Module Specification Complete 2012 - University Of Lincoln Portal

southdakotascrawnyData Management

Nov 29, 2012 (4 years and 9 months ago)

571 views

Module Specification:
Computer Systems

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Computer Systems

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1003M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Grzegorz Cielniak

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module introduces the student to computer hardware, the history of computer, data
representation and
manipulation at the byte level, basic machine instructions, the
operation of the fetch
-
execute cycle, the characteristics of main and cache memory, I/O
control and the inner working of disk storage. This module also presents the most
popular hardware archi
tectures and provides a basic introduction to microcontrollers.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Background knowledge:

The history of computers

Standard units and performance measures

Number systems: binary and hexadecimal systems, conversions between differe
nt
systems, binary arithmetic operations

Data representation:

numbers (integers, real numbers), characters, media

Logic: Boolean algebra, logic gates, combinational and sequential circuits

The structure and function of the computer:

CPU: program
execution, the flow of control: jumping, branching, subroutines, interrupts;
machine instructions, addressing modes, parallelism

Memory: types of memory, memory hierarchy, semiconductor memory, cache memory,
types of cache mapping

I/O devices: classificati
on, I/O control methods, external storage: hard drives and optical
disks

Buses: function and classification

The architecture example: x86 architecture

Microcontrollers: memory, I/O ports, timers, watchdog timer, serial communication, A/D
converters


Module Specification:
Computer Systems

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

This m
odule develops the following mathematical concepts and techniques:

Number systems: binary and hexadecimal systems, conversions

between different systems, binary arithmetic

Data representation: numbers (integers, real numbers),

characters, media

Logic:
Boolean algebra, logic gates, combinational and

sequential logic


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] outline and discuss mechanisms and strategies applied to computer
systems architecture;



[LO2] review models and processes in computer system
architecture.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a program of lectures which introduce and discuss core
concepts and issues. The lectures are supported by practical workshops and assigned
readings. Formative i
n
-
class assessment is employed both to develop a deeper
understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Technical reports
40
[LO1], [LO2]
No
Item 2
In-class test
60
[LO1], [LO2]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Null, L. & Lobur, J., The essentials of computer organization and architecture, 2nd
edition (Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2006)


Stallings, W., Computer Organization and Architecture: Designing for Performance, 7th
ed (Prentice Hall, 2005)


Tanenbaum, A., Structured Computer Organisation, 5th edition (Prentice Hall, 2006)
Module Specification:
Creative Technologies

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Creative Technologies

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1031M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Rose Spilberg

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module is concerned with the technical processes involved in the
combination,
manipulation and management of still and moving image, sound and interactive media
assets. Students will consider issues of analogue to digital conversion, file formats,
compression methods, resolution and quality.


The module will provide a b
asic introduction to the use of a range of software
applications for audio, image and interactive animation production such as Adobe
Audition, Photoshop, and Flash.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Defining creative technology assets.

Graphics and colour
representation and resolution.

Audio, graphical and video file formats.

Asset management.

Introduction to image manipulation software.

Introduction to animation software and scripting


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] combine and manipulate recorded
sound;



[LO2] use post
-
production software to manipulate still and moving images;



[LO3] select and apply appropriate techniques to produce an interactive
product.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


Module Specification:
Creative Technologies

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

This module is taught through a
programme of lectures and workshops that introduce
and explore the principles and practices involved. Formative in
-
class assessment is
employed both to develop a deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse
technique for the summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
50
[LO1], [LO2]
No
Item 2
Assignment
50
[LO3]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Watkinson, J., Introduction to Digital Audio (Focal Press, 2002)


Kelby, S. The Photoshop Book for Digital Photographers (New Riders 2003)


Chun, R. Flash CS3 Professional (Peachpit Press, 2007)
Module Specification:
Data Structures

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Data Structures

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer
Science

Module Code

CMP1035M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


John Murray

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


The module provides students with an introduction to the
techniques for representing
data, and fundamental data structures. No particular programming language is adopted
to support the module, examplars are given using a range of common languages to
further the broad application of the principles discussed.


Se
ction 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Simple data types and the application of compound records in programming and
database table design. Introduction to the fundamentals of data analysis. Complex data
types and their use. Static and dynamic data structures. Comm
on data structures and
their typical application, including but not limited to :


Arrays


Stacks


Queues


Dequeues


Linked Lists


Doubly Linked Lists


Binary Trees


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] identify data types and their application in common
programming
solutions;



[LO2] identify the characteristics of common data structures;



[LO3] characterise a problem solution in the context of potential data
structures;



[LO4] communicate rational and reasoned arguments in writing.

Module Specification:
Data Structures

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2


Section 5: Learning

and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures that introduce core concepts and
issues. These are explored and developed through practical workshop activities and
independent study. Formative in
-
class assessment is
employed both to develop a
deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative
assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3], [LO4]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Brookshear, J. G., Computer Science an overview, 10th edition, (Pearson, 2008)



Stallings, W., Data and Computer Communications, 8th edition, (Prentice Hall, 2006)


Weiss, M. A., Data Structures & Algorithm Analysis in Java, (Prentice Hall, 1999)


Wirth, N., Algorithms and Data Structures (Prentice Hall, 1986)
Module Specification:
Games QA and Production

This

copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Games QA and Production

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CGP1002M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Mark Doughty

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


Video game quality assurance procedures form a critical part of the video game
production cycle. This module explores
the principles of testing software in general
before looking in detail at the specific requirements and characteristics of the quality
assurance stages of the video game production cycle. Knowledge and skills in effective
testing procedures and terminology

will be explored, as well as their application in a
games development domain.


