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sploshtribeSoftware and s/w Development

Dec 14, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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ii


Contents

Table of Contents

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ii

Table of Figures
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iii

Introduction

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1

Methodology

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3

Survey

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3

Faculty Intervi
ews

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4

Outside Research

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4

Results

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5

Faculty Interest and Availability

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5

Faculty interest
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5

Faculty availability/experience

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5

Student Interest and Device Ownerships [Graph for each subsection to be included once
survey is 100% complete]

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6

Student Interest in GiM

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6

Student Interest in Mobile Platforms

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6

Student
-
Device Ownerships

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...

6

Cost

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6

Device Cost and Service Subscription Cost

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7

Developer License Cost

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7

Lab Fees

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8

TEXTBOOKS
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8

iOS

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8

Android

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...

8

Blackberry
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8

Discussion
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9

Student Interest

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9

Faculty Interest

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9

Cost

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10

Recommendation and Conclusions

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11

Appendix

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12

Appendix A


Mobile Development Survey

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12

Appendix B


Typical Interview Questions

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14

Works Cited

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15





iii

Figures

Table 1


Minimum Cost for Phones

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6

Table 2


Minimum Cost for Tablets

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7


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1


Chapter 1

Introduction

The Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering (CSE)
, as one of the
departments of School of Engineering &

Applied Science has a mission to provide high
-
quality undergraduate and graduate education in fields of computing.
In the past, CSE
department has introduced Java, Network Security, and Mobile Application Development
and demonstrated its capability to ada
pt to the

fluid demand for skilled professionals in
the IT industry. In the previous year, corporations such as EA Games and companies such
as Big Fish Games have shown great interest in the mobile platform. The lack of and
thirst
for games on mobile platf
orm had

propelled

this study to
assist

the CSE department
in determining

the possibility to create a course for developing games in mobile
platform(s)

(GiM)
.

Initially, we have intended to study feasibility for development on four platforms:
Android, iOS,
Blackberry, and Windows Mobile.
Due to the lack of student interest in
Blackberry and Windows Mobile platforms evident i
n Chapter 3, we have since then

focused our attention to Android and iOS platfo
rms. Based on the interviews we

gathered,
we
determined
the following

alternatives worth considering:



Keep the current course list.

This alternative suggests no new mobile gaming
course will be added



New course on Android game development.
This alternative suggests creation
of a course, which includes mandatory

topics including introduction to Android
game design,
and Android
SDK, 2D and 3D graphics, sound effects,
networking,
and an optional topic of using Accelerometer.



New course on iOS game development.
This
alternative suggests creation of a
course, which i
ncludes mandatory topics including introduction to
game design,
iOS SDK, 2D and 3D graphics, sound effects,
networking,
and optional topics
including use of Accelerometer and Gyro.



New course on iOS and Android game development.
This alternative suggests
c
reation of a course covering both of them. It includes introduction to Android,
Android
, game design,

and iOS SDK, 2D and 3D graphics, networking, and
sound effects.

In this report, we discuss the research and conclusions on the three alternatives. The CSE

department chair, Dr. Kiper, had concerns on the best learning objective for the course,
faculty interest
, faculty availability
, and cost. As a result, we have based our evaluations
on the following criteria:



Knowledge

and Interest

of faculties
.

One of
the essential elements of a course is
to have an instructor to teach it. Do we have an instructor available to teach a
particular course alternative?


2



Initial and Ongoing Costs
.

The subscription fee makes can be substantial; the
initial cost may be of conce
rn as well.
Could the department afford to teach a
particular course alternative?



Student Interest
.

A course can be approved but may not be practically feasible
due to lack of student interest. How many students are expected to attend a
particular course alternative?



Textbooks
.

Although textbook does not affect the feasibility of the course, it can
infl
uence the selection of the alternatives. Which alternative, if any, has a good
textbook to reference to?




3

Chapter 2

Methodology

Survey

As with the creation of any course at our university, we must be concerned with many
different factors.

