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A FAWCETT BOOK

.

NUMBER 322

LARRY EISINGER


EDITOR
-
IN
-
CHIEF . FAWCETT .BOOKS

GEORGE TILTON



MANAGING EDITOR

W. H. Fawcett, Jr

................................
....................


President

Roger Fawcett

................................
.........

General Manager

Gordon Fawcett

................................
....

Secretary
-
Treasurer

Roscoe Fawcett

................................
.....


Circulation Director

Ralph Daigh
................................
..............

Editorial Director

James B. Boynton

................................
.

Advertising Director

Al Allard

................................
..........................

Art Director

Ralph Mattison

............................

Associate Art Director

MILTON SALAMON
................................
...............

EDITOR

Jean Galloway

................................
............

Associate Editor

HAROLD KELLY

................................
..................

ART EDITOR

Silvio Lembo
................................
...........
Associate Art Editor

Nick Ca
rlucci
................................
..................

Art Associate

Murray Cooper

................................
...............

Art Associate

Harold E. Prtce
................................
...............

Art Associate

Michael Gaynor

................................
..............
Art Associate

Anne B. Ragno

................................
.........
Production Editor

Phyllis Goodman

.......................

Assistant Production Editor

CHILDREN'S FURNITURE YOU CAN BUILD. Fawcett Book 322, it published
by Fa

west I Publications, Inc., Greenwich, Connecticut. Editorial and
Advertising Officer 67 Weil 44th Street, New York 36, New York. General
Officei: Fawcett Building, Greenwich, Connecticut. Trademark of Fawcetr
Publications, Inc. Printed in U. S. A. Copyr
ri
ght

1956 by Fawcett Pub
-
lications, Inc.

CONTENTS

Bill Baker's Construction Techniques

.........


6

Wood Trim for Plywood Edges
..................


16

Projects

1


Toy
-
Bin Desk for Two
......................


20

2


Happy Clown Slide

..........................


30

3


Little Miss Vanity Table

....................


36

4


Modern Night Stand

........................


44

5

Desk V Shelves

..............................


50

6

Little Slat Chair

................................


58

7


C
a
nopy Sandbox

...........................


62

8

Play
-
School Bench

.........................

70

9

Duck Pull
-
Toy

................................
.


76

TO

Provincial Night Table

..................


78

11

-
Old
-
fashioned Cradle

.....................


86

12


Rocking Horse

...............................


92

13


Circus Wagon

...............................


104

14


Wardrobe

Chest of Drawers

.......


106

15


Sandman Crib

.............................


114

16

Garden "H
eart" Bench
................


118

17
-
Teen
-
Age Hi
-
Fi
........

-
..'.
....................


126

Paints and Finishes

................................
...


133

Plastic Laminates

...........................


.........


136

Foam Rubber Mattress

.............................


140

Decorate with Decals

...............................


142

Cov er pho
t
os:
Clown Slide by Edward De
l
ong,
others by
Harold
Kelly.



BEFORE

a ty pical

unf inished basement with v alu
-
able space going to waste. Bui suppose we panel
the walls with e
a
sy
-
to
-
use Weldwood . . .

AFTER


see what a dif f erence Weldwood m
a
kes!
Weldwood Nov op
l
y
®

walls m
a
ke it
a
beautif ul,
practical children's play room.




Hi
-
Fi unit,
shown in book, is Weldwood knotty pine
with perf orated h
a
rdboard sliding doors. Holds
tuner, amplif ier, changer and records.

Handsome
chest

-
on
-
chest,
f
eotured in book, is
easily made of birch and walnut or other Weldwood
Hardwoods such o
s cherry, oak or mahog
a
ny.

NEW! Big 40
-
page Do
-
it
-
Yourself
book by Weldwood shows you

how to wood panel a wall


how to make a plastic laminate sink top
how to
saw and work plywood


how to finish plywood


how to make a hi
-
fi housing

what to do about

a "problem" basement


how to glue plywood


and has all
kinds of tips for the homecraftsman


Plus
do
z
ens of pictures of finished projects!

SEND FOR THIS BIG 40
-
PAGE BOOK TODAY!

And see y our lumber dealer f or beaut
if
ul Weldwood
Hardwood Ply w
oods and superior Weldwood
Douglas Fir Ply wood or, to see the complete line,
v isit any of our 87 showrooms in principal cities.

Weldwood

HARDWOOD PLYWOOD

A product
of
United
Slates Plywood Corporation

World's L
ar
ges
t

Plywood Organization

Unit
ed States Plywood Corporation
Box 61, New York 46, New York

Enclosed is
254
for
your

new "Weldwood Do
-
11
-
Yourself"

book. Please

r
ush my copy!

CF12
-
54

| NAME

................................
................................
................................
......



I ADDRESS
................................
................................
................................
...


j CITY
................................
................................
........

STATE

.....................





N
OW
-

6 great new power tools in 1

Porte
r
-
Cable's revolutionary

ROUTO
-
JIG!


Never before
-

a single tool so
versatile!
The amazing new Routo
-
Jig
converts in a jiffy to any one of
six
top
-
quality portable power tools


lets
you equip your workshop at a fraction of former costs!

Use the Routo
-
Jig

as a
router,
for mortising, grooving, rabbetting... as a
jig
-
saw,
for cutting intricate contours and freehand shapes... as a high
speed
finishing sunder,
with orbital motion that can't gouge or mar.

With its own accessory table, the Routo
-
Jig is a precisi
on
shaper


for
moulding, beading, joining. It's a smooth
-
cutting
power
-
plane


lightning
-
fast on the toughest planing jobs. And the Routo
-
Jig even goes to work in
the garden

as a light, handy lawn trimmer for the places that mowers miss!

It's a shop
-

in i
tself!
And. like every Porter
-
Cable tool, the Routo
-
Jig is
quality built throughout


for years of dependable, trouble
-
free service. See
it
-
try it

at your Porter
-
Cable dealer's today! Or write for free literature.


FREE! $20.00 SAVINGS CERTIFICATE wit h

your 6
-
in
-
l Rout o
-
Jig!
Saves you $7.00 on Shaper.,.$3.00 on Sander...$3.00 on Plane.. .$3.00 on
Grass Trimmer... $4.00 on Dovetail Templet. You save on
every
attachment,
whether you choose one or all five! See your dealer or write for complete details.
Of
fer expires January 31, 1957.


PORTER
-
CABLE MACHINE CO.
6508 N.
Solina St., Syracuse 8, N. Y.

Yes, send me complete information on the Model 140
Routo
-
Jig, and the name of my nearest dealer.

Name

-

Zone.

________________

_State_



Address
-
Cit y

.


Clown slide was begun by drawing grid lines directly on Duraply panel with long board straightedge.

bill baker's

construction

techniques

Take the advice of a seasoned professional; avoid unnecessarily tough
methods of building furniture. Here are some
shortcuts and handy tips.

ALTHOUGH t here are many ways t o

build good furnit ure, s ome requiring
skills and equipment well beyond the reach
of the average home workshop hobbyist,
advanced t echniques are not abs olut e
musts in the construction of sturdy and
at
-
tractive furniture. Here are the basic con
-
siderations in home projects, and some
special tips to make your job easy and in
-
expensive.

Why Plywood?

To build a piece of furniture of solid
hardwood throughout would be an expen
-
sive deal. However, you can
get much the
same effect without sacrificing strength by
using plywood or lumber core having an
outside veneer of the wood you want your
piece to be. Plywood is a laminated product
consisting of 5 or more plys of thin wood
bonded together with glue and pre
ssure to
form a panel of uniform thickness and con
-
siderable strength. The strength is due to
the plys being laid with the grain patterns
alternately set at right angles to each other.
The top ply is a veneer of select wood and
this is the surface that wil
l show in the
finished piece of furniture.

Lumber core differs from plywood in that
it has a thick center core of butt
-
joined
strips of solid wood sandwiched between
four thin plys of veneer, two on each side.
The top plys consist of the finish veneers
whi
ch can be of any type of fine furniture
wood while t he plys directly underneath

Clown outline is then sketched on Duraply while
reierring to the graph
-
paper drawing alongside.

are laid with their grains running at right
angles to the core and top ply
s. Lumber
core is much lighter than plywood and is
highly resist ant t o warping. The glas s
-
hard glue that bonds plywood and lumber
core tends to dull tools, and since less glue
is used in bonding lumber core, that ma
-
terial will be found to be easier on too
ls
than plywood. For the same reason, it is
easier to work with and is less inclined to
splinter.

