The successful integration of newcomers - Master's thesis

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Jul 30, 2012 (5 years and 1 month ago)

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MASARYK UNIVERSITY

FACULTY OF INFORMATICS


The successful integration of newcomers
(guidelines)

MASTER’S THESIS

Bc.
Ivan Holko

Brno, 20
11






Declaration


Hereby I declare that this paper is my original authorial work, which I have worked out by my
own. All sources, references and literature used or excerpted during elaboration of this work
are properly cited and listed in complete reference to the due sourc
e.


In Br
no, 25
th
May

2011

Bc. Ivan Holko

Advisor:

RNDr. Zdenko Staníček, Ph.D.








Acknowledgement


I would like to thank R
NDr. Zdenko Staníček, Ph.D.
for comments, suggestions and time
spent supervising this thesis.








Abstract


The aim of the thesis is to
develop a generic framework and guidelines for a successful
integration of newcomers in larger
,

IT
service
-
oriented
,

business companies based on the
proven best practices, known methods and operations management experiences so that
employers can either sta
ndardize or improve the process of integration and significantly
shorten the time period during which a newcomer becomes fully independent.









Keywords


Newcomer, n
ewcomer
s’

guidelines, employee
induction, knowledge management
,

IT
service
-
oriented

business company,

project










Contents


1

Employee induction

................................
................................
...................

3


2

Role of

knowledge management in the induction process

..........................

5


3

Current situation

................................
................................
.......................

13

3.1

Analysis

................................
................................
................................
..................

13

3.1.1

An unguided induction

................................
................................
..............

16

3.1.2

Short
-
term induction

................................
................................
.................

17

3.1.3

Checklists and skill matrixes driven induction
................................
..........

19

3.2

Evaluation

................................
................................
................................
..............

23


4

Newcomers’
guidelines

................................
................................
.............

26

4.1

Project objectives

................................
................................
................................
...

26

4.1.1

Target solution

................................
................................
...........................

26

4.1.2

Overall approach

................................
................................
........................

27

4.1.3

Key assumptions

................................
................................
........................

32

4.2

Project scope

................................
................................
................................
..........

41

4.2.1

Deliverables

................................
................................
...............................

41

4.3

Project framework

................................
................................
................................
.

42

4.3.1

Stakeholders, organization breakdown, roles & responsibilities

.............

42

4.3.2

Time plan

................................
................................
................................
...

46


5

Summary

................................
................................
................................
..

47

5.1

Benefits

................................
................................
................................
..................

47

5.1.1

Financial

................................
................................
................................
....

47

5.1.2

Other benefits

................................
................................
............................

50

5.2

Lessons learned

................................
................................
................................
.....

52


6

Conclusion

................................
................................
...............................

53


Bibliography

................................
................................
................................
....

56


List of figur
es

................................
................................
................................
...

59

List of tables

................................
................................
................................
.....

60


Appendices

A

Conceptual view of learning

................................
................................
.............
61

B

Savings (more possible scenarios)

................................
................................
...

66

C

Newcomers’ guidelines

................................
................................
..................

68






Page
1





Introduction

This
thesis
,
The successful integration of newcomers (guidelines)
,

is neither
cookbook, manual

nor how
-
to.

It is to be understood as a
valuable

project
aim
of which
is to
provide

a generic framework and guidelines for a successful integration of
a
new employee to
be adopted and adapted by larger
,

IT service
-
oriented
,

business companies.


The first chapter
reveals the approach of firms towards the induction of
employees
,

gives a brief overview explaining what an employee induction is, why it is important and
formally defines the induction program.


Sin
c
e a
n
induction p
rogram is
an
important
part of
o
rganizations’ knowledge
assets,
the second chapter introduces role of knowledge management in
the
induction process.
It
provides different, interesting, view on knowledge management

discipline

from business and
employees’ de
velopment perspective. Knowledge creating processes, as defined in Nonaka’s
and Takeuchi’s book
The Knowledge Creating Company
,

are
mentioned
as well as practical
meaning of The knowledge spiral.

The last part
indicates
the requirements
, which

operations
management
needs to fulfill
,

such that
bot
h new and
existing employees’ development is fully
supported.


The following chapter
briefly analyzes and evaluates the current situation in terms of
tools
,
methodologies
and existing procedures
used for inducting new starters by
some of
IT
service
-
oriented firms

in Czech Republic (
AT&T Global Network Services Czech Republic
s.r.o. , IBM Global Services Delivery Center Brno, Hewlett
-
Packard s.r.o , Logica Czech
Republic s.r.o.
)
.

The
three
most com
mon ways of inducting employees are
introduced and
assessed
within this chapter, too.



The fourth chapter,

Newcomers


guidelines
,
exhaustively
de
fines
the
objective of this
project
, highlighting eight important
requirements (reflecting major flaws of
current
induction programs used by selected larger, IT service
-
oriented
,

companies)
, which a
new
solution must
fulfill, and
describing the overall approach take
n by
the
author
.

It
also
gives an
insight into
commonly used intranet portals technologies
, reco
mmending structure
of such

portal,
and
gives a solution for dilemma of gaining accesses, everything
in details.
Last
subhead
, Project framework, clearly defines
who the
stakeholders
are (Use Case diagram),
what
their main responsibilities
are
(
extended
RACI matrix


RASCI matrix
)

and
how
they fit
into
the
organization (organizational chart).
Finally,
project tasks are specified on the

high
level and project milestones
are
highlighted.




INTRODUCTION


Page
2



The next
chapter to the last one
summarizes benefits, which
Newcomers


guidelines
bring along,
and offers

calculation
s

in terms of financial savings first
ly
. Secondly, it mentions

other five important
areas, where
there was remarkable
improvement
recorded
(increased
productivity,

improved management control of induction pro
cess and newcomers’ progress
and
three
others)
.
Lessons learned during the lifecycle of this project are included in this
chapter, too.


The last chapter provides a summary
of the project
and comments t
he results
obtained after
the implementation phase
in terms of its
usefulness
,
highlighting

the most
important occurrences
.








Page
3





1

Employee induction

In IT services, people are the brand. People make or break a customer encounter. For
that reason, l
arge
r
, IT service
s
-
oriented, business companies invest
billion dollars a year in
education, training and supporting career growth of their employees.

However investing in
people and processes
, which
support them
,

is not the only key to
success.
C
ompanies

often
make the mistake and ignore induction periods. The

new employee
s are

left to pick things up
by themselves, and from
the
existing employees. This costs time, money and buries th
e idea
of
an
induction
that
is the integration of an
employee
into a team
so that they
successfully
and happily settle
as soon as
possible.


When new employee
s are

taken on
, it is
very important to gi
ve them the right
induction
. Thanks to this
,

both new starter
s

and a company will benefit. The
induction period
is to
be

understood as the basics

for getting the most out of the employee
s

and to
govern
their
success in

a
business.