The module will deliver the principles outlined in the syllabus of the ISEB Certified Tester
Foundation Level award.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Fundamentals of testing:



Why is testing necessary?



General testing principles



Fundamental test processes


Test levels and testing types



Component, integration, system and acceptance testing



Functional / non
-
functional testing


Static testing techniques and review processes


Test design techniques



Black box / white box methods


Testing management



Organisation, planning and estimation

Module Specification:
Games QA and Production

This

copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2



Progress monitoring and control methods



Documentation and metrics


Tool support for testing



Eg: Perforce, Bugzilla,


Video games tes
ting processes



Bug reporting and classification



Communication, reproducibility and attention to detail



Testing within the production cycle

o

Alpha / beta / platform approval


The wider video game QA procedures



Localisation



Best practice and accep
ted video game QA principles


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] describe the components and principles of a software testing
strategy;



[LO2] give examples of quality assurance procedures used in a computer
games production cycle;



[LO3] explain the
principles of a testing strategy for a computer game
development project;



[LO4] deliver a presentation using appropriate professional standards.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures, wo
rkshops, group exercises and
tutorials. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to develop a deeper
understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3], [LO4], [LO5]
No


The last item

to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Hambling (Ed), Morgan, Samaroo, Thompson, Williams, (2007) Software Testing: An
ISEB
Foundation, British Computer Society, ISBN: 1
-
902505
-
79
-
4

Module Specification:
Games QA and Production

This

copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

3


Schultz, C., Game Testing All In One (Thomson Course Technology, 2005)


Chandler, H., The Game Localization Handbook (Charles River Media 2005)


Irish, D., The Game Producer’s Handbook (Thomson Course Technology, 2005)
Module Specification:
Information Systems

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Information
Systems

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1009M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


John Lewak

Section 2:
Module

S
ynopsis


The module seeks to raise awareness of the nature, purpose and structure of
organisations in their many forms. The module explores the composition of organisations
and how they operate to yield purpose. Systems tools and methodologies are
investigated as a way of understanding organisational structure and dynamics.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Introduction to organisations and systems.

Information, systems and information systems.

Business Information Systems.

Information Systems Modell
ing.

Use and Impact of Information Systems.

Organisation, theory, structure, processes, culture.

Introduction to Information Systems analysis and design.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] relate the importance of information to business processes;



[LO2] describe, abstract and apply models of systems structure, behaviour
and purpose to organisational systems.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


A combination of lectures, and plenary sessions are used to enable the outcomes to be
achieved and demonstrated. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to
develop a deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the
summative assessments.

Module Specification:
Information Systems

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2]
No


The last item to appear in

this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Beynon
-
Davies P., Information Systems: An Introduction to Informatics in Organisations
(Macmillan, 2002)


Curtis G, & Cobham, D., Business information systems: analysis, design and practice,
6th Edition (Prentice Hall, 2008)


Langer, A. M., Analysis and D
esign of Information Systems (Springer, 2008)


Laudon J, and Laudon P. Management
Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm
(Prentice Hall, 2007)
Module Specification:
Information Systems in Practice

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Information Systems in Practice

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1123M

Credit
Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


John Lewak

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module builds on the previous Computer Information Systems core module
(Information Systems) and
explores the manifestation of Information Systems (IS) in
practical situations. It develops an understanding about the structure and scope of IS
and explores the shared characteristics which make up IS in practice. Consideration is
given to the role of tec
hnologies in facilitating IS and tools and techniques are applied in
the description and communication of IS. This module establishes the basis for the
critical review of IS which is further developed in subsequent levels.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


The

role of technology in support of business activity.

Ethical, Legal and Moral constraints on IS.

Information Security.

Transaction processing Systems, Functional IS, ERP Systems, CRM Systems.

Acquiring applications in support of IS.

Diagramming and documen
ting IS.

IS Development Methodologies.

Integrated IS approaches.

Review of case studies in IS.

Trends in IS.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] explain the role and action of an Information System in facilitating
functional operations;



[LO2] describe

approaches which deliver compliance to the ethical, legal,
moral and security constraints placed upon Information Systems.

Module Specification:
Information Systems in Practice

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a program of lectures which introduce and discuss
core
concepts and issues. The lectures are supported by practical plenaries and assigned
readings.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
R
elationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Creating futures : leading change through information systems / Nada K. Kakabadse and
Andrew K. Kakabadse by Kakabadse, Nada Aldershot : Dartmouth , 2000


Information Systems Development: Methodologies, Techniques and Tools by David
Avison and Guy Fitzgerald (2006)


Business Information Systems: Technology, Development and Management for the E
-
Business by Paul Bocij, Andrew Greasley and Simon Hickie (2008)


Business Information Systems: Analysis, Design and Practice by Mr Graham Curtis and
Dr David Cobham (2008)


Management Information Systems by James A. O'Brien and George Marakas (2011)
Module Specification:
Introduction to User Interfaces

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students

on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Introduction to User Interfaces

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1008M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Rose Spilberg

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module introduces

the basic concepts and practice in the design of user interfaces
for interactive applications. Students will be introduced to the basic principles of
interaction design, and prototyping, and will implement a simple interactive system.


Section 3:
Outline

S
yllabus


Principles of interactivity and interaction design.

Storyboards and prototyping.

Screen design and layout.

Menu design.

