DoD Net-Centric Information Sharing Segment Architecture

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Unclassified



DoD
Net
-
Centric


Information Sharing

Segment Architecture

Version
0.90








November
20
, 2009


The
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense

for

Networks and Information Integration/DoD Chief Information Office
UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________



CHANGE HISTORY











Version:

Date of Change:

Author(s):

Page(s)
Changed:

Comments

v0.9

20

Novem
b
er 2009

Jeffrey Coffin


Formal
Coordination Draft

V1.0




Signed version with
adjudicated
comments











UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


File:
DoD Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing Segment Archite
cture_112009_Draft.docx


Executive Summary

Purpose
:

T
he
Department of Defense (
DoD
)
Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing

(IS)

S
egment
A
rchitecture
p
rovide
s

a
consolidated approach for implementing
information sharing in a net
-
centric environment
. The use of
segment

architecture techniques will help
ensure alignment, clarity, and interoperability
across

information sharing
initiatives
(such as providing SAR support to
Program Managers (
PM
s)

Information
Sharing Environment

(ISEs)
)
and enable
DoD and
agencies to
eliminate

redundancies

by
identify
ing

information sharing
services
that may be implemented and shared internal to DoD and, potentially,
across the Federal Government.

This segment
architecture focus
es

on three sets of customers:



Investment Review Boards (IRBs), Capability Portfolio Managers (CPMs),
Chief Information
Offic
ers (
CIOs
)
, and o
thers managing
Information Technology (
IT
)

investments
.




IT architects across capability portfolios, Federal Agencies
,

and DoD Components
.



DoD and Component Program Executive Officers (PEOs), PMs and their corresponding fun
ctional
requirem
ents managers
.

The DoD
Net
-
Centric IS

Segment Architecture is a high
-
level segment architecture depicting
IS

as
described within the DoD Information Sharing Strategy, Implementation Plan and DoD Information
En
terprise

Architecture (IEA). The combination
of these three documents articulate information sharing
for the Department and provide guidance on how to achieve the goals and objects in an efficient and
effective manner for the enterprise
. Key factors driving this
Net
-
Centris

IS

S
egment
A
rchitecture a
re:

1.

DoD is implementing an agile, net
-
centric IS environment that provides warfighters, decision
-
makers, and mission partners with on
-
demand information to meet mission objectives

thus
providing an information advantage for our people and our mission partn
ers. The DoD
Information Enterprise (DoD IE) impacts the full range of processes, policies, standards, and
services for exchanging information across the Department. The way ahead to achieving this
information advantage is articulated in terms of a set o
f guiding rules and principles in the DoD
IE Architecture.

2.

The DoD IE is enabled by the Global Information Grid (GIG) infrastructure where DoD is
implementing a robust set of services for IS that employs Enterprise Services (ES) including
service registrat
ion, authentication, attribute
-
based access control, directory services, metadata
registration, federated search, and collaboration. DoD has partnered with the IC on a number of
initiatives; e.g., service definition and implementation, metadata descriptio
ns, the Universal
Core context
-
independent framework, and cross
-
domain solutions.

3.

Information Sharing must be accomplished in compliance with the governing laws of DoD and
those of our mission partners. Federal Departments/Agencies such as DHS and DOJ m
ust
support the evolution of state, local, and tribal (S/L/T) capabilities, allowing S/L/Ts to become
functioning partners in the Federal solution set. Federal, PM
-
ISE, and DoD drivers are: IRTPA
2004; 9/11 Commission Act 2007; OMB and PM
-
ISE Budget Guida
nce for Justification of Fiscal
Year 2010 to 2014 Investments Supporting the ISE Priorities; PM
-
ISE Shared Spaces and Core:
UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


File:
DoD Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing Segment Archite
cture_112009_Draft.docx


Discussion Paper for the ISC (July 2, 2008
D
raft); DoD IS Strategy; DoD IS Implementation Plan
(July 2008
D
raft); DoD Net
-
Centric Da
ta Strategy; and DoD Net
-
Centric Services Strategy.

Information
S
haring with external partners is accomplished through the

exchange

of

information using
net
-
centric IS concepts. Achieving this expectation requires continued planning, governance, and
coordination of requirements, implementation, and testing across the ISE and its boundary. The below
DoD principles are recommended for ap
plication to
external partners
:



Data and services must be available and interoperable across the ISE federation by supporting
DoD
IEA rules. Data assets, services, and applications must be visible, accessible,
understandable, and trusted to authorized (in
cluding unanticipated) users. Further, ISE core
services shall be advertised by registering with an enterprise services registry. Performance
characteristics should be documented via service
-
level agreements as needed.



Infrastructure interoperability mus
t be achieved through definition and enforcement of
standards, interface profiles, implementation guidance, and an agile, collaborative environment
of services and IT system policies.



The subject (user or service) seeking access to data assets, including s
ervices, must have
attributes that indicate authorization using a successful mapping to the attributes and
corresponding rules for accessing the resource. For authorization, the ISE must require strong
account management or strong dynamic attribute
-
based
access control. Strong authentication,
i.e., the DoD CAC or comparable eAuthentication Level 4 credentials, must be used to identify
the subject seeking access to the resource.



All external partners must expect
anticipated

partners with comparable, matur
e capabilities
allowing all partners to establish and maintain trust codified in federation governance
agreements/rules. From this anticipated partner capability, the ISE must adjust for
unanticipated

mission partners or mission partners with less mature
sharing capabilities.













Cheryl Roby, Acting









DoD Chief Information Officer




UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


i


Table of Contents

1.0

Introduction and Background

................................
................................
................................
...............

1

1.1

The DoD Information Sharing Strategy

................................
................................
.........................

1

1.2

The DoD Information Sharing Implementation Plan

................................
................................
....

2

1.3

The DoD Information Enterprise Architect
ure version 1.(DoD IEA)

................................
.............

2

2.0

Overview

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

3

2.1

Purpose Statement (FSAM 1.2)

................................
................................
................................
.....

3

2.1.1

Business Drivers and Mandates (FSAM 2.1)

................................
................................
.........

4

2.2

Stakeholders and Their Relationships (FSAM 2.1)

................................
................................
........

4

Stakeholder and Role Overview

................................
................................
................................
............

4

2.4

Scope (FSAM 2.1)

................................
................................
................................
..........................

5

2.5

Appr
oach

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......

6

2.6

Applicable Source and Compliance Documentation

................................
................................
....

8

2.7

Key Terms of Reference

................................
................................
................................
................

9

3.0

Business Outcomes/Performance Goals
(FSAM 2.3)

................................
................................
..........

10

3.1 Desired Outcome

................................
................................
................................
..............................

10

3.2

Understanding Performance Goals

................................
................................
.............................

10

3.3

Information Sharing Performance Goals

................................
................................
....................

10

3.3.1

Promote, Encourage, and Incentivize Sharing

................................
................................
....