Obviously, an
induction
is
given at the beginning of
an
employment
and
stretches for a certain period of time

(days,
weeks, or even months
)
.

Its q
uality
has

an
effect on
t
he employee
s’

perception and

comprehensi
on of a

business and how w
ell they will
int
egrate into it during this time

[1]
.


Induction training is not skills training. It is much more. Induction training is about
the fundamentals that
are so obvious to the seasoned
employees

(e.g. what the dress cod
e
is,

what the shifts are, what the routine for holidays or sickness is,
where

t
he canteen

is …). New
starters want to get to know goals
,
strategy

and a mission
of the organization
, its culture,
respected values, internal rules, and definitely
the job they

a
re
required

to do,
methods

and
expectations.

In terms of
values and philosophy, induction
program is
a
good
op
p
o
rtunity
for
establishing
expectations
and principles of ethics,
social responsibility,

integrity

and all the
other concepts
as a
bedrock of
to
day’s

responsible companies

[2]
.


Formally, a
n induction program is the process used within many businesses to
welcome new employees to the company and prepare them for their new role. According to
TPI
-
theory
1

it should include development of theoretical a
nd practical skills, but also meet
interaction needs that
exist among the new employees [3
]. An induction program is an
important process for bringing staff into an organization. It provides an introduction to the



1

TPI
-
theory

refers that new employees need to develop theoretical (T) and practical (P) skills towards
the performance of the new job, but also satisfy needs of (I) interaction that exist among the new
employees. These three conditions must be fulfilled to become int
egrated to the organization. This
theory is important to approach an understanding of integration and socialization effects [5].



EMPLOYEE INDUCTION


Page
4



working environment and the set
-
up of the
employee within the organization. The process
covers the employer
s’

and employee
s’

rights and the terms and conditions of employment. As
a priority the induction program must cover any legal and compliance requirements for
working at the company. At the sa
me time, it is part of an organizations knowledge
management process and is intended to enable the new starter to become a useful, integrated
member of the team, rather than being thrown in at the deep end without understanding how
to do their job, or how
their role fits in with the rest of the company. Good induction
programs increase productivity and reduce short
-
term turnover of staff. These programs can
also play a critical role under the socialization to the organization in terms of performance,
attitu
de
s and organizational commitment

[3
]
.






ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MA
NAGEMENT

IN THE INDUCTION PRO
CESS


Page
5





2

R
ole of k
nowledge management

in
the
induction process

Enterprises do
realize how

important it is to know what they know and to be able to
get maximum
return
of the knowledge.
This knowledge
dwells

in
shelves, databases,
knowledge bases or peoples’ heads and is spread over the enterprise.
So often times it
happened that one department of a company does the same work and repeats

work of
another

department because
it is either impossible or almost
unsustainable
to keep the track
of knowledge.

To improve this, enterprises need to know what their knowledge assets are and
how to manage
and make use of these assets to get maximum of them.
Unfortunately, most
traditional company policies and controls foc
us on tangible assets of the company, leaving
their important knowledge assets unmanaged.
Success in market, which
is continually
becoming more

and more competitive,
strongly
depends on

the quality of knowledge that
organizations apply.
For instance
IT ser
vices provision depends on knowledge of various
areas
starting

with
customer requirements,
existing infrastructure,
networks
,

servers,
security,

ending with new technologies.

Since the marketplace is increasingly competitive and
the rate of innovation is rising, the knowledge must
b
e assimilated
and must evolve
at
even

faster rate.

Corporations, especially large
r

IT
-
service orient
ed, organize their business so

that
they
are
ai
m
ed at creating

customer value.
Staffing is being reduced as well as management
structures;

there is much pressure
on people to be able to stand in one each other (even in
different roles)

when needed and hidden expectations
stressed on newcomers to
be
tra
in
ed

quickly.

In line with that there is a need to substitute
informal knowledge management

and

tacit knowledge by
formal methods and explicit knowledge wherever possible.

On the other
side,

competitive

pressure reduces

the size of
labor

force
that
possesses this
kind of
knowledge.

It
resides

in their heads and it takes

lot of time
to experience and acquire.
The
fact is that
em
ployees do not
have
so much time for this as the
y had in the past by reason that
he trend
nowadays
is

to retire earlier
, to be
mobile

and

more
flexible
.

Moreover, e
mployees
with that valuable and unique knowledge may no longer be there
.
That is why it is
e
nterprises’
utmost
interest
is
to
avoid any loss of knowledge

[4
].


Knowledge assets are company
-
specific resources tha
t are indispensable to create
values for the firm. They are inputs, outputs and moderating factors of the knowledge
-
creating process

[5
]
.
Knowledge management is not only about managing these knowledge
assets. It is about managing the processes that act
upon the a
ssets. These processes include
developing knowledge,
prese
rving knowledge, using knowledge
and sharing knowledge.
Therefore, k
nowledge management involves the identification and analysis of available and


ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MA
NAGEMENT

IN THE INDUCTION PRO
CESS


Page
6



required knowledge assets and knowledge as
set related processes, and the subsequent
planning and control of actions to develop both the assets and the processes so as to
fulfill

organizational

objectives

[4
]
.
To

effectively managed knowledge creation and exploitation, a
company has to map its inve
ntory of knowledge assets. Cataloguing is however not enough


knowledge assets are dynamic; new knowledge assets can be created from existing knowledge
assets. There are four categories of knowledge assets according to
Nonaka and Takeuchi [5
]:


EXPERIENTA
L


knowledge

assets


-

tacit knowledge through common
experiences
:




Skills and know
-
how of individual



Inter and intra team relations, team
climate



Trust
, e
nergy, passion and tension


CONCEPTUAL

knowledge

assets


-

explicit knowledge articulated through
images, symbols
or
language:




Product concepts



Design



Brand quality

ROUTINE

knowledge

a
ssets


-

t
acit knowledge routinized and
embedded in actions and practices:




Know
-
how in daily operations



Organizational routines



Organization

culture



SYSTEMATIC

knowledge assets


-

systemized and packaged assets
:




Documents, specifications, manuals,
how
-
to’s
, databases



Work instructions, internal rules,
permanently valid reminders



Patents, licenses

Figure 1: Knowledge assets

[5]


There

are several issues

connected with iden
tifying these knowledge assets
and being
cap
able
to use

and manage
them in co
st
-
effective and efficient way. Enterprises need:




to create a culture that encourages knowledge sharing



to ensure that the kn
owledge

is correctly understood (by using enterprise
-
wide
vocabulary
, for instance
)



to be able to identify

and expli
citly represent their knowledge



to share and re
-
use their knowledge among differing applicati
ons for various types
of users (t
his implies being abl
e to share existing knowled
ge sources and also
future ones)




ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MA
NAGEMENT

IN THE INDU
CTION PROCESS


Page
7



Firstly, organizations need to be able to analyz
e and plan their

business
(from
knowledge point of view)
, looking at
the knowledge
they currently have and
the knowledge
they will need
for future
business processes
, at
t
he strategic level.