In some cases plywood is more expensive
than solid wood, but this is not usually the
case. In fact, in the case of fine hardwood
plywoods of
3/4
-
inch thicknes
s, the price
is
us ually les s. In any event, t he home
hobbyist usually finds that money
-
saving
is not the important factor when he selects
material for his project, since materials sel
-
dom exceed one
-
third of the value of the
average cabinet or piece of fur
niture.

In almost all of his furniture projects, Bill
Baker gears his inst ructions t oward t he
use of plywood rather than solid wood, not
only because of the factors of wood strength
and outdoor durability, but also because of
the simplicity in cutting out
necessary
pieces. There is usually little waste, there
are less operations required for the home
hobbyist, and plywood is available in a very
wide range of beautiful hardwoods. New
techniques for edge treatment, such as
Wood
-
Trim in matching veneers, also
add
simplicity to the job.

Duraply
is plywood with a special over
-

On other pr ojects, full
-
size paper patter n is cut
out Use wrong side of plywood for cutting board.




Edward DeLong photo above & at left

Burt Murphy photo

7


lay surface; it i
s non
-
porous and is, there
-
fore, easy and economical to paint. When
finished, Duraply has a handsome appear
-
ance.

Nakora
is the most handsome of econom
-
ical plywoods for indoor furniture, par
-
t icularly for modern furnit ure.
Bi rch
plywood is one of the stro
ngest hardwood
plywoods available and it is especially
suited for colonial furniture. When it is
stained

which it takes nicely without fill
-
ing

it can be made to resemble most any
wood finish. Since it isn't porous, it lends
itself very well to painting an
d is especially
good for children's furniture.

Drawer bot t oms and cabinet backs in
this book's projects were usually
1/4
-
inch
gum
plywood, which is cheap and non
-
porous

therefore having the advantage of
not being a dust
-
collector.

Most plywood comes in 4x6
-
, 4x7
-

and,
most predominantly, 4x8
-
foot sizes. In
various projects, 4x4
-

and 3x4
-
foot sizes
were mentioned; nowadays, many lumber
-
yards

especially those set up for the do
-
it
-
yourself trade

carry smaller pieces or
even cut them to size. If project layout
diagrams call for, say, a 4x4
-
foot sheet and
that size is locally unavailable, the solution
obviously will have to be to buy the next
larger size
-

the leftover plywood can al
-
ways serve for future projects.

Buying Lumber

One of the unhappiest experiences t
he
home furniture maker can run into is buy
-
ing a piece of wood and t hen finding it's

just a little too short. Because of shrinkage
and varying standards of mill planing, there
is a difference between the actual "net"
size of dressed lumber that you get f
rom
the lumberyard and the nominal size that
you order. However, plywood is sold in the
exact dimensions as offered.

Board lumber nominally 1 inch thick will
actually measure from
3/4

to
7/8

inch (usu
-
ally
13/16

inch). And its actual width will
be
3/8

inch

less than its nominal width, in
pieces
between 2 and 6 inches wide; in
wider
pieces the difference will jump to
1/2

inch.

Similarly, dimensional lumber of 2
-
inch
nominal thickness actually measures 1
5/8

inches. So be specific about the size you
want, and
check the extent that the dressed
lumber varies from the rough
-
cut size.

Construction Methods

To simplify construction procedure with
-
out sacrificing strength, dowel assembly is
avoided in favor of screws and glue. Nails
should never be used in the main as
sembly
to hold basic sections of the furniture to
-
gether. Only screws, which pull and hold
the pieces together in a firm tight grip,
should be used here. Nails can be used for
fastening light drawers, attaching edge trim
and other decorative features that
have no
bearing on strength.

To make a strong permanent joint, spread
a t hin layer of glue on bot h s ect ions t o
be joined, set them together, and immedi
-
ately tighten with screws. The best method
of working wit h s crews is t o pre
-
drill
s crew holes in t he t op

piece; t he diam
-


Bill Baker assembles "T"
-
shaped pieces first,
"L" pieces next. Project is wardrobe
-
chest of
drawers
.

Units shown in photo at left are assembled.
Glue
hardens be
t
ter this way and assembly
is easier
.



Bun Murphy photos

8



eter

of the hole is equal to the diameter of
the screw being used. Countersink these
holes (if the screws are located at the back
or underside of the piece where they will
not be visible). Then, after setting the two
pieces together, drop screws into all the
s
crew holes, hammer them part way into
the undrilled wood beneath (unless it is
hardwood), and tighten in the usual man
-
ner. In the case of a long row or ring of
screws, don't tighten them in consecutive
order, but skip around, tightening first one
at one e
nd, then one at the opposite end,
then back to one midway between, and so
on unt il all are t ight ened. This will in
-
sure the pieces being evenly brought to
-
gether and keep them from getting out of
line while assembling.

Screws driven into the end grain of p
ly
-
wood should be long enough to take a
3/4
-
inch bite into the wood. Longer screws will
not add materially to the strength of the
joint and may split the wood. Screws driven
into core stock or solid wood should take a
1
-
inch bite

but to prevent splitting,
a pilot
hole, half the diameter of the screw, should
be drilled first in the solid wood.

Screws driven into exposed surfaces of
the project should be concealed with long
-
grain wood plugs as shown in the photos.
These plugs are cut as needed from the
sides
of scrap wood with a special
1
/2
-
inch
plug cutter. They differ from dowels in
that their ends have the grain pattern run
-
ning across the surface, while dowels have
an end grain. The advant ages of long
-
grain plugs are many. They can be cut

from wood tha
t matches in color and grain
pat t ern t he surface being plugged, and
when properly matched and fitted they be
-
come almost invisible in the finished piece.
Plugs take stain finishes in the same shade
as the surrounding wood, while dowels,
with their end grai
ns, soak up the stain and
appear considerably darker than the sur
-
rounding wood. Dowels used as plugs may
in time distort due to their failure to shrink
and expand in the same direction as the
wood which holds them. Plugs, however,
will expand and contract

in the same way
as the wood. Finally, if for any reason a
plug must be removed later, it can be
chipped out easily with a
1/4
-
inch chisel,
while the only way a dowel can be re
-
moved is to drill it out.

Where screws are to be covered with
long
-
grain plugs,

first bore a shallow
5/16
inch deep by
1/2
-
inch diameter hole for
the plug with a
1
/2
-
inch bit. Then, through
the
center of this hole, drill the screw hole
all
the way through the wood.

When building complex pieces of furni
-
ture that have curved lines suc
h as the
rocking horse or garden "heart" bench, the
best way to insure an accurate job with a
minimum of mistakes is first to make a full
-
scale layout sketch of the piece on a large
sheet of paper tacked on a piece of plywood.
Such a drawing will graphical
ly reveal in
full size all angles, bevels, miters, curves,
assembly points, and true measurements.
In fact, full
-
size patterns can be cut from
your layout on heavy paper. Since, in
many cases such as the rocking horse, pat
-


Bather than dowels. Baker use
s long
-
grain
wood plugs cut from same wood as used in
project
.

Handy plug culler does the job shown at
left; it
is sold by various large
manufacturers of bits.




Milton Salamnn photos this page


To prepar e for wood plugs.
1/2
-
inch h
oles are bored 5/16 inch deep; then 3/16
-
inch screw holes inside.

Glue is placed in
1
/2
-
inch holes and the long
-
grain

When glue has dried, plugs are chiseled down and

wood plugs are hammered into place; let glue dry. sanded flush. Plugs then blend
into rest of wood.





Lou Hochman photci


For clampless assembly, homemade wooden wedge clamps are used. Tighten them by means af small
wedges driven between pieces to be glued and the top o
f

clamp. Construction is as shown in drawing.


Mike Bo
nvino photo

Milton Salamon photo

After pieces have been assembled but before glue can start to dry, square up assembled cabinets by

measuring with tape between diagonal points. If measurements differ, apply pressure on long corner.

terns of parts overlap
each other it is ad
-
visable to cut out one pattern at a time
while leaving the rest of the layout tightly
tacked in place. Then, after using the pat
-
tern, place it back in its original place, tape
it with transparent tape, and continue cut
-
ting out pattern
s. All templates must be
cut carefully wit h a s harp knife.

Another method of full
-
size layout trans
-
ferred to wood is, when working with large
surfaces such as in the clown slide, where
the layout took all of a 4x8
-
foot sheet of
plywood and a paper layout
would require
excessive time and be inconvenient, to
make the layout directly on the top sur
-
face of the plywood itself. Then merely cut
the plywood along the lines.