Implementation and testing.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] design a simple interactive system demonstrating basic
principles of
good user interface design;



[LO2] implement a simple interactive system demonstrating basic
principles of good user interface design;



[LO3] document the design, development and implementation of a simple
interactive system, applying
appropriate practice and standards.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures that introduce core concepts and
issues. These are explored through seminar discussions, practical workshops and
i
ndependent study. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to develop a
Module Specification:
Introduction to User Interfaces

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students

on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative
assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3]
No


The last item to appear in this
table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Brown, C. M., Human
-
Computer Interface Design Guidelines (Intellect books, 1999)


Johnson, J., GUI Bloopers
Don'ts and Do's for Software Developers and Web Designers
(Morgan Kaufman, 2000)


Krug, S., Don't Make Me Think (New Riders, 2000)


Le Peuple, J. & Scane, R., User Interface Design (Crucial, 2003)
Module Specifi
cation:
Introduction to Web Technologies

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Introduction to Web Technologies

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln
School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1037M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Rose Spilberg

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


The module provides students with an
introduction to the development and application of
web technologies from first principles. Students will learn key concepts in mark
-
up
languages, and will develop and implement a simple interactive web site incorporating
simple server
-
side functionality. T
he module adopts a

standards driven approach, requiring students to clearly discriminate between content,
structure and presentational elements in web design. Issues of quality, standards,
usability and accessibility are discussed.


Section 3:
Outline S
yll
abus


The origins and development of the internet and markup technologies. The idea of

document type and its specification in a DTD.

Standards and professional practice, including W3C standards, WAI. and WCAG. The
issues, principles and practice of structural vs presentational markup.

Introduction to structural markup technologies such as HTML, XML. Introduction to

presentational marku
p using style sheets.

Implementation of a simple interactive website with simple server
-
side functionality.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] apply structured techniques in web site development;



[LO2] implement a simple interactive web application,
applying appropriate
standards and guidelines.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


A lecture programme will introduce concepts and theoretical issues, which will be
Module Specifi
cation:
Introduction to Web Technologies

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

supplemented by practical lab
-
based workshops.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Buyens, J., Web database development step by step
(Microsoft Press, 2002)

Eaglestone, B. & Ridley, M., Web database systems (McGraw Hill, 2000)

Leedorf, R. & Tatroe, K., Programming PHP (O'Reilly 2002)

Musciano, H. & Kennedy, W. HTML and XHTML: The Definitive Guide (O’Reilly UK,

2002)

Niederst, J., Learni
ng Web Design 2nd ed (O’Reilly, 2003)

Paciello, M.G. Web Accessibility for People with Disabilities (CMP books, 2000)

Peck, S., Williams, G. & Arrants, S. Structure vs Style in Website Development.

Proceedings of the ACM, 1999, 12(3)pp 100
-
110

Shafer, D. &

Andrews, R. HTML Utopia: Designing Without Tables Using CSS, 2nd
Edition (SITEPOINT 2006)

Sklar, D., Learning PHP 5 (O’Reilly, 2004)

Slatin, J., & Rush, S. Maximum Accessibility (Addison Wesley 2003)

Welling, L. & Thomas, L., PHP and MYSQL Web Developme
nt (Sams, 2003)


Miscellaneous on
-
line resources, including: The Worldwide Web Consortium,

http://www.w3c.org and Web Content Access Guidelines WCAG/WAI

http://www.w3c.org (standards and best
-
practice materials relating to web technologies)

www.w3schools.com/ HTML and other web technologies tutorial material
Module Specification:
Introductory Games Studies

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 20
1
2
)

1

Section 1:
Basic Module Data


Module Title

Introductory Games Studies

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CGP1001M

Credit Rating:

30

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Mark Doughty

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module introduces students to fundamental principles in computer gaming. Broad
considerations of the contemporary computer game industry including the societal view
of gaming and
cultural implications, the nature and structure of the computer games
industry and the processes involved in the game development cycle are discussed. In
addition, fundamental skills are developed via the investigation of introductory
mathematical principl
es relating to computer games development, the development of
basic game design and development skills, and the introduction to 3D modelling
software.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Introduction to the business of games development, industry roles,
development cycles
and QA processes.

Representation and imagery in games: gender/violence, etc.

Media reporting of games.

Ethical issues facing game developers.

Introduction to techniques for designing games and game assets.

Introduction to game develo
pment in an appropriate software development environment.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] recognise the ethical and cultural aspects of computer games;



[LO2] describe aspects of the games development industry and the
development cycle for games;



[LO3] express a game design using a standard design technique;



[LO4] present an interactive game artefact using appropriate techniques;



[LO5] work effectively as a member of a team.

Module Specification:
Introductory Games Studies

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 20
1
2
)

2


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is
taught through a programme of lectures, laboratory workshops, group
exercises and tutorials. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to develop a
deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative
assessments.


Section 6
: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
50
[LO3], [LO4]
Yes
Item 2
Examination
50
[LO1], [LO2], [LO5]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Very useful:


Creighton, R., Unity 3D
Game Development by Example Beginner's Guide (Packt
Publishing, 2010)


Rabin, S. (ed), Introduction to Game Development (Charles River Media, 2005)


Moore, M., Introduction to the Games Industry (Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007)


Good reading, but not essenti
al:


Dunn, F., & Parberry, I., 3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development
(Wordware, 2002)


Tremblay, J., Mathematics For Game Developers (Course Technology, 2004)


Wolf, M. J. P., & Perron, B., The Video Game Theory Reader (Routledge, 2003)


Hambling, Brian (2007). Software testing. British Computer Society.