Wi
th the distribution of an online survey, and a few paper surveys, we
hoped to capture the feeling among prospective students on a few of these factors that go
into course creation.

This included student interest, which looked at their preferences in many
different
aspects.

The survey asked the students to rate many different topics on a scale between
1
-
5 (5 being most interested).

These topics included collision detection, 2D graphics, 3D
graphics, accelerator use, mobile networking, Android development,

iPhone development,
and finally Blackberry development.

The topics were chosen based on topics covered in
potential text books and other courses offered at other universities.

Based on this section,
with the addition of the next section we will talk abo
ut, gave us a good baseline on what
to expect from students that would take this course if implemented.


The next part of the survey to be talked about is the courses taken and courses to be taken
portion.

This section of the survey gave us a good indicat
ion of student interest verses
how much programming experience potential students would have going into such a
course.

This is crucial to look at while exploring possibilities of prerequisites and
material to cover in a course.

If students won’t have tak
en Data Structures by the time
they would take this course then it would be useless to include that topic, or rather expect
the students to know that material for this course.

We were also interested to learn how
much programming non
-
computer science majo
rs would have in their college careers.

If
most non
-
computer science students would end up taking CSE174 but not CSE271 then
that would create cause to think more about the level of this course.

Maybe it should be a
200 level course instead of a 400 leve
l course if that is the case.


Another part of the survey asked the potential student if they have had any previous
experience developing for mobile devices.

This again, will help us better decide on the
type of material to include in the course.

If the
majority of students interested in the
course have already had experience developing for mobile devices then we can skips
some of the more elementary topics that may be associated with mobile development.


The final aspect of our student survey had to deal

with the maximum amount of extra fees
that they would be willing to pay.

This lab fee would help us better analyze costs
included in this type of course and whether or not students would be able to help
compensate some of this cost.


Appendix A
:

Full St
udent Survey


Link for online survey:

https://yechen.me/phpESP/public/survey.php?name=Mobile_Game_Development_Surve
y


4



Faculty Interviews

To gauge faculty interest and look at potential professors that could teach a mobile game
development course we decided to conduct faculty interviews.

These interviews were
designed to give us information on a wide array of topics that would need to be di
scussed
in the creation of this course.


The first item that needed to be decided upon was which faculty to interview.

This is one
of the most, if not the most, important aspects of this feasibility study.

Without faculty
support, or a professor to teac
h the course there would be no chance at getting this class
added.

So when deciding which professors to interview we decided to focus on
professors that had experience with game creation, graphics, or mobile
development.

Three main names came out of disc
ussion with each other and other
professors.

These professors were Dr. Zmuda, Dr. Bachmann, and Dr. Gannod.

Dr.
Zmuda was chosen because of his experience with graphics.

Dr. Bachmann was chosen
because of his experience with graphics, but also his invol
vement in CSE487 Game
Creation and Implementation.

Finally Dr. Gannod was chosen because of his
involvement in teaching the mobile development course this upcoming summer and
experience developing for mobile platforms.


After we had a good grasp on which
faculty we were to talk to, we could concentrate on
the questions that we would ask.

These questions covered a multitude of topics including
previous mobile development, topics that they would like to see in the course, lab fee
expenses, potential course
objectives, potential text resources, and finally if they
themselves were interested in teaching such a course.

We thought that these questions
would not only help us gauge faculty interest in mobile game development, but also aid
in knowing the type of o
utside research that we would need to do.

This would include
potential textbooks, realistic course objectives, and other aspects that we could learn from
other similar courses offered at other universities.



Appendix B

: Faculty interview



Outside Resea
rch

All the information necessary for course creation cannot be retrieved merely from student
surveys and faculty interviews.

In order to grasp the full magnitude of a course we
needed to look at other sources.

Syllabuses in mobile game development cours
es at other
universities would help us grasp what is needed, or has succeeded, at other places of
learning.

