materials. The
objective of the course is to broaden the horizons of the students in the field of mechanics of materials.
The course also aims at creation of an e
nvironment in which the students are encouraged to participate
in the development of solution algorithms of various problems and, in this way, to improve the problem
solving skills of the students.

Course Content

Analysis of stress in 3D. Strains and stre
ss
-
strain relations in 3D. Mechanical behavior of materials.
Failure theories. Beams on elastic foundations. Elastic stability of axially loaded members. Solution
techniques by energy and finite difference approaches.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the c
ourse unit, the students will be furbished with comprehensive knowledge and problem
solving skills in a wider field of mechanics of materials.

CE 424 URBAN HYDROLOGY AND HYDRAULICS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester
: Once in several years.

Course Content

Urban climate. Hydrological consequences of urbanization. Intensity
-
duration
-
frequency curves. Design
hyetograph. Rainfall losses: SCS method, Green and Ampt method. Rational method, Modified Rational
method. Detenti
on basins, retention basins. Overland flow. Reservoir routing, hydraulic routing.
Overview of important computer models. CE 425 INTRODUCTION TO FINITE ELEMENTS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Spring or Fall Semes
ter.CE 384 should be completed before taking

CE 425 INTRODUCTION TO FINITE ELEMENTS.

Course Content

Matrix algebra. Potential energy and Rayleigh
-
Ritz Method. Element interpolation and local coordinates.
Elements based on assumed displacement fields in 1
-
D. Plane stress analysis. Higher order elements.
Computer implementation.

CE 426 WATER SUPPLY AND WASTEWATER ENGINEERING DESIGN

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Course Content

Quantity of water and wastewater, aqueducts and water pipes, pumps and pumping stations, quality of
water supplies, treatment of water
-
clarification and filtration miscellaneous water treatment methods,
wastewater collection, sewers, flow in sewers and sew
er appurtenances, design of sewer systems.

Course Objective

s: This course is basically prepared to give students an ability to understand the concept of water supply,
treatment principles and design wastewater collection system.

CE 427 CIVIL ENGINEERING
SYSTEM ANALYSIS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Once in several years.

Course Content

Introduction to major concepts and analytic procedures for the identification and selection of optimal
systems. Systematic su
rvey of theory and applications of mathematical optimization to engineering
problems. Evaluation procedures for single and multiattributed problems, covering utility theory and
statistical decision analysis.

CE 428 HYDROSYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0) 3

Offered Semester:Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Objective

To provide a systematic framework for hydrosystems modelling in engineering and management. Focus
will be on bringing together the use of e
conomics, operations research, probability and statistics with the
use of hydrology, hydraulics, and water resources for the analysis, design, operation and management of
water projects.

Course Content

Introduction. Descriptions of hydrosystems, the syste
ms concept, economics of hydrosystems, system
analysis techniques, linear programming applications, uncertainty and reliability analysis of
hydrosystems, applications in surface and groundwater systems.

Learning Outcomes

An ability to apply knowledge of m
athematics, science, and engineering, an ability to use the techniques,
skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice, and an ability to communicate
effectively.

CE 429 WATER SUPPLY ENGINEERING DESIGN


Credit (Theoretical
-

Applica
tion
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester:Fall or Spring Semesters CE 471 should be completed before taking CE 429 WATER
SUPPLY ENGINEERING DESIGN.

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to enable the students to understand the basic probl
ems of Water
Supply and Distribution with special emphasis on how to design a Water Distribution Network. Students
are expected to make a design project after having collected the necessary data using the recordings of
the SCADA system of the associated wa
ter utility including street plan related to the extension work of
that system. Students are offered an extensive hydraulic review at the beginning of the semester
concerning their project. Each student submits a term project.

Course Content

Pump, valves,

friction loss formulae. Water transmission by pipelines. Hydraulics and operation of
pumped discharge lines and gravity pipelines. Design of pipelines. Hydraulics, operation and design of
water distribution systems. Municipal water requirements, extension

of population. Hardy
-
Cross method.
Newton
-
Raphson method.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the learner is expected to be able to master basic hydraulic concepts related to
the design and analysis of water transmission lines and to be able to m
ake decisions for designing a
water distribution network.