Schultz, Charles P. Bryant, Robert.Langdell, Tim. (2005). Game testing all in one. .
Thomson/Course Technology



EDGE magazine (Future Publishing).


Module Specification:
Introductory Games Studies

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 20
1
2
)

3

Any technology
-
focussed media, national broadsheet newspapers, etc.


www.gamasutra.com

www.gamedev.net

www.gamemaker.nl
Module Specification:
Maths for Computing

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Maths for Computing

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1036M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Mark Doughty

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module aims to equip students with mathematical knowledge and skills required to
design and develop computer systems and software.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Sets, relations and functions:


Operations on sets, laws of set operations, properties of relations.


Logic:


Propositions, truth tables, operators, Boolean algebra.


Basic calculus:


Derivatives, integrals, limits, maxima,
minima.


Algebra:

Linear and polynomial algebra, vector and matrix algebra. Trigonometric, exponential
and logorithmic functions.



Basic Statistics:

Introductory concepts, mean, median, mode, standard deviation, variance, confidence
and significance.
Introduction to probability theory.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] use appropriate mathematical theories and techniques for computer
science;



[LO2]

Select appropriate mathematical formulae to solve problems;

Module Specification:
Maths for Computing

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2



[LO3]

Solve computational problems

using relevant mathematical
techniques;



[LO4] Locate and reference relevant information.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


Students attend a programme of lectures supported by workshops.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Coursework
30
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3], [LO4]
No
Item 2
In-class test
70
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Croft, A., Davison, R., Foundation Maths 4th ed, Prentice Hall, 2006.


Piff, M., Discrete Mathematics: An Introduction for Software Engineers, Cambridge
University Press, 1991.


Truss, J., Discrete Mathematics for Computer Scientists 2nd ed, Addison Wesley, 1998.
Module Specification:
Operating Systems

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Operating Systems

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1005M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Nicola Bellotto

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module studies both the theoretical design concepts which
underpin all operating
systems and, through case
-
studies, the practical implementation techniques of current
operating systems. Special attention will be given to shell programming languages and
examples to practically implement concepts and techniques at
the basis of the various
operating systems


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Basic introduction to Operating Systems.

Review of Operating Systems: Development and evolution, different types.

Computer architecture, I/O programming and resource management.

The c
oncept of Process: Process Management: Process creation and switching.
Scheduling. Memory Management: Address space issues, segmentation. Virtual
memory.

Inter
-
process Communication; pipes

Deadlock: Conditions for deadlock and its avoidance.

Input
-
output
systems: Programmed I/O, DMA, device drivers

File systems: File management, directories, RAID.

Introduction to shell programming: Bash shell, Awk, PERL


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] outline and discuss mechanics and strategies within operating
system architectures;



[LO2] review models and processes in operating systems architectures;



[LO3] use a range of tools to interact with operating systems from the
Windows and the UNIX families.

Module Specification:
Operating Systems

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This
module is taught through a program of lectures which introduce and discuss core
concepts and issues. The lectures are supported by practical workshops and assigned
readings. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to develop a deeper
understanding o
f the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
In-class tests
20
[LO1], [LO2]
No
Item 2
In-class tests
20
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3]
No
Item 3
Examination
60
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional
Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Stallings, W., Computer Organisation and Architecture 6th Edition (Prentice
-
Hall, 2005)


Ritchie, C., Operating Systems Incorporating UNIX and Windows 4th Edition (Thomson,
2003)


Stallings, W., Operating Systems:

Internals and Design Principles (Prentice
-
Hall, 2004).


Tanenbaum, A. & Woodhull,
A.S., Operating Systems: Design And Implementation 3rd
edition (Prentice Hall, 2006)
Module Specification:
Problem Solving

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Problem Solving

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1032M

Credit
Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Kevin Jacques

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


Problems are a natural occurrence in an organisational context and this module
introduces students
to problem solving from a mix of theoretical and practical
underpinnings. The module examines the principles of abstraction, decomposition,
modelling and representation as a means to frame and characterise problem scenarios,
and as tools to understand pot
ential solutions. The module concentrates on problem
solving strategies and in particular the vocabulary through which these strategies are
articulated. This type of vocabulary is explored as a representational device for
capturing organisational behaviou
r and form.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Introduction to problem solving.

Complexity and problem boundaries.

Problem characterisation.

Problem solving models.

The vocabulary of problem solving.

Problem solving tools.

Managing problems in an organisation
al context.

Pre
-
packaged solutions to generic problems.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] characterise a problem in the context of possible solution
mechanisms;



[LO2] model a problem solution using appropriate vocabulary;



[LO3] deliver a
presentation using appropriate professional standards;



[LO4] work effectively as a member of a team.

Module Specification:
Problem Solving

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


A combination of lectures, and plenary sessions are used to enable the outcomes to be
achieved and
demonstrated. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to
develop a deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the
summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Presentation
75
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3], [LO4]
Yes
Item 2
Assignment
25
[LO1]
No


The last item to appear in this table i
s the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Adair, J., Decision Making and Problem Solving Strategies. (Kogan
-
Page, 2007)


Brown, D. Tricks of the Mind. (Channel 4 Books, 2007)


Grabarchuk S., et al, The Simple Book of Not
-
so
-
simple Puzzles. (A K Peters, 2008)


Robertson, S.I., Problem Solving. (Psychology Press, 2001)
Module Specification:
Social Computing

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Social Computing

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of
Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1007M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Shaun Lawson

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


Social computing is concerned with the intersection
of human social behavior and
computer science. This module gives an overview of the established role that social
computing plays in society as well as exploring the emerging trends in the area.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