10

3.3.2

Achieve an Extended Enterprise

................................
................................
.........................

11

3.3.3

Strengthen Agility, in Order to Accommodate Unanticipated Partners and Events

..........

11

3.3.4

Ensure Trust Across Organiza
tions
................................
................................
......................

11

3.4

Approaches to Achieve the Goals

................................
................................
...............................

11

3.4.1

Recognize and Leverage the Information Sharing Value Chain (FSAM 3.1)

.......................

11

3.4.2

Forge Information Mobility

................................
................................
................................
.

11

3.4.3

Make Information a Force Multiplier Thro
ugh Sharing

................................
......................

12

3.4.4

Promote a Federated Information Sharing Community/Environment

...............................

13

3.4.5

Address the Economic Reality of Information Sharing

................................
.......................

13

3.5

Segment Architecture Vision Summary (FSAM 2.2)

................................
................................
...........

13

3.6

Performance Scorecard (FSAM 2.3)

................................
................................
................................
....

14

3.6.1

Data and Services Deployment Metrics

................................
................................
..............

15

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


ii


3.5.3

Secured Availability Metrics

................................
................................
................................

18

4.0

DoD Net
-
Centric

Information Target Business and Information Architecture

................................
...

19

4.1

The Information Sharing Value Chain
(FSAM 3.1)

................................
................................
......

19

4.2

DoD Information Sharing Business Functional Model

................................
................................

20

4.2.1

Data and Services Deployment (DSD) Priority Area

................................
............................

21

4.2.
2

Secured Availability (SA) Priority Area

................................
................................
................

23

4.2.3

Data and Information Interoperability


Universal Core (UCORE)

................................
....

25

5.0

Conceptual Solution Architecture


Enterprise and Core Services (FSAM 4)

................................
.....

25

5.1

Guiding Principles and Rules (OV
-
6a)

................................
................................
.........................

25

5.1.1

Data & Services Deployment Princ
iples (DSDP)

................................
................................
..

26

5.1.2

Secured Availability Principles and Rules

................................
................................
............

27

5.2

Implementing Net Centric SOA for Information Sharing (FSAM 4.2)

................................
.........

28

Information Sharing in a DoD and Net
-
Centric Environment

................................
.............................

28

5.2.1

Service
-
Oriented Architectures

................................
................................
...........................

29

5.3

Net
-
Centric Enterprise Services (NCES)

................................
................................
......................

30

5.3.1

Content Discovery

................................
................................
................................
...............

31

5.3.2

Content Delivery

................................
................................
................................
.................

33

5.3.3

SOA Foundation

................................
................................
................................
..................

34

5.4

DDMS(FSAM 4.2


Data Reuse)
................................
................................
................................
...

40

5.4.1

Defense Discovery Metadata Specification

................................
................................
........

40

Defense Discovery Metadata Specification

................................
................................
............................

40

5.5

MDR(FSAM 4.2


Data Reuse)

................................
................................
................................
.....

40

Why does Information Sharing require Metadata?

................................
................................
............

40

DoD MetaData Registry (MDR)

................................
................................
................................
...........

41

Who are the MDR Users

................................
................................
................................
.....................

42

5.5.1

MDR Federation

................................
................................
................................
..................

43

6.0

DoD
Information Sharing Modernization Blueprint (FSAM 5)

................................
............................

46

6.1

Transition Plan Overview (FSAM 5.2)

................................
................................
.........................

46

6.1.1

Data and Services Deployment (DSD)

................................
................................
.................

46

6.1.2

Secured Availability (SA)

................................
................................
................................
.....

50

6.1.3

Understandability and Trust of Data

................................
................................
...................

54

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


iii


Appendix A
DOD NET
-
CENTRIC

Information Sharing Segment Architecture Summary Information (AV
-
1)

58

A.1

DoDAF v2.0 AV
-
1 Overview & Summary Information

................................
................................

58

A.2

Scop
e

................................
................................
................................
................................
...........

58

A.3

Purpose and perspective

................................
................................
................................
............

59

A.4

Context

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

59

A.5

Status

................................
................................
................................
................................
..........

59

A.6

Tools and File Formats Used

................................
................................
................................
.......

60

A.7

Assumptions and Constraints

................................
................................
................................
.....

60

Appendix B Acronyms (AV
-
2)

................................
................................
................................
......................

61

Appendix C Glossary of Terms (AV
-
2)

................................
................................
................................
........

63

APPENDIX D Technology Standards (Standards View SV
-
1)

................................
................................
......

70

APPENDIX E

References

................................
................................
................................
...........................

74

Appendix F USE CASE #01


Suspicious Activity Reporting (SAR) Information Sharing in support of the
Information Sharing Environment

................................
................................
................................
..............

76

F.1

Definition and Scope:

................................
................................
................................
..................

76

F.
2

DoD’s Approach to the Information Sharing Environment (ISE) Shared Space (SS) Initiative

....

76

F.2.1

DoD’s Net
-
Centric Information
Sharing Principles

................................
................................
..

76

F.3

ISE
-
SAR Top
-
Level Business Process
................................
................................
............................

77

F.4

DoD's Approach for Sharing SAR Information Utilizing a Third Party Broker

.............................

79

F.5

DoD
-
SAR Information Flow

................................
................................
................................
.........

80

F.6

Top
-
Level Business Process Step: Information

Acquisition

................................
........................

83

F.6.1

Description

................................
................................
................................
..............................

83

F.7

Top
-
Level Business Process Step: Organizational Processing

................................
.....................

84

F.7.1

Description
20

................................
................................
................................
..........................

84

F.7.2

Outcomes

................................
................................
................................
................................

85

F.7.3 Affected ISE Core Service Processes

................................
................................
..........................

85

F.7.4 Constraints

................................
................................
................................
................................
.

85

F.8

Top
-
Le
vel Business Process Step: Integration/Consolidation

................................
.....................

86

F.8.1

Description
24

................................
................................
................................
..........................

86

F.9

Top
-
Level Business Process Step: Data Retrieval/Distribution (Data will be View Only)

...........

86

F.9.1

Description26

................................
................................
................................
..........................

86

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


iv


F.10

Top
-
Level Business Process Step: Feedback

................................
................................
...............

87

F.10.1 Description

................................
................................
................................
...............................

87

F.11

DoD’s As
-
Is ISE Implementation using eGuardian

................................
................................
..

87




List of Tables and Figures

Table 1.2
-
1: List of Stakeholders and Their Roles

................................
................................
........................

4

Figure 1
-

3.6
-
1: FSAM Performance Scorecard Template

................................
................................
..........

14

Table 3.6.1
-
1: DSD Metrics 1

................................
................................
................................
.....................

15

Table 3.6.3
-
1: SA Metrics 1

................................
................................
................................
.......................

18

Figure 4.1
-
1: Information Sharing Value Chain

................................
................................
...........................

