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Oct 30, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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IT287: Marketing Information Systems

Marking Scheme


May/June 2012



SECOND

DRAFT
QUESTIONS FOR IT287 EXAM 2011
-
12
,
WITH ANSWER GUIDANCE IN ITALICS
.

ANY THREE FROM THESE SEVEN
***

QUESTIONS. TWO HOURS.


(*** Note to external examiner: if you judge that
three from seven offers a tad too much choice, I
will be happy to delete question 2)


The percentages in the right hand margin add up to 100% for each question.


Question 1


(i)

Recall and briefly describe:


five
of
t
he six

essential characteristics of Web

2.0, as opposed to Web 1.0.













(25%)



Participative (read
-
write)



Digital self
-
expression


telling stories



Collaboration


sharing stories



Getting things done c.f. visiting



Social interaction



Web
-
based application platforms

(Software As A
Service)

(Platform As A Service)



(Infrastructure As A Service)


(ii)

By discussion u
sing examples
,

show comprehension of:


h
ow the various Web 2.0
tools

enable the essential characteristics
.


(50%)




Wikis



Blogs



Microblogs (Twitter etc)



Social networking: MySpace, YouTube, Facebook, etc



Tags



Podcasts, videocasts



Real Simple Syndication (RSS)



Etc.


(iii)

Imagine:


h
ow a specific organisation you choose might use mashups.



(25%)




T
he picture above

was the lead
-
in example

used in a le
cture

of a Mashup. We went on to examine in
detail the use of Mashups in a couple of “virtual universities” in the USA, notably that of University of
California. Two
good short videos produced by IBM to show the Mashup concept were shown in
lectures.


Questio
n 2


(i)

Recall and briefly de
scribe these five terms:


Spam; Phishing
; Pharming; Whaling; Denial of S
ervice



(25%)




Spam



Unsolicited e
-
mail



Phishing



Masquerading as an official
-
looking e
-
mail in order to acquire personal information



Pharming



Fraudulent acquisition and use of a company’s Domain Name



Whaling



Phishing for specific big phish!

Targeting specific senior staff of companies.



Denial of Service



Causing a site to crash by bombarding it with an overload of hits



(ii)

By discussion u
sing
examples
,
show comprehension of:


the
w
ays in which
specific
human errors and
del
iberate

software attacks


can cause
loss of
c
ompany data or

other

resources
.

















(50%)


A wide range of the two classes of problem was examined in lectures
. The fo
llowing complex




diagram was used to give internal organisational context, then various slides elaborated the
controlled/u
ncontrolled environments issues:



Carelessness with laptops and portable devices



Opening questionable e
-
mails



Poor password
selection and use



Careless Internet surfing



Shoulder surfing


(iii)

Imagine:


h
ow “cyber
-
warfare” might be part of a military war occurring five


y
ears from now
.








(25%)


Plenty of recent articles from the national press were used for this: the 9 Jan 2011
one below;





the case of the Essex geek teenager who turned out to be the brains behind a massive hacking of
Pentagon computers; China now the world’s hacker hub; denial of service in the Russia/Georgia
conflict; and a video showing the use of Botnets i
n Estonia. Altogether a varied diet for us all to
consume and worry about! Throughout, I emphasized the new economic ways of destroying a
country.



Question 3


(i)

Recall and briefly describe
t
he following wireless networking methods:


Bluetooth;
Near Fiel
d Communication; WiFi; WIMAX;
GPS.












(25%)




Short range



Bluetooth 1.0 (10 metres)



Near Field Communications Network



Medium range



WiFi




Bluetooth 2.0 (100 metres)



Wireless mesh networks



Wide range



Cellular radio



Worldwide Interoperability
Microwave Access (WIMAX)



WIMAX has range 31 miles c.f 100 metres WiFi



GPS


the engine of cellphones



(ii)

By discussion u
sing examples
,
show comprehension of:


h
ow wireless networking methods can be used when marketing from mobile


d
evices

including smartphones.


















(50%)

We looked at videos in lecture time, for instance



You Tube Sybase Global Mobile Technology Solutions




In the fast video,
we
watch
ed

for INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE and ROCK SOLID
DATABASE



Attend
ed

to the impo
rtance of having your database work on a variety of platforms



On right of screen were several video links. Tried

the various pointers to Sybase iAnywhere,
iAnywhere Mobile Office, and Sybase Unwired Platform.




Tried

You Tube Mobile Marketing Volvo



Learn
ed

from You Tube Jakob Nielsen small businesses m
obile marketing (
May 2010)
.


Students were asked to watch these again from home and we hope they did.


(iii)

Imagine:

how a small business in
rural
central Africa

could use
wireless networking.
























(25%)





Yes this is India (!) but it was a useful way to start looking at rural undeveloped countries while
preserving the marketing context. I brandished a high spec smartphone in one hand, the new cheap
Nokia offering to the African market in the ot
her, while re
-
showing the “wireless networks” slide in
the other. The resulting dialogue with the students was really stimulating and gave me high hopes
for this question.





Question 4


(i)

Recall and briefly describe:


t
he

five

stages of the Customer Relationship Manag
ement process (CRM)
.



(hint: if the model you want to use has only four stages, then add


“define population”

as a fifth stage)






(25%)


Probably this one from Jelassi & Enders, but not necessarily:




We examined in a class how the Jelassi & Enders model could be used by a specific theatre.


(ii)

By discussion using examples,
show comprehension of:


h
ow different Customer Touch Points can be used in CRM



(50%)


Here’s the starter…



Now go for it!



