Roman Architecture - Woodford County Public Schools

spyfleaUrban and Civil

Nov 25, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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Roman
Architecture

A Tapir Production


by

Mr. Kahn

for

WCMS Social Studies

Stadiums


A stadium is a large public facility for
watching sports or other entertainment


Important design features include:


Simple entrance & exit


Comfort for spectators


Functional facilities for the events

Stadiums


Modern stadiums take many forms, but are,
for the most part, alike in many ways

Ohio Stadium

This is a LARGE
open stadium
which seats over
100,000 fans.


Notice the access
points for spectators
to go to their seats

Azteca Stadium, Mexico City

This stadium has
a different feature
for the comfort of
the spectators.


What is it?

Saltlake Stadium, Calcutta

This is another
stadium which
provides shade
for the spectators.

Glendale Stadium, Phoenix

This stadium has
a moveable roof
panel.


What common
features have you
noticed about these
stadiums?

Ancient Greece

The Greeks did not have
great stadiums for
sporting events. They
did, however, have huge
amphitheatres for plays.

Seating

Stage

The Romans adapted this idea for
larger events

By making a second
amphitheatre as a mirror
image of the first, a
stadium was born.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

This stadium,
also known as the
Colosseum

is one
of the best
-
known structures
in the world.


Notice the
similarities to the
other stadiums
we have seen.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

The Colosseum seated
between 45,000 and
50,000 spectators.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

There were many
tiers of seats, with
easy entryways to
allow access.


There were also
covered walkways
beneath the seats.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

Even though what
we see today is
mostly in ruins, we
know what this
incredible building
looked like when it
was built, around
98 AD.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

The structure was
620 feet long, 512
feet wide, and 158
feet high.


More than 1.1
million tons of
stone, bricks &
concrete were used
in construction.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

There was a great
silk drape, called
the
velaria
, which
could be drawn
over the open top
to act as a sun
shade. This was
secured by ropes
on 250 masts and
rigged by 1,000
sailors.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

There were 76
public entrances
and, though events
were free,
spectators needed a
numbered ticket
which directed
them to the correct
entrance.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

The open area you
see at the base of
the Colosseum was
covered by a
wooden floor, 177
feet wide, which
would have been
covered by sand.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

The exposed area
you see, which
would have been
covered by the
floor, consisted of
rooms and cages,
and nearly a mile
of passages which
led to elevators and
32 trapdoors in the
arena floor.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

There were many
levels under the
Colosseum, and
mechanical hoists
and ramps would
lead animals and
gladiators to the
trapdoors in the
arena floor.

The Flavian Amphitheatre

When it was first built,
these underground
chambers were not yet
included in the plans.
The floor was sometimes
flooded and sea battles
were staged inside the
Colosseum!

Ancient Rome

The Colosseum was
only part of the
center of ancient
Rome. As you can
see on this map, this
great stadium
anchored one end of
the Forum. In the
lower right, you see
another sports venue,
the Circus Maximus.

Ancient Rome

This model gives
you an idea about
the layout of Rome,
and how the
Colosseum fit into
the city.

Ancient Rome

The Forum was the
center of Roman
government and
commerce. Many
government
buildings,
monuments, and
markets were there.

Ancient Rome

Today, the Forum is
one of the largest
historic areas in
Rome. Though the
ruins are only a
skeleton of what was
there, you can
imagine the grandeur
of this space.

Ancient Rome

Today, the Forum is
one of the largest
historic areas in
Rome. Though the
ruins are only a
skeleton of what was
there, you can
imagine the grandeur
of this space.

Ancient Rome

Today, the Forum is
one of the largest
historic areas in
Rome. Though the
ruins are only a
skeleton of what was
there, you can
imagine the grandeur
of this space.

Ancient Rome

Today, the Forum is
one of the largest
historic areas in
Rome. Though the
ruins are only a
skeleton of what was
there, you can
imagine the grandeur
of this space.

Circus Maximus

Don’t think that we
have cornered the
market on horse
racing. The Romans
had a racetrack that
held 250,000
spectators.


This area is the site of
the Circus Maximus.

Circus Maximus

The Circus Maximus
was used for chariot
races. It was 2,000
feet long, and had
starting gates for the
chariots.

Circus Maximus

You can still see the
outline of this huge
track from the air, but
most of the structure
is gone.


Does this look much
like a racetrack of
today?

Circus Maximus

Imagine yourself in
the stands at this
incredible facility,
cheering on your
favorite charioteer.
These men either
became very wealthy
with success, or very
dead with failure.

Circus Maximus

The ruins of the
Circus Maximus
don’t look as
impressive if you
don’t know the glory
of what was there.


The Pantheon

The Pantheon was
built in 128 AD as a
temple to all the gods.


The concrete dome is
one of the wonders of
ancient Rome.

The Pantheon

The Romans
pioneered the use of
concrete in
construction.


The roof,the oldest
dome in existence, is
made of concrete.

The Pantheon

The open space
beneath the dome is
one of the grandest in
the ancient world. It
is lit by sunlight
streaming through an
8 meter wide hole in
the roof called the
oculus
.

The Pantheon

The dome of the Pantheon is
144 feet in diameter and
soars to a height of 144 feet.
It is made of non
-
reinforced
concrete.


What design features do you
notice, and what would be
their effect?

I hope you have enjoyed this visit
to ancient Rome.



All photos are public domain unless otherwise noted.