TCE 340 - College of Education - Oregon State University

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Education Double Degree

Oregon State University

College of Education


SYLLABUS

TCE 340 Supportive Differentiated Environments (WIC)

3 Credits


Fall

Term 2009 Monday

and Wednesday 12:00
-
1:20 Education Hall 107




Instructor: Kay L. Stephens


541
-
737
-
8205



Education Hall 202A


stephenk@oregonstate.edu

Office Hours: by email or by appointment.


Prerequisites: Provisional
Admission to Professional Education Program


REQUIRED TEXTBOOKS


Tomlinson, C. A. (1999).
The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners
.
Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


"Kronowitz (2008)
The teacher's guide to success
. Pearson LEARNING


American Psychological Association (APA) Publication Manual or Writing Manual.

Note: The instructor will require you to bring a writing manual to class by Week 4. This may be
a manual that you have used in required writing courses.


COURSE INFORMATION



This course adheres to all OSU academic regulations as found in the
Schedule of Classes
.

Accommodations are collaborative efforts between students, faculty and Services for Students
with Disabilities (SSD). Students with accommodations approved through

SSD are responsible
for contacting the faculty member in charge of the course prior to or during the first week of the
term to discuss accommodations. Students who believe they are eligible for accommodations but
who have not yet obtained approval through

SSD should contact SSD immediately at 737
-
4098.


TCE340 is the designated Writing Intensive course (WIC) for the Double Degree in Education.
This course adheres to all requirements for an OSU Writing Intensive course, found at
http://wic.oregonstate.edu/i
ndex.cfm.


COURSE DESCRIPTION


The course serves as a foundation for all students planning to become teachers in early
childhood, elementary, middle school, or high school. This course will address special abilities
and needs of learners, and help prepare
teachers to develop strategies and instructional practices
for diverse learners and students with exceptionalities in a supportive and inclusive classroom.


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TCE 340 is a Writing Intensive Course (WIC) and written assignments are assessed using criteria
fro
m the Oregon Department of Education Scoring Guide for Writing, including “Ideas and
Content,” “Organization,” “Word Choice,” “Conventions,” “Voice,” and “Use of References.”
Students will participate in informal and formal writing practices that include
submission of
rough drafts, participation in peer editing, receiving of specific peer and instructor feedback, and
revision of written work. All writing assignments will be related to writing expectations for the
professional teacher and prepare students f
or successful production of documents required for
earning Oregon licensure.



Link to Conceptual Framework, Knowledge Base, and National and State

The Professional Teacher and Counselor Education (PTCE) unit Conceptual Framework is based
on four foundati
onal or core values that are listed below. To find out more about how the
knowledge base relates to the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
(NCATE) guidelines, review the Conceptual Framework at the website:
http://oregonstate.edu/education/accreditation/

1.

Ethics and Professionalism

2.

Reflective Practitioner

3.

Lifelong Learners

4.

Diversity and Equity


With respect to national standards, this course includes application of NCATE

content
knowledge, professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills, dispositions, and student
learning. NCATE Unit Standards:
http://www.ncate.org/public/unitStandardsRubrics.asp?
ch=4


The Oregon TSPC Standards embedded in this course include the following:



Standard 1: Plan Instruction that supports student progress in learning and is appropriate
for the developmental level.



Standard 2: Establish a classroom climate conducive to
learning.



Standard 3: Engage students in planned learning activities.



Standard 4: Evaluate, act upon, and report student progress in learning.



Standard 5: Exhibits professional behaviors, ethics, and values.



COURSE OUTCOMES


This course is part of the professional teacher preparation program leading to the Oregon
Teaching License. Its goal is to address those domains of knowledge related to the standards of
the Professional Teacher Education Program. Through instruction and a
ssessment, students in
this course will


1)


Review, analyze and understand the major theoretical perspectives on classroom
management in developing safe and secure differentiated learning environments.

2)

Understand and be able to demonstrate how to establish
a supportive classroom as it
reflects the culture of students in schools, communities, and workplaces.

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3)

Evaluate, understand and be able to implement a repertoire of pedagogical strategies for
differentiating instruction.

4)

Demonstrate knowledge of ways to pr
ovide access to intellectually challenging
curriculum for all students.

5)

Demonstrate knowledge of and be able to practice equal
-
status interactions for students in
diverse classrooms.

6)

Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of special needs, including the
ir assessment
and implications for instruction.

7)

Demonstrate a sensitivity to cultural and gender factors in the assessment of students and
the planning of instruction for these students.

8)

Develop and strengthen writing skills through rough draft, revision,
and final draft
processes.

9)

Demonstrate knowledge and ability to use Oregon Scoring Guide for Writing.


Writing
-
Related Learning Outcomes

Because this is a Writing Intensive Course (WIC) students will write for and during each class
meeting, growing and
improving writing skills to present themselves well as professional
educators. Student will practice and prepare to meet the following WIC outcomes:

A. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of




1) the main features of writing in the fiel
d of education,


2) the main uses of writing required by professional educators,



3) expectations of readers in their field,


4)uses of writing as a critical
-
thinking tool in education,


5) interactions among critical thinking, critical reading, and writ
ing for educational

purposes,


B. Students will demonstrate competence in/knowledge of writing processes b


1) building written documents in stages,


2) reviewing work
-
in
-
progress in collaborative peer groups for purposes other than

editing,


3) editing

and polishing in the later parts of the writing process,


4) applying technologies commonly used to research and communicate within their field.