At the tactical level
,
organizations

might be
concerned with
pinpointing
and
formalizing

existing knowledge,

gaining

new knowledge for future use,
anchoring
it
an
d
developing
systems that enable
effective and efficient application of the knowledge within the
organization
.
Finally, a
t the
operational level
,

knowledge is
practically
used in every

day by
employees
who need access to
the right knowledge, at the right time, in the r
ight location

[
4
]
.



One of the first and most critical points
Ikujiro Nonaka

makes
in the book
The
Knowledge Creating Company

is

that many organizations ignore some of the most

important available knowledge. Most organizations

focus their management on
the explicit
knowledge,

the stuff that is easy to explain and write down. But

every person has a great deal
of
tacit knowledge

-

things
that

are
know
n

but
they are difficult to explain or communicate.
Tacit knowledge is the knowledge that is referred to as

'vitally important for innovative
process'

[6]
.
Innovation is inseparable part of the interactive m
odel of knowledge
dissemination (
see
Figure 2

depicted below
)
.
I
nnovation

is
attained when new knowledge is
disseminated into practice and implemented there
. Knowledge is produced through human
resources (teamwork)

and i
t differs from any other
capital good in its flexibility
-

reallocation

of human resources can result in new teams that are able to produce new forms of specialist
knowledge. Ability to do thi
s is treated as a major precondition of success.



Figure 2:
Circular model of knowledge dissemination

[6]


For instance, if one is trying to help someone but he can not tell them (just show
them), that is tacit knowledge.

Induction programs and e
ducation systems
f
ocus on
delivering and

evaluating

explicit knowledge.
Recent
graduates provide

more current

explicit
knowledge at a greatly reduced salary cost.

To the contrary, companies ru
n largely on tacit

knowledge of the business and operations, of
which

the newbies have

zero.
For this reason,
m
any businesses
either
hire
(
back
)

the laid
experienced

people just to keep the business



ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MA
NAGEMENT

IN THE INDUCTION PRO
CESS


Page
8



running
or
select po
tential newcomers
more carefully
[
7
].

The relationship between explicit
and tacit knowledge can be described by the “Iceberg” metaphor:



Figure
3
:
The Iceberg metaphor

of relationship between tacit and explicit knowledge

[
8
]


Referring

to The Nonaka and Takeuchi Knowledge Spiral,
knowledge
is analyzed
creating in four
areas (a
two by two matrix of knowledge
moving
from
tacit or

explicit
to
tacit
or explicit

where e
ach quadrant needs

a

different
way
of thinking and interaction.

Our most
familiar process is
combination
that represents transfor
mation of explicit knowledge again
to explicit knowledge. One takes explainable knowledge, combines it with other explicit
knowledge and develop
s

new explicit knowledge.
In terms of a successful induction program,
t
his process
is required to
step

into before newcomer joins the team.
It
can be characterized
by
t
he development
new
or
correction of existing
procedures, work instructions,
spe
cifications, manuals, how
-
to’s…


The book
offers plenty of s
tories
about
product development collaborations
.
T
here
is

a
strong theme in all of these stories
. The message is
that
successful design often requires
getting tacit knowledge into an explicit form so that
one
can develop effective designs.

This
process is called

externalization
.
For one

to
better understand it,
one of
the stories, a

development of the automatic breadmaker
, c
an be used

as an example
.
No matter how many
times p
roducers interviewed bakers many times and watched
them doing their
job,
result was
always
the same


producers’ design failed in producing
good bread.
However,
after some
engineers
introduced and apprenticed themselves to baking

and

made a lo
t of bread
, they got
to know the whole

process

and its key aspects

and finally
they
were able to make mu
ch better
bread.

And the same parallel can be found in
the

induction process
-

organization h
iring
employees

in role of producers
,
newcomers (new employees)
in role o
f engineers (
who had to


ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MA
NAGEMENT

IN THE INDUCTION PRO
CESS


Page
9



a
cquire
tacit knowledge of baking

in the aforementioned story
)

and
the
existing

(
experienced
and skilled
)

employees in role of bakers
who were
inducting
engineers
for them to
understand the process of baking due to the fact that this knowledge was not externalized


everything resided in backers’ heads.

The key
to su
ccess is an ability
to
decompose k
nowledge

(comprising
strategy, prac
tice, method, or approach
)

to information

(
comprising
description,
definition, or persp
ective
)
and
then
to particular data

as depicted in

Figure 4
.



Figure 4:
Knowledge
decomposition

[9]


Internalization

is the process whereby something one learns becomes from some
time
point in automatic. This is a transformation of explicit knowledge to tacit.

Once the
process is deeply learned, it becomes internal completely automated. Basically, one can do
something without noticing that he is doing it.
Internalization goes hand in hand with the
develop
ment of a context
.

To be more
specific, w
hen

a pattern rel
ation exists among

the data
and information, the pattern has the potential to represent knowledge. It only becomes
knowledge, however, when one is able to realize and understand the patterns and their
implications

(see
Figure 5
)
.

Wisdom
then
arises when on
e understands the foundational
principles responsible for the patterns representing knowledge being what they are. And
wisdom, even more so than knowledge, tends to create its own context.

It
embodies principle,
i
nsight, moral, or archetype.




ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MA
NAGEMENT

IN THE INDUCTION PRO
CESS


Page
10





F
igure 5:
Developing a context [10
]


Internalization, in process of newcomers’ induction, represents mastering of existing
procedures, instructions and many other, periodically repeated, activities by new employee.

The interesting thing is that when one pays attenti
on to how he is performing these activities,
it impairs his performance
-

try writing down
instructions for overtaking a car!


The most powerful human learning capacity is through
socialization



through
observing behavior
of others and imitating it.

The f
act is that humans survive

in their culture
only
thanks to

socialization. It is said that the reward and punishment principle
is at the root
of learning and in fact it is true
-

one learns by watching
how
others

are rewarded or
punished for their behavior.

The same applies to induction process
-

if a new employee joins
the team and someone behaves in a way that
it triggers specific reaction, newcomer realizes
(often unconsciously) to do or not to behave in the same way (depends on what reaction was
trigg
ered
)
.

Person, who is new to the team, gets to know
team members
, inter and intra
team
relations,
feels t
he
atmosphere
and gradually gains trust

through socialization.


