NGR6110 Syllabusx - Kellee Smith

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Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

1





C
HRISTINE
E. L
YNN
C
OLLEGE OF
N
URSING

COURSE SYLLABUS

Spring
20
1
2




COURSE NUMBER:

NGR
6110

00
2, 003, 004

(
22432 & 18985
)

COURSE

TITLE:

ADVANCED

PRACTICE

NURSING

GROUNDED

IN

CARING


COURSE FORMAT

Video Conference Live with Web Enhancement




CREDIT HOURS:

3 Credit Hours

C
OURE SCHEDULE

Thursday 0900
-
1150


PSL

MP114
, Boca
CEL CON
201




PLACEMENT IN



THE CURRICULUM:

Theory course in first semester of Masters
Program


PREREQUISITE:

None

COREQUISITE:

None




FACULTY:


Susan Mac Leod Dyess
, PhD, RN





Assistant Professor





Office: NU 3
28

Boca Raton Campus





Ph: (561) 297
-
3236





Email:
sdyess@fau.edu





OFFICE HOURS: Tuesday & Thursday
12
-
2

or


By appointment

live, on line or by phone







COURSE DESCRIPTION

A detailed examination of caring as the essential concept for nursing practice,
research, administration, and
education. Major contributions to an understanding of
caring from nursing as well as from humanities and science are surveyed. Emphasis
on conceptualizations in nursing and philosophical literature. Students will examine
the i
mplica
tions of caring in relat
ion to the use of multiple ways/patterns of knowing.


Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

2



COURSE
OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of NGR6110 the student will be able to:

1.

Explore and develop innovative images of advanced practice nursing.

a.

Analyze images of nurse and nursing over time that illuminate caring
and transcultural nursing.


2.

Advance the discipline of nursing through practice and research.

a.

Synthesize advanced knowledge of caring as a dynamic, relational, co
-
creative, transactional
and transcultural process that facilitates

choice
-
making of clients and significant others for well
-
being, health
and healing in health care and nursing situations.



3.

Demonstrate synthesis of advanced practice nursing role.

a.

Analyze expressions of caring i
n selected nursing roles from the
perspective of professional nursing
-
clinicians, advanced practitioners,
leader, administrator, researcher, and educator.


4.

Incorporate an understanding of wholeness of persons connected with others
and the environment throu
gh caring.


a.

Understanding caring is the intentional and authentic presence of the

nurse with another who is recognized as a person living and growing

in
caring.


5. Actualize advanced practice nursing as nurturing the wholeness of others

through caring.




a. Integrate the centrality of caring within the discipline of nursing from



the study of theoretical and research literature in nursing and related



fields(philosophy, theology, anthropology, sociology, and economics).




TEACHING

LEARNING

STRATEGIES


Teaching learning strategies include
video conference
presentations

that consider
nursing situation and
readings, collegial dialogue, focused learning modules, critical
analysis, development and presentation of aesthetic expr
essions of caring, and
enrichment activities.


GRADING AND
EVALUATION METHODS


COURSE ASSIGNMENT GRADE CALCULATION:

Assignment

Points

% of Total
Grade


Collegial Caring Dialogues

Throughout semester



24


24%



Reflection Paper

Due

January 26 2012 0900


15


15%


Scholarly Critical Analysis

Due

February 23 2012 0900


20


20%





Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

3



Scholarly Aesthetic
Appreciation:


Part 1: Explication Scholarly
Aesthetic Paper

Due

April 5




25




25%

Scholarly Aesthetic
Appreciation:


Part 2:

Aesthetic Project

Due

April 19




16




16%


Total Points Possible



100



100%

See specific guidelines for each element of evaluation.

**
Please note that a grade of B or above is required for progression in the
graduate program in Nursing.

GRADING SCALE:

Faculty retains
discretion for final grade determination.


Grade

Percentage



A


93
-

100 %





A
-

90
-

92

%





B+


87
-

89 %





B

83
-

86 %





B
-

80
-

82%



C+

7
7
-
79%



C

73
-
76 %




C
-

70
-
72%


D+

67
-
69%



D

63
-

66

%




D
-

60
-
62%



F


<59%



REQUIRED TEXTS:

Boykin, A., & Schoenhofer, S. O. (2001).
Nursing as caring: A model for
transforming

practice.

Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett. [ISBN# 0
-
7637
-
1643
-
x]

Mayeroff, M. (1970).
On caring.

New York: Ha
rper & Row. [ISBN# 0
-
06
-
092024
-
6]

Newman, M.A. (2008).
Transforming presence: The difference that nursing makes.
Philadelphia, PA: F.

A. Davis Co. [ISBN10
-
0
-
8036
-
1752
-
6].

RECOMMENDED TEXTS:

American Psychological Association (APA
) Manual of style
(6
th

ed
.).


Parker, M. et al (2010)
Nursing theories and nursing practice (3
rd

Ed)[ISBN
9780803621688}

Roach, S. (1992).
Caring: The human mode of being

(revised ed.). Ottawa, CA:
Canadian Hospital Association Press. [ISBN# 1
-
896151
-
44
-
2]

can acquire an online
link to
text free
-
details forthcoming

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
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4



TOPICAL OUTLINE
:


Dates 2012



Unit Theme

Readings

Assignments Due


% of Grade in unit



January 12 2012



Orientation

to
Course &
C
ommunity


F
OCUS ON
E
XPECTATION FOR
C
OURSE
&

G
RA
DUATE LEARNING
:

organization, computer
readiness, refining
academic language skills,
reviewing APA proficiency,
completing completing
Library data base search
tutorials, locating/ordering
required semester journal
articles


Goals for Self Due on or
before


January 19 @ 0
900



1%

Goals for Self



*

Goals for self
Earned
only

during the first week of the
semester.