20

Figure 4.2.1
-
1: DSD Functional Decomposition (OV
-
5)

................................
................................
...............

22

Figure 2.1.1
-
2: DSD Decomposition Cont. (OV
-
5)

................................
................................
......................

23

Figure 2.2.2
-
1: Secured Availability Decomposition (OV
-
5)

................................
................................
........

24

Figure 5.5
-
1: Metadata Types and Support

................................
................................
...............................

42

Figure 5.5.1
-
1: Concepts to Achieve Federation

................................
................................
........................

44

Figure 5.5.1
-
2: MDR Implementation of Modes

................................
................................
........................

45

Figure 6.1
-
1: EA Transition Strategy: Baseline to Target

................................
................................
............

46

Figur
e 6.1.1
-
1: Transition to Data Services Deployment (DSD)

................................
................................
.

47

Table 6.1.1
-
1: DSD Overarching Transition Strategy

................................
................................
.................

49

Table 6.1.2
-
1: SA Overarching Transition Strategy

................................
................................
....................

52

Table 6.1.3
-
1: DSD Objective 2: Enabling Programs/Initiative
s

................................
................................
.

54

Table 6.1.3
-
2: DSD Objective 2: Transition Strategy

................................
................................
.................

56

Figure
C.3
-
1: ISE
-
SAR Top
-
level Business Model (OV
-
1)

................................
................................
...........

78

Figure F.5
-
1: DoD
-
SAR Top
-
level Inform Flow for Supporting the ISE
-
SAR EE (OV
-
2)

...............................

81

Table F.5
-
1: SAR Top
-
Level Information Flow Descriptions

................................
................................
......

81

Figure F.11
-
1: EGUardian SAR P
rocess Flow (OV
-
6C)
................................
................................
.................

89





UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


v














This page intentionally left blank.














UN
CLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


1


1.0

Introduction

and Background

As described in the Federal Segment Architecture Methodology (FSAM) s
egment architecture is related
to enterprise architecture (EA) through three principles: structure, reuse, and alignment. Because it is
related to EA, segment architecture:



Inherits the framework used by the EA, although that framework may be extended and
specialized to meet the specific needs of a core mission area or common or shared service;



Reuses important assets defined at the enter
prise level, including data, common business
processes and investments, and applications and technologies; and



Aligns with elements defined at the enterprise level, such as business strategies, mandates,
standards, and performance measures.


The DoD
Net
-
C
entric

Information Sharing Segment Architecture

is a high
-
level segment architecture
depicting Information Sharing as described within the DoD Information Sharing Strategy,
Implementation Plan and DoD Information En
terprise
Architecture (IEA).

The combina
tion of these
three documents articulate information sharing for the Department and provide guidance on how to
achieve the goals and objects in an efficient and effective manner for the enterprise.

1.1

The D
o
D Information Sharing Strategy
1

provides a comm
on vision to synchronize
information sharing initiatives and investments throughout the Department. Sharing of information is an
increasingly important element of Departmental mission success. It is imperative to effectively exchange
information among comp
onents, Federal agencies, coalition partners, foreign governments and
international organizations as a critical element of our efforts to defend the nation and execute national
strategy. Through this
s
trategy, the Department will achieve improved unity of
effort, a reduction in
decision time, increased adaptability of forces, improved situational awareness, and greater precision in
mission planning and execution.

The strategy
guides
t
he Department

s sharing of information within

the DoD and with Federal,
state,
local, tribal, coalition partners, foreign governments and

security forces, international organizations,
non
-
governmental organizations, and the

private sector
(
external partners
)
. The Strategy represents the
first

step in a comprehensive initiative

to assess and modify as needed existing policies,

business
processes, budget allocations, and cultural perspectives.

The focus on improving information sharing across the U.S.
F
ederal
G
overnment is

reflected in White
House guidance, such as Executive Orde
r 13388
“Further Strengthening the Sharing of Terrorism
Information to Protect Americans”
, legislation,

such as the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention
Act (IRTPA) of 2004, and

international cooperatives, such as the
Multi
-
National Information Sha
ring
(MNIS)

initiative. Numerous independent mission or functional area specific initiatives address

aspects
of information sharing from intelligence and counter
-
terrorism, multinational, and

stability operations,
to humanitarian assistance and disaster re
lief.
These strategies and efforts must be synchronized in
order to achieve unity of effort as well as economic and operational efficiencies.





1

Adapted from
DoD Information Sharing Strategy
, 04 May 2007.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


2


The DoD
IS

Strategy establishes five touchstones of information

sharing: Culture, Policy, Governance,
Economics a
nd Resources, and Technology and

Infrastructure. Each stakeholder community shall
improve these five areas to realize the

overall goals of this Strategy.

1.2

The DoD Information Sharing Implementation Plan


The DoD Information Sharing Implementation Plan
i
s DoD’s plan for

implementing the vision and goals
of the DoD Information Sharing Strategy, as well as Goal 2, Information as a Strategic Asset, of the DoD
Information Management (IM)/Information Technology (IT) Strategic Plan. The tasks identified in this
plan focus on en
hancing DoD’s ability to share information in a timely and protected manner with
appropriate internal and external participants as required to ensure mission success. These internal and
external participants are hereafter referred to as mission partners or

the
extended enterprise
.

For
the
purposes of this document,
information sharing
is defined as it is in the DoD Information Sharing
Strategy:
“making information available to participants (people, process
es
, or systems),” which
“includes the cultural, man
agerial, and technical behaviors by which one participant leverages
information held or created by another participant.”

The DoD Information Sharing Implementation Plan recognizes that organizations’ cultures play a
significant role in any successful infor
mation sharing environment. This plan identifies tasks to drive
cultural transformation as needed to better promote the practice of information sharing. Recognizing
that cultural shift alone is not sufficient, the DoD Information Sharing Implementation Pla
n also
addresses management, operations, classification and marking processes, identity and access
management, technical infrastructure, and
F
ederal
G
overnment wide information sharing initiatives.

DoD recognizes its responsibility to support its own missions and its role in the

broader national
information sharing landscape. Accordingly, this plan supports the National Strategy for Information
Sharing and other federal initiatives that include areas of cooperation with the Director of National
Intelligence, activities from the F
ederal Information Sharing Environment Implementation Plan, and
development of the National Command and Coordination Capability in conjunction with the Department
of Homeland Security.

1.
3

The
DoD

Information
Enterprise Architecture

version 1.
(DoD IEA)
2

The DoD IEA
1.1
provides a common foundation to
support accelerated transformation of
the DoD to net
-
centric operations. It
presents the vision for net
-
centric
operations and establishes near
-
term
priorities to address critical barriers that
must be overco
me to achieve that



2

Adapted from
DoD Information Enterprise Architecture

(DoD IEA 1.1) 09 March 2009.

DoD Net
-
Centric Vision
:

To function as one unified Do
D Enterprise, creating an
information advantage for our people and mission partners
by providing:



A rich information sharing environment in which data and
services are visible, accessible, understandable, and
trusted across the enterprise.