CE 430 PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester:Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Objective

To introduce the concept of construction project management and fundamentals of construction
planning. To provide students with information on contract types, organisational structures, procedures
and practical aspects of site management. To present basics

of planning, network analysis and
techniques for making cost
-
time tradeoffs.

Course Content

Introduction to management, general description of construction industry, contract systems, types of
construction contracts. Review of typical organizational stru
ctures for construction companies and
projects. Planning and scheduling, resource analyses and leveling, management of resources. Survey of
main activities and procedures for starting a new project. Communication basics and communication in
construction si
tes. Monitoring and control systems. Procedures and formalities for project completion.

Learning Outcomes


Course Objectives are significantly related with the following ABET outcomes: a. An ability to
communicate effectively. b. An understanding of profe
ssional and ethical responsibility. c. The broad
education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context.
d. A knowledge of contemporary issues. e. An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern
engineer
ing tools necessary for engineering practice.

CE 434 CONSTRUCTION PLANNING

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester:Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Objective

Construction industry has a very poor reputation for achieving p
lanned completion dates within estimated
cost budgets. In the case of developing countries, delays and frequent changes in plans and
specifications are very common. To compensate these adverse consequences, frequent updating of
construction projects is ess
ential. In the framework of this course; the theoretical background of Critical
Path Method (CPM) and Probabilistic Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) are given and also
illustrated with a computer application. Thus, the student is furnished with the t
heoretical aspects as well
as practical solutions of the construction planning process.

Course Content

Economical and juridical basis of construction planning. Methods of planning. Gantt charts,
cyclogrammes, networks. (CPM and PERT) Arrow and precedence
systems. Resource leveling and time
-
cost trade
-
offs. Probabilistic and deterministic networks. Computer applications of construction planning
process by using available softwares. Problems encountered during implementation.

Learning Outcomes

The student w
ill be furnished with the basic priciples of construction planning. The practical applications
of CPM will be shown via the usage of a planning software. Thus the student is expected to gain
knowledge both in theoretical and practical basis.

CE 435 CONSTR
UCTION SITE TECHNIQUES

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester:Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Objective

The objective is to give the basics about site organization and site procedures of a construction project

Course Co
ntent

Principles of construction job layout: working schedules; materials; manpower and equipment
requirements on the job; organization for building, bridge, tunnel, airport, dam, and harbor sites; Rock
drilling and blasting operations, service roads, serv
ice bridges, narrow gauge railroads.

Learning Outcomes

The student will be able to set up a construction site and will be able to adminester it.

CE 436 FORMS AND SCAFFOLDING FOR REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Once in several years

Course Content

General objectives and economic considerations in formwork and scaffolding design and construction.
Form materials and fastening elements used.
Fresh concrete pressure of forms. Impact loads and
vibration effect. Design of foundation, wall, slab, beam, and column forms. Bridge forms, thin shell roof
forms and slipforms. CE 437 INSULATION OF BUILDINGS.

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory):

(3
-
0
-
0) 3

Course Content

: Heat losses and gains in buildings. Thermal insulation materials. Calculations for thermal insulation.
Insulation of buildings against water proofing systems. Sound insulation in buildings airborne and impact
noises. Sound abso
rption and absorbent materials. Effects of fire on building materials and components.
Fire proofing materials.

Course Objective

: To provide the student with an understanding of building physics. To give basic information regarding
heat transfer, water an
d moisture effects, airborne and impact noises and effects of fire in building
components. To familiarize with relevant insulation materials and systems and simplified insulation
calculations.