In assembling the pieces, too, the full
-
scale layout proves its worth. Points of
assembly
can be marked accurately on the

various pieces by laying them in super
-
imposed position on the drawing and using
t he drawing as a guide in marking t he
points on the wood where other pieces are
to be joined. Constant references to the
full
-
scale drawing in

this manner will re
-
sult in a well
-
constructed project with a
minimum of mistakes and wood waste.

The assembly of a piece of furniture can
proceed in many ways, some right, many
wrong. The right way to assemble a piece
is to break it up into a series of "
T's" and
"L's", joining together all the T's first, and
then all the L's. A "T" assembly consists of
two pieces that form a "T" when joined
together; two pieces that form an "L" when
joined constitute an "L" assembly. By
joining your T's and L's first, you

give each
screwed and glued joint a chance for the
glue to harden before straining it with an

11



Beeswax is far superior
t
o candlewax or paraffin Before screwing members of a permanent assembly
for
lubricating screws for easy entry and removal.

together, always use glue
f
or increased strength.



Milton Salamon photos above, below left

Edward DeLong photo below, opposite page left



Wherever possible, save time and have better ie
-

Base trim molding for c
abinets is beveled here on
suits by marking, cutting several parts at once. radial saw. and joined as shown on opposite page.

12





Mitered base trim shown on preceding page is then
mounted in place with
g
lue. 3d finishing nails.

Limite
d rabbet is begun on edge by care
f
ully low
-
er ing wood onto blade.
3/8

of an inch from
edge.

Biirt Murphy photo


added assembly. Soon after a piece has
been glued and joined, the glue forms a
skin and begins to harden. At this crucial
sta
g
e if the piece

is mishandled enough to
break t his s kin and s eparat e t he glued
pieces slightly, the two separated surfaces
of glue will form individual skins and thus
destroy the glue's ability to bond For best
results, surfaces to be glued should be well
squared (use a
large square to check this)
and glued pieces should be given sufficient
time to dry before working with them fur
-
ther Check the instructions on the glue
container for required drying time.

When assembling with glue, it is im
-
portant to apply instant pressu
re to the two
j
oined pieces as soon as the glued surfaces
have been brought together. Screws should
be fastened immediately to effect this pres
-
sure and, where necessary, clamps should
be brought into play. An inexpensive sys
-
tem of clamping down a large a
rea without
going to the expense of buying dozens ot
clamps, is to make the simple wedge clamps
shown in the photos. These are made of 2
-
inch thick hardwood and function very
efficiently by means of small wooden
wedges forced under them.

To use the wedge c
lamp, slip it over the

freshly glued and joined pieces, then force
a pair of small wooden wedges under the
upper iaw, driving the wedges in from op
-
posite sides until the desired pressure is
brought to bear on the glued pieces. Do
not force the wedges in
too much or the
clamp may break. The correct amount o
f

pressure is reached when glue begins to
squeeze out of the joint. To protect the
surface of the wood from injury, slip a
s heet of heavy cardboard bet ween t he
clamp jaw and the good surface, and drive
t
he wedges only on t he underside ot t he

P1

Having glued and joined all T's and L's,
the next step is to assemble these joined
sections together to complete the basic
shape of the piece. It is best to do this
without glue at first, assembling the entire
unit

with screws alone. Then, when it is
together in good order and you are satisfied
that nothing is out of line, take it apart,
clean and sand all the pieces to prepare
them for
fi
nishing, and reassemble the unit
again, this time permanently with glue.
Thoug
h this method imposes some extra
time and effort on your part, it makes the
sanding operation easier and better, and
reassembly goes fast and accurate with

13

Hurt Murphy photo above

For r abbet cut into edge, set blade to depth and

mar k limits of
blade's cut onto table; use square.

For r abbet cut in sur face, set blade to depth and
mar k limit of blade's cut on tape on saw f ence.


Af t er assembly chisel is being used to clean out
corner where rabbet ends in back edges of unit top.

Edward De
Lung photo

Angle iron should be placed flush with back edge
f or added support, when no cabinet back is used.


everyt hing fit t ing back int o place like a
glove.

Furniture, in order to have good lines
and smooth working drawers and doors,
must be squared u
p during assembly before
letting the glue
-
joined sections dry. In
many cases, a large square will serve to
check the accuracy of smaller joined sec
-
tions. On larger cabinets with big rec
-
tangular compartments, you can check for
squareness by measuring diag
onally across
the compartment opening from corner to
corner. Note this measurement and then
measure the opposite crossing diagonal in
the same manner. If the cabinet is square,
t he t wo meas urements will be t he s ame.
If the measurements differ, the piece is

not
square. To make it square, apply pressure

on the corner that has the longer measure
-
ment until the cabinet has been forced into
a square shape and both diagonal meas
-
urements are the same.

Having squared the cabinet, it is a good
idea to tack the b
ack panel on next before
making any doors or drawers, or doing any
furt her work. The back panel will s erve
to hold the cabinet in shape while adding
the rest of the features and, if necessary, it
can be removed temporarily whenever it
interferes with work
to be done.

Some pieces shown in this book have
rabbets or grooves that do not run the full
length of the wood from edge to edge. These
rabbets start at a point inside from one
edge, and end before they reach the oppo
-
site edge. To make such limited in
side

14





rabbets or grooves on a circular saw, use
the method shown in the photos. First raise
the saw blade to a height equal to the depth
of the rabbet desired. (If a groove is being
cut, a dado saw blade is used.) Next, with
the fence set at the proper

distance from
the blade, use a square to mark vertical
lines on the fence, one line indicating where
t he out s ide arc of t he s aw blade firs t
emerges above the table and starts to cut,
and the other line pointing to where the
inside arc of the blade descend
s below the
table and the cutting ceases. For cutting a
groove, these lines are the only ones needed
on the table saw, but for cutting a rabbet
a similar set of lines should be drawn hori
-
zontally across the table surface to indi
-
cate these same limits of
the saw cut.

Next, mark two short lines across the top
of the wood directly over the points where
the groove or rabbet underneath is to begin
and end. Then, without turning on the saw,
lay the wood over the blade and flush
against the fence, back it up unt
il the for
-
ward line on the wood is lined up with the
outside line on the fence, and put a clamp
on the fence at a point where it will hold
the wood in this position and not let it slip
back. Now, turn the saw on, back the wood
against the clamp stop, hold
ing it at an
angle above the spinning saw blade, and
then carefully lower it down on the blade
until it is lying flat on the table top. Im
-
mediat ely advance t he wood along t he
fence until the rear line on the wood comes
into line with the rear line on the
fence.
Then stop and remove the wood. If a rabbet
is being cut, turn the wood on end and re
-
peat the operation, this time using the guide

lines on the table surface to start and stop
the cut.

To finish the groove or rabbet, use a nar
-
row chisel to square
up the ends of the
grooves which were left in an arc by the
saw blade.

With the advent of custom
-
made legs.
modern furniture making has been given
a big lift. Wrought iron legs simplify con
-
struction considerably and add a decorative
modern flavor to the p
iece. The best type
of wrought iron leg to use is the type where
the leg is welded to a right
-
angle base plate
containing the screw holes. This kind is
sturdier, easier to line up when mounting,
and will hold better.

The newest trend in modern furniture is

the use of turned hardwood legs with brass
tips. These legs are available in a variety
of woods, and come equipped with mount
-
ing plates and allow you to mount the legs
either on a slant or straight

both methods
are desirable for modern appearance. The
le
ngths that these legs are available in
range from 4 to 28 inches (the last is used
for dining room tables). These ready
-
made
legs are excellent for the hobbyist because
they save him the good
-
sized problem of
turning legs, making aprons, etc. The price
is
approximately the same as for wrought
-
iron legs.

For appearance's sake, wrought iron or
brass
-
tipped wood legs should not be
mounted too close to the edge of the furni
-
ture. A good rule is to mount a leg so that
the foot sets back under the table edge ap
-
p
roximately 2 inches for every foot of table
height. Thus, if the table is
3

feet high, the
feet would set back about 6 inches. •


To miter small wood moldings, it is best to use
a fine
-
toothed backsaw and simple wood miter
box.

For decorative cutou
ts, start with drill to fit
shape of inside curves: 1
-
inch drill is used here.


Burt Murphy photo above

1.5


Weldwood Flexible Wood
-
Trim is sold in
8
-
f oot r olls, packed in a handy container.

Old, time
-
consuming methods of trimming
plywood edges are out;
now a flexible wood trim does the job without fuss or trouble.

HERE PLYWOOD is used for the
main construction of a piece of furni
-
ture, the problem of concealing the unat
-
tractive plywood edges can be handled
either by covering it

with solid wood trim,
or with U. S. Plywood Corporation's new
Weldwood Flexible Wood
-
Trim.