An available and

protected network infrastructure (the
GIG) that enables responsive information
-
centric
operations using dynamic and interoperable
communications and computing capabilities.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


3


vision.

The
DoD

Information Enterprise
(IE)
comprises the information, information resources, assets, and
processes required to achieve an information advantage and share information across the Department
and with mission partners. As
such, the D
oD
IEA defines the layer of services and standards that enable
Information Management (IM) operations and drive the fundamental concepts of net
-
centricity across
all missions of the Department.

DoD programs providing IT capabilities must also
adhere to applicable DoD CIO established global
standards such as the Universal Core information exchange schema and use, where appropriate, Core
Enterprise Services provided through the Net
-
Centric Core Enterprise Services (NCES) program.
Additionally, D
oD IT leverages the shared common computing and communications infrastructure of the
Global Information Grid (GIG). Non
-
GIG IT includes stand
-
alone, self
-
contained, or embedded IT that is
not and will not be connected to the enterprise network.

2
.0

Overvi
ew

2.1

Purpose Statement

(FSAM 1.2)

The purpose of the
DoD
Net_Centric

Information Sharing S
egment
A
rchitecture is
to provide
architecture design and development, planning, integration, technical guidance, transition planning, and
coordination of DoD Compo
nent efforts in support of DoD information sharing in a net
-
centric
environment
. The use of
segment

architecture techniques will help
ensure alignment, clarity, and
interoperability
across

information sharing
initiatives
(such as providing SAR support to
PM ISE's
Information Sharing Environment presented as an information sharing use case in appendix E)
and
enable
DoD and
agencies to
eliminate

redundancies

by
identify
ing

information sharing
services
that may
be implemented and shared internal to DoD and, potentially,
across the Federal Government.

This
Information Sharing Segment Architecture will be updated collaboratively and used as a tool by the
Information Sharing Working Groups to drive the net
-
centric development, planning, integration,
technical guidance, and coordination of

DoD Component efforts in support of the DoD Information
Sharing.

This segment
architectures focus on three sets of customers:



Investment Review Boards (IRBs), Capability P
ortfolio Managers (CPMs),
Chief Information
Officers (
CIOs
)
, and others managing IT investments. In addition to providing investment
criteria, architecture information can help identify key business processes to enable with a
solution, and help determine
whether to
deliver capability via enterprise
-
wide services or with
Component
-
specific services.




IT architects across capability portfolios, Federal Agencies
,

and DoD Components. They use the
architectures to align touchpoints and boundaries as well as to

identify interoperability gaps and
the requirements for federation. The DoD federated set of architectures is collectively known as
UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


4


the federated DoD Enterprise Architecture (DoD EA). The DoD EA is in turn federated with the
Federal Enterprise Architect
ure (FEA) and other external architectures.



DoD and Component Program Executive Officers (PEOs), Program Managers (PMs) and their
corresponding functional requirements managers. Enterprise architectures provide these
customers
with
design principles by en
abling each program to filter applicable laws, regulations,
policies, standards and frameworks imposed from internal and external sources.

2.
1
.
1

Business Drivers and Mandates (FSAM 2.1)

There are several drivers for the development of the
DoD Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing Segment
Architecture coming from both internal to DoD and External from Federal
-
Level guidance. This segment
architecture is being developed to document the direction that DoD will take in response to these
drivers for information shar
ing.

From the Federal Level:



Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (IRTPA)



Executive Order 13388 of October 2005



President Memorandum, Guidelines and Requirements I Support of the information Sharing
Environment of December 2005



PL 110
-
5
3 Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (Enacted
August 3, 2007)

From within DoD



Quadrennial Defense Review 2006 (February 6, 2006)



DoD Directive 8320.02: Data Sharing in a Net
-
Centric Department of Defense, 02 December
2004



DepSe
cDef Memo (August 29, 2007)



DoD Information Sharing Strategy (May 4, 2007)



DoD Information Sharing Implementation Plan (February 2008)

2.2

Stakeholders and Their Relationships (FSAM 2.1)

Stakeholder and Role Overview

Table 2
.2
-
1

shows the
primary
stakeholder
s and brief

overview as it applies to the
DoD Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing s
egment
. As part of the development of the business layer of the segment
architecture, t
he
stakeholders will be mapped to
business processes and eventually to services

and
systems within the segment.

Table
1
.2
-
1: List of Stakeholders and Their Roles


Stakeholder Name

Role

SAR Information Sharing
-
specific
Role

Office of Management
and Budget (OMB)

Assists the President in
overseeing the preparation of the
federal budget and supervises its
administration in Executive
Provides policy, direction, and
oversight for the implementation of
ICAM initiatives.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


5


Stakeholder Name

Role

SAR Information Sharing
-
specific
Role

Branch agencies
.

General Services
Administration

(GSA)

P
rovides government building

space,
acquisition solutions
for

government organizations and
the military
, and
management
best practices and efficient
government operations.

Establishes and maintains
acquisition vehicles and approved
products for HSPD
-
12 deployment.

Provides the US Access HSPD
-
12
Managed Service Offering.

Leads E
-
Authentication Services

PM ISE

Lead for the Development and
implementation of the
Information Sharing Environment
in accordance with PDD
Ref

Establishes the Enterprise
Archi
tecture for Information Sharing,
provides guidance, and establishes
standards.

Federal Bureau of
Investigation (FBI)

Protects and defends the United
States against terrorist and
foreign intelligence threats,
upholds and enforces the
criminal laws of the U
nited
States, and provides leadership
and criminal justice services to
federal, state, municipal, and
international agencies and
partners.

Acts as 3
rd

party broker for DoD
eGuardian implementation providing
SAR data to the ISE.




2.
4

Scope (FSAM 2.1)

The
Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing Segment Architecture version
0
.
9

is a high
-
level segment
architecture representing Information Sharing as a specific area of interest for DoD IT investments. The
DoD
Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing Segment Architecture
will focus on the Data and Services
Deployment (DSD) segment of the DoD IEA while cross referencing into the Secured Availability (SA)
priority area for Identity and Access
Management (
IdAM
)

related content. SA is a cross functional
segment relevant to th
e success of achieving the vision for information sharing in a net
-
centric
environment.


Working together these two priority areas of the DoD IEA provide guidance for net
-
centric information sharing for DoD.

The DoD IEA will be used as the basis for the h
igh
-
level descriptions
of this Segment Architecture. This architecture will be built using an abbreviated
Federal Segment
Architecture Methodology
(
FSAM
)

format.