CE 438 LEGAL ASPECTS IN CONSTRUCTION WORKS


Credit (Theoretica
l
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Content

General information about construction industry. Laws; code of obligations. Documents in a contract file,
types of contracts and contractorship licenses, Biddi
ng Act. No. 2886. Control Regulations for Public
Works. General Specifications for Public Works. Documents kept on site. Technical Specifications.
Quantity measurement, monthly payments. Final account and payment. Settlement of disputes. Safety in
construc
tion CE 439 RAILWAY AND METRO TUNNELS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Content

Development of railway and metro tunnels. Profiles and cross
-
sections of railways and metros. Theorie
s
of vertical, lateral and bottom pressures. A numerical example by segment design. Novel techniques and
equipment used in construction. Metro tunnel characteristics and general pattern of planning. Subway
and deep level stations. Ventilation and aerodynam
ic aspects. Some important examples. NATM method
and cost calculations.

CE 441 HIGHWAY MATERIALS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Content

Nature, sources, and uses of asphalt. Pro
duction and classification of asphalts. Chemistry of asphalt.
Physical properties of asphalt. Tests on asphalts. Classification and properties of mineral aggregates.
Test on aggregates. Aggregate calculations. Types of asphalts aggregate combinations and t
heir
applications. Significant properties of asphalt paving mixture calculation. Asphalt mix design.

CE 445 CONCRETE
-
MAKING MATERIALS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Objective

Con
crete is the most widely used construction material in the world. Therefore, the properties of this
material have to be known very well. In order to know and realize the importance and properties of
concrete, the properties of the materials that compose co
ncrete need to be known as well. In brief, the
objective of this course is to give necessary information on cements, aggregates, admixtures and water.

Course Content

Properties and types of cements and aggregates. Methods and standards of mixing water. Ch
emical and
mineral admixtures.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the learner is expected to get the necessary knowledge on cements,
aggregates, admixtures and water in order to use these materials efficiently and correctly in designing
concrete
mixes.

CE 446 PROPERTIES OF FRESH AND HARDENED CONCRETE

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Objective

The civil engineering students meet with concrete to a certain extent in their sec
ond year course, CE 244
-

Materials of Construction. Due to the time limitation, only limited information on the properties of
concrete can be taught in CE 244. Therefore, this course on "Properties of Fresh and Hardened Concrete"
is planned to furnish the

fourth year students the necessary information on fresh and hardened concrete.
Those students taking such a course will not only learn the properties of concrete but also properly
evaluate the importance of concrete from the technical and economic viewpoi
nts.

Course Content

Properties of fresh concrete: Workability, consistency, bleeding, stiffening, setting, air
-
entrainment, unit
weight, uniformity, batching, mixing, conveying, placing, compaction and curing. Properties of hardened
concrete: Nature and s
ignificance of concrete strength, kinds of strength, compressive strength, tensile
strength, fatigue strength; durability, shrinkage and volume changes.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the learner is expected to learn the properties of concret
e both in fresh and
hardened states. This will form the basis to make successful mix
-
designs and use concrete efficiently.

CE 447 ADVANCED MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring

Semesters

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to provide the students with the knowledge of construction materials in
an advanced level (starting from atomic and microstructural level of materials and further analyzing
general properties o
f materials which are used in civil engineering applications).

Course Content

Characteristics of construction materials, deterioration of building materials, ferrous metals and various
methods for shaping metals, alloys of metals, steel, structural steel
types, non
-
ferrous metals, precast
concrete blocks, brick and tile, wood and wood products, polymers and various adhesives.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the learner is expected to know the materials which he/she may come across
during a con
struction, their properties and usage in detail.

CE 451 ANALYSIS OF TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Objective

The objective of the course is to provide anal
ytical tools for those students interested in majoring in
transportation engineering to analyze the transport systems.

Course Content

Development of transportation demand and supply models. Analysis of cost functions, cost estimating
methods and some general cost function. Merging supply and demand models for network equilibration.
Simulation and optimizing approaches for equilibrium. Ev
aluation of alternative transportation systems.
Transport regulation in an inefficient or in an excessive competitive environment. Cost and demand
conditions of a regulated industry.

Learning Outcomes

The students would enable to analyze any passenger and

freight transport system by considering the
demand and the supply sides to achieve an equilibrated network so that the system could be operated in
an efficient an economical environment.