Both methods have their advantages. The
flexible Wood
-
Trim is available in ma
-
hogany, oak, walnut, birch and Korina to
match the most popular plywood faces. The
ven
eer is only 1/58 inch thick, and is
mounted on a latex
-
impregnated paper
backing. Wood
-
Trim can be cut easily with
scissors, knife or razor blade and fastened
with any high
-
quality glue or other wood
adhesive. In the projects featured in this
book, Weldwoo
d Contact Cement was used.
No heat or clamping is required, and its
quality of immediate bonding allows a

quick follow
-
up sanding of the piece for
fast construction.

Other advantages are that no machine
cutting is required, and no time
-
consuming

mit er joint s mus t be made. The t rim
matches the plywood surfaces, unlike solid
wood trim which is cut from a different part
of the tree than the plywood veneer and
therefore rarely matches the rest of the
piece. Further, the flexibility of the Wood
-
Trim a
llows it to be bent to almost any
desired shape; it can almost be tied into
knots without cracking. This makes it de
-
sirable for curved edges.

Solid wood trim has distinct advantages
of its own. Where a piece is expected to
receive much abuse, solid trim i
s to be
preferred. And if slight moldings are de
-
sired on the furniture, even a
1/
4
-
inch thick
trim can be shaped to provide the decora
-

16



W

Photos by Milton Sa
l
amon unless otherwise noted



Contact cement
or

other high
-
quality adhesive is
used for b
onding; apply to both the trim and wood.

When contact cement is dry, roll on trim slowly;
allow some over lap at end when cutting the trim.

for plywood edges

Photo by Burt Murphy

Above, if r oller isn't handy, t r y
using wood scrap to pressure trim
down:
or

hammer lightly on scrap.

17


Lef t, i
f

roller is available it is ex
-
cellent means of pressing tape down
f
irmly for a reliable
and lasting bond.



"Break" trim overhang with piece of scrap wood
by rubbing the wood back and forth alter bending
the trim
over the edge. Don't use knife or razor.

Wardrobe
-
chest of drawers project shown below
had edges trimmed with Wood
-
Trim. Result is an
almost undetectable edge difference after finish.

All photos on right by Lou Hochman



Edge overhang (see photo o
n facing page) is then
removed easily by filing. Corners will be lightly
sanded. Wood
-
Trim takes all finishes handsomely.

Mark edge trim for mitered corner by tacking it
down with ends overlapped, drawing diagonal be
-
tween outside, inside comers; make

miter cuts.


Next, miter cut made on the edge t rim is t r ued
up t o the guide line by sanding off t he sur plus
wit h a disk sander, f or a perfectly square edge.

tive effect Another preferred use of solid
wood trim is where the top edges of furni
-
ture a
re to be rounded off.

The best way to apply this solid wood
edge trim is to use at least
1/
4
-
inch thick
solid wood and cut the strips slightly wider
than the thickness of the plywood being
t rimmed. Us e glue and s mall brads t o
attach the strips and let a na
rrow margin
of the strips jut out beyond the edge of the
plywood. This margin is later trimmed
down with a small plane and sandpapered.

To make neat mitered corner joints, other
than 45 degrees, tack the trim strips down
t emporarily wit h one cros s ed over t
he
other. Make sure that they are accurately
positioned along the plywood edge, then
with a straightedge mark a diagonal line
from outside corner to inside corner on the
top strip where it crosses the bottom strip.
Now, remove this top strip, cut away the
excess wood at a point just outside the
diagonal line, then sand the mitered edge
down to the line on a disk sander.

Next, tack this piece back on the ply
-
wood edge with the tack nails going back
into the same holes they made before. The
mitered edge will
then rest on top of the
crossing trim strip and should be used as
a straightedge to mark the diagonal cut
-
ting line on the second piece. Remove the
second piece of trim and cut and sand the
miter edge. Using glue and nails, set the
t rim back permanent ly in

place. •

Excess projecting trim is planed down flush with
surface to produce a neat, even edge; sanding is
next; counter sink br ads with nail set, add putty.

19





toy
-
bin desk for two

It's a twin desk, a long worktable,
a roomy toy chest

and its two
shelf
and drawer units can serve as night
tables next to a bed on each side.

Photo; by Milton Salamon
unless otherwiie
noted


NLIKE THE USUAL toy box or desk,
this versatile combination solves at
least four of children's furniture
problems.
First of a
ll, the toy chest beneath
the hinged
lids is a deep, roomy area
where a long
time accumulation of odds
-
and
-
ends can
be stored

the newer, much
used toys on
top, the older but cherished
ones at the
bottom.

The wide work surface allows two chil
-
dren to play a
t once, each on an identical
half so that there's no squabble over pref
-
erence. The end t able units each contain


U

a drawer and adjustable shelf for neat stor
-
age of toys and "work."

The overall unit is 5 feet long, 16 inches
deep and 26 inches high. The to
p can be
covered with plastic laminate, as the one
shown, or finished in wood, depending on
the room decor and intended use. Instruc
-
tions follow for both methods.

For the model shown here,
3/4
-
inch
thick
birch Weldwood plywood was used,
and
the top was co
vered with Micarta
plastic
laminate.

One sheet of
3/4
-
inch by 4x8
-
foot ply
-
wood will suffice for most of the pieces
needed for this project. Cut out all pieces
as shown in the drawings, and mark them
with letters for easy identificat ion.

After cutting two
side pieces (C) to
3/4x15x251/4

inches, rabbet the back
edges
1/4

inch deep by
3/8

inch wide.
Make similar
rabbets on t he back edge of
hinge s t rip
(Bl) and the back edges of
both top ends
(A). When cut t ing rabbets
in t ops (A).

stop the cuts 1
3/8

inches f
rom the outside
edge but let the cut run through the inside
edge.

Aft er cut t ing part it ion panels (Cl) t o
a dimension of
3/4
xl4
3/4
x25
1/
4 inches,
mount
3/4
-
inch hardwood drawer runners,
meas
uring
1/
2 inches wide by 13
3/4

inches
long,
to the inside surfaces
of all four
pieces (C)
and (Cl). Locate these runners
3
1/4

inches
in from and parallel with the
top edges.
Use glue and 2
-
inch No. 8
flathead screws,
and when mounting be
sure to keep the drawer runners exactly
3/4

inch from the
front edges of these
pieces
.

Parallel with and
2
1/2
,

inches in from the
bottom edge of pieces (C) and (Cl), bore
four equally spaced
3/16
-
inch holes; coun
-
tersink on the outside for flathead screws.
Start the holes
3/4

inch in from the outside
edges.

On the inside surfaces of (C) an
d (Cl),
draw lines
1
7
/
8

and 2
5/8

inches from and
parallel with the bottom edges. These are


2
\

ALL PARTS FROM 3/4" X 4 FT. X 8 FT. PLYWOOD

On sides and partitions (C, Cl),
3
1/4

inches
from
lop edge, glue and screw down the drawer
runners.

guide lines

for mounting plywood floors
(G). Note that to avoid error it is best to
keep one side (C) paired with a partition
(Cl) until assembled.

On the top surface of both tops (A), 1
3/8

inches from and parallel wit h t he s ide
edges, bore four equally spaced
1/2
-
in
ch
holes,
5/16

inch deep; then
3/16
-
inch
holes all the way through the center of
these. Start the holes
3/4

inch from the
back edge and
1
3/4

inches from the front
edge.

On the outside surface of both partitions
(Cl), mark off
11/2

inches from the front
edg
e at the top, and 6 inches from the back
edge at the bottom. This is to establish the
outside guide line for mounting knee wall
(F). Position piece (F) against these lines
and mark t he exact height and t he angle
of top and bottom edges.

When knee wall (F)
has been cut and
fitted, mount
3/4
xl
-
inch hardwood cleats
to
its inside surface, flush with the side
edges;
the cleats must be
3/4

inch shorter
than the height of (F), and the top ends
should be rounded. Bore
3/16
-
inch holes
about 5 inches
apart along adja
cent sides
of each cleat;
start 1 inch from the ends,
and countersink
for flathead screws. Use
glue and 1
1/2
-
inch
No. 8 flathead screws
for mounting.

Assemble the end tables, making sure
t hat s ides (C) are t he out s ide pieces of
both tables. Note that parti
tions (Cl) are
1
/4 inch narrower and have no rabbets at the
back.

Use the drawer fronts to brace the cabi
-
net on one end when assembling side (C)
to plywood floor (G). Use glue and
11/4
-
inch No. 8 flathead screws for this assem
-
bly. Now turn the assembly u
pside down
and place partition (Cl) onto it.