Customer

Acquisition

Customer

Retention

Customer

Extension

Customer

Selection

(iii)

Imagine:


h
ow a Brighton club / music venue might use e
-
CRM to attract and keep


valuable

customers.








(25%)


T
he key here


aside from the students’ obvious world knowledge


is the

segmentation stage of the
following CRM model.








Question 5


(i)

R
ecall and briefly describe:


f
ive of the main types of e
-
Commerce.





(25%)




Business
-
to
-
Consumer (B2C)




sell to final customer using the Web



Business
-
to
-
Business (B2B)




hugely out
-
values B2C



Consumer
-
to
-
Consumer (C2C)




bypass the supplier



Peer
-
to
-
Peer
file sharing



Intra
-
company (inB)




transactions within the company’s Value Chain



Business to Employee (B2E)



Government
-
to
-
Citizen (G2C)



e
-
voting



Government Gateway



Now m
-
Commerce?...




(ii)

By discussion u
sing examples
,
show comprehension of:


t
he

benefits of e
-
Commerce to

companies
;
and
to
customers;
and
to
society;


and
to
businesses in developing countries
.





(50%)




Benefits to organizations



Makes national and international markets more accessible



Lowering costs of processing, distributing,
and retrieving information



Benefits to customers



Access a vast number of products and services around the clock (24/7/52)



Benefits to society



Ability to easily and conveniently deliver information, services
and products to
people in cities and in

rural areas



Benefits to business in
developing countries



Through wireless networking, e.g WIMAX, e
-
Commerce can avoid the
limitations otherwise set by dodgy power supplies and unreliable transport etc,
also the inherently lower entry costs of mobile
-
orie
ntated e
-
C.


(iii)

Imagine:


f
uture uses of e
-
Commerce in

and from University of Brighton.


(25%)


Perhaps…



Sell seminars to local companies

(B2C/B2B)



Uni buys paper and other consumables electronically (B2B)



Obtain visiting lecturers electronically (B2C)



Purchase distance learning services (B2B)



Sell consultancy services (B2B)



Recruit new students and accept payment of fees (B2C)



Drive down costs by forming alliances (B2B)



Students share and distribute used textbooks and notes (C2C)



Student travel agency

(C2C)



Uni as intermediary contact with airlines etc (B2B)



Question 6


(i)

Recall and briefly describe:


T
he five
main

parts of an Intelligent Knowledge
-
Based System


known as an


Expert System.








(25%)



Knowledge base


Inference engine


User interface


Blackboard


Explanation subsystem




(ii)

By discussion u
sing examples
,
show comprehension of
:


the difference between Neural Networks and Expert Systems
(hint:


consider the importance of training)
.






(50%)



Here’s a textbook
example of the way that Neural Networks conceal how they get to the
answers:







(iii)

Imagine:


the uses a marketing professional working in
the year 2015


could make
of intelligent systems
.






(25%)


It is likely that the student will answer this in terms

of Web 3.0
. Some examples of
intelligence in Web 3.0 so far:




Amdocs



Originally (1980s) good at billing telecoms companies



Later (2000s) into financial services consulting worldwide



Now “Customer Experience Systems”



Including CRM, mobile advertising, dig
ital entertainment..



Elastra



Configuring large cloud
-
based applications



A long way on from DEC’s early XCON Expert Systems work, automatically
configuring based on customer preferences.



BBC


2010 World Cup



Automatic generation of Web pages when user click
s on topic of interest.



Features that Web 3.0 is expected to display…




Combine & multiply data from disparate sources



Hyperconnectedness, hyperinteractivity



Access to hitherto unavailable info about customers



Funnelled into intelligent mashups



Know more
about customers than they know about themselves!



(
A new age for Peter Drucker…
)



Question 7


(i)

Recall and briefly describe:


The
eight

stages in the extended V
-
model of information system development












(16
%)


Here are the eight stages:






And t
he four items in a MoSCoW checklist




(
9
%)


The MoSCoW list:





(ii)

By
full
discussion using examples, show comprehension of:


The reasons for and against using Outsourcing as a way to involve management users


to

an optimal extent in the design and development of Marketing Information

Systems.









(50%)




The above table is the basic for
-
and
-
against (the ABIES effect, by the way, is a salutary tale I
told the students about the risk of your being one of the

first few contracts won by a
new/inadequately experienced consultancy)


(iii)

Imagine:


that you are a marketing information system developer. A representative from the

intended user community claims that you propose to do too much testing of the new

system.


How will you answer the claims?






(25%)


Here are some li
kely claims, these were set up as
A
unt
S
allies in a tutorial:



Testing takes up too much time & money’



‘We’ve run out of time, let’s cut back on testing’



‘It is such a small project, there’s no
need to test’



‘Testing is dull!’



‘We can’t test everything, so why bother?’



‘Testing is a technical issue’ (lack of business ownership & involvement)



‘When should we stop testing?’




‘Time
-
to
-
Market is too short to
permit us to
test much’.


Either

intelligent refutation of the above

claims


or well thought
-
through

support of them!


will gain
credit. I do anticipate that students will
run with
the new

case for automation of testing:




Save on time, save on people



Design and build enterprise test
automation frameworks



Test all systems IN A BUSINESS PROCESS



Functional testing



Usability



Performance (load, volume, stress)



Compatibility



Security



Keep test automation frameworks over time



Migrate test automation tools



From platform A to platform B



---
------------------
--------------------

geoff rs 21
.2
.2012