CE 452 TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters

Course Content

Introduction, causes of traffic accidents, statistical report on road accidents, safety effectiveness of
highway design elements, identifica
tion of problem locations, data analysis of problem locations, accident
reporting systems, education and training, rescue and hospital services.

CE 454 PAVEMENT MAINTENANCE AND REHABILITATION

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
2) 3

Offered

Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Objective

The objective of this course is to enable the students to learn the most reliable and cost
-
effective
rehabilitation techniques for both flexible and rigid pavements. The course also provides students wi
th
the understanding of the process of pavement maintenance and rehabilitation techniques in logical
sequence involving existing pavement structural evaluation, condition assessment, identification of
distress mechanisms, life
-
cycle costs analysis and sele
ction of feasible alternatives.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, the students will demonstrate the ability to:
-

distinguish between flexible
pavements and rigid pavements, their structural layers and construction processes
-

perform initial si
te
surveys to gather necessary information for pavement condition evaluation and distress surveys and
prepare charts and plots to summarize their survey results
-

conduct detailed load associated distress
surveys and identify their possible reasons and mec
hanisms for the observed distresses
-

prepare
rehabilitation and maintenance project plan to remedy deteriorated pavement sections
-

propose a
number of alternative rehabilitation and maintenance projects to recover the serviceability of existing
pavement
equivalent to that of new constructed pavement
-

perform life cycle cost analyses of feasible
alternatives and analyze them for their cost, maintainability, constructability and reliability throughout
their service life
-

determine the most feasible altern
ative and present evaluation and analysis results to
support the reasons for the selected alternative plan.

CE 457 HIGHWAY DESIGN

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 353 should be comple
ted before taking CE 457
HIGHWAY DESIGN

Course Objective

The objectives are to introduce the principles geometric design of highways and to provide the students
to practice completing a partial highway design project.

Course Content

Stopping and passing
sight distance, zero line application simple horizontal curve, compound and reverse
curves, transition length and superelevation, surface and subsurface drainage, culvert design, types of
pavements, material characteristics for subgrade, subbase, base, bin
der and wearing courses, thickness
design using AASHTO 86 design manual, discussion of other pavement design approaches, properties of
concrete, asphaltic concrete.

Learning Outcomes

The stuents are expected to handle the basic inputs for geometric design

of highways, to evaluate the
inputs and formulate the design problem using the relevant standards and to process design work
including preparation of necessary drawings by using any suitable software.

CE 461 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN FOUNDATION ENGINEERIN
G

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Content

Settlement. Bearing Capacity of Shallow and Deep Foundations. Stability problems and problems of
practical interest. CE 462 FOUNDATION E
NGINEERING 2

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Objective

The course emphasize pile foundation design and teach the state of the art concepts of behavior and
design of single piles
and pile groups. Course Content Deep foundations. Piles and pile foundations, types
of piles, pile foundation design. Types of sheet pile walls. Single
-
wall, double
-
wall and cellular
cofferdams. Box open and pneumatic caissons. Underpinning of existing str
uctures.

Learning Outcomes

The course gives;
-
An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tolls necessary for
engineering practice
-
An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.

CE 464 GROUND IMPROVEMENT


Credit (Th
eoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Objective

The objective is to introduce the full spectrum of ground improvement methods to civil engineering
undergraduates. Some of the methods are quite ne
w. This course is a supplementary course to CE 366
Foundation Engineering.

Course Content

Preloading, vertical drains, deep compaction of cohesionless soils: vibrofloatation, vibratory probes,
compaction piles, dynamic compaction, blasting, grouting: perm
eating grouting, compaction grouting,
chemical grouting, jet grouting, deep mixing. Soil reinforcement: Soil nailing, micro piles, reinforced
earth, stone columns, lime columns, geotextiles, freezing, electro
-
osmosis.

Learning Outcomes

An ability to apply

knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering, an ability to design and conduct
experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data, and an ability to use the techniques, skills, and
modern engineering tools necessary for engineering design and pra
ctice.