Management tends to think
of designs and solutions as if
it is happening in the
explici
t
-
to
-
explicit combination and
deduction mode.
Nonaka
and Takeuchi
claim

that
that
problem resolution
,
design

a
nd knowledge creation processes are
much
more effective
when

they spiral through all

q
uadrants

of

The knowledge spiral depicted i
n
Figure 6
:





ROLE OF KNOWLEDGE MA
NAGEMENT

IN THE INDUCTION PRO
CESS


Page
11




Figure 6: The knowledge

spiral

[5]


In the induction process it is utmost necessary
to rotate advisedly
through the cycle
multiple
times

until the knowledge is solid
and accurate

enough for a

team to
take
advantage
of a newcomer.
For processes to work
effectively and effic
iently in each quadrant,
management

is to

ensure that the existing employees
posses the right skills and have such
kind of relationship that the knowledge is allowed to emerge.

It
is worth mentioning that
the
knowledge creation is extremely difficult
in the pyramid concept of organizations

(larger IT
service
-
oriented companies definitely fall into this category)
, where multiple aspects
decisions are passed up to the higher level
s (This is one of Nonaka’s an
d Takeuchi’s
interesting conclusions, too)
.

The middle managers
, guided by the director,
effectively
develop the co
mplex knowledge that is
needed for success of the organization
.
This
information is then passed down to operation
s management
who

is expected

to
:




develop newcomers and existing employees



introduce new employees to their tasks



conduct appraisal and counseling



provide a motivating environment for his/her staff



develop the professional competence of the staff


In order to
provide full
support
for
knowledge creating process and knowledge
development
of newcomers,
operations management
is not to
be tied to relaying or
ders or

developing reports

only
. These activities can be easily
replace
d
with
automated tools

(macros,
scripts)
.




ROLE OF

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMEN
T

IN THE INDUCTION P
ROCESS


Page
12



I
n the book
The Knowledge Creating Company,
Nonaka and Takeuchi
implicitly
pr
ovide

very useful way to think

about

the company, facilitation of units (departments,
teams) within companies

in terms of newcomers’ and existing employees’
development, as
well as critical l
essons for people who a
re responsible for structuring

organizations and
developing

induction programs, realizing the
importance and potential
of tacit knowledge
.







CURRENT SITUATION


Page
13





3

Current situation

3.1

Analysis

There has been a considerable shift from the primary and sec
ondary sectors of the
economy to the tertiary sector
(
service industry
)

for the last 30 years.
Nowadays, service
sector is the largest and also the fastest
-
growing one.

IT service oriented business companies
have been
expand
ing

their portfolio to offer man
y more services in reaction to the

continuous
progress in information technologies

and, o
n the other side, customers need help in sorting
out the new scope of technology choices
. T
hey
want an advice on the right strategy for their
business

and need help to

better
understand the

impact of new technologies on their overall
enterprise strategy.


To be able to fulfill customer’s
demanding requirements companies
need the right
people in

the right place

at the right time
.

They need
professionals,

who
possess
both

hard
and soft skills,
with rich
experiences

and there are two ways how to acquire people such
people. Companies may either acquire professionals and hire them directly

(just when there
is a demand)

or
continuously
educate them


have
people
become
professionals
,

from the
time when they join a company,
by
supporting their career growth
,

motivat
e them
, giving the
right direction, guidance and much more.



On the other side, not everyone w
orks (and
wants to work) hard and move forward to
reach the
int
e
n
ded
top. Because of that fact people responsible for hiring, inducting and
mentoring employees
in an IT service oriented business companies should
be
capable

to
recognize who are the best candidates with service oriented approach, willing to broaden
their

knowledge.

This is definitely not the easy task for
companies’

leaders what is supported
by the fact that the average
attrition

rate of employees working on
“starting”
position
s

similar
to helpdesk agents or the 1
st

level support (also referred to as the Tier 1 support)

is less than
33

months. In addition,
the
m
edian
number of
years
that employees had been with their
current employer

(
in IT
industry
)

was 5,0 in January 2010
(Table 1)
.

T
he length of the
employment is
directly
proportional to the age of an employee


the younger person the
shorter period of time
2
.






2

The median tenure of workers ages 55 to 64 (10 years) was more than three times that of workers
ages 25 to 34 (3,1 years) [1
1
].



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14



Industry

\

Year

2000

2002

2
004

2006

2008

2010

Information

3,4

3,3

4,3

4,8

4,7

5,0

Publishing, except Internet

4,2

4,8

4,7

5,3

4,7

5,6

Motion pictures and

sound
recording industries

1,6

2,3

2,2

1,9

1,9

3,8

Radio and television
broadcasting and cable

subscriptions programming

3,6

3,1

4,0

4,6

3,4

4,3

Telecommunications

4,3

3,4

4,6

5,3

6,9

6,6

Professional and business services

2,
4

2,
7

3,
2

3,
2

3,
1

3,
4

Professional and technical
services

3,6

3,1

3,6

3,8

3,3

4,0

Management, administrative,
and waste services

2,0

2,1

2,6

2,5

2,5

2,9

Administrative and
support services

1,8

1,9

2,4

2,4

2,4

2,8

Waste management and
remediation services

3,6

4,3

3,4

4,1

4,1

2,9

Table 1:

Median years of tenure with current employer for employed wage and salary workers by
industry, selected years, 2000
-
10 [
11
]


Wrong decisions during hiring
together with

poor induction
process
do cost
businesses huge amount of money each year. The costs of bad decisions
and incomplete
or
missing induction programs
negatively reflect on organizations’
profits, market share

and
competitiveness,

not
talking about
employee
morale and
at
t
rition
.
When

the same errors are
being made repeatedly
or no improvement seen
it is not a secret that
costs
get
increase
d

th
en.
It is believed that
one

hopes to learns
learn from mistakes, unfortunately
, this is
not always
the case.
If
costs of

a

weak or completely missing induction process the bottom line of an
organization

can be impacted.
In addition, m
istakes go beyond losing the
full
services of
a

person. There are
also

indirect costs
, administrative expenses

to the business and, before all,
p
oor performance

of an individual

w
hat results in
an i
ncreased workload

and the
variation
in
operational flow for the
present
employees
.


Therefore there
is

a must to minimize the number of failures during the hiring

process
and, as for the induction phase, ensure that it is improved

standardize
d

and
the time period

during which a newcomer becomes fully independent is as short as possible. As a reaction on
these
requirements this thesis

provides the solution in form o
f the
“Newcomers


guidelines”.

To achieve the best result, that incorporates and links to
tools, methodologies and existing


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15



procedures used
nowadays
for inducting new starters

the current situation
has to
analyzed

first
.


Several l
arge, IT service
-
oriented,
companies
acting in Czech Republic were chosen to
be asked for participation

on a survey

that was conducted via e
-
mail
communication,
supported by a phone conversation
(
in one case
)
.
There were responses received from:





AT&T Gl
obal Network Services Czech Republic s.r.o.