Purdue University and Central Connecticut State University both had existing
courses in mobile game development, so looking at their syllabuses pro
vided us with
essential information in a variety of areas.

The information that applied most to our
situation of looking at the feasibility of this course was potential textbooks, course
objectives, and course topics.


Textbooks used in these other course
s gave us a starting point in which books to
research.

Websites such as Amazon.com and Google Books allowed us to easily look at

5

the popularity and effectiveness of these potential books.


Another major aspect that needed to be addressed in outside resear
ch was the cost
associated with developing for mobile devices.

To look into this area we went to the
individual device websites that would be associated with the costs and looked at
subscription costs along with initial device costs.

All this of course,
was reliant on the
amount of devices needed for the course, which is discusses later on in this report.



Chapter 3

Results

We interviewed the three faculties of CSE department suggested by Dr. Kiper. We have
received mixed feelings about the new cou
rse. Based o
n these interviews, we find
convincing the committee to approve the course will be a challenge. However, we also
found some faculties
that
have interest and knowledge in teaching a GiM course.

We explored the costs and subscription alternatives

of the two platforms in regional and
national carriers, as well as developer subscription cost.
The findings of the costs are
explained in the next chapter, while the raw data of device cost, subscription fee, license
fee, and suggested lab fees are prese
nt in this chapter.

We surveyed the students and determined the student interest. From the […] students we
have surveyed, most of the students are interested in developing either Android or iOS
games, and are generally uninterested in developing Blackberry

games.


Faculty Interest and Availability

Faculty interest

We conducted three faculty interviews and have also talked with the department chair, Dr.
Jim Kiper. Dr. Kiper showed interest in the opportunity to see how it would play in with
the rest of the courses. Dr. Gannod said he would be interested in teaching a

course in
mobile game development and seemed excited about the idea of creating a mobile game
development course to add to the curriculum. Dr. Zmuda, who makes the final decision
on whether courses get approved or not, wasn’t as excited as we anticipated.



Faculty availability/experience

Dr. Zmuda hasn’t dealt with mobile game development like Dr. Gannod has. Dr. Gannod
has experience creating mobile applications on both iOS and Android platforms, and he
also supervised the creation of the Miami applicati
on for iOS. From Dr. Gannod’s
recommendation we also talked with Dr. Grace, a professor in the IMS department. Dr.
Grace has experience working with graphics and other game programming.


6

Student Interest and Device Ownerships

[Graph for each
subsection to b
e included once survey is 100% complete]

Student Interest

in GiM

From result of the […] students majoring in Computer Science, Software Engineering,
Engineering, and IMS we have surveyed, we have found there is a strong interest to learn
how to develop
mobile games. This is particularly true for the Computer Science,
Software Engineering, and IMS majors, as
[…] out of […] students in those majors have
shown interest in GiM.

Student Interest in Mobile Platforms

Over all students surveyed who owns Android

and has interest in developing mobile
games, they are generally interested in developing in both Android and iOS platforms.
Similarly, over all students surveyed who owns iOS devices, they also have shown
interest in both Android and iOS development. The
interest in developing in Android
platform is marginally larger than developing in iOS platform.

Student
-
Device Ownerships

Out of all students we have surveyed, more students own an iOS device than an Android
device ([%] vs [%]). In contrast, less than 15%

of the students own a blackberry device.


Cost

Unlike a typical course in the department, a GiM course may include device cost,
subscription cost, and developer license fee.
For the purpose of developing and testing a
mobile game using a Wi
-
Fi network, it

is superfluous to have voice, data, and texting
services. As a result, we have attempted to minimize the cost of voice, data, and texting
as much as possible while collecting the data.

Table

1 shows device and subscription costs

(with minimum plan requirement indicated
by the vendors)

for smartphones, and Table 2 shows device and subscription costs for
tablets.

Note the cost listed includes the current

Ohio Sales T
ax, which resulted the
numbers to be 6.25% higher than flat price
listed in the web offers.