Late or incomplete
preparation earns no points
.



January 19 2012


And


January 26 2012


U
NIT
1

Caring as
Foundational to
Nursing
-
Philosophy and
Knowing


Carper,1978

Brilowski & Wendler, 2005

Johns,
2004

Nagle
-
Bailey 2009

Newman, Sime & Corcoran,
1991

Newman, Smith, Pharris &
Jones, 2008

Sumner 2010

Text:

Mayeroff

Reflection Paper Due

On or before


January 26 2012

Submit to
sdyess@fau.edu

email
and SafeAssign



3% Caring Dialogue:

15% Reflective Paper



Participation is expected to
reflect
your readings
so they
must be completed early in
prior to
class
and

integrated
into
collegial discus
sions
.






February 2 2012

And

February 9 2012


U
NIT
2

Imaging Caring in
Nursing from
Various

Theoretical
Perspectives





Sumner & Danielson 2007


Texts:

Boykin and
Schoenhofer
,2001;


Newman
, 2008


Rec:

Roach or Watson


3% Caring Dialogue:


Scholarly Critical Analysis Paper
Topic Selected
, with articles

approved on or before February
9 2012 send to
sdyess@fau.edu

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

5






February 16 2012


And


February 23 2012



U
NIT
3

Caring in Nursing
Practice,
Administration,
Education, and
Research




Andershed & Olsson,2009

Boykin & Schoenhofer,
2001
a
;

Drumm & Chase, 2010

Paliadellis, Cruickshank, &
Sheridan, 2007;

Persky et al, 2008

Ray ,Turkel & Marino

2002;

Shirey, 2005;

Turkel, 2007

Watson, 2006;

Scholarly Critical
Analysis
Paper Due
on or
before February 23


Submit to
sdyess@fau.edu

email
and SafeAssign


3% Caring Dialogue:


20% Critical Analysis






March 1

no
live
class

BUT

ON line
dialogue
(1.5)


Spring Break
March 8
-
no class

No assignment


March 15,2012
-
live class

(2)



March
22
-
no
live
class

BUT

ON line dialogue

(1.5)



U
NIT
4

Caring in the real
world

Bondas, 2003

Boykin et al 2004

Boykin et al 2005

Dyess, Boykin & Rigg, 2010

Felgen, 2003

Longo,

2011

Mustard, 2002

Pipe, 2006

Roch, Dallaire, Roy &
Robinette 2005

Wesorick,2004





5% Caring Dialogue

Online Dialogue responses





March 29 2012


And April 5 2012




U
NIT
5

Appreciating
Expressions of
Scholarly Caring:

Aesthetic Knowing
in Nursing


Barry & Purnell, 2008

Finfgeld
-
Connett 2008

Fleck 2006

Holmes & Gregory,1998

Hemsley &Glass, 2008

Pearcy 2010

Ray
-
chapter 15

Turkel, 2003

Scholarly Aesthetic
Appreciation: Explication
and Expression

Part 1 Explication
:

Paper Due
on or before

April 5


3% Caring Dialogue:



25% Scholarly Paper


Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
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6



Submit to
sdyess@fau.edu

email
box and SafeAssign



April 12 2012
-


U
NIT
6

Global Caring

for Communities
and way of being
professional nurse


Bent 1999

Fleck,2006

Dyess &
Chase, 2010

Mlloch, 2001

Crigger, 1997

Johansson et al, 2006


3% Caring Dialogue

First entry due
by
November 10






April 19 2012


And


April 26 2012







U
NIT
7

Synthesis:

Honoring Growing
in Caring:
Envisioning the
Future.





Davila, Merrill, &

Baize,
2010

Hudacek, 2008

Sumner, 2008

Watson, 2006

Scholarly Aesthetic

Appreciation: Explication
and Expression

Part 2 Expression:

Project due

on or before


April 19

Submit to email and
present in class for
collegial discussion(April
19 & 26)

Ingathering and Self
-
Evaluation




3% Caring Dialogue

16% Scholarly Expression




COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:

Specific Guidance:

CLASS CARING DIALOGUES (24 Percentage Points)

Guidelines:

This course is designed around times of active and thoughtful participation in which
each one of us is both teacher and learner. Each class will be held in the context of a
caring community which will be nurtured by us all throughout the semester. Each
stu
dent is expected to actively participate in the on line discussion.



Dialogue

should be center around a specific topic and selected or discovered
readings. Dialogue is guided by multiple patterns of knowing as a framework
for ongoing discussion in which at
tentive relating with colleagues enhances
understanding.



Reflection

on nursing questions, resources, and shared knowledge inspires
insightful critical review and analysis.
Critical analysis

and integration of
assigned readings into dialogue is expected.
I
ntegration

of readings with
Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
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current practice facilitates personal and professional growing in the caring
process.



Reliance only upon PowerPoint and lecture notes
is insufficient

to assure
complexity of understanding and this will be reflected in your dialo
gical
entries and responses. The notes provided you are intended as contexts for
increasing dimensions of study.



S
ubstantial

comments or entries
within the two web enhanced classes will
comprise
the Caring Dialogues
for
each unit
. Verbal (live class) and w
ritten (
web
-
enhanced class) comments
are required as
minimum
.
These
must be
focus on
the
unique discussion of the Unit topic,
including citations to the
resources you used to

support your learning and understanding
. The
resources cited must be clearly
related to the topic and be from the required
or suggested readings or from other informative journals or books focused on
caring in nursing.

Merely saying that you agree does not constitute a
substantial entry. You will be graded for each Unit.