IBM Global Services Delivery Center
Brno



Hewlett
-
Packard s.r.o



Logica Czech Republic s.r.o.


Each of the companies
was

asked the following questions:


1.

Are you able to determine the time point (since join
ed the team) when a new
starter
becomes fully independent and valuable team member?


If yes:

a.

H
ow long does it take?



2.

Are there any existing methods that your company utilizes when inducting new
starters?


If yes:

a.

For which time
period?

(Newcomers' first week
at work, first month, 3
months…
)

b.

Could you, please, briefly describe them or share some templates with me?


3.

What kind of documents

(checklists/matrixes/…
)
and tools

(software)
do you

use
to support this process?


It must
be said that

there was
a
noticeable

response time
-

it took
up to 7 weeks for
some companies

to
provide an answer
.
T
he
information, which had been obtained by the
eighth week from when companies were approached for the first time,

was

processed

and
analyzed

afterwards
. I
n order to gain
reason
able
, objective and exhaustive information about
the
methods
currently
utilized for induction
,

the evaluation was done based on the following
criteria that are important from the induction process’ perspective:




D
uration of the
controlled induction



R
esources available to a newcomer



M
ethods commonly used during the controlled induction



N
ewcomer’s mentor



O
wners of actions (tasks) resulting from the induction program



C
hecking newcomer’s progress



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16





C
onfrontation between newcomers



A
sses
sment of a newcomer


criteria


It was found out that t
here
are

three commonly used

methods utilized across the
organization
s

that
participated in the

survey
.

3.1.1

An

unguided induction

A
lmost every IT services oriented business company claims that the area of

inducting
new employees is developed and therefore no extra attention should be paid to it

what is
demonstrably

not true.

Based on a survey done in terms of this project it was found out that
up to 10%
of teams
simply
don’t
conduct a
steered

induction due

to absence of such matter.


The
controlled
part of the
induction usually takes 1 day (the top is 5 days) and consists
only from the introductory meeting
between a new employee and ei
ther a
M
anager or a
Technical L
eader of the team

(also referred to as a T
eam Leader)
, who introduce the
company, describe the job and the team, inform about the attendance and insinuate the next
progress. After that a newcomer is introduced to the team
.
Then, t
he Shift Leaders or the
most talkative people
do the first step and start
giving an insi
ght
into the job from their
perspective.

New employees are
left to pick things up by
them
and from the existing
employees

what completely
buries

the idea of
an
induction

and also
c
osts time and money
.


There are ve
ry limited resources for newcomers
to utilize. At the team’s intranet
portal
sites
there is not a dedicated section for them.
Most of how
-
to’s, manuals,
descriptions

and documents either do

n
o
t exist or they are outdated (it is not an exception
that the la
st
update of some of them
was done in
2005 year
)
.
Neither o
bsolete
instructions

for requesting
accesses to different systems
contribute
to the smooth process of the induction.

In this case
newcomer has to rely on seasoned employees’ knowledge and experience since the most
relevant and up
-
to
-
date information dwell
s

in their heads.
I
t has to be pointed out that
some

information is not always
necessarily to be correct. Because of
this fact, new starters
have
been
provided
with untrue facts since the beginning

what is
a
serious mistake
during any
learning process and it is not to be fixed
as
easily

as expected
.


The most common methods
used
during the induction period are self
-
study

and e
-
learning. One of the
dis
advantages (and advantages at the same time) is exposure


when a
new employee is unexpectedly assigned a task to work on

w
ithout knowing anything


no
background, no instructions, no information
given


just a basic facts
or

fragme
n
t
s provided.

The last and least
used method

used is “on the job coaching”
that is
applied seldom



literally
depends on the existing employees’ busyness and willingness.




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17



This implies that there is no
t a
dedicated
person


newcomer’s mentor during
the
process (if not counting a Manager or the Team Leader giving general overview within the
introductory meeting). Also applications, requests (to systems), arrangements or any other
step must be performed and initiated by a new employee who is sole owner

of actions. It may
have, and very often has, a negative impact on employee’s motivation, morale and perception
of the company. Not being pushed or reasonably forced to do something, to move ahead,
means that the
available
potential of the employee
is not
fully used.


Consequently it is difficult to check and see how (and whether) a new starter is
progressing. The
adequate
data is not available, there are no facts one can stick to.
An
unguided induction gives zero possibilities for
the objective
conf
rontat
ion between
employees
,

who have been staying in a company for different periods of time,
for sake of an
assessment.

Team members’ feedback which is based on the perception, feelings gained
during the creation of either personal or formal relationship, is v
ery important but not the
decisive criteria.


Nobod
y can decide when a newcomer
becomes fully independent and valuable
member of the team

but
definitely
it is more than three months’ time period.
The reason why
just t
hree months
are mentioned is that this is the first breakpoint in employment contract.
This is the period during which the contract can be terminated
either by the company or the
new employee
without
providing a reason. Good to keep in mind in case doesn’t fit into te
am
leaders’
ideas and conception of the team even though such a person successfully passed the
selection process and was accepted at the job interview. The sooner non IT service oriented
people are unmasked the more time and possibilities for all parties i
nvolved to do the
necessary re
-
arrangements. But an unguided induction is something that can hardly help in
this respect
.


3.1.2

Short
-
term
induction

Almost one third of the approached teams (30%
to be
exact) use more elaborate
schemes and methods for inducting
newcomers.

A controlled part of the induction process
takes between 5 and 14 business days.
A new starter is introduced to the team and then
usually
attends two meetings, one shortly after another. During the first one, conducted by a
Manager, the company,

its history and
scope of services are

introduced

and an overall
overview of the organizational structure and hierarchy is provided.

A more precise
d
escri
ption

of the

job
and practical information are then provided by the Team Leader

(a
practical exhibition may follow)
. It is
also
deep
-
rooted that
t
he Shift Leaders and

the Focal


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18



points
3

for specific activities
then take care and
giv
e

newcomer
an
insight into
the job
.
There
is a schedule available to both mentors and newcomer who follo
w it.
An overwhelming
majority of teams uses the one similar to the table depicted below.