The module will cover the role o
f social computing in established areas such as blogs,
email, instant messaging, social network services (such as Facebook and MySpace),
wikis, mash
-
ups and social bookmarking, as well as in emerging areas such micro
-
blogging, mobile social software (MoSoS
o) services, and persuasive and locative
technology. The module will discuss the growing popularity of social software and Web
2.0 technology, the application of social network analysis to such technology, and the
sense that all of this can have a profound

and sustained impact on everyday life. The
module will, also, cover the following: the theories underlying computer mediated
communication (CMC), crowd sourcing and citizen science, emerging examples of
persuasive technology and games with a purpose, and
shared virtual environments.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] describe the characteristics of social software and Web2.0
technologies;



[LO2] discuss the impact of social computing technologies on everyday
life;



[LO3] present an aspect of the
application of social computing in a
practical context.


Module Specification:
Social Computing

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


A combination of lectures and workshops are used, to enable the learning outcomes to
be achieved and demonstrated. Formative in
-
class assessment is
employed both to
develop a deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the
summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Shirky, C. Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing without Organizations
(Allen Lane, 2008)


Jones B. L., Web 2.0 Heroes: Interviews with 20 Web 2.0
Influencers (John Wiley &
Sons, 2008)


Wang, F.
-
Y., K. M. Carley, D. Zeng, & W. Mao (2007). Social computing: From social
informatics to social intelligence. IEEE Intelligent Systems 22(2), 79

83.


Tapscott, D. & Williams, A. D., Wikinomics: How mass colla
boration changes everything
(Portfolio, 2006)


Recent issues of the journal Computers

in Human Behaviour (Elsevier)
(http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/759/description)
Module Specification:
Software Development

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Software Development

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP1001M

Credit Rating:

30

Level:

1

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Mark Doughty

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module introduces the concepts and practice of simple computer
programming, with
attention paid to quality and testing issues. Following on from this fundamental base, the
module extends students' knowledge of computer programming enabling them to create
systems consisting of multiple classes and objects. Fundamental
principles of discrete
mathematics are explored and developed.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Imperative programming concepts: variables, sequence, iteration, repetition; data types
and values; quality issues and testing; implementation and design processes
.

Classes and objects; class definition; object instantiation; using and defining methods.
Class and use
-
case modelling using UML; interactions between classes; developing
systems of classes; testing and validation techniques; user
-
interface development.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] implement programs consisting of multiple procedures;



[LO2] use simple testing techniques to evaluate programs;



[LO3] create classes and instantiate objects in an OO programming
language;



[LO4] explain and model

an OO approach to a software development
problem.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures, laboratory workshops, group
Module Specification:
Software Development

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

exercises and tutorials. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed
both to develop a
deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative
assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
30
[LO1], [LO2]
No
Item 2
Assignment
70
[LO3], [LO4]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Useful:


Sharp, J., Microsoft Visual C# 2010 Step by Step Book/CD Package (Microsoft Press,
2010)


Liberty, J., Learning C# 2005, (O’Reilly, 2006)


Britton, C., Doake, J., A

Student Guide to Object Oriented Development (Butterworth


Heinemann, 2004)


Good reading, but not essential:


Liberty, J., Programming C# 4th edition (O’Reilly, 2005)


Drayton, P., C# Language Pocket Reference (O’Reilly, 2002)


Or other object oriented programming languages as appropriate.
Module Specification:
3D Modelling

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module
Title

3D Modelling

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP2003M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

2

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Duncan Rowland

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module introduces the student to the methods and techniques of 3D computer
graphic modelling from two distinct perspectives. The first of these examines the artists
view of asset creation. A range of modelling techniques an
d production methods are
explored to create a gaming asset using an industry standard software tool (such as 3D
Studio Max, Blender, Lightwave or Maya). The second perspective views the same
process from the point of view of the Technical Artist or Tools D
eveloper. This re
-
examination exposes the mathematics and algorithms behind the technology, and shows
how the standard toolset can be extended through the use of scripting. By employing
this dual perspective, the aim is to show the student that ultimately
both vantages are
seeing projections of the same conceptual world, and how a deeper undestanding of this
is beneficial to the student’s knowledge of the design and implementation of games and
their supporting infrastructure.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Fundamentals and features of current industry standard workflows and tool chains :


Artistic modelling methods and techniques:

Texturing and lighting considerations

Techniques for camera settings and placement

Rendering, output file format and compressors


Scripting :

Variables, Objects, Classes, Properties, Program Flow, Interface Design


Mathematical/Algorithmic Concepts :

Vectors, Matrices and Transformations, Scene
-
graph


Module Specification:
3D Modelling

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

Section 4: Learning O
utcomes


[LO1] employ a standard artistic workflow to
design, construct and texture a
prescribed model;


[LO2] employ scripting techniques and apply appropriate mathematical
constructs to create a specified tool;


[LO3] employ dynamic camera and lighting to render an animation.


Section 5: Learning and Teachi
ng Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures that introduce core concepts and
issues. These are explored and developed through practical workshops and guided
independent study. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to

develop a
deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative
assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Presentation
20
[LO1]
No
Item 2
Assignment
80
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Autodesk, 3ds Max MAXScript Essentials (Focal Press, 2nd edition, 23 Feb 2007)


Summers, D., Texturing : Concepts and Techniques (Charles River , 2004)


Wright, S., Digital Compositing for Film and Video (Focal Press, 2002)
Module Specification:
Advanced Software

Development

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic
Module Data


Module Title

Advanced Software Development

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP2067M

Credit Rating:

30

Level:

2

Pre
-
requisites:

Software Development

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred
Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Nicola Bellotto

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module provides a comprehensive analysis of the general principles and practices
of advanced programming with respect to software development.