CARING DI
ALOGUES Evaluation Criteria:

One substantive
comment
for the unit focuses on
responding to the questions posed. This is where you
will express
depth of understanding
,
original
thinking,

enriched grammatically correct language;
connection and flow. Your e
ntry is supported

with
references

to the readings


3

points



Total points possible per unit = 3 x units

1, 2, 3, 5,6
& 7
=
18 points

5 points for unit 4 due to 2 online questions

Plus
one
additional for first week

goals
=
1

X
orientation unit
= 24


24 points


FOR PAPERS:

All formatting for submitted work should be APA 6
th

Edition Manual of Style, no
exceptions. This means correctly formatted in
-
text citations, and references page,
etc., as well as correct spelling, punctuation and grammar.
Each pa
per will be linked.
If necessary, obtain the services of a writing coach or seek the help of the Center for
Excellent in Writing in the Social Science building. The UCEW also offers online
assistance. Please note that
there will be no second attempts on pa
pers, so please
plan ahead and allow ample time to create your assignment, and to subsequently
review it before submission.

You will upload your paper for grading into the appropriate
email
sdyess@fau.edu

AND Safe Assign
by the date due. Your paper must consist of one file. (Do not
submit your title page or references page separately.

For the critical Analysis paper
Please also upload your main article used.


REFLECTION PAPER (15 points or 15 percentage
points
)

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
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The purpose of this assignment is twofold

1. It is intended to be a thoughtful caring expression reflecting upon a recent
nursing situation.

2. To provide a diagnostic writing sample

and determine a nursing practice
concept for consideration.

Overview of Assignment

The paper should be at least 2
-
3 pages in length, plus title page and reference page
if necessary, to reveal substantive sharing of a reflection upon a nursing situation.
The language of a paper should demonstrate efforts to develop
an understanding of
caring in professional nursing profession, and should be written in a grammatically
correct style. It is appropriate to use the subjective “I”; do not use objective
descriptors such as “the writer”

or the nurse
. You are sharing a story
from your
practice. The more

current the nursing situation,
the better.

End the reflection with a
focused practice concept that you will develop in subsequent work


The focus of your paper should be on
a practice concept that you would like to
explore,
depth of thought, openness to new dimensions of understanding and
creativity to your nursing practice, rather than a series of thoughts that are pondered
only briefly.


Evaluation:

The reflective paper will be evaluated for depth of reflective thought, r
ichness of
language, and growth in understanding. Each paper will be evaluated for:


1.

APA format, focus on topic, and adherence to instructions.

2.

Clearly written reflection of nursing situation that demonstrates quality of
reflective thought: depth, fl
ow and connections, content, richness,
complexity, and originality.

3.

Quality and richness of language, integration of growth in understanding, and

reflections that reveal growing in caring.





REFLECTION PAPER EVALUATION CRITERIA:


Nursing Situation

T
horough with richness to detail yet
concise written (1
-
1.5 p)



3 points



Situation Reflection

Describes author’s thoughts related to
what happened, emotions experienced,
professional growth related to caring and
written with a focus on the relevance of
new knowledge to personal
understanding of caring in advanced

7

points

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
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practice nursing (1


1.5 pp)


Clearly Identified Practice Concept


Format:

Correct APA format and
appropriate references (grammar,
punctuation, and formatting). Language
is appro
priate to required graduate level
writing skills.



4 points

CRITICAL ANALYSIS (20 percentage
points)

Guidelines:

The purpose of this assignment is twofold:

1.

To facilitate the wide exploration of literature on
concepts associated to
caring
in nursing focused on your practice
concept
interest
identified in your first paper.
Specialty areas
such a
s critical care, school nursing, community nursing,
administration, hospice, care of older adults, care of infants and children or any
other particular practice specialty

can be considered but within a particular concept
,
and

2.

To promote the necessary s
kill of critically analyzing important literature
relevant to caring for advanced practice nursing.

Overview of the Assignment:

You will be creating

a
scholarly analysis

of 2 or 3

authors’ substantive journal
articles

on caring directly related to a nursing (not medical) topic of interest in your
practice. One author (s)’s ideas will “anchor” your analysis. The remaining 1 or
author (s) will contribute to development of your analysis with comparison and
contrast of th
e subject. The main subject of each journal article chosen must be on
your topic of interest. You will analyze the substance that each paper contributes to
your topic in the main paper, and then compare and contrast them. You will
ultimately develop a subs
tantive, coherent understanding of the combined
knowledge on your topic gained. This will constitute your scholarly analysis.


Critical Analysis EVALUATION CRITERIA:


Title question and introduction

Must be obje
ctively written, relevant
,
linked to practice concept identified in
paper one

and succinct. (.5 page)



2 points



Main Article Analysis

Describes author’s purpose, main
themes, conclusions, integration of
caring. Well
-
organized, flowing,
objectively wr
itten. (1


1.5 pp)



4 points


Critical Analysis Discussion:


8 points

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
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10



Concept

analyzed objectively and relative
to other
another
author’s ideas
.

Paper is
well organized, shows evidence of critical
thought, smoothly link relevant readings
content. Analyzes and discusses
conceptual similarities, contrary views, or
expands meanings. Language is
scholarly, and appropriate to graduate
level work with s
ubstantive content and
expression of complex understandings.
(shoot for 2.5 pp )



Synthesis and Conclusion:

Relevance of new knowledge to personal
understanding of
your practice concept
and
caring in advanced practice nursing.
Findings related to the paper title~ was
your question posed answered?

(.5


1 page)



3 points

Format:

Correct APA format and
appropriate references (grammar,
punctuation, and formatting) enhances
and does not hinde
r understanding.
Language is formal and appropriate to
required graduate level writing skills.

*Note:

Incorrect APA and grammar may
also adversely affect earned points in
other areas.