9:00

10:00

11:00

12:00

13:00

14:00

15:00

16:00

17:00

Mon

welcome day

Tue

welcome day

site tour,
showing
around

lunch

activities
performed
by the
team

overview
of
other
teams

a
session

shadowing the shift
present at work

Wed

overview of internal
processes

team room
introduction

lunch

c
ore

1

activity
-

introduction

activity 1
-

mentoring

activity 1
-

practicing

shadowing
the shift
present at
work

Thu

activity 2
-

mentoring

activity 2
-

practicing

core 2
activity
-

introduction

lunch

self
-
study, e
-
learning

activity 1
-

mentoring

activity 1
-

on the job
coaching

shadowing
the shift
present at
work

Fri

activity 2
-

mentoring

activity 2
-

on the job
coaching

additional
activities
-

introduction

lunch

self
-
study: internal rules, processes, presentations, manuals, how
-
tos, …

Table 2
:

Short
-
term
guidelines
schedule


In comparison with an unguided induction,
a knowledge base (in form of team room,
for example) of
teams conducting short term induction
contains
a dedicated section created
solely
for newcomers where
useful
links and documents, guides for self study, how
-
to’s,
instructions a
nd tests for checking progress can be found. Although various types of
documents and instructions for requesting accessed to different systems are available to new
employees,
not all of them are regularly updated. Newcomers
are

still dependent upon
existin
g employees

who posse
s
s up
-
to
-
date information,

tips and tricks and
time
-
proved
practices.

Despite this fact
and thanks to the resources intended for new employees, they a
re
provided with more relevant information (and with more information generally)
, com
paring
to an unguided induction. This also helps to

decrease
the
amount of

occurrences when
incorrect information
is

being obtained.





3

In large, IT
-
service oriented, business companies,
Focal Point is a skillful employee who has
either
rich experience

or
an extensive
and
deep knowledge

about specific customer
(s) or
customer(s)’
IT
infrastructure
. Thanks to these qualities, Focal Poin
t is being approached by other, less experienced,
team members for an advice or for help with solving more difficult/complex issues when there is strong
need to have problems sorted out quickly, responsibly and reliably.



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19



The
Table 2

implies
that the
re are 4 methods
highly
utilized
:
self
-
study, mentoring,
practicing
and on the job coaching
and one marginally: shadowing.



D
uring a controlled part of a short
-
term induction, employee is not exposed to
unexpected

task
s what
means

that there are
persons (
A
Manager
plus

a

Team Leader
in
introductory meetings and mainly Shift Leader together with
Focal Points
) who take care of
newcomers and provide guidance.
When it comes to some arrangements or different types of
requests (from requests for accesses to some other applications) it is partially the newcomer
and partially his mentor who takes the act
ions


all depends on what is documented in the
newcomers’ section and what dwells in settled employees’ heads.



A

short
-
term induction
, analogous to an unguided induction,
does not provide
any
option to
check new starter
s’ progress and
make an objective
confrontation between already
seasoned who were also newcomers at some time point and between newcomers
.
There are
no reasonable data being collected for that purpose.
However, the thing that can be possibly
taken into consideration is the newcomer’s attit
ude towards task assigned within the short
-
term induction program.
The
other

information available is, again,
feedback

from team
(shift) members which is
formed
based on inner fee
lings gained during the
interaction with
the newcomer.
It is known that the f
eedback is very important for the team climate but it is
not the authoritative criteria for
the
comparison of individuals’ performance at work.


To sum it up, short
-
term induction program represents more elaborate method for
inducting newcomers and conside
rably improves this area.

It brings some features

(
schedule
itself,
training methods,
and dedicated

section for
newcomers …)

which, if further developed,
become essential part of
integration
.
One of the disadvantages is its short duration
-

after the
short
-
term induction stage is over (5
-

14 days) a period of an unguided induction starts.
And
t
his is
doubtless
an obvious step back.
Using

a
short
-
term induction program it is not
possible to make a decision and set the date when a newcomer is considered to be valuable
a
nd self
-
contained

team player
. What can be safely said is that
the whole process of a
successful integration
take
s

more than
3

months

wh
at

is the important
breakpoint
(as
explained in the previous chapter) that should be challenged for specific reasons
.

3.1.3

C
hecklists

and skill matrixes

driven induction

The most advanced method used by majority of the addresses teams (60%)

is an
induction driven (and

supported) by checklists
and skill matrixes where one supplements the
other.
M
ost of the

teams use time scheduled for
3 mon
ths period of time but

6 months’
schedules are not exceptions and they are being used too.
Analogously
to previous methods
(an unguided induction, a short
-
term induction), the process of an induction starts d
uring
the first
meeting, usually conducted by a
Manager

of newcomer’s team where more general


CURRENT SITUATION


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20



information
about the

company

and
services

catalogue
is p
rovided.
More detailed and more
practical information (related to job)
are then
given
by the Team Leader
,
Shift Leaders
,
Focal
points
and the experienced team members who
further
actively take part in newcomers’
integration process.
Mentors,
in order to
be

able to
guid
e successfully effectively

and not to
omit
important
matters
, adhere
to
standardized and
unified documents

-

so called
Newcomer

s checklist and Skill matrix

which have the following shape and content:


Surname, Name:


Date and time


Week No.

Area

Activity

Description

Mentor

2

4

6

8

12

15

Knowledge

Work
environment

Security
clearance
, Dress
code policy,…

Team
Leader

25%

60%

100%

-

-

-

Customer’s
environment

Technical
components,
services
provided,…

Shift
L
eader

20%

50%

80%

100%

-

-

Technical

knowledge




50%

60%

70%

80%

100%

-

Job
requirements

Roles and
responsibilities,


75%

100%

-

-

-

-











Tools










Core 1
activity










Core 2
activity










Core n
activity










Internal
procedures










Other










Table
3: Newcomer

s checklist


Table
3

depicts sample of a Newcomer

s checklist

document
.

The header of a table contains

newcomer’
s name and date of joining. Columns are divided into tw
o logical parts
:


1.


Area

,

Activity
” and “
Description


providing
refined,
top
-
down
,

overview of
activities to be learned
,

2.

Mentor, Week Number

de
noting the name of a person
(s)

who p
rovides
mentoring
for the specific activity and
certain periods of
time
at the end of which a progress
is being tracked and noted
down.





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21





Job area 1

Job area 2

Average

Name

Role

Activity 1

Activity 2

Activity

3

Activity 1

Activity 2


...

Focal Point







...

Team member







...

Newcomer







...

...







Area average







-

Table

4: Skill matrix


Table
4

depicts sample of a Skill matrix document.
In this table columns are
divided into
three

logical parts:


1.

“Name” and “Role” containing

every
team
member’s

name (no matter if it is a
Shift Leader, Focal Point, team member or a newcomer) and
their position
(job
role)
,

2.

“Job area” and “Activity”

providing overview of activities (grouped by job area
to
which
they belong)
to be
classified,

3.

“Area Average” and “Average”

de
noting a degree of
team members’

progress
achieve
d

in parti
cular activity, represented by the

average
grade.