CE 465 EARTH STRUCTURES

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 363 should be completed before taking CE 465 EARTH
STRUCTURES

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to fam
iliarize the students with the basic types of embankment dams,
with special emphasis on the methods of stability analysis, and the estimation of the pore pressures
under the different conditions of the dam such as during and immediately after the completio
n of
construction, during steady seapage, and during rapid drawdown

Course Content

Highway and railway fills, earth dams. General principles of design, the choice of the type of dam. The
circular arc method of stability analysis; the prediction of pore pr
essures during construction, steady
seepage and rapid drawdown. Special methods of analysis for rock fill dams. Design in earthquake areas.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course unit, the student is expected to be able to read and understand any book

or
article on the wide subject of the design and constuction of embankment dams; be able to choose the
cross
-
section appropiate to the site in question; to be able to detemine the relevant soil properties, and
carry out the necessary stability analyses fo
r the safety of the dam; and to be able to choose details of
the cross
-
section that will enhance safety in earthquake regions.

CE 467 INTRODUCTION TO SOIL DYNAMICS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring
Semesters.

Course Content

Fundamentals of vibration. Earthquakes and ground vibrations. Shear modulus and damping in soils.
Response of soil layers to earthquake motions. Lateral earth pressures on retaining walls. Mononobe
-
Okabe active earth pressure theo
ry. Liquefaction of soils. Stability of slopes and dams under seismic
loads. Dynamic Bearing capacity and settlement of foundations. CE 468 GEOTECHNICAL DESIGN

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semes
ters. CE 362 and CE 366 should be completed before taking CE
468 GEOTECHNICAL DESIGN

Course Objective

Given the structure and soil profile and soil properties to teach how to proceed in
foundation/geotechnical design.To

introduce students to professional practice and design codes.

Learning Outcomes

Basic principles of soil mechanics and foundation engineering are given in the undergraduate courses.
Although various problems are solved in these courses many design detail
s are not given, and students
are not trained in open
-
ended "real life" design problems integrating and reflecting their knowledge. The
course is aimed at closing this gap, and planned to go through several geotechnical design problems
which are commonly f
aced by civil engineers. Course Content Design problems in geotechnical
engineering: Shallow foundations, consideration of differential settlements, foundations on bored and
driven piles, dewatering of a foundation pit, stabilization of landslips by variou
s methods, In
-
situ
retaining structures for excavation support, foundations on problem soils, ground improvement against
excessive settlements and liquefaction.

CE 470 INTERMEDIATE FLUID MECHANICS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 371 should be completed before taking CE 470
INTERMEDIATE FLUID MECHANICS

Course Content

Bernoulli equation, Differential analysis of fluid flow; conservation of mass, stream function, Navier
-
Stokes equations
, some simple solutions. Potential flow, Euler's equation, velocity potential, elementary
plane flows, superposition. Viscous flow; pipe flow, Reynolds stresses, eddy viscosity, mixing length,
theory, velocity profiles, boundary layer concepts, boundary la
yer equations, flat plate, separation, lift
and drag. Measurement of discharge, pressure, velocity, turbulence.

CE 473 OPEN CHANNEL HYDRAULICS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Obj
ective

The goals of the course are to recapitulate with which the students are assumed to be already familiar
and to emphasize certain points that are of particular interest in later applications to control open
-
channel flow and to teach the design of over

flow spillways and energy dissipators.

Course Content

General equation of gradually varied flows (GVF). Types of channel slopes. Characteristics and
classification of GVF profiles. Solution of GVF equations. Characteristics of rapidly varied flow. Flow o
ver
spillways. Crest shape and discharge of the overflow spillways. Basic characteristics of the jump. Stilling
basins. Flow measurement in open channel. types of flow measurement structures. Sharp
-
, short
-
, and
broad
-
crested weirs.

Learning Outcomes

an a
bility to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs, a knowledge of
contemporary issues, and an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
necessary for engineering practice.

CE 475 INTR. TO GROUNDWATER FLOW MODE
LING

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Content

Basic concepts of groundwater modeling. Fundamentals of mathematical models. Governing equations of
groundwater flow. Review of modeling techniques and their comparison. Analytical models. Numerical
models by finite differences. Application of selected mod
els.