3 points

SCHOLARLY AESTHETIC APPRECIATION


Explication and Expression



Part 1: Scholarly Paper

Guidelines:


The purpose of this assignment is to facilitate an integrated understanding of caring

as foundational to advanced nursing practice. This paper is

intended to be an
expressi
on of scholarly and aesthetic understanding of caring in nursing, integrating
paper one and two, your
lived
practice
experience, scholarly literature and artful
communication of a synthesized whole picture that is personally relevant and
professionally sou
nd.

Overview of the Assignment:

You will write a formal paper explicating
from the literature
, the central caring
concept (the essence of caring) that is expressed in your nursing.
Based on the
nursing situation
submitted in paper one and the concpt critic
ally analyzed in paper
two
-
link to caring theory
.
S
earch CINAHL for
more
articles to illuminate your
concept
create your formal explication from these articles, analyzing, comparing, contrasting,
synthesizing

and then integrating within one of the caring t
heories
. You will use your
Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

11



nursing situation to provide
brief

illustrations of the explication of your
concept as
you link within caring
.


Evaluation Criteria: Part 1
-

Scholarly Aesthetic Paper



Nursing
concept based on nursing
situation



Central
concept clearly
identified

and
introduced



2 points




Theoretical perspective
described

Basic assumptions and key
tenets
presented
. What do nurses think about
when nursing from this perspective?

How
is this theory appropriate as a lens for
this practice concept?


6

points

Explication of Caring Essence:

4
additional
articles
(
minimum
)

examined. Develop and discuss a
substantial analysis of articles in addition
to other references. Analysis should be
well organized, with evidence of critical
thought. Smoothly links relevant readings
content and integrates theoretical
perspective through
out.

Connection between your
nursing
situation, practice concept,
one caring

theoretical framework,
and
the
supporting literature, is clear, consistent,
and woven throughout.

Language is scholarly, and appropriate to
graduate level work with substantive
c
ontent and expression of complex
understandings. (4.5
-

5pp max)



10 points


Synthesis, Reflection, and
Conclusion:

Central
practice concept

essence and
attributes stated.

Paper brought to a satisfying, reflective
conclusion (.5


1 page)



3 points

Format:

Correct APA format and
appropriate references (grammar,
punctuation, and formatting) enhances
and does not hinder understanding.
Language is formal and appropriate to
required graduate level writing skills.

4 points

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

12



Logical flow and organization of paper.


Part 2: Aesthetic Project

Guidelines:


The purpose of this assignment is to facilitate an integrated understanding of caring
as foundational to advanced nursing practice. This project

is

intended to be an
expression of

aesthetic understanding o
f
caring in nursing, integrating lived
experience with

an artful communication of a synthesized meaning of
the practice
concept and
caring in your nursing situation.

Overview of the Assignment:

You will create an aesthetic project that clearly reflects the central caring essence
and attributes of your scholarly aesthetic paper. The project will need to be
photographed or scanned, and uploaded into the appropriate
email
for grading.

Evaluation Cri
teria: Aesthetic Project


Uniquely illustrates the caring
expressed in nursing situation
and

the concept explicated in paper:


6 points


Presentation of Project including
Abstract

4 points


Aesthetic quality

and attention to
detail. Indicates special
thought


6

points


Bibliography:


U
NIT
1:



Brilowski, G. & Wendler, M. (2005). An evolutionary concept analysis of caring.
Journal of Advanced Nursing, 50
(6), 641
-
650

Carper, B. (1978).

Fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing.
Advances in Nursing
Science, 1(
1), 13
-
23.

Johns, C. (2004). Becoming a transformational leader through reflective practice
Reflections on Nursing Leadership
30.2: 24
-
26.

Nagle
-
Bailey, D. (2009). Caring defined: A comparison and analysis.
International
Journal for Human Carin
g, 13

(1), 16
-
31

Neman, M. Sime, A., and Corcoran, S. (1991).The focus of the discipline.
Advances
in Nursing Science, 14
(1), 1
-
6

Newman, M. Smith, M., Pharris, M., & Jones, D. (2008). The focus of the discipline
revisited

Advances in Nursing Science, 31
(
1), e16
-
e27
.

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

13



Sumner
, J. (2010). Reflection and moral maturity in a nurse’s caring practice: A
critical perspective.
Nursing Philosophy, 11
, 159
-
169

Text:

Mayeroff, M. (1970).
On caring.

New York: Harper & Row. [ISBN# 0
-
06
-
092024
-
6]

U
NIT
2:


Sumner, J. Danielson, E. (2007) Critical social theory as a measn for analysis of
caring in nursing. International Journal for Human Caring, 11(1), 30
-
37

Texts:

B
oykin, A., & Schoenhofer, S. O. (2001).
Nursing as caring: A model for
transforming

practice
.

Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett. [ISBN# 0
-
7637
-
1643
-
x]

Newman, M.A. (2008).
Transforming presence: The difference that nursing makes.
Philadelphia, PA: F.

A. Davis Co. [ISBN10
-
0
-
8036
-
1752
-
6].

Rec.

Roach, S. (1992).
Caring: The human mode of being

(revis
ed ed.). Ottawa, CA:
Canadian Hospital Association Press. [I
SBN# 1
-
896151
-
44
-
2]

Watson, J.

(2011) Human Caring Science. A theory of Nursing. 2nd Edition. Sudbury,
Mass: Jones & Bartlett. A new revised edition of Human Science and Human Care.
Originally pub
lished in 1985

U
NIT
3
:

Andershed,B. & Olsson,K. (2009). Review of research related to Kristen Swanson’s
mid
-
range theory of caring.
Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
,
doi:
10.1111/j.1471
-
6712.2008.00647.x


Boykin, A. & Schoenhofer, S. (2001
a
). The
role of nursing leadership in creating
caring environments in healthcare delivery systems
. Nursing Administration
Quarterly, 25
(3), 1
-
7.


Drumm, J, & Chase S. (2010).Learning caring: The students; experience.