To get a more detailed understanding of external information sharing for DoD this segment arc
hitecture
will present a SAR Information Sharing use case that will be limited in scope to SAR Information Sharing
for counter
-
terrorism to include: DoD Infrastructure Support to ISE Core, the ISE Front Porch concept,
the DoD 3
rd

Party Sharing concept (eGa
urdian solution), and Services related to Discovery, Retrieval, and
Mediation.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


6


The following rules have been identified to guide the develop
ment

of this segment architecture:



The DoD
Net
-
Centric
Information Sharing segment architecture will recognize that
there is a
minimal, universal, common set of implementation specifications that must be adhered to in
order to drive information sharing.



Architecture products will be developed and decomposed only to the level of detail required to
adequately portray ente
rprise "To
-
Be" information sharing operational / mission capabilities and
support investment decision
-
making at the DoD CIO level.



The architecture will represent data and services as independent from systems and applications
and will show how they are mad
e visible, accessible, understandable, trusted, and governed
across the Enterprise.



The architecture will document all critical rules, constraints, and best practices necessary for
accelerating the implementation of information sharing operations. Th
e
se w
ill be sufficiently
critical and "Enterprise" in nature that waivers should be granted only in exceptional cases.



Quantity is to be sacrificed in favor of quality. (Quality=Consistent, Accurate, Understandable, &
Integrated) and DoDAF conformant.

2.5

Approach

As mentioned earlier the DoD
Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing Segment Architecture is a high
-
level
segment architecture depicting Information Sharing as described within the
DoD Information Sharing
Strategy
,
the
DoD Information Sharing
Implementation Plan
,
and
the
DoD Information En
terprise

Architecture

(IEA)
, and the
Department of Defense Net
-
Centric Services Strategy
,
and the DoD
Information
Enterprise Transition Plan (
IE
TP).

The Information
Sharing
Strategy provides the

V
ision and
G
o
als


for information sharing, the DoD IEA
provides the high
-
level content for
the segment architecture

s

Target Business Function Model

,
the
Net
-
Centric Services Strategy
, and NCES documentation provide information for the

Conceptual
Solution Architectu
re

,
and the Information Sharing Implementation Plan provides the Basis for the

Blueprint and Sequencing Plan

. In addition to these documents the
I
ETP
provides
a
description
for

T
ransition


through the mapping of the segment architecture to the DoD IEA.

The DoD IEA provides the high
-
level content for the
Segment Architecture Target

Business Function
Model
.
The D
oD
IEA 1.
1

establishes a very limited set of core principles and rules drawn fro
m collective
DoD IM policy and guidance, and presents them as a set of basic criteria for all applicable IT
investments. These guidelines will drive net
-
centric information sharing, increasing effectiveness,
efficiency, and interoperability across the Dep
artment. Several principles are universal, cutting across all
capability areas, and should be considered and applied appropriately to all other IT decisions. These
core principles
are presented below:

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


7



Other, more specific,
principles and rules are better introduced and positioned as they relate to specific
DoD IE

priorities. During the development of th
e DoD IEA
, five priorities were identified
as areas where
increased attention and investment would drive important progress towards achieving net
-
centric
information

sharing. These priorities are neither organizations nor functions


they are a way to focus
effort across cross
-
functional areas to a
chieve goals.


Priorities help transform the enterprise by focusing on key needs that will help achieve the target state.
These priorities are the fundamental organizational construct for D
oD
IEA 1.
1
, and focus the
architecture on aligning investments wi
th net
-
centric principles. The following priorities have been
defined:



Data and Services Deployment (DSD)



Decouples data and services from the applications and
systems that provide them, allowing them to be visible, accessible, understandable and truste
d.
Defense Information Enterprise Global Principles



D
oD CIO
-
governed resources are conceived, designed, operated
,

and managed to address the mission
needs of the Department.




Interoperability of solutions across the Department is a strategic goal. All parts of the GIG must work
together to achieve this goal
. Information is made interoperable by following the rules for net
-
centric
sharing of data and services across the enterprise. DoD achieves infrastructure interoperability
through
definition and enforcement of standards and interface profiles and implemen
tation guidance.



Data assets, services, and applications on the GIG shall be visible, accessible, understandable, and trusted
to authorized (including unanticipated) users.



Defense Information Enterprise services shall advertise service
-
level agreements
(SLAs) that document their
performance, and shall be operated to meet that agreement.



The GIG will provide a secure environment for collaborative sharing of information assets (information,
services, and policies) with DoD’s external partners, including ot
her Federal Departments and Communities
of Interest (e.g., Department of Homeland Security, the Intelligence Community), state and local
governments, allied, coalition, non
-
governmental organizations (NGOs), academic, research and business
partners.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


8


DSD guides the building and delivery of data and services that meet defined needs but are also
able to adapt to the needs of unanticipated users. DSD lays the foundation for moving the DoD
to a Service
-
Oriented Architecture (SOA).



Secured Availability

(SA)



Ensures data and services are secured and trusted across DoD.
Security is provided, but security issues do not hinder access to information. When users
discover data and services, they are able to access them based on their authorization.
Permis
sions and authorizations follow users wherever they are on the network.



Computing Infrastructure Readiness (CIR)



Provides the necessary computing infrastructure
and related services to allow the DoD to operate according to net
-
centric principles. It ens
ures
that adequate processing, storage, and related infrastructure services are in place to
dynamically respond to computing needs and to balance loads across the infrastructure.



Communications Readiness (CR)



Ensures that an evolvable transport infrastr
ucture is in place
that provides adequate bandwidth and access to GIG capabilities. The transport functions must
provide an end
-
to
-
end, seamless net
-
centric communications capability across all GIG assets.



NetOps Agility (NOA)



Enables the continuous ability to easily access, manipulate, manage and
share any information, from any location at any time. NetOps Agility sets policies and priorities
necessary to operate and defend the GIG. It establishes common processes and stan
dards that
govern operations, management, monitoring and response of the GIG.

The DoD
Net
-
Centric

Information Sharing Segment Architecture will focus on the DSD
priority area

of the
DoD IEA
and address specific aspects of the
SA
priority area that are spec
ifically
relevant to
IdAM and
Identity, Credential, and Access Management
(
ICAM
)

as these concepts are required to ensure
the
success
ful

a
ttainment of the
information sharing

vision within
in a net
-
centric environment.