CE 476 GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
3) 3

Offered Semester: Once in several years. CE 372 should be completed before taking CE 476
GROUNDWATER ENGINEERING.

Course Content

Fundamental concepts, hydrologic

cycle, ground water, aquifer types, differential equations of confined
and unconfined aquifers. Well hydraulics. Analytical and graphical solution. Modeling of ground water
flow. Construction of wells. Management of ground water: Ground water budget, conc
epts of basin yield,
basin management by conjunctive use, artificial recharge. Surface and subsurface investigations of
ground water. Saline water intrusion in aquifers.

CE 477 DESIGN OF WASTEWATER COLLECTION SYSTEMS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Labo
ratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Once in several years.

Course Content

Waste water systems, sources of waste water, hydraulics of waste water flow, combined and separate
sewers. Manning equation, flow in partially filled sewers, self cleansing of pip
es, design of sanitary
sewers, system layout main sewers, manholes, house and building connections, sewer profiles, design
criteria, population estimate, peak factors, construction and maintenance of sewer systems, Turkish
standards for sewerage system con
struction.

CE 481 REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 382 should be completed before taking CE 481
REINFORCED CONCRETE STRUCTURES.

Course Objective

Togethe
r with CE382, this course establishes a reasonable background in reinforced concrete for those
who are inclined towards structural engineering.

Course Content

General RC behavior: Moment
-
curvature relationship; plastic hinge, redistribution. Behavior and
strength
of members under combined shear and torsion: Equilibrium torsion, compatibility torsion, punching,
capacity design. Repair/Strengthening Principles: Column, beam, slab repair, structural system
improvement. Seismic design principles. Serviceabilit
y. Detailing.

Learning Outcomes

The objective of this course is to improve the ability of the interested students to design RC frame, wall
or wall
-
frame structures and its components for gravity and earthquake induced loading. In addition, the
course aims

at the recognition of the need for life
-
long learning and directs the students towards
research. For this purpose students are asked to form small groups (3
-
4 students form one group) and
each group is a assigned a research topic. The groups are asked to
present a 30 page report and make
an oral presentation (not longer than 30 minutes) on their research topic. In this respect, the course also
aims at the development of the ability to use the techniques and the skills for engineering practice and to
commun
icate effectively.

CE 482 STEEL STRUCTURES


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Objective

The objective of this course is to enable students to understand the principles of steel des
ign.

Course Content

Principles of Plastic Design, Load and Resistance Factor Design, Tapered Columns, Tapered Beams,
Torsion, Introduction to Plate Girders , Beam to Column Connections, Roof Trusses, Introduction to
Industrial Building design, Light Gage
Cold formed members.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course, the learner is expected to be able to perform advanced steel design. Be able to
understand the modern design codes. Apply the principles to real structures of interest.

CE 483 ADVANCED STRU
CTURAL ANALYSIS

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.CE 384 should be completed before taking CE 483
ADVANCED STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS.

Course Objective

This course is mandatory for students who choose structural mechanics as their area of expertise. It
amplifies on the scope of material covered in its prerequisite course, and provides a solid theoretical
background for more advanced topics covered in othe
r courses. It emphasizes computed
-
aided solution
techniques coded in currently used structural analysis software. The basic Course Objective is to enable
students to manage the requirements of modern structural analysis in an automated environment. Its
pri
ncipal topics are:Basic concepts of structural analysis; virtual work principles; derivation of element
stiffness matrices, assembly procedures, solution methods; special topics in structural analysis;
introduction to the finite element method.

Course Con
tent

Review of basic concepts of structural analysis, direct stiffness analysis of 2D and 3D frame structures,
special techniques in stiffness analysis of structures, virtual work principles based on virtual
displacements, introduction to finite element me
thod, nonlinear analysis of frame structures for large
deflections.

CE 484 PRESTRESSED CONCRETE

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 382 should be completed before taking CE 484
PRESTRESS
ED CONCRETE.

Course Objective

Course will teach the basic principles of analysis and design of prestressed concrete members.