International Journal for Human Caring, 14
(4
), 31
-
37.


Paliadellis, P. Cruickshank, M. & Sheridan, A. (2007). Caring for each other: How do
nurse managers manage their role?
Journal of Nursing Management, 15
(1), 830
-
837


Persky, G., Nelson, J. & Bent, K. (2008). Creating a profile of a nurse
effective in
caring.
Nursing Administration Quarterly 32
(1), 15
-
20.


Ray, M., Turkel, M., & Marino, F. (2002). The transformative process for nursing in
workforce redevelopment.
The Changing Workforce, 26
(2),1
-
14


Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

14



Ray, M. A., Didominic
, V. A., Dittman, P. W., Hurst, P. A., Seaver, J. B., Sorbello, B.
C., et al.

(1995). The edge of chaos:

Caring and the bottom line.

Nursing
Management, 26
(9), 48
-
50.


Ray, M. & Turkel, M. (2002). The transformative process for nursing in workforce
develo
pment.
Nursing Administration Quarterly, 26(2), 1
-
14.


Ryan, L. (2005). The journey to integrate Watson's Caring Theory with clinical
practice
. International Journal for Human Caring, 9
(3), 26
-
30.



Shirey, M. (2005). Nurturance: Concept clarification an
d theory for nursing
administration.
International Journal for Human Caring, 9
(3), 65
-
72.



Turkel, M. (2007). Dr. Marilyn Ray’s theory of bureaucratic caring.
International
Journal for Human Caring, 11

(4), 57
-
67.


Watson, J. (2006). Caring Theory as an et
hical guide to administrative and clinical
practices.
Nursing Administration Quarterly, 30
(1), 48
-
55.


U
NIT
4




Bondas,T. (2003). Caritative leadership: Ministering to the patients.
Nursing
Administration Quarterly, 27
(3), 249
-
253.


Boykin, A., Bulfin,

S., Baldwin, J., & Southern, R. (2004). Transforming care in the
emergency department.
Topics in Emergency Medicine
, 26 (4), 331
-
336.


Dyess, S.M., Boykin, A. & Rigg, C. (
2010
).
Integrating caring theory with nursing
practice and education: Connecting wi
th what matters.
Journal of Nursing
Administration.

40(
11), 498
-
503

Felgen, J. (2003). Caring: Core value, currency, and commodity…Is it time to get
tough about “soft?”
Nursing Administration Quarterly, 27
(3), 208
-
214.


Felgen, J. (2004). A caring and heal
ing environment.
Nursing Administration
Quarterly, 28
(4), 288
-
301.


Longo, J. (2011). Nurses caring for nurses.
Holistic Nursing Practice
,
DOI:
10.1097/HNP.0b013e3181fe2627


Mustard, L. Caring and Competency. JONA’s Healthcare Law, Ethics and Regulation,
4, (2), 36
-
43.


Pipe, T. B. (2006) Optimizing nursing care by integrating theory driven evidence
based practice.
Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 22
(3), 234
-
238.


Roch, G., Dallaire, C. O’Neill, M., Roy, M. & Robinette, L. (2005). The politics of
caring: U
sing a political tool to analyze and intervene in the implementation of a
caring philosophy in a Montreal hospital.
International Journal for Human Caring,
9
(3), 9
-
14.


Wesorick,B. (2004). A leadership story about caring.
Nursing Administration
Quarterly,

28
(4), 271
-
275

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

15




U
NIT
5:



Barry, C. & Purnell, M. J. (2008). Uncovering meaning through the aesthetic turn: A pedagogy
of caring.
International Journal for Human Caring.


Bent, K. (1999). The ecologies of community caring. Advances
in Nursing Science,
2
1
(4), 29
-
36.

Como, J. (2007). Care and caring: A look at history, ethics and theory.
International
Journal of Human Caring 11,
(4), 37
-
45.

Finfgeld
-
Connett, D. (2008). Qualitative convergence of three nursing concepts: Art
of nursing, presence, and caring
.
Journal of Advanced Nursing, 63
(5), 527
-
534

Fleck, L. (2006). The costs of caring: Who Pays, who profits, who panders?
The
Hastings Center Report, May

June
, 13
-
16
.

Hemsley, M. & Glass, N. (2008). Sacred journeys of nurse healers.
Journal of Holistic

Nursing,24
(4), 256
-
268.

Holmes, V. & Gregory, D. (1998). Writing poetry: A way of knowing nursing.
Journal
of Advanced Nursing, 28
(6),


Pearcey, P. (2010) Caring: It’s the little things we are not supposed to do anymore.
International Journal of Nursing
Practice, 16
, 51
-
57


Ray
-
chapter 15


U
NIT
6



Crigger, N. J. (1997).

The trouble with caring: A review of eight arguments against
an ethic of care.

Journal of Professional Nursing, 13
, 217
-
21.


Dingman, S., Williams, M., Fosbinder, D., & Warnick, M.
(1999). Implementing a
caring model to improve patient satisfaction.
Journal of Nursing Administration,
29
(12), 30
-
37.


Dyess, S. M., & Chase, SK, (2010).
Caring for adults living with a chronic illness
through communities of faith.
International Journal for Human Caring, 14
(4), 38
-
44.



Johansson, I. Holm, A., Lindqvist, I., & Severinsson, E. (2006). The value of caring in
nursing supervision.
Journal of Nursing Management, 14
, 644
-
651.


Malloch, K. (2001). The white lies of leader
ship: Caring dishonesty.
Nursing
Administration Quarterly, 25
(3),61
-
68.


Connor, M. (2008). The dimensions of leadership: A foundation for caring
competency.

Nursing Administration Quarterly, 32
(1), 21
-
26.


Unit 7

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

16




Davila, L., Mewrrill, D., &

Baize, T. (2010), Susatining caring change in a healthcare
system.
International Journal for Human Caring, 14
(4
), 45
-
50.