Mount top (A) to the cabinet with glue
and l
1/4
-
inch No. 8 flathead screws.
During
t he cabinet as s embly, hold
bot t om (G)
flush in the back with the
rabbet of side
(C) and the back edge of
(Cl); hold the
back e
dge of (A) flush
with (C) and (Cl)
in the same way. Square
up both cabinets,
making sure the sides
are straight
-

Set the
end table cabinets
aside to let the glue dry.

Make a mounting strip of
3/4
x2x32
-
inch
scrap plywood or solid wood and glue it to
t he bot
t om of hinge s trip (Bl); us e 1
1/4
-
Lnch No. 8 flathead screws also. This strip
must not extend more than 1 inch beyond
(Bl) on each end. Drill a
3/16
-
inch hole
through the extended ends and countersink
for flathead screws.

Plane the front edges of th
e cabinets

22



When knee wall (F) has been cut and fitted, mount
3/
4xl
-
inch hardwood cleats to the inside sur
-
face, flush with the aide edges. Top end o
f

each cleat is rounded, and cleats must be
3/4

inch
shorter than piece (F). Countersunk holes

are drilled every
5

inches; mount with glue and screws


Assemble the end table cabinets by joining side
(CS, partition (CD. top (A) and bottom piece (G).

When mounting top (A), use drawer front piece for
spacer. Assemble with glue, 1
1/4
-
inch No.
8
screws.

Top photo at right, iecond f rom
top
at lef t by Edward DeLonq

flush at the sides and bottoms, then cover
all edges with matching Weldwood Wood
-
Trim (use Weldwood Contact Cement for
this). File down the excess trim.

Turn each cabinet ups ide down a
nd
chis el t he upper out s ide corner of t he
rabbet square, as shown in the photographs.
Mount knee wall (F) to one of the cabinets,
lining it up along the guide lines. Check
t hat t he t op and bottom edges are flus h.

Place both cabinets upside down and
paralle
l, about 30 inches apart. Then mount
hinge strip (Bl) in place to bind the cabi
-
net s; hold flush in t he back during t his
step. Use glue and l
1/4
-
inch No. 8 flathead
screws. Now mount knee wall (F) to the
second cabinet, again lining it up with the
guide li
ne.

Wit h t he cabinet s s t ill ups ide down,
fasten
3/4
-
inch square cleats 2
1/
4 inches
from and parallel with the bottom edges;
these will support the toy bin floor. Be
-
cause of the angle at which wall (F) is
mounted, the long cleat that is glued to the
inside

of (F) must also be planed to an
angle so that its top surface will be parallel
to the ground. Although a supporting cleat
is glued to the plywood back panel, cleats
on (Cl) and (F) will adequately s upport
the toy bin floor.

Fasten a
3/4
-
inch thick matchi
ng solid
wood base t rim (2
5/8

inches wide). St art
by cutting the end of the first piece of trim
to an angle, then butt it against the knee
wall (F)

which has no base trim

and
miter the trim around each end table. The

Square up both cabinets; diagonal measu
rement is
good check (see construction techniques chapter).

Mounting strip is glued, screwed to hinge strip
( Bl). Strip end overhang shouldn't exceed 1 inch.




With the cabinet back up, chisel out the rabbet
in the upper outside corner so that it is square.

Mount knee wall (F) to the right c
abinet, follow
-
ing guide lines. Make sure edges are flush.

25


If

unit is to have wood rather
than laminate top finish, cover
front edges with Wood
-
Trim.
Refer to chapter Wood Trim for
Plywood Edges. Photo below
shows how excess trim is re
-
moved by filing, not by cutting.


Lef t above, mounting str ip attached t o hinge st r ip ( Bl) is f ast ened t o t ops ( A), t o join cabinet s.
Knee wall (F) fastens to le
f
t cabinet (center photo) thr ough cleats, in sam
e manner as r ight cabinet.
Jointer is set up at angle {right photo) to cut long bottom cleat on (F) to proper mounting angle.

top edge of the base trim can be either
rounded or chamfered
1/2

inch as shown in
the photographs.

Turn t he cabine
t right s ide up and fit
and mount the toy bin bottom, made from
1/4
-
inch plywood. Then place the cabinet
front down, and mount the
1/4
-
inch ply
-
wood back, using
3/4
-
inch head nails.

Fit both hinged covers (B) in place,
leaving about A inch between them, be
fore
fastening on the Wood
-
Trim. Both covers
(B) must be exactly the same size. Attach
a
3/16
-
inch (single dimension) piano
hinge
onto each lid (B); then re
-
fit and
tempo
rarily mount bot h pieces (B) in
place.
After seeing that the lids mount on
per
fectly
, number them, take them off,
and cover the edges with Wood
-
Trim.
How
ever, note that if the top is to be
covered
wit h plas t ic laminat e, do not
mount t he
lids yet and do not cover the
edges with
Wood
-
Trim until the laminate
has been
applied; see the chapte
r on
applying plastic
laminate.

Mount the lids (B)

if a wood finish is
being used

and fill the
1/2
-
inch holes in
tops (A) with matching long
-
grain wood
plugs, using glue, as described in the chap
-
ter on construction techniques.

Shelves for the end tables a
re optional,
and so is the manner in which they are
mounted. It is advisable to use
3
/4
-
inch
thick matching plywood if possible, and
cover the front edge of the shelves with
matching Wood
-
Trim. Metal brackets are
available for shelf mounting; these can be
placed in any pair of a series of holes so
that the shelf height is readily adjustable.
However, a
3/4
-
inch square matching
wood
cleat on side (C) and partition (Cl)
will
suffice.

The next s t ep is building t he drawers.
If you make the drawer sides
1/
2
inch

thick,
rabbet t he drawer front s
3/8

inch deep
by
1/2

inch wide. If you use
3/4
-
inch thick
sides,
make the rabbets
3/4

inch wide. Try
drawer

front s (D) for fit, and number t hem for
left and right cabinets. Next, fit the drawer
sides, then the backs.

Mark
the drawer sides in pairs, for the
top edge and bottom. Cut a
1/
4
-
inch square
dado for the drawer bottom on the inside
of the drawer sides,
1/2

inch from the bot
-
tom edge. Then place the sides on the in
-
side surface of drawer front (D), holding
them flush
on the top. Mark the position of
the dadoed groove onto the drawer front,
and then channel out this groove, too. Note
that the distance from the top of the dadoed
groove to the top edge of the drawer sides
is the height of the drawer backs. Cut these


26




Mount cleats on line with long cleat on ( F). Toy
bin f loor of
1/
4
-
inch plywood rests on the
cleats.

Standard baseboard is bevel
-
cut. Miter all cor
-
ner s of base trim; top edges can be r ounded off.





Left after mounting first piece of

base t rim t o
part it ions (CD, count ersink all t he nail heads.

Bel ow i s a compl et e back view of the unit before
plywood back is mount ed wit h

3/
4 inch head nails.

Gl ue a sup p o r t st r ip t o pl ywo od back, so
as t o add rigidit y t o bot t om of t
oy bin.

27

Fill all
1/2
-
inch holes with matching long
-
grain
wood plugs as described in chapter on
construction
techniques. When glue is dry,
chisel off excess.

backs to size accordingly for a perfect fit.

After cutting rabbets in the front for the
dr
awer sides, assemble the drawers with
glue and 4d finishing nails or
11/4
-
inch No.
6
flathead wood screws. Square up and
straighten the drawers, just as you did
previously with the end tables. Fit the
1/
4
-
inch plywood drawer bottom, insert it in
the dadoed

groove and fasten it to the back
with
3/4
-
inch head nails.

Bevel the back edges of the drawer as
shown in the photograph, bottom of page.
Then fit the drawer into the cabinet. If
either drawer is too loose, place ordinary
thumbtacks on the inside of the c
abinet
sides, 1 inch from the front edge and near
the drawer runner. If the fit is too tight,
plane down any drawer excess and sand
smooth. Use paraffin freely wherever there
is contact between drawer and cabinet.

For matching
1/2
-
inch solid wood, cut a
3
3
/4
-
inch wide back strip (E), the same
lengt h as t he ent ire unit t op. Cut bot h
ends of this back wall to an angle as shown
in the drawings and photographs. Mount
the strip with glue and
11/
4
-
inch No. 8
flat
-
head screws spaced about 8 inches
apart.

Sand all
parts well both before and after
assembly. The cabinet is now ready to be
finished. The one shown here was stained
wit h Early American maple s t ain (one
coat) and then wiped. After 24 hours it was
painted with Satinlac (two coats, 6 hours
apart).