Course Content

The principles of prestressed concrete, construction materials and methods, losses, flexural members,
analysis and

design, deflections, shear, bond, torsion, disturbed regions. Axially loaded members,
introduction to piles, circular prestressing, and continuous beams.

Learning Outcomes

The aim of this course is to increase the knowledge of the students in the field o
f Prestressed Concrete
Structures, which will be used in their future engineering carrier.

CE 486 STRUCTURAL DESIGN: CONCRETE STRUCTURES


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.CE 382 should be
completed before taking CE 486
STRUCTURAL DESIGN: CONCRETE STRUCTURES.

Course Objective

To increase design skills as applied in practice and to build up self confidence of the student.

Course Content

One
-
two way slabs, joist floors. Wall, individual, com
bined and continuous footings, mat foundations.
Stairs. Structural systems: Framed, wall and combined structures, flat slabs, flat plates, masonry.
Modeling. Approximate methods of structural analysis, most unfavorable loading. Introduction to
advanced met
hods of construction: Prefabricated prestressed concrete, composite structures, etc.
Professional authority and responsibility.

Learning Outcomes

To help develop and earthquake conscious engineer who has developed self confidence and can ask
critical ques
tions about an engineering problem.

CE 487 INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Content

Dynamic disturbances. Single and multi degree of freedom sy
stems. Continuous systems. Equations of
motion. Energy methods in structural dynamics. Application in structural design. Earthquake response of
structures.

CE 488 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN STRUCTURAL EN

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0)
3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 384 should be completed before taking CE 488
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN STRUCTURAL EN.

Course Objective

To provide the modern civil engineering student with practical training in structural engineering compu
ter
methods so that the student can both use the programs as they stand and modify them to achieve
special needs. The second objective of the course is to provide a useful collection of structural
engineering programs and to have each supported by the rele
vant theory so that all who use them will
be fully aware of the underlying assumptions.

Course Content

The components of a computer system. Operating systems. Advanced FORTRAN programming. Finite
-
difference solution of differential equations. Introduction

to finite element method and computer
programs. Applications for structural mechanics problems. Utilization of package programs in modeling of
structures. Three dimensional building analysis programs.

CE 489 EXPERI. BEHAVIOUR OF CONCRETE STRUC.

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 382 should be completed before taking CE 489 EXPERI.
BEHAVIOUR OF CONCRETE STRUC.

Course Content

Experimental and theoretical examination of reinforced

concrete structural elements as regards (i)
uniaxial loading and confinement, (ii) bending behavior, (iii) shear behavior, (iv) torsion behavior, (v)
bond, (vi) slab behavior and (vii) current experimental research at MU.

CE 490 EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT DESI
GN

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 222 should be completed before taking CE 490
EARTHQUAKE RESISTANT DESIGN

Course Objective

The objective of this course is to teach the basic concep
ts of earthquake resistant design to a B.S. level
Civil Engineer.

Course Content

Causes of earthquakes, characteristics of earthquake ground motions, earthquake magnitude and
intensity measurements. Seismic response analysis of simple structures. Derivati
on of elastic response
spectra and earthquake design spectra. Earthquake design criteria. Free and forced vibration analysis of
frame structures. Modal spectral analysis and equivalent static lateral force method. Design codes,
design applications.

Learni
ng Outcomes

On successful completion of this course, it is expected that students should be able to; * Suggest
possible causes for the movements of the plates * Describe convergent, divergent, and transform types
of plate boundaries * Describe elastic rebo
und theory as it is related to seismic activity * Distinguish
between earthquake magnitude and earthquake damage (intensity) * Understand why earthquakes
occur, how they are measured and categorized and the effect they may have on engineering structures *
Understand the concepts of seismic forces and how they relate to engineered slopes and infrastructure *
Predict the Dynamic Behavior of simple structural systems * Develop an understanding of structural
dynamics of simple systems subject to harmonic, impul
se and/and arbitrary loading * Construct
eigenvalue solution algorithms * Employ the Response Spectrum Analysis Method for Earthquake
resistant R/C Buildings * Apply the Basic Principles of Conceptual Design for Earthquake resistant R/C
Buildings. * Carry
out the detailed design of Earthquake resistant R/C Buildings. * Understand the
concepts and implementation of TEC(1998) and other common seismic design codes.