2.
6

Applicable Source and Compliance
Documentation

S
ource

documents
establishing

the
requirements and compliance criteria

for the
DoD
Net
-
Centric
I
nformation
S
haring
S
egment Architecture

are
:



National Strategy
f
or Information sharing, October 2007



Department of Defense Information Sharing St
rategy, 04 April 2007



Department of Defense Information Sharing Implementation Plan, April 2009



Department of Defense Information
E
nterprise Architecture Version 1.1, March 2009



DoD Directive 8320.02: Data Sharing in a Net
-
Centric
D
epartment of Defense, 02

December
2004



Directive
-
Type Memorandum (DTM) 08
-
007


DoD Force Protection Threat Information



Directive
-
Type Memorandum (DTM) 09
-
001


DoD Force Protection Threat Information



DoD's Approach to the Information Sharing Environment (ISE) Shared Spaces (SS)
Initiative



White Paper



Memorandum for Agency Chief Information Officers and Chief Architects

Instruction for
Agency Submission of Enterprise Architecture Segment Reports, 06 February 2009

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


9




Memorandum for Agency Chief Information Officers and Chief Archit
ects


Evaluating Federal
Government Information Sharing Using Enterprise Architecture Assessment Framework Version
3.0 and the Enterprise Assessment Segment Report (EASR) Version 1.0, 13 February 2009



Executive Order 13388: Further Strengthening the Shari
ng of Terrorism Information to Protect
Americans, (White House; October 2005)



ISE Enterprise Architecture Framework (EAF), Version 2.0, (Office of the PM
-
ISE; September
2008)



ISE
-
FS
-
200: ISE Functional Standard Suspicious Activity Reporting, Version 1.0,
(Office of the PM
-
ISE; January 2008)



ISE Implementation Plan
, (Office of the PM
-
ISE; November 2006)



ISE Privacy Guidelines
, (Office of the PM
-
ISE; December 4, 2006)



ISE Profile and Architecture Implementation Strategy (PAIS), Version 1.0, (Office of the

PM
-
ISE;
May 2008)



ISE
-
SAR EE Implementation Guide (DOJ/BJA, 2008) {Draft}



Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies: Designation and Sharing
of Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI), (White House; May 9, 2008)



Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative: Concepts of Operations, Version 1.0, (Office
of the PM
-
ISE; December 2008)



Privacy and Civil Liberties Implementation Guide for the ISE, Version 1.0, (Office of the PM
-
ISE;
September 2007)

2.
7

Key
Terms of Reference

Language is key to understand and due to the broad range of audience for this document it is very
important for the reader to understand the DoD

s intent as to the meaning of a few key concepts
discussed throughout this document.

DoD Inf
ormation Enterprise
:

The
DoD

information resources, assets, and processes required to achieve
an information advantage and share information across the Department and with mission partners. It
includes: (a) the information itself, and the Department’s ma
nagement over the information life cycle;
(b) the processes, including risk management, associated with managing information to accomplish the
DoD mission and functions; (c) activities related to designing, building, populating, acquiring, managing,
operat
ing, protecting and defending the information enterprise; and (d) related information resources
such as personnel, funds, equipment, and information technology, including national security systems.

DoD Net
-
Centric Vision
:

To function as one unified DoD Ent
erprise, creating an information advantage
for our people and mission partners by providing:



A rich information sharing environment in which data and services are visible, accessible,
understandable, and trusted across the enterprise.



An available and prot
ected network infrastructure (the GIG) that enables responsive
information
-
centric operations using dynamic and interoperable communications and
computing capabilities.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


10


Information
S
haring
:

“Making information available to participants

(people, processes,
or systems).”
Information
S
haring includes the cultural, managerial,

and technical behaviors by which one participant
leverages information held or created

by another participant
3
.


Universal Core (UCore)
4
:

An interagency information exchange specification and implementation
profile. It provides a framework for sharing the most commonly used data concepts of “who, what
,

when, and where”. UCore serves as a starting point for data level integration and permits

the
development of richer domain specific exchanges. UCore was developed in concert with

National
Information Exchange Model (
NIEM
)
5

program office, and is a collaborative effort between D
o
D, DOJ,
DHS and the Intelligence Community.

3.0

Business Outcomes/
Performance Goals

(FSAM 2.3)

3.1 Desired Outcome

A coordinated Do
D architecture, sharing environment infrastructure, planning, integration,
synchronization, and implementation efforts and to address critical aspects of the architecture planning
and develop
ment in a long
-
term, systematic approach.

3.
2

Understanding Performance Goals

According to the FEA the performance goals for the segment include target performance measures and
the timeframe to achieve performance goals. Performance goals form the basis of

the performance
layer of the target segment architecture and should be reconciled with the agency EA and agency
strategic plan to establish a line of sight between the segment performance goals and the agency’s
overall strategic goals. The IPT uses the pe
rformance goals to determine the performance gaps that
need to be closed.

3.
3

Information Sharing

Performance Goals
6

As identified in the DoD Information Sharing Strategy the goals describe the interrelated concepts
needed to move the DoD from the current
state of information sharing to the vision. The

attainment of
the

information sharing goals
will foster

an environment across the DoD that will:

3.
3
.
1

Promote,
E
ncourage, and
I
ncentivize
S
haring

Successful information sharing necessitates a mindset where information is continually shared as a
normal course of work. It begins when organizational leaders set the example and demonstrate their
commitment by advocating for information sharing, and will

be realized when the dissemination of
information is supported at all organizational levels. Leaders shall align individuals to the common
information sharing vision and encourage the adoption of the new mindset and culture. A common set



3

Definition source
DoD Information Sharing Strategy

May 04, 2007.

4

Information on UCore may be found at
https://www.ucore.gov/

. A Log
-
in ID and Password are required for
access to UCo
re.gov.

5

Information on NIEM may be found at
http://www.niem.gov/

.

6

Adapted from the
DoD Information Sharing Strategy

May 04, 2007.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


11


of unifying appr
oaches to DoD Information Sharing will be developed, requirements validated, and
individuals trained on the proper tools, techniques and procedures so that this common set of
information sharing practices is used at all levels throughout the Department.

3.
3
.2

Achieve an
E
xtended
E
nterprise

The extended enterprise refers to all internal and external participants required to ensure mission

success. This facilitates collaborative and coordinated decision making, shared situational awareness
and improved knowle
dge at every level. The extended enterprise requires the alignment of plans,
processes, and systems across organizational and functional boundaries.

3.
3
.
3

Strengthen
A
gility, in
O
rder to
A
ccommodate
U
nanticipated
P
artners and
E
vents

Though it is important
that the DoD continue to proactively plan for information sharing with
anticipated partners and events, it is also critical to prepare for unanticipated partners and events. To
accomplish information sharing in diverse and disadvantaged situations, the DoD

shall enact and
implement adaptive policies, guidance, practices, protections, and technologies.

3.
3
.
4

Ensure
T
rust
A
cross
O
rganizations

A cornerstone of information sharing is trust
-

trust in the partner organizations including, but not
limited to, thei
r policies, procedures, systems, networks, and data. The DoD shall develop methods to
promote and establish trust. These methods will take into account and remain agile to accommodate
differing levels of trust based on the environment, situation, and exten
ded enterprise.

3.
4

Approaches to Achieve the Goa
ls

The information sharing goals will be accomplished through implementation of the following
approaches:

3.
4
.
1

Recognize and
L
everage the Information Sharing Value Chain

(FSAM 3.1)

The Information Sharing Value Chain articulates the “opportunity” of information sharing to support
informed decision making, shared situational awareness and improve knowledge at every level of the
DoD. The risks encountered at each step of the informatio
n sharing value chain must be managed to
mitigate negative consequences.