Software development
issues and techniques are considered from an high
-
level
perspective and notions of advanced programming are emphasised in the context of
analysis, design and implementation. Great importance is placed upon the Object
-
Oriented paradigm and related concepts
applied to software development.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Encapsulation, composition, object reference, overloading, garbage collection.

Inheritance, overriding, polymorphism, introduction to design patterns.

Exceptions, containers, I/O system,
serialization, GUI.


This module develops mathematical mathematical concepts, techniques and principles
related to software development, such as: software complexity, software coupling and
cohesion.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] review concepts of

advanced software development and
programming methods;





[LO2] critically apply appropriate software development concepts;





[LO3] use advanced OO principles and programming techniques in
software development;


Module Specification:
Advanced Software

Development

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2




[LO4] apply advanced logical and mathematical techniques in software
development and programming.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures that introduce and discuss core
concepts and issues
. Practical workshops offer the opportunity for students to practically
apply topics covered within the lecture programme and in the module's recommended
textbooks. Workshops support students to review their understanding of the module's
lectures, assigned

readings, and applying them in the practical work involved in the
assignments. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to develop a deeper
understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
50
[LO1], [LO2]
No
Item 2
Assignment
50
[LO3], [LO4]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Eckel B., Thinking in Java, 3rd edition (Prentice Hall, 2003).

Eckel B., Thinking in C++, Vol. 1, 2nd edition (Prentice Hall, 2000).

Eckel B. & Chuck A.,Thinking in C++, Vol. 2, 2nd edition (Prentice Hall, 2000).

Lunn, K., Software Development with UML (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003).
Module Specification:
Artificial Intelligence

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Artificial Intelligence

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP2020M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

2

Pre
-
requisites:

Software Development

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module
Co
-
ordinator:


Tom Duckett

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module provides a basic introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). The
module first considers the symbolic model of intelligence, exploring some of the main
conceptual issues,
theoretical approaches and practical techniques. The module further
explores knowledge
-
based systems such as expert systems, which mimic human
reasoning performance by capturing knowledge of a domain and integrating it to deliver
a performance comparable t
o that of a human practitioner. Modern developments such
as artificial neural networks and uncertain reasoning using probability theory are also
covered, culminating in a practical understanding of how to apply AI techniques in
practice using logic program
ming.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Introduction to AI. Logic programming. State space search. Heuristic search. Knowledge
representation. Expert systems. Artificial neural networks. Reasoning with uncertainty.
Practical programming in PROLOG.


This module

develops the following mathematical concepts and techniques:
propositional logic, first
-
order predicate logic, unification, graph theory, probability theory.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] explain the theoretical capabilities of Artificial
Intelligence;



[LO2] apply Artificial Intelligence techniques to solve practical problems;



[LO3] locate and reference relevant information.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


Module Specification:
Artificial Intelligence

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

A combination of lectures, workshops and seminars will be
used to enable the outcomes
to be achieved and demonstrated. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to
develop a deeper understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the
summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
50
[LO2], [LO3]
No
Item 2
Examination
50
[LO1]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Callan, R., Artificial Intelligence (Palgrave
Macmillan, 2003)


Callan, R., The Essence of Neural Networks (Prentice Hall, 1998)


Cawsey, A., The Essence of Artificial Intelligence (Prentice Hall, 1998)


Lucas, R.J., Mastering Prolog (UCL Press, 1996)


Luger, G.F. and Stubblefield, B., Artificial
Intelligence 3rd edition (Addison Wesley, 1997)


Luger, G.F., Artificial
Intelligence 5th edition (Addison Wesley, 2005)
Module Specification:
Business Processes

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Business Processes

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP2018M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

2

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


John Lewak

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module aims to develop awareness of the ways in which informatics can be used to
support business processes. It will consider how
various business processes contribute
to the realisation of organisational goals and how informatics can contribute to this, and
aims to develop an awareness of the frameworks and processes through which data
may be transformed into information. Further, t
he module addresses the issue of
effective, professional, communication with a given audience by reviewing the role of
statistical approaches and presentation devices in contemporary informatics.
Consideration will be given to the concept of desirable leve
ls of integration and the
awareness of the dynamic nature of organisations when designing information systems.
It will also include consideration of both production and service sectors.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Introduction to Operations Management.

Human Activity Systems.

The importance of decision
-
making.

Information capture and knowledge engineering.

Issues in systems provision e.g. large systems and small systems, in
-
house
development and external sourcing.

Levels of systems integration.

Featu
res and problems of various decision areas e.g. process design, capacity planning,
stock management, human resources and quality management.

Data analysis: popular distributions and their typical applications.

Data mining; data warehousing.

Data present
ation: narrative, tables and graphs; human factors, aesthetics and
technique in data presentation.

Strategic issues in business and technology.

Success and failures of IS.

Module Specification:
Business Processes

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

Impact of culture on IS/ Impact of IS on culture.

Organisation process; Business
Process design and redesign, Porter’s value chain,
modelling organisational processes.

