COSC 356-001: Network Security Syllabus

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Nov 3, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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1

COSC
356
-
001
:
Network Security

Syllabus




Instructor:

Dr. Waleed Farag


Semester:

Fall

200
6

Lec
tures:


T
/
Th

8
:
00

A
M
-

9
:
30

A
M



Room

Str
3
3
1
/
2
20


Phone:

(724)357
-
7995


Office:


33
8

Stright Hall

E
-
mail:

farag@iu
p.edu

Web Site:

www.people.iup.edu/farag


Office Hours:

Monday

4:30 PM
-

5:30 PM

Tuesday

9:30 AM
-

11:30 AM

Thursday

9:30 AM
-

11:30 AM


I. Course Description

COSC
356



Network Security

Credits: 3.00
Lecture: 3.00

Pre
-
requisites:
COSC 3
16

or COSC/IFMG 352
.


II. Course Objectives

The main goal of this course is to provide
students

with a fundamental understanding of
network security principles and implementation.

Students
will learn about the
techno
logies used and principles involved in creating a secure computer networking
environment.
Students

will learn about the authentication, the types of attacks and
malicious code that may be used against your network, the threats and countermeasures
for e
-
mai
l, Web applications, remote access, and file and print services. A variety of
security topologies are discussed as well as technologies and concepts used for providing
secure communications channels, secure internetworking devices, and network medium.
Furt
her,
Students

will learn about intrusion detection systems, firewalls, and physical
security concepts. In addition, security policies, disaster recovery, and computer
forensics are covered. Aside from learning the technologies involved in security,
stude
nts
will get to understand the daily tasks involved with managing and
troubleshooting those technologies. You will have a variety of hands
-
on and case project
assignments that reinforce the con
cepts you read in each chapter.


III. Web Site

Supplementary in
formation for the course is available at

www.people.iup.edu/farag
.
The
S
ite contains class notes, PowerPoint slides, class announcements, course syllabus,
projects and assignment statements, important

dates,

and ot
her information related to the
course.



2

IV
. Required Textbook
:

Mark Ciampa, “
Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals

,

2
nd

Edition

Course Technology Incorporated, 200
5
, ISBN

0
-
619
-
21566
-
6”.

V
.
Suggested

Course Outline

Week

Topics

Chapter
R
eadings

Projects

Exams

Week 1

Information Security
Fundamentals

Chapter 1




Week 2

Attackers and Their
Attacks

Chapter 2


Chapter 1 & 2

Due Week 2


Week 3

Security Basics


Chapter 3



Week 4

Security Baseline


Chapter 4

Chapters 3 & 4

Due Week 4


Wee
k 5

Securing the Network
Infrastructure

Chapter 5



Exam I

Week 5

Week 6

Securing the Network
Infrastructure/Web
Security

Chapters 5

and
6

Chapters 5 & 6

Due Week 6


Week 7

Protecting Advanced
Communications

Chapter 7



Week 8

Scrambling Through
Cryptog
raphy

Chapter 8


Chapters 7 & 8

Due Week 8


Week 9

Using and Managing
Keys

Chapter 9



Week 10

Operational Security

Chapter 10

Chapters 9and
10

Due Week 10

Exam II

Week 10

Week 11

Operational Security /
policies and procedures

Chapters 10 &
11



Week 1
2

Policies and Procedures

Chapter11



Week 13

Security Management

Chapter 12

Chapters
11 and
12

Due Week 12


Week 14

Advanced Security and
beyond

Chapters 13



Week 15

Review (if time permit)



Final
Exam

Week 15



3

V
I
. Evaluation Methods

1.

Only work assi
gned by and submitted to the instructor of record will count
toward the final grade in this course.

2.

Grading Scale: The standard grading scale will be used:

90%+ = A;

80
-
89% = B;

70
-
79% = C;

60
-
69% = D;

<60% = F.

3.

Approximate

Point Distribution:



50% of the g
rade is based on three exams
.
All exams
are cumulative and may
be given in a multiple choice
or

short essay forma
t.



3
0% of the grade is based on completing the end of chapter case
/security

project assignments.



10% of the grade is based o
n class participati
on and attendance
.



1
0% of the grade is based on keeping a project notebook. Students are asked to
obtain a small notebook or to use a lab notebook and keep notes on the results
of the hands
-
on projects at the end of each chapter in the text. The notes sho
uld
include comments that you can use once the class is over to help describe
results of the hands
-
on
-
projects. Include any helpful tips or advice that you
might use in the future.

4.

Exam conflicts will be dealt with individually.
No late submission will be
accepted except if it is associated with a valid documented excuse
. On
-
time
work is usually graded before late work, which means that late work carries the
added penalty of not being as helpful to your learning. All exams are closed
-
book
ones.

5.

Electronic v
ersions of all assignments must be submitted too. Instructions on
how to submit your work electronically will be supplied in the class
.



V
I
I. Academic Conduct.


Computing technology presents unique opportunities for inappropriate academic conduct,
for exa
mple, copying things from the Web and submitting it as your own work or hiring a
ghost
-
writer. These and other unethical and/or illegal acts will be penalized by loss of
points and/or grades, plus any other penalties allowed in IUP policy. Because these
be
haviors are uniquely harmful to the goals of the course and the university, we must deal
with them in ways that may seem uniquely harsh to you. If you are concerned about
anything that happens in this course relative to possible charges of academic miscond
uct,
contact me immediately and in writing.

E
-
mail is uniquely well suited to immediate
contact that can be used as a formal record if there is a possibility that you may be
accused or implicated in academic misconduct.


4

VI
I
I. People who will help you lear
n.


The best way to contact me outside of class is through E
-
mail To:
farag@iup.edu
. You
may check my
office hours
listed in this syllabus

too
.
If you want to see me at another
time, you may make an appointment through

e
-
mail or by phoning me. If you need
technical help, please access appropriate help first

by emailing
student
-
helpdesk@iup.edu
. When you come to my office for help, bring as much current hard
cop
ies

with yo
u as you can.
I

encourage you to learn from each other. Talk with fellow
students, but be careful that you do not get or give too much help on assignments.
Inspecting each other's plans is
a
good professional behavior; submitting someone else's
work as you
rs
is a

serious form of academic misconduct. Email me and annotate anything
that I may construe as improper academic conduct.


Note: I may attempt to make one or
more projects a two person effort. Timely, professional effort is especially critical when
you

work together. I hope that you will help each other learn more than you annoy each
other; I usually observe a little of both.

IX. Attendance.

According to university policy, you are responsible for all class activities, including,
exams, and handouts. An
y class absence jeopardizes your chance to benefit from this
course and achieve a good grade. This course relies heavily on lecture
s, labs,
and
classroom interactions. Make arrangements with a classmate to share notes and pick up
handouts if you are not in

class. In accordance with official IUP policy, I hereby state that
I reserve the right to reduce your grade for class absence according to IUP guidelines. A
ll

absences are harmful to your participation in this class. If you miss 2 classes in a row or
more

than 3 classes for any reason,
2%
will be deducted for any additional missed class.
If you have urgent circumstances, please let me know in advance (whenever possible).
Do not miss class
es
!

Th
is is the best way to avoid
fall
ing

behind!