To assure that the c
lassific
ation is

o
bjective

and standardized
,
respect
ing the
requirements and
conditions laid down
,
the

following table
is commonly used
,

by the teams
asked,

for the assessment
:


Grade

Job Role

Knowledge

Skills &
Experience

Support level

1

Newcomer

No

No

Strong

2

Newcomer

Low

No

Strong

3

Newcomer

Low

Low

Strong
-
Medium

4

Newcomer

Low

Low

Strong
-
Medium

5

Team member

Medium

Medium

Medium

6

Team member

Medium

Medium

Medium

7

Team member

Medium

Medium

Medium

8

Focal Point

High

High

Medium
-
Low

9

Focal Point

High

High

Medium
-
Low

10

Focal Point

High

High

Low
-
No

Table

5
: Skill matrix
-

classification



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Most of the teams that proceed with the induction driven by checklists and skill
matrixes
do use any of intranet portal technologies (to be
detail
described

in the following
chapter)
,
where there is
a section dedicated to newcomer
s created, analogically to a short
-
term induction.

The section, which
appears to be structured

(valid for most of the teams)
,

contains:





bookmarks (
or
useful links)
,



studying materials,



guides for self
-
study,



manuals,



h
ow
-
to’s
,



newcomer

s checklist
,



skill matrix
.


Still
, considerable amount of these documents
is not (
regularly
) updated and new
employees are
dependent upon
already settled employees

advices who

knows the stuff that is
not clearly written in team’s internal documentation
or that can be found in there but is o
ut
of date.

Similarly to

the
short
-
term induction
, new starters are provided with more
information

that are relevant and valuable which contributes to minimize the number
of
possibilities when misleading and confusing facts is learned.



When inducting

newcomers the most utilized methods are: mentoring,
self
-
study,
and
on the job coaching
.

However there are certain tasks or projects t
hat may
be suitable for
delegation to a newcomer who is exposed to something that
results in obtaining knowledge
and new skills.


People who are involved in the process of an

induction are
, obviously, leaders of the
team

(during introductory and regular meetings)
, but mainly the Shift Leaders and Focal
Points who
definitely
possess the right skills

for it.

These persons also need to take some
actions instead of
a newcomer
(requests for accesses, applications)

as the documentation and
some procedures are not tuned
-
up.


Checklists and skill matrixes driven induction

give
s

an option
to check the progress
of
a newcomer

in specific activities
thanks to
:




The
N
ewcomer

s
checklist document

where
an

improvement

is
noted down at the
end of
the
defined periods of time.



Skill matrix document where a
n average
grade de
notes the

degree of
team
member

s

knowledge

and skills
achieved in particular activity


Besides checking the pro
gress there is also a possibility
to do the confrontation
between newcomers
themselves or

between newco
mers and the existing team members.


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However,
comparison
is limited only to the
activities
and job areas that are embraced by
N
ewcomer
s

checklists and skills matrixes are being wa
t
ched.


In addition,
newcomer’s attitude toward
s

the
ass
igned tasks and projects along

with
the achieved progress within a
given period of time and feedback
provided by the team (shift)
members
can be taken into
consideration fo
r the purpose of an assessment.


In summary
, checklists and skill matrixes driven induction

is considered to be the
most advanced
method for inducting newcomers

that the asked

teams do use nowadays.
Positive
is seen in
intro
ducing

new ways of checking team members
’ progress. On the other
side

there is completely missing schedule plan of any part of induction


the process of
integration is stuck
to the results not to the way how

to achieve them (
which is
much
more
important
)
.

Thank
s to checklists and skill matrixes

driven induction program
the date
,

when
a newcomer
becomes
the independent team player
, may be derived from
the available data
about the former newcomers’ progress achievements.

None of the asked teams confirmed
that the
induction period takes less than critical 3 months

(based on team leader
s


experiences

-

it is approximately 4
-

6

months
).

Supposing
an induction plan (or guidelines)
was

present
the period would be shorter, challenging 3 month
s


time period
.


3.2

Evaluation


The current situation in newcomers induction area was analyzed in large
r
, IT service
-
oriented, companies acting in Czech Republic (AT&T Global Network Services Czech
Republic s.r.o. , IBM Global Services Delivery Center Brno, Hewlett
-
Packard s.r.o , Logic
a
Czech Republic s.r.o.). There was a survey done and every company was asked the same two
questions. Based on the input provided by them the data was processed and analyzed.
It has
turned out that today there are three methods utilized when
inducti
n
g

new
employees:


1.

An unguided induction (used by 10% of teams)

2.

Short
-
term induction (used by 30% of teams)

3.

Checklists and skill matrixes driven induction (used by 60% of teams)


In the previous
sections each of these methods was exhaustively decomposed,
focusing

on eight attributes (d
uration of the controlled induction
, r
esources available to a
newcomer
, m
ethods commonly used during the controlled induction
, n
ewcomer’s mentor
,
o
wners of actions (tasks) resulting from the induction program
, c
hecking newcomer’s
pro
gress
, c
onfrontation between newcomers
, a
ssessment of a newcomer


criteria
) that are
considered to be crucial from newcomers induction process’s perspective.




CURRENT SITUATION


Page
24



The analysis revealed many interesting fact
s
, both positive and negative.
A b
rief
overview, whic
h offers confrontation between all thre
e methods, is denoted in

Table 6
.



An

unguided induction

Short
-
term guidelines

Checklists and skill
matrixes driven
induction

duration of the
controlled induction

not more than 5 days

5


14 days

3


6

months

resources available to
a newcomer

-

team documentation

-

bookmarks

-

settled team members’
experiences and
knowledge

-

schedule plan

-

links and documents for
the job

-

documents for the
self
-
study

-

instructions for
requesting accesses

-

schedule plan

-

links and documents for
the job

-

documents for the
self
-
study

-

instructions for
requesting accesses

-

some how
-
to’s

-

newcomer’s

checklists

skills
m
atrixes

methods commonly
used during the
controlled induction

-

self
-
study

-

e
-
learning

-

on the job
coaching

exposure


-

self
-
study

-

e
-
learning

-

mentoring

-

practicing

-

on the job coaching

-

self
-
study
,
e
-
learning

-

mentoring
,
practicing

-

on the job coaching

-

shadowing

-

tasks and projects
delegation

-

assign
ing on tasks and
projects that
require

obtaining new skills

knowledge or exposure

newcomer’s mentor

-

Manager

-

Team Leader

-

Manager
,
Team Leader,

-

Shift Leader
,
Focal
Point

-

Shift L
eader or a person
appointed by the Shift
Leader

owners of actions
(tasks) resulting from
the induction
program

a newcomer

-

a newcomer

-

Manager
,
Team Leader,

-

Shift Leader
,
Focal
Point

-

a newcomer

-

Manager
,
Team Leader,

-

Shift Leader
,
Focal
Point

checking newcomer’s
progress

not possible

not possible

relatively possible

confrontation between
newcomers

-

impossible to be done
objectively
(mainly based
on team members
perception, feelings and
relations with a newcomer)

almost impossible to be
done objectively

possible, to some extent
(only
based on specific
activities

embraced by
newcomer

s

checklists
and skills matrixes)

assessment of a
newcomer
-

criteria

feedback provided by team
members

-

feedback provided by
team members

-

attitude towards task
assigned within the
short
-
term induction
program

-

feedback provided by
team members

-

attitude towards task
s

assigned

-

progress achieved
in
the

given time frame

Table
6
: Analysis of the current situation
-

summary



CURRENT SITUATION


Page
25



As
the

last step of the analysis,
main drawbacks and gaps
in the c
urrent process
were
identified

what is definitely regarded to be an important part of a new solution development.