Table
1



Minimum Cost for Phones

Minimum Cost for Phones

Carrier

Device

Version

Device Cost

Monthly Fee

2 year total

T
-
Mobile

Motoblur

2.3

$0.00

$85.00

$2,040.00

Cincinnati Bell

Vibrant

2.2

$212.49

$63.74

$1,742.23

AT&T

Phoenix

2.2

$53.11

$39.51

$1,001.46

AT&T

iPhone 4

N/A

$212.49

$55.45

$1,543.33

Verizon

iPhone4

N/A

$212.49

$74.35

$1,996.98

Verizon

Droid X

2.2

$159.36

$74.35

$1,943.85

Sprint

Epic

2.1

$159.36

$74.36

$1,944.11



7

Table
2



Minimum Cost for Tablets

Minimum Cost for Tablets

Carrier

Version

Device

Data

Device
Cost

Monthly
Fee

2 year total

N/A

3.0

Xoom

0 (Wi
-
fi)

$636.44

$0.00

$636.44

N/A

N/A

iPad2

0 (Wi
-
fi)

$530.19

$0.00

$530.19

N/A

2.2

Galaxy Tab

0 (Wi
-
fi)

$530.19

$0.00

$530.19

Sprint

2.2


Galaxy Tab

2GB

$212.49

$31.86

$977.23

Verizon

3.0

Xoom

1GB

$636.44

$21.25

$1,146.44

Verizon

2.2

Galaxy Tab

1GB

$158.31

$21.25

$668.31


Device Cost

and Service Subscription Cost

In general, smart phones devices are cheaper than tablet devices. However, essentially all
smartphone plans we have seen has some mechanism to ensure the customers must
activate a service plan before the device can use Wi
-
Fi network.
iPhone

devices sold in

United States are either locked to AT&T, or is using CDMA.

In either of the two cases,
the devices are not usable without activating them first with a service plan. There is also
an option to purchase an iPhone without a contract. However, the price of a
16GB iPhone
without subsidy from either vendor is $690.61 (tax included).

It is worth noting that
because iPhone has to be activated before use, either one
-
month
-
fee of $55.45(AT&T) or
$74.35(Verizon) has to be included in the calculation. This resulted a
minimum of
$746.06 for the device. “Nexus One” is an Android device that can be activated without a
service plan if purchased in some countries outside the United States. Such a device is
difficult to obtain. All other Android
smartphones

we have researche
d h
as to include a
service plan.

Tablet devices are generally not r
equired to have a service plan. One of the exceptions is
Galaxy Tab. The department may choose to purchase Galaxy Tab

(8.9)

in either Verizon
or Sprint at a reduced price, but that would l
ock the department into a 2
-
year contract.

An alternative to iOS tablet is an iPod touch. An iPod touch contains
gyroscope/accelerometer as well as
Wi
-
Fi connectivity. The price for an iPod touch
currently is $243.31.

Over

all students we have surveyed, ov
er 40% of the students
own

an iOS device, while
over 25% of the student
s owns an Android device. This may impact the number of
devices the department may need to acquire, which will be discussed in Chapter 4.

Developer License Cost

The department is alread
y paying an Apple Developer Subscription fee. No new
developer license cost is expected should this course orientate around iOS. The students
can also get simulator for Android for free, and simulator for iOS device for free, without
the need to pay a subs
cription fee. However, if the department wishes to use Android
Market feature, a
one
-
time

$25 fee has to be paid before the application can be published.


8

Lab Fees

Out of the interested students we have surveyed, over 60% of the students are willing to
pay
$10
-
$49

for the lab fee.