Economic, social and political environments of organisations.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] review the appropriateness of informatics systems design in
supporting business process and strategy;



[LO2] employ and evaluate techniques of data analysis;



[LO3] justify and implement effective approaches to the contextual
presentation of data

and information;



[LO4] locate and reference relevant information.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures which introduce and discuss
core concepts and issues. Lectures are supplemented w
ith plenary seminars to further
explore and discuss the concepts raised in the lecture programme, and to explore
design issues. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to develop a deeper
understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for th
e summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2], [LO3], [LO4]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Curtis G, and Cobham, D. Business information systems: analysis, design and practice:
6th Edition (Prentice Hall, 2008)


Goodwin, P., Wright, G., Decision Analysis for Management Judgment (Wiley, 2004)


Heineke, D., Managing Services: Using Technology To
Create Value (McGraw
-
Hill,
2003)


Lucas, T., Information Technology for Management (McGraw
-
Hill, 1999)


Schroeder, R., Operations Management, & Contemporary Concepts (McGraw
-
Hill, 2000)


Module Specification:
Business Processes

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

3

Turban, E., Information Technology for Management: Transforming Business in the
Digital Economy (Wiley, 2001)
Module Specification:
Computer Graphics and Games
Programming

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Computer Graphics and Games
Programming

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CGP2004M

Credit Rating:

30

Level:

2

Pre
-
requisites:

Software Development

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Amr Ahmed

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module introduces the student to the fundamentals, theory, principles, methods,
and techniques of 2D and 3D Computer Graphics (CG) and Computer Generated
Imagery (CGI). The specialised
mathematical underpinnings are explored along with
their practical application in algorithms. The development of skills in implementing and
developing computer graphic applications with C/C++ and standard graphics libraries
(such as OpenGL) encourages the
student to develop their programming skills while
observing the theory of 3D graphics in practice. The above will be delivered through a
games programming context. Students will be encouraged to develop game code to
utilise the graphics algorithms and tech
niques.


This module develops the following mathematical concepts and techniques: coordinate
systems, transformations (translation, rotation, and scaling), projection, vector additions
and multiplications, matrix operations, dot and cross products, paramet
ric curves and
surfaces, viewing conventions.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


Fundamentals of Computer Graphics and Computer Generated Imagery (CGI), including
overview history, applications and relationship with other fields.


Principles of 2D and 3D
graphics programming with the aid of a standard graphics library
such as OpenGL.


Computer graphics algorithms e.g. line/circle drawing, clipping, culling, hidden
-
surface
removal.


Principles of shading, lighting, texturing, and the rendering pipeline e.
g. phong lighting
Module Specification:
Computer Graphics and Games
Programming

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

models, texture mapping, shadowing and bump maps.


Real time, optimisations, and performance consideration and improvement techniques
e.g. Level of Details (LOD), shaders, vertex arrays, display lists.


Game programming: the concept of a
game ‘state’, the game loop, game updates and
timing, as well as memory management.


This module develops the following mathematical concepts and techniques: Coordinate
systems, Transformations (translation, rotation, and scaling), projection, vector addit
ions
and multiplications, matrices operations, dot and cross products, parametric curves and
surfaces, viewing conventions.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] apply appropriate mathematical/algorithmic techniques for 2D and
3D graphics;



[LO2] design
and develop interactive 3D graphics software using
appropriate programming techniques and standard graphics library;



[LO3] implement efficient algorithms for computer games programming;



[LO4] design and develop games software using appropriate games an
d
graphics programming techniques and standard graphics libraries;



[LO5] communicate rational and reasoned arguments in writing.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures and an accompanying

programme of practical hands
-
on workshops and theory seminars. Formative in
-
class
assessment is employed both to develop a deeper understanding of the subject and to
rehearse technique for the summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
30
[LO1], [LO2], [LO4]
No
Item 2
Assignment
40
[LO1], [LO4], [LO5]
No
Item 3
Examination
30
[LO2], [LO3]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Module Specification:
Computer Graphics and Games
Programming

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

3

Astle D. &

Durnil D., OpenGL ES Game 2 edition Development (Thomson Course
Technology, 2004)


DeLoura M., Game Programming GEMS (Charles River Media, 2000)


Foley et. al., Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice in C , 2nd Edition (Addison
Wesley, 1995)


Hill F. S., Computer graphics: using Open GL (Prentice Hall, 2001)


Moller et. Al., Real
-
Time Rendering 2 edition (AK Peters, Ltd, 2002).


Wright, R. S., & Lipchak, B., The OpenGL Super Bible (Sams Publishing, 2004)


Rabin, S, Introduction to Game Dev
elopment (Charles River Media, 2005)


Schreiner, D., The OpenGL Programming Guide (Addison Wesley, 2003)


Other useful resources, include:


http://www.opengl.org/


Game Developer Magazine (CMP Media)


http://nehe.gamedev.net
Module Specification:
Database Systems

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Database Systems

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP2060M

Credit Rating:

15

Level:

2

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Bashir Al
-
Diri

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module explores

the issues in the design, implementation and use of database
technologies which requires the student to develop a conceptual view of database theory
and then transform it into practical implementation of a database application.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabu
s


Definition and key characteristics of a database.

Role and functionality of a DBMS; detailed analysis of RDBMS (relational model).

Design: entity relationship modelling (data modelling) and relational data analysis
(normalisation).

Query language; SQL.

Database security and integrity.

Database administration.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] appraise and evaluate database models and mechanisms;



[LO2] design and analyse a database solution.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching

Strategy/M
ethods


This module is taught through a programme of lectures which introduce and discuss
core concepts and issues. Lectures are supplemented with plenary seminars to further
explore and discuss the concepts raised in the lecture programme, and
to explore
design issues. Formative in
-
class assessment is employed both to develop a deeper
understanding of the subject and to rehearse technique for the summative assessments.