The strategic shift (opportunity) for the Department

s information sharing is to create the governance,
policy, technology, culture
,

and economics that promote all aspects of the Inf
ormation Sharing Value
Chain and facilitate the access, sharing and integration of information such that the DoD has freedom of
maneuverability.

3.
4
.
2

Forge
I
nformation
M
obility

Information mobility is the dynamic availability of information which is prom
oted by the business rules,
information systems, architectures, standards, and guidance/policy to address the needs of both planned
and unanticipated information sharing partners and events. Information mobility provides the
foundation for shared and user
-
defined situational awareness. Trusted information must be made visible,
accessible, and understandable to any authorized user in DoD or to external partners except where
limited by law or policy.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


12


Information mobility is both the foundation and core of the

DoD Information Sharing capability. There
are five elements of information mobility, as described by the following functional areas:

Technology


enables the flow, management and processing of information. Technology
includes architecture, core enterprise

services, and information communications and technology
infrastructure. Technology must support information mobility by requiring trusted information
to be visible, accessible, and understandable to any authorized user in DoD or to external
partners excep
t where limited by law or policy.


Workforce Information Sharing Competence



the workforce's ability to share information
across the enterprise. Workforce competence will be promoted through leadership examples,
shifts in cultural norms, and training on t
actics, techniques and procedures.


Social Networks



the ability to form and join social networks and communities of practice.
Trust relationships often begin with individual interactions that reinforce a shared mental model
of the decision environment. O
pportunities and norms to establish these networks, build trust
in, and accommodate the individual
'
s operating practices will be developed through the
federated information sharing community approach.


Policies



enable information mobility across
operational domains, clarif
y

roles and
responsibilities, define relationships, harmonize rules and procedures, and create a risk
managed environment that protects privacy and personal liberties. Span entire information life
cycle process from discovery to
disposition.


Security


promotes information protection and sharing with assurance and trust of information
availability, integrity, authentication, confidentiality, and non
-
repudiation.


3.
4
.
3

Make
I
nformation a
F
orce
M
ultiplier
Through

S
haring

Information as a force multiplier refers to exploiting relative information advantages against our
adversaries and to support effective, unified disaster response. Sharing is inherent in information
becoming a force multiplier and results in increased oper
ational effectiveness.


The following factors are challenges that must be addressed to enable information sharing to serve as a
force multiplier:


Volume

-

The amount of data that exists that could support the specific mission need or event.
As information

sharing improves, the volume of data available to analyze for decision making
will continue to grow.


Veracity
-

The ability to create relevance and de
-
conflict potentially conflicting data received
from a number of sources. While analysts and decision
-
ma
kers may receive more information,
more quickly, and from more directions, its accuracy, consistency, authority, currency and
completeness must be validated.


UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


13


Velocity

-

The timeliness of information required as compared to the ability to obtain, transfer,
and share information. Analysts and decision makers can receive a multitude of information
from a variety of sources, in real
-

or near
-
real
-
time.



Vector
-

Informati
on sharing is increasingly multidirectional and crosses domains and
boundaries (e.g., mission, functional, organizational, security, classification)

3.
4
.
4

Promote a
F
ederated Information Sharing Community/Environment

Governance, policy and cultural conside
rations establish the required multi
-
lateral relationships working
in a regulated, risk management environment that ensures information security, privacy, and trust. The
federated approach establishes and maintains a trusted community of information sharin
g that
promotes collaboration, leverages the information integrators in the community and reduces the
“seams” between organizations, domains and functions.


DoD operates with a federated approach to information sharing with external partners. This approach

establishes the relationship between legally autonomous entities and provides a binding framework for
information sharing and collaboration. Federated information sharing includes trust mechanisms,
standards, procedures and audit regimes to establish and
maintain trust and compliance with the
federation agreements.

3.
4
.
5

Address the
E
conomic
R
eality of
I
nformation
S
haring

Create guidance and incentives within the budgeting and resource allocation process to encourage
organizations to share information that

promotes informed decision making, improves situational
awareness, establishes economies of knowledge, and creates unity of effort.


Orchestrating funding and resource investments is critical for the successful implementation of
information sharing and
achievement of unity of effort. Existing initiatives, resources and evolving
requirements must be integrated to efficiently use scarce resources. The requirements, acquisition and
Planning, Programming, and Budgeting System (PPBS) processes must be synchro
nized to efficiently
provide funding and resources. A risk management approach will determine resource allocation and
investment. Measures of effectiveness will determine return on investment and the effectiveness of the
DoD information sharing initiative.

3.
5

Segment Architecture Vision Summary

(FSAM 2.2)

The vision describes the desired future state for DoD Information Sharing. It describes something that
does not exist today, and it intentionally states “what” the future state includes, rather than “how” the
Department arrives at such a state. The vision
for information sharing for the DoD is:


Deliver the power of information to ensure mission success

through an agile enterprise with freedom of maneuverability across the

information environment.


The vision above and the
architecture

articulated in this
document enhance the Department

s position
on information sharing by aligning the
DoD Information Sharing Strategy
, the
DoD Information Sharing
Implementation Plan
,
t
he
DoD

IEA
,
the
Department of Defense Net
-
Centric Services Strategy
,
and the
Information
E
nterprise Transition Plan (
I
ETP)
. The vision describes a future state where transparent,
UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


14


open, agile, timely, relevant, and trusted information sharing occurs to promote freedom of
maneuverability across the information environment. Successful accomplishme
nt of this vision will
result in efficiencies in operations, enhanced and shared situational awareness, and


ultimately


mission success.

3.
6

Performance Scorecard

(FSAM 2.3)

The performance scorecard consists of strategic, business, program and segment
performance data. This
analytical technique is designed to conform to

the

EAAF v3.0 reporting requirements. The purpose of
the Segment Performance is to create a reporting framework to measure how well the activities and
investments within a segment are performing.


The performance scorecard
depicted in
Figure 3.
6
-
1

developed b
y the
Federal Segment Architecture
Working Group (
FSAWG
)

implemented as

an Excel spreadsheet with tabs for the following:



Strategic Performance (PAR)
--
reports on the PAR Key Indicators that are aligned to the Segment.



Program Performance (PART)
--
rep
orts on the PART assessments for the programs aligned to the
Segment.



Business / Service Performance
--
creates multiple lines of sight based on the BRM Sub
-
functions that
the Segment performs. These sub
-
functions may be replaced with higher level busines
s processes
based on the Segment Business Architecture.



Segment Performance
--
captures the Segment Architecture Development metrics that measure the
successes of the architecture effort.




Figure
1
-

3.6
-
1: FSAM Performance Scorecard Template

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


15




As a first step towards developing a Performance Scorecard the DoD has developed a set of meaningful
performance metrics that are aligned with either the IM/IT goals or the objectives of the
Data and
Services
Delivery (
DSD
)

as identified within the DoD IEA. By developing a mapping of systems to PAR
and PART to the table elements this data can be used as the basis for developing the EAAF v3.0
reporting requirements.