TEXTBOOKS

While researching we found textbooks that covered topics we wanted to include
in the course. All are relatively cheap compared to many other course books as they range
from free online
-
$35. Many books can be bought or do
wnloaded online for a lot cheaper
than paperback copies.



iOS

Based on our research of iOS platform based textbooks we found 3 suitable
textbooks to work with



“iPhone® Game Development” by Chris Craft and Jamey McElveen



“3D for iPhone® Apps with Blender a
nd SIO2” by Tony Mullen




“iPhone Game Development” by Paul Zirkle and Joe Hogue

Much of them cover similar topics where they progress from easier to more difficult. In
the three iOS platform textbooks they all cover accelerometer use, and all get into a
software development kit (SDK). The textbook “iPhone® Game Development” by Chris
Craft and Jamey McElveen seems to provide the most information and directs its focus
towards specific topics when compared with the other two books we researched. Its other
to
pics not covered in the other books are a game design aspect giving the reader 2D and
3D design implementation using OpenGL ES. It also discusses collision detection and
GPS. Networking as well is a needed aspect and the book mentioned above covers
specifi
cally P2P and H2H, while the other books do not have an explicit coverage. Like
the other books it also provides step
-
by
-
step instructions but with many examples to
allow a less experienced programmer to understand it better.



Android

As supported by our
research we came across several Android game
development textbooks, but found they were for advanced game programmers and would
not be suitable for an undergraduate program. A textbook that would be reasonable that
covered the Android platform was harder t
o find. We did; however, find one worth
looking into called “Beginning Android Games” by Mario Zechner, but it couldn’t
provide us with a lot of information, because it has not even been released yet. Dr.
Gannod does have a textbook on Android development
that he mentioned he likes very
much, and is a great book for beginning mobile development. The only setback is that it
is not a “game” development textbook.



Blackberry

We managed to locate a textbook for the blackberry platform that has many of the aspe
cts
that the iOS textbook had, except it does not include example problems. Without example

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problems the book could be hard to follow. From our survey results we don’t really see a
need for the blackberry book, because a small number of people were actuall
y interested
in working with a blackberry platform.

Chapter 4

Discussion

Student Interest

From the student survey we easily gathered that students interested in taking a mobile
game development course are far more interested in developing for Andro
id and iOS
rather than the other alternatives.


From the survey results it can be seen that the majority of engineering majors are not
interested in learning about mobile game development, where as a large majority of IMS
and computer science majors want t
o. The overall interest in the topics also drops
significantly when dealing with just engineering majors at about a 2.7 out of 5 to just
CSE and IMS majors, who are at about a 4.0 out of 5.

Faculty Interest

When proposing our project we met several times w
ith Dr. Kiper and he
explained to us the main points of creating a course and what was needed. In this process
he persuaded us that the course objectives and topics were a main concern when
approving courses, but that subject couldn’t even come into play u
ntil we had received
confirmation on interest in the course. Using the surveys we found student interest, yet
we were still missing faculty interest. Dr. Kiper gave us the impression the he was
interested in our idea and encouraged us to talk to other prof
essors and get their
professional opinions.




















Our first interview with Dr. Zmuda was discouraging, because he didn’t show as
much interest, which could have resulted from his lack of experience in developing
games or applications for a mob
ile device platform, even though he has taught game
courses. He stated that he would not like to teach the course, and said it would be a
challenge, because the department is trying to restrict course approvals to prevent classes
from having fewer than 8 s
tudents.












The second interview was conducted with Dr. Gannod. He provided us with the
most useful information from the faculty and also stated that he would be willing to teach
such a course. Dr. Gannod has the most experience out of the three pr
ofessors
interviewed, which could be the cause of his interest compared to Dr. Zmuda. From
Appendix B

the questions that we asked can be seen. Dr. Gannod has worked with both
iOS and Android platforms. He then shared with us that each topic except GPS use
was a
necessity when teaching a course. The course objectives would be very similar to any
other game development course with the only difference being the type of platform being
worked with. He also gave us a small insight into the cost and facilities fro
m the
department’s perspective; the cost of the course would be very minimal with enough

10

facilities to accommodate.