If you wis
h to cover the top with plastic
laminate, as was done with this unit, refer
to the chapter on this subject. •

Drawer bottom is inserted into l
/4
-
inch dado groove
in sides and front, and fastened with 3
/
4
-
Inch
head nails to drawer back. Square drawer first
.

Angle
-
cut the back edges of drawer to a bevel and
then sand. Then fit the drawer into cabinet See
text above for instructions on obtaining a good fit.



Piano hinge is attached to each cover lid
(B). and then screwed to top only after
fit of lids is sure, and plastic laminate
and Wood
-
Trim have been added to the lids.

Shelves are optional. Made from
3/4
-
lnch

plywood to match rest of cabinet, front
edges should be covered with trim. Mount
with metal brackets or square wood cleats.

2
9



Back strip the length of entire top
is cut from
½
inch solid wood,
33/4

Inches wide, with ends ang
led as in
photo at right. Glue and screw to top.


Gaily colored clown makes sliding twice as much fun. You can vary design to suit the children.

happy clown sl
ide

Even the smallest toddler is safe in this gently sloped and
splinter
-
free slide. And it's unique as a lawn decoration.

HIS UNUSUAL, decorat ive s lide will prove it s elf us eful eit her
indoors or out, and

unlike mos t ready
-
made s lides

is s afe for
the
l
ittle tots of four and under.

Built from
3/4
-
inch Duraply, the sensational material developed
by the plywood industry, this slide is waterproof and fireproof. You
can
leave it outdoors without any worries of its being damaged by heat,
rain,
snow or frost.

The clown slide measures 8 feet at its longest part and 4 feet at its

30

Photos by Edward DeLong and Warren Bender


T



Clamp both sheets oi Duraply together, mark off
4
-
inch squares on top and lay out clown outline.

To save time and have a perfect

match, cut out
both sides at once; move the clamps as necessary.

Both clown sides are still clamped together and
edges are sanded thoroughly; then unclamp sides.

highest. Two 4x8
-
foot sheets of
3/4
-
inch
Duraply (for both sides) plus a 16
-
inch
wide by 7
-
f
oot long slice of
3/8
-
inch Dura
-
ply (for main slide) will cover the major
part of the materials.

To successfully and evenly cut out both
clowns, place the two
3/4
-
inch' sheets of
Duraply on top of each other and hold them
together with three or four clamps
. Now,
because you are working with a big sur
-
face, make the layouts right on the plywood
surface. Use a soft pencil in order not to
scratch the material. Mark 4
-
inch squares
on the entire surface of the top sheet. Next,
mark the clown, following the graph

lay
-
out. Then cut out the clown as shown. Be
-
fore taking the clowns apart, sand all edges
well.

From leftover pieces of the
3/4
-
inch
Duraply, make the four steps, the top plat
-
form, and t he 8
-
inch wide reinforcing
block. Each of these parts is to be 16 in
ches
long.

From
3/4
x
3/4
-
inch s olid wood, cut
about
a 6
-
foot length for cleats. From this
length, cut eight pieces
5
1/2

inches long
and two
pieces 9 inches long. Round off
one end of each cleat as shown in the
drawing. Place the cleats together and
mark the
m
for drilling as shown in the
drawing. Bore
3/16

inch holes on the
marks. Countersink for flathead screws on
one side, after hold
ing t he cleat s in pairs
for t his operat ion.

Mount the cleats on the bottom surface
of the four lower steps and the top "plat
-
form" s t ep, flus h wit h t he ends (s hort
edges). Use waterproof Weldwood glue
and l
1/4
-
inch No. 10 flat head s crews.

Attach the steps and platform to the in
-
side surface of one clown side. Start the
first step 9 inches from bottom and
11/2
.
inches from back,
parallel with the straight
edge of the clown's shoe. Do not use glue.
Next, use a template made from scrap (see
drawing), to place the other steps and the
platform in the right positions. This is done
by holding the 5
1/2
-
inch wide end of the
template flush

to the already mounted step,
with the cut
-
out corner on the top of the
template facing in. Fit the corner of the
next step to be mounted into this cut
-
out,
attach the step to the clown side, and con
-
tinue like this all the way up.

Cut from s olid wood t wo
3/4
xl
1/2
-
inch
cleats, each 7 feet long. Fit one of
them to
the top platform,
5/8

inch below
the top
surface of the platform, letting
the cleat
run down to a point 8
5/8

inches
from the
bottom and about 2 inches from
the front. Draw a line along it. Now, cut

the cleat to
a 76
-
inch length and round off
the end
nearest the bottom, in the same
manner as

32





33


Three
-
quarter
-
inch square mounting cleats tha
t

go under steps are rounded off on one end only.

To maintain uniform holes, cleats are marked to
-
get
her prior to boring pilot holes In the sides.

Two or three 3/16
-
inch holes are drilled in the
cleats for attaching to steps (see detail drawing).

Mount cleats onto bottom of steps, holding round
end of cleat toward f ront and f lush with edg
es.

Top edges of steps (including lop platform) are
rounded and sanded, to about
1/4

inch round.

the step cleats. Trace the outline of this
cleat onto the other cleat. Keeping both
cleats together, bore
3/16
-
inch holes
along
the wider sid
e, about 5 inches apart
and starting 1 inch from the end.
Countersink
on oppos it e s ides for
flat head s crews.
Mount the first cleat in
place, using water
proof glue and No. 10
screws. Outline the
steps and platform on
the sides.

Take all the steps and the p
latform off
again. Round off the top edges of the plat
-
form and steps to
1/4

inch round. Then,
mount the steps and platform to the inside
of the other clown side, repeating the pro
-
cedure already described. Mount the other
long 3
/
4x1
1/2
-
inch cleat in place
, as done
previously. NOTE: If you do not intend
ever to disassemble the slide, use Weld
-
wood glue, starting with the assembly de
-
scribed in this paragraph.

With the first clown side on the ground,
place the completed side
-
and
-
step assem
-
bly over it, setti
ng the steps and platform
in place. Brace t he bot t om part s (t he
clown's face) with a 16
-
inch long wood
s t rip between t he s ides. Put t he s crews
back in t heir original holes and t ight en.
On the 7
-
foot,
3/8
xl6
-
inch Duraply main
-
slide piece, bore
3/16
-
inch hol
es 5 inches
apart,
3/8

inch in from and parallel wit h
the long edges, and countersink for flat
-
head screws. Fit one end of this slide to
the top platform, using a bevel square to
check for correct angle. Round off the edge
of the other (bottom) end. Mount
the ply
-
wood strip in place, using l
1/4
-
inch No. 10
flathead screws.

While the slide is still lying to one side,
mount the 8
-
inch wide reinforcing block
on a right angle, 9 inches from the finger
-
t ip of t he clown's hand, bet ween bot h
clowns' sides. Use thr
ee 1
1/2
-
inch No. 8
flathead screws through the outside.

Stand the clown slide right side up and
finish assembling. Round all edges. •






Starting 9 inches from bottom of clown profile,
st eps are mounted to side with help of wood jig.

Mount
the slide cleat in place, wit h the top end
cut to fit snugly against platform: use glue, screws.


When steps and cleats are in place, second clown Main Duiaply slide, with holes already drilled,
side is attached; brace block is used near fac
e. is scr ewed down; f it carefully at top platform.


Place 8
-
inch wide brace on r ight angle and flush Fasten brace block in place with three
1/
2
-
inch
with
bottom edge, 9 inches from clown's fingertip. No. 8 flathead screws t
hrough side of the clown.

35


36

Photo abov e by Hal Kelly; all others by Milton Salomon

The young lady of the house is entitled to her private area for
party primping and childhood efforts to "look like mother."

INCE VANITY

a pride and pleas ure in he
r own appearance
-
plays an important part in every little girl's life, this simple and
modern vanity table is a must in your daughter's room. It will give the
little lady a feeling of importance, as well as making her mother feel
proud and pleased. As for f
ather . . . well, turning out this table will be
a pleasure in itself. It's a wonderful project for beginners, and shouldn't
take more than one weekend.

One
-
half sheet of plywood and the few small essentials shown in
the material list will do the job. Cut
out all plywood parts as illustrated
in the plywood layout drawing, and mark all pieces as shown. Next,
plane all edges smooth.