3.
6
.
1

Data

and Services Deplo
yment Metrics
7

T
he Data and Services Deployment priority area has developed a handful of meaningful performance
metrics. These performance metrics are aligned with either the IM/IT goals or the objectives of DSD.
This set of metrics will support the assessment of progress

to the envisioned target state. Additional
information on the method used for establishing and structuring the metrics as well as the overall
objective of the DoD IETP metrics is available in DoD IETP
Chapter 4,
Performance Measurements
.


Table 3.
6
.1
-
1

identifies the metric that will support evaluating the transition. Detailed in
formation is
available by clicking the desired metric.

Table 3.6.1
-
1: DSD Metrics
1


Metric

Operational Definition

Alignment with IM
\
IT Strategic
Goals or Priority
Transformation

Percentage of registered
COIs that are meeting the
responsibilities of a COI


Percentage of active and effective COIs
that are meeting the responsibi
lities of a
COI described in DoD8320.1G as
demonstrated by discoverable artifacts
generated by the COIs. These artifacts
include:

A. Identify data assets and information
sharing capabilities, both operational and
developmental

that should conform to the
d
ata strategy goals.

B. Identify approaches to enable those
data assets and information sharing
capabilities to satisfy data strategy goals
and to measure the value to consumers of
shared data.

C. Develop and maintain semantic and
Promote Community of Interest
(COI) Based Solutions to identify
data and qualities of that data…




7

Adapted from the DoD IETP. Links are provided throughout the text. The DoD IETP
has restricted access to DoD
personnel.

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


16


structural agreements to

ensure that data
assets can be understood and used
effectively by COI members and
unanticipated users.

D. Register appropriate metadata artifacts
for use by the COI members and others.

E. Extend the DoD Discovery Metadata
Specification (DDMS) (Reference
(c)) as
required to ensure that COI
-
specific
discovery metadata is understandable for
enterprise searches.

F. Partner with a governing authority, as
appropriate, to ensure that COI
recommendations are adopted and
implemented through programs,
processes, s
ystems and organizations.

Percentage of programs

participating in at least
one COI


Percentage of programs submitted for
interoperability review during a fiscal year
participating in at least one COI

Promote Community of Interest
(COI) Based Solutions to identify
data and qualities of that data…

Percentage of combat
systems whose weapons
system track file or
analogous functionality, is
exposed on IP networks


Percentage of combat systems submit
ted
for interoperability review after FY2004
whose weapons system track file or
analogous functionality, is exposed on IP
networks, either directly or indirectly (via
pass
-
off to 3rd party for tagging)

Use XML Tagging to support the
understandability and
trust of data
AND Provide Data and Services
Registries to support the visibility
and accessibility of tagged data
and services

Percentage of busi
ness
systems whose
transaction data is
exposed on IP networks


Percentage of business systems submitted
for interoperability review or IRB review
after FY2004 whose business system
transaction data is appropriately exposed
on IP networks, either directly or
indirectly (via pass
-
off to 3rd party for
tagging)

Use XML T
agging to support the
understandability and trust of data
AND Provide Data and Services
Registries to support the visibility
and accessibility of tagged data
and services

Percentage of Intel related
systems whose
transaction data is
exposed on IP networks


Percentage of Intel related systems
submitted for interoperability review after
FY2004 whose data is appropriately
exposed on IP networks, eithe
r directly or
indirectly (via pass
-
off to 3rd party for
tagging)

Use XML Tagging to support the
understandability and trust of data
AND Provide Data and Services
Registries to support the visibility
and accessibility of tagged data
and services

Number of CES available
for general use on NIPR
net


Number of CES available for general use
on NIPR net

Develop standard, reusable core
enterprise services that are
employed across the enterprise

Number of CES available
for general use on SIPR
net


Number of CES available for general use
on SIPR net

Develop standard, reusable core
enterprise services that are
employed across the enterprise

UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


17


Percentage of services
registered during the
fiscal year developed
from existing CES


Percentage of services registered during
the fiscal year developed from existing
CES

Develop standard, reusable core
enterprise services that are
employed across the ent
erprise

Number of MES available
for general use on NIPR
net


Number of MES available for general use
on NIPR net

Develop standard, reusable
miss
ion enterprise services that are
employed across the enterprise

Number of MES available
for general use on SIPR
net


Number of MES available fo
r general use
on SIPR net

Develop standard, reusable
mission enterprise services that are
employed across the enterprise

Percentage of new
services registered during
the fiscal year developed
from existing MES


Percentage of new services registered
during the fiscal year developed from
existing MES

Develop standard, reusable
mission enterprise services that are
employed across the enterprise

Percentage of COIs that
have established a
names
pace in the DOD
Metadata registry


Percentage of active/effective COIs that
have established a namespace in the
Metadata Registry and are in the process
of populating it in the DoD Metadata
Registry

Provide Data and Services
Registries to support the visi
bility
and accessibility of tagged data
and services

Percentage of COIs that
have registered their
services


Percentage of stable/mature COIs t
hat
have registered their services

Provide Data and Services
Registries to support the visibility
and accessibility of tagged data
and services

Number of Registries that
are visible and accessible
via the NCES discovery
service


Number of Registries that are visible,
accessible via the NCES discovery service

Provide Data and Services
Registries to support the visibility
and accessibility of tag
ged data
and services

Number of COIs that
utilize Web 2.0
functionality to support
their warfighting,
business or intelligence
processes


Number of non
-
dormant COIs that utilize
Web 2.0 functionality to support their
warfighting, business or intelligence
processes

Employ Web 2.0 social
networking tools to efficiently
enable broad audience
participation .

Number of COIs that
utilize Web 2.0
functionality to support
their COI processes


Number of non
-
dormant COIs that utilize
Web 2.0 functionality to support their COI
processes

Emp
loy Web 2.0 social
networking tools to efficiently
enable broad audience
participation .

Percent of services
generated from the
adoption of com
mercial
industry


Percent of services generated from the
adoption of commercial industry

Leverage Service Oriented
Practices to efficiently develop and
share information services

Percentage of completion
of required policies that
allow Service Oriented
Practices to proceed


Percentage of completion of required
policies that allow Service Oriented
Practices to proceed

Leverage Service Oriented
Practices to efficiently develop and
share information services

Number of SO Enterprise
Agreements awarded and
The number of agreements established
with COTS Vendors and providers of SO
Leverage Service Oriented
Practices to efficiently develop and
UNCLASSIFIED

_____________________________________________________________________________________


18


manage
d by ESI


integration services with ESI who
centrally managing the SLAs

share information services

Number of Programs
using ESI vehicles for SO
services

The number of programs who are the end
customer of the agreements who are
trying to implemen
t SO services

Leverage Service Oriented
Practices to efficiently develop and
share information services


3