We were recommended by Dr. Gannod to speak with Dr. Grace, who is a
professor in the IMS department. [
Information

from what Dr. Grace said]


Cost

To

satisfy course objectives of any one of
the

alternatives, the department has no need to
purchase any additional device. How
ever, based on the data we
obtained from the survey,
about 50% of the students interested in
taking GiM class do not have an iOS device, and
more than 50% do not have an Android device. If the department were not distributing
devices to these students, there is a possibility that the grades will favor the students who
happen to own these devic
es.
The instructor may either require all students to use
simulators only, or distribute devices to the students in a manner that do not significantly
tilt the grade distribution purely based on personal preference and economical
background. The former is diff
icult to enforce, while the later requires the department to
lend devices out to the students.

With a pseudo
-
minimum class size of 8

students
, distributing smartphones

to 4 students
who do not have the device(s)
will require at least $4
,
005.84 in two years

for the Android
alternative, $6
,
173.32 in two years for the iOS alternative, and $10,179.16 in two years
for the combo alternative.

Due to the short support of Android devices, and the observed
four
-
year iOS support for iOS devices, we believe it is reas
onable to assume such a cost
wi
ll be renewed every four years. From what we have gathered in the interviews, the
chance of a class being approved with such cost is slim.

Based on results we have in the last chapter, we have three other alternatives for th
e iOS
alternative. A
n iPhone4 without a contra
ct costs $2,984.24. However,
this cost can be
applied only once as long as iPhone4 is
still a supported device, as the department may
choose to cancel the subscription after the first month. The iPod alternativ
e seems to be
most promising for the iOS alternative. It only includes a one
-
time cost of $973.24.
An
iPad2 also incurs a one
-
time fee only,

offers game development in a different screen and
allows students to utilize the faster processor, but costs twice
as much as an iPod.
Changing screen resolution is a typical problem addressed in any computer games, and it
is not particularly interesting for mobile devices. Also, if the students can run their games
in slower processors, they can sure run them in faster

processors. As a result, we
conclude iPod is a better device for the iOS alternative.

From the last chapter, we also have the tablet alternative for Android devices. The two
most affordable devices (over two years) are “Galaxy Tab” (Wi
-
Fi only), totaling
$2,120.76, and “Xoom” (Wi
-
Fi only), totaling $2,545
.76. The “Galaxy Tab” listed by the
vendors is the 7 inch 8.9 version. Xoom has a larger screen (10 inch) than the older
model of “Galaxy Tab”, and it includes a newer Android operating system (3.0) than
G
alaxy Tab 8.9 (2.2).

We recommend Galaxy Tab over Android due to the fact that 1) it
is the most affordable choice, and 2) Version 2.2 is more mainstream than 3.0.


11

In the last chapter, we have also gathered data including license fee and suggested lab fee.

Based on th
ose data, we think those costs are minimal and do not have an impact on the
feasibility of any of the alternatives we propose.

Conclusion: Because the possibility of the grade distribution become biased, we suggest
if a course were to be offere
d, the department should distribute devices to test the
programs after the testing is done in the simulations.
We conclude that over all three
alternative course plans, iOS alternative is the most affordable of all three, while the
combo alternative is the

least affordable. Based mostly on affordability, we chose iPod
Touch for the iOS alternative ($
973.24)
, and Galaxy Tab 8.9 for the Android alternative

($2,120.76)
. The combo alternative uses both of these devices

($3,094.00)
.


Chapter 5

Recommenda
tion

and Conclusions



After evaluating all the results and analyzing all of the discussion points we have come to
the conclusion that the best alternative to pursue is the course on iOS game development.
While there is interest from the students for d
eveloping for both Android and iOS it
would be hard to include both device’s topics in a semester long course. It is also less
costly ($973.24) for the iOS alternative than the Android alternative ($2120.76), or for a
combo package ($3094.00). The fact t
hat most students already have iOS devices also
weighed in on our decision because most students surveyed wanted to develop for their
own devices.

In conclusion we feel that our research covered the main areas needed for course creation
here at Miami
University in the computer science department. After gauging student
interest, faculty interest, and doing a great deal of outside research we feel we came to
reasonable recommendation.