Hudacek, S. (2008). Dimensions of caring: A qualitative analysis of nurses’ stories.
Journal of Nurisng Education, 47(3), 124
-
129.


Sumner, J. (2008). Is caring in nursing an impossible ideal for today’s practicing
nurse?
Nursing Administration Quarterly, 32
(2), 92
-
101.


Watson, J. (2006).Caring theory as ethical guide to administrative and clinical
practices.
JONA’S Healthcare Law, Et
hics, and Regulation:
8(1):87
-

93.


Classic Caring literature

Some of the classic caring literature is not readily available on line but can be
accessed through ILL or in the stacks of the library.


Allmark, P. (1998).

Is caring a virtue?


Journal of
Advanced Nursing, 28
, 446
-
72.


Barker, P. J., Reynolds, W., & Ward, T. (1995).

The proper focus of nursing: A
critique of the caring ideology.
International Journal of Nursing Studies, 32
(4), 386
-
397.




Beidler, S. (2005). Ethical issues experience
d by community based nurse
practitioners addressing health disparities among vulnerable populations.
International Journal for Human Caring, 9

(3), 43
-
50.



Bottorff, J. (1991). Nursing: A practical science of caring.
Advances in Nursing
Science, 17
(1), 71
-
79.


Bowden, P. L. (1995).

The ethics of nursing care and "the ethic of care."

Nursing
Inquiry, 2
(1), 10
-
21.


Boykin, A. & Schoenhofer, S. (1990). Caring in nursing: Analysis of extant theory.
Nursing Science Quarterly, 3
(14), 149
-
155.


Boykin, A. & Schon
ohofer, S. (1997). Reframing outcomes: Enhancing personhood.
Advanced Practice Nursing Quarterly, 3
(1), 60
-
65.


Brody, J. K. (1988).

Virtue ethics, caring, and nursing.

Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing
Practice, 2
(2), 87
-
96.


Cara, C. M. (2001).

The apprenti
ceship of caring.

International Journal for Human
Caring, 5
(2),

33
-
41.


Carper, B. (1979).

The ethics of caring.

Advances in Nursing Science, 1(
3), 11
-
19.


Crowley, M. A. (1994).

The relevance of Noddings' ethics of care to the moral
education of nurses.

Journal of Nursing Education, 33(
2), 74
-
80.


Dunphy, L. & Winland
-

Brown, J. (1998). A circle of caring: A transformative model
of advanced practice nursing.
Clinical Excellence for Nurse Practitioners,

2
(4), 241
-
247


Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

17



Dunlop, M. J. (1986). Is a science of

caring possible?

Journal of Advanced Nursing,
11
(6), 661
-
670.


Fealey, G. M. (1995). The concept of caring: A review of the literature.
Journal of
Advanced Nursing, 21
(3), 506
-
514.


Fry, S. T.

(1989). Toward a theory of nursing ethics.
Advances in Nursing

Science,
11
(4), 9
-
22.



Gadow, S. (1999). Relational narrative: The postmodern turn in nursing
ethics.

Scholarly
\
Inquiry in Nursing Practice, 13
(1), 57
-
70.


Gadow, S. (1996).

Practice applications:

Ethical narratives in practice.

Nursing
Science Quarterly
, 9,
8
-
9.


Gadow, S. (1995).

Narrative and exploration: Towards a poetics of knowledge in
nursing
. Nursing Inquiry, 2,
211
-
214.


Griffin, A. P. (1983).

A philosophical analysis of caring in nursing
. Journal of
Advanced

Nursing, 8
(4), 289
-
295.


Hawthorne,
D. L., & Yurkovich, N. J.

(1995).

Science, technology, caring and the
professions:

Are they compatible?

Journal of Advanced Nursing, 21
(6), 1087
-
1091.


Kyle, T.V. (1995).

The concept of caring: A review of the literature
. Journal of
Advanced Nursing, 21
(3
), 506
-
514.


Lauterbach, S. S., & Becker, P. H.


(1996).

Caring for self: Becoming a self
-
reflective
nurse.


Holistic Nursing Practice, 10
(2), 57
-
68.


Lebold M. & Douglas, M. (1998). Coming to know: A teaching
-
learning journey.
International

Journal for H
uman Caring, 2
(1), 17
-
23.


Locsin, R. (1995). Machine technologies and caring in nursing.
Image: The Journal of
Nursing Scholarship,
27(3), 201
-
203.


Locsin, R. (1998). Technologic competence as caring in critical care nursing.
Holistic
Nurisng

Practice 12
(4), 50
-
56.


Locsin, R. (1998).

Music as an expression of caring in nursing: A cocreated moment
International Journal for Human Caring,

2
(1), 40
-
2.



Maggs, C. (1996). A history of nursing: A history of caring?

Journal of Advanced
Nursing,23
(3), 630
-
635.


McCance, T.V., McKenna, H. P., & Boore, J. R. P. (1999). Caring: Theoretical
perspectives

of relevance to nursing
. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 30
, 1388
-
1395.


Michael, S. R., Candela, L., Mitchell, S. (2002). Aesthetic knowing: Understandi
ng
the experience of chronic illness.
Nurse Educator, 27
(1), 25
-
7.


Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

18



Morse, J., Bottorff, J., Neander, W., Solberg, S. (1991). Comparative analysis of
conceptualizations and

theories of caring.
Image: The Journal of Nursing Scholarship,
23
, 119
-
126.

Morse,

J., Solberg, S., Neander, W. Bortoff, J. & Johnson, J. (1990). Concepts of
caring and caring as a concept.
Advances in Nursing Science, 13

(1), 1
-
4

Omery, A. (1995).

Care: The basis for a nursing ethic?