CE 491 COASTAL ENGINEERING I


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered
Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to enable the students to understand the Small Amplitude Wave Theory,
refraction, shoaling, diffraction and reflection of waves, wave breaking phenomenon. In line with
these
topics wind waves, wave prediction and forces on massive Structures, breakwaters are also taught in
order to make the students to capture the basic concepts of coastal engineering.

Course Content

Linear wave theory, wave transformations (shoaling, r
efraction, breaking, diffraction, reflection), wind
-
generated waves and their prediction, wave climate, design of rubble mound and vertical wall
breakwaters.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course unit, the students are expected to understand the
basic concepts of coastal
engineering like wave breaking, diffraction, refraction, shoaling etc. The students are also expected to
know some preliminary design concepts of rubble
-
mound breakwaters and vertical wall structures.

CE 492 COASTAL ENGINEERING II


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Objective

The objectives of this course is convey the basic information about the coatstal processes such as coastal
currents, principles of coas
tal sediment transport, coastal erosion and control, soft and hard measures,
coastal pollution control, data collection in field and laboratory.

Course Content

Coastal currents, principles of coastal sediment transport, coastal erosion and control, coasta
l pollution
control, data collection in field and laboratory.

Learning Outcomes

The basic information about coastal processes, how the hydrodynamics of waves occur in nearshore
region, types and characteristics of sediment, the parameters effecting transp
ort mechanism of in the
nearshore region, types and characteristics of pollutants, the details of circulation, dispersion, all aspects
of sea outfals

CE 493 DESIGN OF SEA OUTFALLS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester:

Fall and Spring Semesters.

Course Content

Sources and types of pollutants; pollutant transport processes in coastal waters; mixing processes and
models; data acquisition for sea outfall design; sea outfall design procedure; sea outfall design example,
se
a outfall practices in Turkey.

CE 494 PORT PLANNING AND DESIGN

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 491 should be completed before taking CE 494 PORT
PLANNING AND DESIGN .

Course Content

Importance and classification of ports, ports and shipping technology, site selection. Traffic pattern,
economical analysis, optimum capacity, port layout. Determination of design wave characteristics.
Breakwater alignment, design of breakwaters, berthing
structures, quays, bollards, fenders.

CE 495 OCEAN ENG. & UNDERWATER OPERATIONS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Content

Scope of ocean engineering. Basic properties of ocean env
ironment: buoyancy, flotation, stability, flow of
ideal fluids, added mass, forces on objects, motion of objects in fluid. Ocean structures: fixed and
floating ocean structures, phases of design, loads on ocean structures, probabilistic aspects of design.
Principles of diving, human body in ocean environment, decompression sickness, safety, underwater
communication, diving in special and extreme conditions, protection of scuba environment.

CE 496 PLANNING AND DESIGN OF MARINAS


Credit (Theoretical
-

Applicat
ion
-
Laboratory): (2
-
0
-
2) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters. CE 491 should be completed before taking CE 496
PLANNING AND DESIGN OF MARINAS

Course Content

Classification of marinas, marina developments. Facilities and components of marinas, pre
liminary
studies and investigations. Site selection. Layout planning and design. Marina economics. Environmental
and social impacts of marinas. Marina management. Legal and administrative considerations.

CE 497 COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT

Credit (Theoretical
-

Application
-
Laboratory): (3
-
0
-
0) 3

Offered Semester: Fall or Spring Semesters.

Course Content

The coast and coastal issues; the boundaries, shoreland and coastal waters subsystems; introduction to
coastal ecosystems; coastal resources and uses; sustain
able resource development and ecocoastal
engineering; environmental impact assessment; coastal water quality management; beach management;
marine and coastal protected area management; coastal zone management tools and instruments;
institutional arrangemen
ts, coastal management in Turkey.