12


Appendix

Appendix A



Mobile Development Survey


The purpose

of this survey is to properly gauge student interest in adding a course in
mobile game development. Our Technical Writing Group, under the guidance of Dr. Paul
Anderson, is working closely with Dr. Kiper and the CSE Department on looking at such
a possibi
lity. Please take some time to fill out this questionnaire. Thank You!


1. Do you have any experience creating mobile applications?


Yes


No

2. Which mobile device (if any) do you currently own? (Check all that apply)


None

Android

Blackberry


iPhone

Wi
ndows Mobile



Other: _____________

3. Would you be interested in learning how to develop mobile games?


Yes

No

4. How interested would you be in taking a Mobile Game Development course if it
includes the following topics?


Least Interested




Most Intere
sted

Collision
Detection





1

2

3

4

5

2D Graphics





1

2

3

4

5

3D Graphics





1

2

3

4

5

iPhone
accelerator use






13

1

2

3

4

5

Mobile
Networking





1

2

3

4

5

Android
Development





1

2

3

4

5

iOS development





1

2

3

4

5

Blackberry
Development





1

2

3

4

5


5. How much additional money (e.g.: lab fee) would you be willing to spend (maximum)
to take a Mobile Game Development course?


No extra

$10
-
$49


$50
-
$99


$100
-
$200


$200+

Questions 6
-
9 ask you to choose among some course
numbers. The following table
describes what those courses are.

Course Number

Course Title

CSE 174

Fundamentals of Programming

CSE 271

Object
-
Orientated Programming

CSE 274

Data Structures

CSE 251

Introduction to Game Programming

CSE 487

Game Design
and Implementation

IMS 211

Introduction to Game Studies

IMS 212

The Design of Play



14

6. What is your highest course in computer science that you have taken here at Miami?


None

CSE174

CSE271

CSE274

Higher

7. What do you
plan

your highest course in computer science will be here at Miami?


None

CSE174

CSE271

CSE274

Higher

8. Have you taken any courses in game creation? (Check all that apply)


No

CSE251

CSE487

IMS211

IMS212

9. What courses do you
plan

on taking in game creation? (Check all that apply)


No

CSE251

CSE487

IMS211

IMS212



10. Which of the following describes your major the best? (Check all that apply)


Computer Science

IMS

Engineering

Other

11. How many credit hours you have earned
so far? (Cumulative)


0
-
29

30
-
63

64
-
95

>95




Appendix B



Typical Interview Questions

Faculty Interview

Do you have experience developing for mobile devices? (Platforms)


-
iOS
-
Android
-
Blackberry
-
Windows Mobile



What topics do you feel should be
part of a mobile game development course?


-
2D
-
3D
-
Accelerometer use
-
Gps use
-
Collision Detection


-
Mobile Networking



What level of student do you feel this course would best apply to? (1st year, 2nd, etc)


-
1st year
-
2nd year
-
3rd year
-
4th year



-
Wo
uld you have a preference of what device development would occur on?


-
iOS
-
Android
-
Blackberry
-
Windows Mobile



-
What do you believe is a realistic lab fee for this type of course? (high end)


-
$0
-
$10
-
49
-
$50
-
99
-
$100
-
200
-
$200+



-
What kinds of course
objectives do you think this course could have?




-
Do you have any suggestions for resources (TextBooks or Websites) to use in this
course?



-
In your opinion would the CSE Department have facilities to accommodate this course?



-
Would you be interested
in teaching a mobile game development course?


15

References

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T
-
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-
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8b5a
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f026b9db5528

Verizon. (n.d.). Retrieved 4 16, 2011, from Verizon Wireless:
h
ttp://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/index.html

Zechner, M., & Taylor, R. (2011).
Beginning Android Games.

New York, NY: Springer
Science+Business Media.

Zirkle, P., & Hogue, J. (2010).
iPhone Game Development.

Sebastopol, Calif: O'Reilly
Media.