Journal of Cardiovascular
Nursing 9(
3), 1
-
10.

Pardue
, K. T. (2004). Introducing readers’ theater! A strategy to foster aesthetic
knowing in nursing.
Nurse Educator, 29
(2), 58
-
62.

Rafael, A. R. (1998). Nurses who run with the wolves: The power and caring dialectic
revisited.
Advances in Nursing Science, 21
(
1), 29
-
42.


Ray, M. (1994).Transcultural nursing ethics: A framework and model for
transcultural ethical

analysis.
Journal

of

Holistic Nursing, 12
(3), 251
-
264.


Ray, M. (1987). Health care economics and human caring in nursing: Why the moral
conflict mus
t be resolved
. Family and Community Health, 10
(1), 35
-
43.



Ray, M. A. (1998).

A phenomenological study of the interface of caring and
technology in intermediate care: Toward a reflexive ethics for clinical
practice.

Holistic Nursing Practice, 12
(4), 69
-
77
.




Reverby, S. (1987).

A caring dilemma:

Womanhood and nursing in historical
perspective.
Nursing Research, 36
(1), 5
-
11.


Roach, M. S. (1998).

Caring ontology: Ethics and the call of suffering
. International
Journal for Human Caring, 2(
2), 30
-
4.


Ryan
, L. (2005). The journey to integrate Watson's Caring Theory with clinical
practice
. International Journal for Human Caring, 9
(3), 26
-
30


Schuster, E. A., Chesley, S. T., Kuhns, K. I., Wallace, C. L., & Wells, M. D. (1997).


Discovering the common ground:

The future of health, healing and environment.


Advanced Practice Nursing Quarterly, 3
(1), 18
-
24.


Schuster, E. A. (1998).


Reflections: Environment as client, person as client.

Journal
of Holistic Nursing, 16,

264
-
6.

Schuster, E. A. (1990). Earth caring.

Advances in Nursing Science, 13
(1), 25
-
30.

Swanson, K. (1991). Empirical development of a middle range theory of caring.
Nursing Research, 40
(3), 161
-
166.

Swanson, K. (1993).Nursing as informed caring for the well being of others.
Image:
The Journal of N
ursing Scholarship, 25,

352
-
357.

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

19



Swanson, K. (1999). What is known about caring in nursing science : A literary
meta
-
analysis. In A.S. Hinshaw, S. Feetham, & J. Shaver (Eds)., (pp. 31
-
60).
Handbook of Clinical Nursing Research
. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

To
uhy, T., Strews, W. & Brown, C. (2005). Expressions of caring as lived by nursing
home staff, residents and families.
International Journal for Human Caring, 9
(3), 31
-
37

Ulrich, Y. C. (1996). The relational self: Views from feminism on development and
cari
ng.
Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 17
, 369
-
380.


White, J. (1995). Patterns of knowing: Review, critique and update.
Advances


Course Policies AND Guidelines


COLLEGIAL CARING


A supportive environment for learning is a caring environment in which all
aspects of
person are respected, nurtured, and celebrated. The course is a commitment of
active and thoughtful participation in which each one of us is both teacher and
learner. Each class will be held in the context of a caring community that will be
nurt
ured by each of us throughout the semester. Creative, reflective dialogue is best
facilitated by treating each other in a caring manner and by supporting each other to
grow from each experience.


COURSE PARTICIPATION AND ATTENDANCE:

C
lass attendance is imp
erative. Participation in class is an integral part of teaching
and learning in this course and during this process of coming to know each other
.
Often, participants
become a very close
-
knit community of scholars
as we
study
caring.
You will be missed
if y
ou are not participating in
the
dialogues
.


The
expectation is that you will enter the course
dialogue
and participate in
discussions.


WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

APA (6
th

ed.) Manual of Style is used for formatting all written assignments. A
sample paper
layout and other formatting helps and guidelines have been provided
for you in the resources tab. Please read them carefully, since they provide basic
instructions to help you create a scholarly assignment. All papers will require an

appropriately formatte
d cover page and references page unless otherwise instructed.
It is important that your APA skills are at a proficient level, since your grade will be
affected by improper formatting.

Safe Assign:

What is SAFE ASSIGN?


It is an anti
-
plagiarism

program tha
t will check your
paper

against other papers, websites, journal articles, etc. and show both of us what
is "original" (that is your own work) and that which is the work of others, but with
your name on it instead.


SAFE ASSIGN will give you an originality
percentage and
report:


in general, the lower the %, the more original your work is (citations to give
credit to the intellectual property of others!)

0
-
15%
-

Originality of work is your own
-

good!

Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

20



16
-
40%
-

Reflects paper with a fair amount of citations and
references.


I will be
checking that you are citing sources correctly!

40%
-
100%
-

May suggest plagiarism or using the work/words of others and claiming
as your own.


A paper submitted to SAFE ASSIGN that generates this range is not
usually acceptable.

The SAFE ASSIGN tool is located in the

Blackboard "shell" of this course.


I will check
papers submitted in our Ecollege course dropbox along with your SAFE ASSIGN
results (in Blackboard).



SAFE ASSIGN SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:


To access SAFE ASSIGN, go
to

blackboard link

You will need your

BB user name
(usually your fau email ID and passcode (follow instructions).



Find and open our
course (shell is in BB): NGR 6110.


Go to Assignments.


You will see (3) SAFE

ASSIGN folders, one for each of your papers.



GRADES:

Grades will be posted in the Online Grade
-
book

located through blackboard
. The
Grade
-
book information is confidential and only the professor and the individual
student
are able to
access that informat
ion. You can follow your course progress
through the Grade
-
b
ook, with each assignment grading criteria being a portion of
100. Final grades will be available on
-
line through OASIS at the end of the term and
will also appear in your grade book. Please note
that final grades will not be emailed
to your home.