Module Specification:
Database Systems

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
100
[LO1], [LO2]
No


The last item to appear in
this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Codd, E. F., A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks in
Communications of the ACM (13(6)
1970 pp 377
-
387.1)


Date, C. J., An Introduction to Database Systems, 7th edition (Addison
-
Wesley, 2000)


McFadden, F. R., Hoffer, J. and Prescott, M. B., Modern Database Management (5th
edition), (Addison
-
Wesley, 1999)


Connolly, T., Begg, C. and Strachan
, A., Database Systems: A Practical Approach to
Design, Implementation and Management (Addison
-
Wesley, 1996)


McFadyen/Kanabar, An Introduction to SQL (Wm. C. Brown Publishers, 1991)
Module Specification:
Game Design

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module Data


Module Title

Game Design

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CGP2001M

Credit Rating:

30

Level:

2

Pre
-
requisites:

Introductory Game Studies

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Mark Doughty

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module explores the process by which a game concept is first germinated and its
subsequent development via a process of design and documentation to a prototype
stage.

Concepts such as design patterns, gameplay, game mechanics, storyline, narrative,
g
ame architecture and game balance are all studied, using examples of card games,
board games and computer games from both contemporary and traditional sources.

The module will be broadly split between game design theory and game design practice.
Level des
ign (as an example of experience design in general) and its practical
application via a commercial game development environment will be practically explored
in detail. Theories of game design and design patterns will be studied using hands
-
on
exercises suc
h as paper prototyping and board game mock
-
ups as examples. Practical
analysis deconstruction of existing games will encourage debate and comparisons of
design styles principles.

Students will be encouraged to critique both their own designs and others. F
requent
constructive group critiques will give students feedback on their design and ideas.


Section 3:
Outline S
yllabus


First concepts. Ideas, analysis, evaluation and justification of an idea.

Gameplay. What it is, its importance to a games success, enhancement and
development.

Game Balance. Balance and symmetry in game design. In particular, the balancing of
game elements, payoff matrices and other methods to ensure comparability of
experience

for competing players.

Abstraction. Fundamental elements of game experience, character and avatar
representation.

Game design patterns. Patterns in design as the building blocks of a macro game design

Level design tools, principles of level design for
different game types, commercial game
Module Specification:
Game Design

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

2

engine modification.

Design documentation.


Section 4: Learning O
utcomes




[LO1] apply theoretical principles to the design of a prototype game;



[LO2] examine the architecture, design and underlying patterns of a g
ame;



[LO3] design and implement a game level using appropriate tools;



[LO4] construct a portfolio of design documentation to illustrate a game
design;



[LO5] locate and reference relevant information.


Section 5: Learning and Teaching Strategy/M
ethods


This module is delivered via a number of lectures, task driven practical tutorials, hands
-
on workshops and group critique sessions. Learning will be developed and reinforced by
the assessments which require:

• Modding tutorials, submit signed task sheets

• Game analysis and deconstruction, hand in and presentation

• Game design and documentation for prototype. Formative in
-
class assessment is
employed both to develop a deeper understanding of the subject and

to rehearse
technique for the summative assessments.


Section 6: Assessment


Assessment Type
Weighting (%)
Indicative Outcomes
Group Work
Item 1
Assignment
20
[LO3], [LO4], [LO5]
No
Item 2
Presentation
50
[LO1], [LO4]
No
Item 3
Examination
30
[LO2]
No


The last item to appear in this table is the t
he final
assessment submission for this
module.


Section 7:
Relationship to Professional Body


None


Section 8: Indicative R
eading


Adams, E. & Rollings, A. Fundamentals of Game Design (Prentice Hall, 2006)


Bjork, S., & Holopainen, J., Patterns in Game Design (Charles River Media, 2005)


Rabin, S (ed), Introduction to Game Development (Charles River
Media, 2005)


Salen, K., & Zimmerman, Rules of Play (MIT Press, 2004)


Module Specification:
Game Design

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

3

Holt, T., Mapping and Modding Half Life 2 Complete (Paraglyph Press, 2006)


Rollings, A., & Morris, D., Game Architecture and Design (Coriolis Press, 2000)


Katz, A., & Yates, L.,
Inside Electronic Game Design (Prima Publishing, 1996)


Saltzmann, M., Game Design: Secrets of the Sages (Brady Publishing, 1999)


Lewinski, J. S., The Developers Guide to Computer Game Design (Wordware, 2000)


Game Developer Magazine CMP Publishing.

EDGE

Magazine Future Publishing.

www.gamasutra.com

www.gamedev.net
Module Specification:
Group Project

This copy released on
16/03/2013


(students on Programme as at September 201
2
)

1

Section 1: Basic Module
Data


Module Title

Group Project

Faculty

Faculty of Science

Department

Lincoln School of Computer Science

Module Code

CMP2068M

Credit Rating:

30

Level:

2

Pre
-
requisites:

None

Co
-
requisites:

None

Barred Combinations:

None

Module Co
-
ordinator:


Amr Ahmed

Section 2: Module

S
ynopsis


This module aims to provide students with the experience of working as part of a team
on a development project. Students will produce a set of deliverables relevant to their
programme of study, including a finished
product or artefact. Final deliverables will be
negotiated between the group and their supervisor, the module coordinator will be
responsible for ensuring that each project covers the learning outcomes of the module.
Groups are expected to manage their own

processes, and to hold regular meetings both