Cover the end edges of the table top (A) with matching Weldwood
Wood
-
Trim, using Weldwood Contact Cement. Bore four equally
spac
ed
1/2
-
inch holes
5/16

inch deep, located
3/8

inch from and
parallel with the left end edge of (A). Bore four similar holes
3/8

inch
from the


S



On e
-
h al f i n ch h o l es fo r wo o d p l u g s
ar
e b o r ed 5/1 6 Th en 3/1 6
-
i n ch h o l es ar e d r i l l ed t h r o u g h cen t er

i n ch d eep i n t o t o p o f d r awer
-
cas e t o p p i ece ( D). o f
1/2
-
l n ch h o l es, al l t h e way t h r o u g h,
f
o r s cr ews.

37



bottom edge of cabinet side panels (B). In
both cases start holes
3/4

inch in from the
front and back edges. Now bore
3/16
-
inch
holes all
t he way t hrough t he cent er of
these

1/2
-
inch holes.

Repeat this operation by boring holes
3/8

inch from and parallel with the left,
right
and back edges of drawer case top
(D), and with the bottom edges of both
drawer case
sides (E). Then bore three
holes
(the same
kind as done previously)
on top (A), 15
5/8

inches from and parallel
with the left edge,
and square with the
back edge. Start the

first of these three holes
3/4

inch from the
back; the second one 4
1/
4 inches more
t oward t he front; and t he t hir
d anot her
41/4

inches forward.

Bore
3/16
-
inch holes all the way
through
drawer case bottom (F),
3/8

inch
from and parallel to the back edge, and
countersink
all holes on the bottom surface
for flathead
screws.

Now assemble both cabinet sides (B) to
base (C
), using glue and l
1/
4
-
inch No. 8
flathead screws. Hold the bottom edges of
(B) flush with the bottom surface of (C),


Cabinet sides (B) are joined to base (C) with glue
and
11/4
-
inch No. 8
f
tathead screws; square
up.

Drawer case sides (E) are similar
ly fastened to
bottom (F): keep parts flush on bottom and back.


Check drawer case back for fit before mounting Complete the drawer enclosure by mounting top
top (D). It's important that all edges are flush. (D) onto sides. Draw
er case must be made square.


39

square up as necessary, and set the pieces
aside to let the glue dry.

As s emble t he drawer cas e by firs t
mounting both drawer c
ase sides (E) to
bottom (F), using glue and l
1/
4
-
inch No. 8
flathead screws, keeping all parts flush on
the bottom and back. After checking the
fit of the back, mount the top (D), keeping
the sides flush. Mount the back of the
drawer case, holding it flush

in the back.
Plane all front edges flush and cover them
with Wood
-
Trim, and file the trim flush.
Fill all
1/2
-
inch holes with long
-
grain plugs
(see the chapter on construction tech
-
niques ), and s et t he as s embly as ide.

Table top (A) is now assembled onto
a
lready assembled parts (B) and (C). Use
glue and 1
1/4
-
inch No. 8 flathead screws,
square up the assembly, and fill all
1/2
-
inch
holes wit h long
-
grain plugs. Plane
all
front edges flush and cover them with
Wood
-
Trim.

Next s t ep is t o make t he drawer. Firs t
f
it drawer front (G) into the case so as to
leave a heavy
1/16
-
inch margin all
around.
Then check the
1/2
-

or
3/4
-
inch
thick (same
as drawer front) solid wood
sides for fit, and mark them both at the
same time. On drawer front (G) and both
sides, dado a
1/
4
-
inch square channel for
the drawer bot
t om,
1/2

inch from t he
bot t om of t hes e
pieces. Cut the drawer
back piece to the
same length as the front
(G) less the thick
nes s of bot h drawer
s ides. Then rabbet
both ends of front (G)
3/8

inch deep; the
width of th
e rabbet is
determined by the thickness of the sides.

Assemble the drawer, using glue and 3d
finishing nails. Square the drawer up and
refit as necessary, making sure the drawer
is straight. After covering the top edges of
the drawer front with Wood
-
Trim,
attach a
drawer knob in the center of the drawer
front.

Mount the drawer case onto top (A),
holding the case flush on the left side and
back, and fasten it with four l
1/4
-
inch No.
8 flathead screws through the bottom of
(A)
after boring
3/16
-
inch countersu
nk
holes in
(A). Do not use glue, and sand
the top
surface of (A) well before
permanently
mounting the case.

Make the mirror frame from Ix2
-
inch
matching solid wood. Bore two
1/2
-
inch
holes, followed by
3/16
-
inch holes in the
cen
ter of these as done for p
revious
assemblies,
in each end of the side
members,
3/8

inch
from the end.
Assemble the frame with
glue and l
1/
4
-
inch No. 8 flathead screws,
and square
and straighten the frame if
necessary.
Plane the edges flush and cover the front
with
1/4
-
inch plywood,

using glue
and
3/4
-
inch head nails. In order to conceal


To begin drawer assembly, glue and nail sides
Into the tabbets (see above) in drawer front (G).


the
1/
4
-
inch plywood edges, a
1/
4
-
inch deep
by
3/8
-
inch wide rabbet will have t o be
cut in the f
ront edges before assembling.
Bore three
3/16
-
inch
holes through the
bottom strip of the frame, and another
3/16
-
inch hole through the side member that
mounts against the drawer case. This lat
ter
hole is located 2 inches from the bottom
edge of the side.
Countersink the holes for
flathead screws. When the frame has been
fitted correctly, take it off again and have
a
1/
4
-
inch polished
-
edge mirror fitted onto
it. Use two metal clips on the top and one
on each side to fasten the
mirror.
But do
not attach the
mirror before mounting the
frame

and hold off on mounting the frame
until the legs have been attached.


40


In drawer part layout below, front (G) is at the
left, dadoed drawer sides are at top and bottom.

Drawer back is glued and nailed between sides,
keeping
1/4
-
inch channel for drawer bottom clear.

Square
method

up drawer fay
is describe
d in

measuring diagonally;
chapter on techniques.




Refit drawer into enclosure to
straight, then insert bottom into

check that it's Table top (A) is mounted on assembly (B
-
C) with
1/4
-
inch dadoes. glue and sc
rews. Then fill boles with wood plugs.




Turn the vanity table upside down for
mounting the legs. Preferably use ready
-
turned, brass
-
tipped legs with slanted
steel
-
plate mounts. For the lower part of
the cabinet, mount on 9
-
inch legs located 4
inc
hes from the front and back and 7 inches
in from the outside. (These measurements
indicate the location of the centerpoint of
each leg.) Aft er t he 9
-
inch legs are
mounted, measure the height of the legs
plus the cabinet, up to the bottom surface
of table t
op (A): this will give the length
of the longer two legs.

Since the standard 28
-
inch leg is too long
for your use, cut it down as follows: Re
-
move the screwpin from the legs, cut off
as much from the top of each leg as neces
-

Holding drawer case flush on
le
f
t side and
back, fasten it to top (A) with screws from the
bottom.




Assemble mirror frame made from Ix 2
-
inch match
-
ing solid wood; use glue, screws (see
drawings).

sary, bore new pilot holes and replace the
pins. Attach the steel mounting plates
di
agonally, locating the legs 4 inches from
the front and back and 7 inches from the
right side.

Now mount on the mirror frame and sand
the entire table. (Remember that all parts
are always sanded before assembly.) At
-
tach the mirror in place.
Note:
No cabin
et
back was used in the project photographed
here, but one can easily be mounted by
cutting
1/
4X
3/8
-
inch rabbets in pieces
(B),
(C) and part of (A), before
as s embly. •

42





Fill boles with
1/2
-
inch long
-
grain wood plugs
of
matching wood. Chisel an
d sand down excess
plug.

Plywood backing.
1/4

inch thick. Is then glued and
nailed to mirror fra
m
e front with
3/4
-
inch nails.




Edges of mirror frame are sanded smooth and even.
Polished
-
edge mirror will be cut to fit the frame.

Fasten fram
e to tap (A) to check for perfect fit
prior to having mirror cut, then remount frame.




Tapered brass
-
tipped legs are attached be
f
ore
frame is, are set at angle and located 7 inches in.

Coat of white F
ir
rzite followed by two coats
of
Satinlac and final wax rub completes the
project.






modern night stand

There's a bonus for your efforts when you turn out a piece
of handsome furniture that you can "borrow" from the children
for your own occasional use

like this modern night table.

Ph
otos by Edward DeLong

4
4



PIECE OF DO
-
EVERYTHING furni
-
ture, this versatile night stand will find
frequent use as an occasional table

and is
equally desirable for Junior's room, or
Susie's, or even the oldsters'.

Some of its features are plenty o
f storage
space, clean lines that harmonize with a
wide variety of furniture styles, and sim
-
plicity of construction. To give the night
stand a "youngish" appearance, Nakora
plywood

which is similar to ash

would
be an excellent and inexpensive choice.