COLLEGE OF NURSING AND
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
:


Policies below may be found in:

a).

The Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing Graduate Handbook located at:

http://nursing.fau.edu/index.php?main=3&nav=457



b).

Florida Atlantic University’s Academic Policies and Regulations


http://www.fau.edu/academic/registrar/catalogRevs/academics.php


and
http://www.fau.edu/regulations


CODE OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

The University policy regarding academic integrity is

enforced in this

course.

Students at
Florida Atlantic University are expected to maintain the highest ethical standards. Dishonesty
is considered a serious breach of these ethical standards, because it interferes with the
University mission to provide a h
igh quality education in which no student enjoys an unfair
advantage over any other. Dishonesty is also destructive of the University community, which
is grounded in a system of mutual trust and places high value on personal integrity and
individual respon
sibility. Harsh penalties are associated with academic dishonesty. For more
information, see:

http://www.fau.edu/regulations/chapter4/4.001_
Code_of_Academic_Integrity.pdf


Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

21



The College of Nursing regards adherence to the
Code of Academic Integrity as a
prof
essional competency and an expectation of all students.
ANY

act of dishonesty that
violates the
code of academic integrity

and misrepresents your efforts or ability is
grounds for immediate failure of the course.


DISABILITY STATEMENT
:

In compliance with

the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), students who require
special accommodations due to a disability to properly execute coursework must register
with the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) located in Boca Raton


SU 133
(561
-
297
-
3880), in
Davie


MOD 1 (954
-
236
-
1222), in Jupiter


SR 117 (561
-
799
-
8585)
or at the Treasure Coast


CO 128 (772
-
873
-
3305), and follow all OSD procedures.


INCOMPLETE POLICY
:

The Incomplete Grade Policy is enforced.
A student

who registers for a course but fails to
complete the course requirements, without dropping the course, will normally receive a
grade of “F” from the course instructor. A student
who is passing a course

but has not
completed all the required work because o
f exceptional circumstances may, with the
approval of the instructor, temporarily receive a grade of “I” (incomplete).

This

must be
changed to a grade other than “I” within a specified time frame, not to exceed one
calendar year from the end of the semeste
r during which the course was taken.



ATTENDANCE POLICY:

Students are expected to attend all of their scheduled University classes and to satisfy all
academic objectives as outlined by the instructor. The effect of absences upon grades is
determined by th
e instructor, and the University reserves the right to deal at any time with
individual cases of nonattendance. Students are responsible for arranging to make up
work missed because of legitimate class absence, such as illness, family emergencies,
military

obligation, court
-
imposed legal obligations, or participation in University
-
approved activities. Examples of University approved reasons for absences include
participating on an athletic or scholastic team, musical and theatrical performances, and
debate
activities. It is the student’s responsibility to give the instructor notice prior to any
anticipated absence and within a reasonable amount of time after an unanticipated
absence, ordinarily by the next scheduled class meeting. Instructors must allow each

student who is absent for a University
-
approved reason the opportunity to make up work
missed without any reduction in the student’s final course grade as a direct result of such
absence.


RELIGIOUS ACCOMMODATION

In accordance with rules of the Florida Board of Education and Florida law, students
have the right to reasonable accommodations from the University in order to observe
religious practices and beliefs with regard to admissions, registration, class attendan
ce,
and the scheduling of examinations and work assignments. Students who wish to be
excused from coursework, class activities, or examinations must notify the instructor in
advance of their intention to participate in religious observation and request an
excused
absence. The instructor will provide a reasonable opportunity to make up such excused
absences. Any student who feels aggrieved regarding religious accommodations may
Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

22



present a grievance to the director of Equal Opportunity Programs. Any such griev
ances
will follow Florida Atlantic University’s established grievance procedure regarding
alleged discrimination.


USE OF STUDENT COURSE MATERIAL

The Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing may use students’ course
-
related materials for
legitimate institution
al purposes, such as accreditation, university
review process, or state
board of nursing review process, etc. In such cases,
materials will be used within the
college and university.



Dyess NGR6110 sp2012
-

23






CHRISTINE E. LYNN COLLEGE OF NURSING


STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY



Nursing is a discipline of knowledge and a field of professional practice
grounded in caring. Scholarship and practice in nursing require creative integration
of multiple ways of knowing. Nursing makes a unique contribution because of its
special f
ocus: nurturing the wholeness of persons through caring. Caring in nursing is
a mutual human process in which the nurse artistically responds with authentic
presence to calls from clients.


The experience of nursing takes place in nursing situati
ons: lived experiences
in which the caring between nurse and client fosters well
-
being within a co
-
creative
experience.

Nurses participate with members of other disciplines to advance human
understanding

to enhance

personal and

societal living within a glo
bal environment.


Person is viewed as a unique individual dynamically interconnected with
others and the environment in caring relationships. The nature of being human is to
be caring. Humans choose values, culturally derived, which give meaning t
o living
and enhance well
-
being. Well
-
being is creating and living the meaning of life. The
well
-
being and wholeness of persons, families, groups, communities, and societies
are nurtured through caring relationships.



Beliefs about learning and en
vironments which foster learning are derived
from an understanding of person, the nature of nursing and nursing knowledge, and
from the mission of the University. Learning involves the creation of understanding
through the integration of knowledge within a

context of value and meaning. A
supportive environment for learning is a caring environment. A caring environment is
one in which all aspects of the human person are respected, nurtured, and
celebrated. The learning environment emphasizes collegial relati
onships with faculty
and students.


The above fundamental beliefs concerning Person, Nursing, and Learning
express our values and guide the endeavors of the Faculty. The Faculty of the
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing believe in the values and
goals of higher
learning and support the Florida Atlantic University mission of education, scholarship,
and service.



April, 2002.