Taking these facts into account
there is going to be an idea

of
an effective and
successful integration
of new employees

in
large
r

IT service
-
oriented

business companies
introduced
in the next chapter

(in a free
-
form)
.
In reference to the eight key areas of
newcomers’ induction there are g
oals, which should be attained and reflected in
future
Newcomers


guidelines
, defined
,

too
.







Page
26





4

Newcomers


guidelines

4.1

Project objective
s

The aim of this project is to develop
generic framework and guidelines for a successful
integration of new employees so that the process of newcomers’ induction in large
r

IT
-
service
oriented companies is standardized, improved and the time period, during which a
newcomer becomes fully independent, is shortened to 3 months at maximum.

4.1.1

Target solution

Newcomers


guidelines
provides solution for
eight

key
areas that
were iden
tified a
s
major flaws of current induction programs

within the
analyze

phase
. The target solution
ensures that:


1.

Duration of the controlled induction:

A newcomer is successfully integrated into the team and becomes fully independent
team member within 3
months after joined the company.


2.

Methods commonly used during the controlled induction:

Suitable combination of all learning methods is used.


3.

Newcomer’s

mentor
:

Shift Leader, Focal Point or an experienced team member who is familiar with the
idea of an i
nduction process is appointed and educated.


4.

Owners of actions (tasks) resulting from the induction program:

Newcomer is the owner all actions (except of those the ones that necessarily require
supervisor’s attention and intervention).


5.

Checking newcomer’s

progress:

The information about newcomer’s progress (how is he doing at which period of time)
is available.





NEWCOMERS’ GUIDELINE
S


Page
27



6.

Confrontation between newcomers:

Confrontation between existing and former newcomers is possible.


7.

Assessment of a newcomer


criteria:

Criteria
for newcomer’s assessment are clearly defined and widely understood.


8.

Others
:

Costs spent on newcomers’ induction are decreased
.

4.1.2

Overall approach

The essentials of the concept
, as expressed in
Figure 7
,

are

that
,

regardless of
pedagogical approach, a person gets a role in the learning process, typically a newcomer or an
employee role. In this role one works toward certain outcomes by performing activities
within given environment. The environment consists of the a
ppropriate learning objects and
services to be used during the performance of the activities.
N
otification

(triggered by an
outcome)
determines which role gets which activities at which point in time during the
process. The method is, before all, designed
to meet learning objectives and assumes certain
prerequisites (specification of the entry level of particular stage).

Appropriate method is
u
s
ed
with respect to person’s characteristics.
The
induction process is supported by Newcomers’
guidelines



the document
, logically structured into chapters (Stages)

and subheads (Units),
that provides guidance for a newcomer. By following N
ewcomers’ guidelines, a newcomer
is
able to
success
fully integrate into the team and become independent and valuable

tea
m
player.



NEWCOMERS’ GUIDELINE
S


Page
28




Figure 7: Conceptual view of learning


The definitions of entities and semantics can be found in
Appendix A
.




NEWCOMERS’ GUIDELINE
S


Page
29



In practice, n
ewcomer is provided with printed version of Newcomers


guidelines when
he
4

joins the team and fills in a table on the se
cond page (unique ID, Name and Surname,
Date).

The
document is divided into structured chapters



representing
stages
, each of them
denoting significant time period during new starters’ induction. Each chapter contains these
six subheads

-

units
:


1.

Expectations

2.

Prerequisites

3.

Learning o
bjectives

4.

Instructions

5.

Summary

6.

Comments


1.

Expectations
,

intended mainly for a newcomer
,
g
ives an interesting overview, stating what a
newcomer can expect and what is expected from him
.


Example (Day 1
-

Welcome day)
:


A
newcomer meets the supervisor at the reception and is welcomed by the team. Knowing his
working place he attends “Introductory meeting” with the Team Leader/Manager. The structure
of the company is explained to him and a newcomer learns about different tea
ms, too. Once
successfully logged into a workstation employee gets familiar with Code of Conduct. Team
Leader or Shift Leader meets a newcomer, giving him a brief overview of tools used by the
team. In spare time, there is a possibility for a newcomer to s
et up the workstation. He passes
two soft skills oriented online courses and checks out the company’s/team’s intranet.



2.

Prerequisites
,

intended for both newcomer and mentor
, denotes:




Accesses that a newcomer should already have to successfully complete
the stage



Accesses that should be requested



Knowledge that a newcomer should already have to successfully complete the
stage








4

Herefrom, “he” is to be understoo
d as a

common gender for purpose of this document



NEWCOMERS’ GUIDELINE
S


Page
30



Example (Day 1
-

Welcome day)
:


Access

A newcomer should have access to:



Company’s premises



Unique ID



Telephone number


3.

Learning o
bjectives
,

intended for both newcomer and mentor
, contains list of
learning activities, support
activities, tasks, contacts an
d resources needed for successful accomplishment of all
learning
objectives
within the stage
.
At the end of each
stage

(
Day 1, Day 2, …, Week
2
-
4, etc…) a newcomer marks the progress in
Learning o
bjectives table, puts actual
date, his/her name, surname and a signature below the table (
right through

the light
grey pre
-
printed text).


Example (Day 1
-

Welcome day)



learning
objective

contact

link

progress

A

Meet at reception

MGR/TL
5


%

B

Meet the team

MGR/TL/T


%

C

Introductory meeting

TL/MGR


%

D

Internal Policy and procedures

self
-
study

<link>

%

E

Overview of tools

TL/SL


%

F

Workstation setup

newcomer


%

G

Online course: Soft skills oriented course

self
-
study

<link>

%

H

Online course: Soft skills oriented course

self
-
study

<link>

%

I

Company’s/Team’s intranet
-

overview

self
-
study

<link>

<
link
>

%

Table
7: Objectives


date

name surname

signature

supervisor’s signature






5

MGR = Manager, TL = Team leader, SL = Shift Leader, T = Team



NEWCOMERS’ G
UIDELINES


Page
31



4.

Instructions
,

intended mainly for mentor
, provides guidance and highlights important
points/topics/activities that should be explained to a newcomer)