The
job requires one 4x4
-
foot piece of

3/4
-
inch plywood (s ee t he mat erial lis t ).
Cut out all pieces from it as indicated in the
cutting diagram.

After cutting the pieces, on each of the
two sides (A) draw lines on the outside
surface parallel to and
3/8

inch
in from the
back edge and the bottom edge. Make a
mark on these lines 1
1/4

inches from each
end, and two more equally spaced between.
Bore
1/2
-
inch holes on these marks,
5/16

inch
deep; then bore
3/16
-
inch holes in
the center
of these holes, all the way
th
rough. On the same surface, bore three
holes along a line

45


A



On each side o
f

platform shelf (D), make
3/4
-
inch
cut 13
3/4

inches long. 4'
1/
2 inches from the front
edge. Cabinet sides (A) will fit into the cuts.
Culling dimensions for plywood parts are s
hown in
diagram below; letters key up with those on
drawing on preceding page and in material list.

ALL PARTS FROM ONE 3/4" X 4" X 4'PANEL
OF WELDWOOD OR NAKORA PLYWOOD

L2

________

°

________

<
-
L


For decorat
ive top ledge, bore 1
-
inch holes
1/2

inch deep in top of piece (C), prefer
-
ably before mounting top (C) on cabinet.

parallel to and 4
1/8

inches from the top edge.
Locate the holes
2
1/2

inches,
71/2

inches,
and
13 inches from the back edge. Bore
the
holes in the same manner as you did
the
previous ones.

On the better surface of back panel (B),
mark a line parallel to and
4
1/8

inches from
the top edge. Bore four holes along this
line, 1
1/
4 inches in from each end with the
two remaining holes spaced equ
ally be
-
t ween; again, t hes e are
1/
2
-
inch holes
5/16

inch deep, followed by
3/16
-
inch holes
all the
way through.

Bore s imilar
1/2
-

and
3/16
-
inch holes
on
the better surface of central platform
(D),
locating them
3/8

inch in from each
short
side edge at the
wider front portion;
there
are two holes on each side, 1 inch
from the
back and front of the wider
portion of (D).

Assemble back (B) and sides (A), using
11/
4
-
inch No. 8 flathead screws and
glue.

47



Alter cut shown on the opposite page is carefully
made, cut off th
e
3/4
-
inch strip with back saw.

Platform shelf (D) is fastened to cabinet sides
(A), then the bottom (E) is attached with screws.

Attach recessed front spacer on CD), then mount
3/4
-
inch square drawer runners snug against sides.



To assemble drawer, attach sides
into rabbet
in
drawer
front (F), using
glue, 1
-
inch No. 6
screws,
-
add drawer back and Insert bottom. Check fit of drawer in cabinet before
mounting
lop (C)
in
place.

Make sure the edges of (A) are flush with
the outside surface of back (B). Then put
platform shel
f (D) between sides (A) and
fasten with
11/
4
-
inch No. 8 flathead
screws
after gluing.

Fasten bottom (E) to the completed as
-
s embly wit h glue and l
1/4
-
inch No. 8
s crews. The bottom edges of (A) s hould
be flush with (E).

On the outside surface of table top (
C),
draw lines parallel to and
3/8

inch in from
the shorter side edges, and mark for holes
along this line: two holes
11/
4 inches from
the front and back, and two spaced equally
between those. Similarly, mark for four
holes
3/8

inch in from the back
-

edge,

with
the end screws located 2 inches from
the
end and the others spaced between.
All holes are to be
1/2

inch diameter,
5/16

inch
deep, with
3/16
-
inch holes
drilled all the way
through the center of
these.

Mount a
3/4
x2xl5
1/
4
-
inch recessed
spacer
onto pla
tform shelf (D), 5
1/
4
inches from
the front edge, with the cutout
edge facing
t he front. Then fas t en
3/4
-
inch s quare
drawer slides snug against
the sides and
s pacer, us ing glue and
nails.

Now attach table top (C) to the above
assembly with glue and l
1/
4
-
in
ch No. 8 flat
-
head screws. Make sure that all edges are
flus h wit h t he cabinet. Cover all edges
with matching Weldwood Wood
-
Trim; use
Weldwood Contact Cement for this.

Fill all bored holes in the cabinet with
1/
2
-
inch long
-
grain wood plugs (as dis
-
cussed i
n the chapter on construction tech
-
niques) , using glue. When the glue is dry,
plane and sand the plugs flush and, at the
same time, sand the entire cabinet well.

Turn the cabinet upside down and mount

four 14
-
inch ready
-
turned bras s
-
t ipped
legs to the bo
ttom, 4 inches from the out
-
side.

The next construction step is to make the
drawer. Rabbet out both ends of drawer
front (F) to
3/8
x
1/2

inch. Then channel
out
a groove for the
1/
4
-
inch plywood
drawer
bottom, locating the groove
3/8

inch from
the bottom: ed
ge, on the inside.
Repeat this
for drawer s ides (I). Bore
1/8
-
inch holes
and countersink for
flathead screws.

To assemble the drawers, mount the sides
into the rabbets of the drawer front and
place the back of the drawer between the
sides, holding them flu
sh in the back. All
top edges must be flush also. Fasten with
glue and 1
-
inch No. 6 flat head s crews.
Next, slide the drawer bottom in through
the back and nail it on with a few
3/4
-
inch
head nails. Sand all drawer parts both
be
fore and after assembly.

Fit

t he drawer int o t he night s t and. If
it is too loose, place ordinary thumbtacks
on the inside of sides (A), near the front.
If it is too tight, plane or sand off the high
spots. In either case, place large amounts
of paraffin on the inside of the table and

drawer runners.

If you wish to add the decorative top
piece (T), cut out t he piece as s hown in
the plywood cutting diagram. On the bot
-
t om s urface of (T), draw four equally
spaced lines parallel with the ends, starting
2
1/2

inches from each end. Transfer
the
lines to the top surface of top (C), against
the back edge. On these lines, 1
3/4

inches
from the back edge of top (C), bore 1
-
inch
holes
1/2

inch deep. Repeat t his in t he
center of the lines on the bottom surface
of piece (T).

48


Cut four pieces
of 1
-
inch diameter dowel
(preferably of matching hardwood); make
each piece 4 inches long. Then cover all
edges of piece (T) with matching Wood
-
Trim, using contact cement. Sand piece
(T) and t op (C).

Glue dowels into the holes in piece (T)
and then mount t
he assembly to top (C),
making sure that the dowels are straight.

Refer to the chapter on painting and
finishing for various methods of treating
t he complet ed night s t and. •


Left, all

1/2
-
inch holes over screw heads
are
filled with long
-
grain wood plugs
.
Chisel
off excess plug and then sand down
Hush.

Decorative top ledge, with hardwood dowels
in place, is mounted after cabinet has been
sanded. Holes in ledge and (C) must match.

Bottom photo, tapered brass
-
tipped legs are
mounted 4 inches from outside ed
ges. Buy
type whose mounts allow legs to slant out.




desk 'n' shelves

A
k
indergarten
-
to
-
college unit that is both simple and inexpensive to
make, the desk
‘n’

shelves offers multiple use in a minimum of space.

50


TORAGE SPACE and a work desk area
are the two most pressing
requirements for childhood activity. Here is a way to combine them
both, in an inexpensive and space
-
saving unit that retains its utility
from
kindergarten to college.

As a suggestion, this project can be made from either clear or

knotty
solid pine or plywood, and then painted.

To begin, cut out desk top (A) from
3/4
-
inch thick plywood. Bore
three equally spaced
1/
2
-
inch holes 5/16 inch deep,
3/8

inch from the left
end; then drill 3/16
-
inch holes in the center of the
1/2
-
inch holes
, all the
way through. Start the end holes 1 inch from the front and back of (A).

Cut out desk side (C) and s ide facing s trip (D) from Ixl2
-
inch

Photos by Edward DeLong


S

Opposite page. Bill Baker's son Cary finds shelves just
r
ight for hi
s toys; sister sneaked a doll in.


Desk top (A) is cut out for ledge {B). Note that Nail lacing strip (D) to desk side (C), using
only four pieces in unit are made of plywood. glue and 6d finishing nails or flathead

screws.


Base t rim for desk and shelf units ar e miter cut;
use standard
1/2
zx3
-
inch baseboard (6
-
foot
length).

solid wood; (C) measures 9
1/4
x28
1
/4 inches,
and (D) 2
1/2
x28
1/4

inches. Fas t en (D)
t o
(C) with glue and 6d finishing nails or
11/
4
-
inch No.

8 flathead screws. If nails