C. Students will demonstrate the knowledge and use of


1)the conventions of usage, specialized vocabulary, f
ormat, and documentation in

education


2) strategies through which they can achieve better control of field
-
specific conventions

of Standard Written English


COURSE EXPECTATIONS


Education Double Degree

By the end of the term, students will be able to


1)

Complete a research proj
ect on an exceptionality or methodology, using primary and
secondary sources that demonstrates critical thinking and developing of new knowledge;

2)

Report a field experience related to learners in a supportive learning environment,
analyzing and synthesizing

interactions between students and teachers;

3)

Write a context statement that analyzes and explains the relationship among community,
school, classroom, and learners;

4)

Prepare and teach a student
-
centered, differentiated lesson to their peers;

5)

Write introspe
ctive reflections on teaching experience and course readings;

6)

Interact with peers in creating new knowledge related to teaching through postings to the
Blackboard Discussion Board;

7)

Write in response to assigned readings, reflecting critical thinking rela
ted to the
application of knowledge to practice.


COURSE TOPICS




Developing a supportive school and classroom community that demonstrates an
understanding of the relationship between students’ culture and appropriate management

heuristics,



Strategies for o
rganizing the learning environments, curriculum, and teaching so they have
positive influences on student behavior and participation,



Identifying exceptionalities and how they might affect learning,



Understanding the responsibilities of the teacher for est
ablishing and sustaining a safe and
secure classroom for all students including those with exceptionalities,



Designing learning tasks to differentiate instruction and accommodate exceptionalities,



Learning techniques for equalizing high quality
participation of all students,



Reviewing appropriate assessments for the diverse classroom,



Developing a philosophy and strategies for creating and maintaining a supportive learning
environment for the diverse classroom,



Developing and practicing writing
skills appropriate for the professional educator through
instructor and peer feedback and the revision process, using the Oregon State Scoring Guide.


AUTHORIZATION LEVELS


Students are guided through academic and practicum experiences in the development o
f plans for
instruction that support student progress in learning. All of the assignments are graded with
expectations of gains in knowledge about interpreting and applying new knowledge to the
classroom at the appropriate authorization level.

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Method o
f Instruction

The above standards and course outcomes are implemented in this course by the following
practices:


1.

Student
-
centered curriculum, instruction and assessment


2.

Standards
-
based curriculum, instruction and assessment


3.

Collaborative learni
ng


4.

Instruction integrated within courses and field experiences


5.

Practice in reflective thinking and writing

Students will work individually and collaboratively during class meetings to create knowledge
and products that reflect learning. Students wi
ll participate in accessing assignments and posting
class products on the course Blackboard site and engage in discussion and the exchange of
information using the Blackboard Discussion Board.


Statement Regarding Students with Disabilities

Accommodations

are collaborative efforts between students, faculty and Disability Access
Services (DAS). Students with accommodations approved through DAS are responsible for
contacting the faculty member in charge of the course prior to or during the first week of the
term to discuss accommodations. Students who believe they are eligible for accommodations but
who have not yet obtained approval through DAS should contact DAS immediately at 737
-
4098.

http://oregonstate.edu/dept/budgets/genupol/gupdissu.htm


Link to Statement of Expectations for Student Conduct

http://oregonstate.edu/admin/stucon/achon.htm


Academic Integrity


Students are expected to comply with all regulations pertaining to
academic honesty, defined as:
An intentional act of deception in which a student seeks to claim
credit for the work or effort of another person or uses unauthorized materials or fabricate
d
information in any academic work.

For further information, visit
Avoiding Academic
Dishonesty
, or contact the office of Student Conduct and Mediation at 541
-
737
-
3656.


REQUIREM
ENTS


Note
: all assignments will be word
-
processed and edited to reflect writing skills consistent with
expectations for upper division courses and the professional teacher.


1) Students are expected to:


•come to each class on time and prepared to engage

in dialogue with colleagues,


•prepare materials and think critically about resources,


•demonstrate clarity of ideas, application of knowledge, and appropriate and relevant

contributions in class discussion,


•exhibit insight and reflection through self
-
evaluation,


•prepare assignments, delivered on time, that meet all the criteria,


•recognize and respect the ideas and skills of colleagues and experienced professionals,

and


•participate actively and positively in class activities.


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2) Students will
demonstrate the ability to synthesize, analyze, and think critically by preparing
course readings (Active Reading Journals) and assignments and by participating actively in class
discussions, and collaborative activities (see attached participation scoring

guide).


3) Students will practice professional behavior, including timely and appropriate notice when
you cannot participate in class activities (e.g., email message if not an emergency and in
advance, or voice mail message if an emergency).


Education Double Degree

Evaluation

Your course grade will represent your growth in the context of your effort. The extent to which
you achieve the objectives will not be compared to what other students in this course do. A
scoring guide evaluating class participation is attached. Additiona
l scoring guides appropriate to
assignments detailed below will be posted in the Blackboard course site.


REQUIRED ASSIGNMENTS


Each assignment will be accompanied by directions for either posting to the Discussion Board or
presentation in class. All stud
ent products in response to assignments will be scored consistent
with assignment criteria using scoring guides.


Course requirements include the following:


1. Participation


5 points each class meeting

Participation will include perfo
rmance related to assignments and discussion points. See attached
scoring guide for participation expectations.


2. Performance Demonstrations

10 points each

You will be assigned several performance demonstrations for which you will prepare written
documen
ts that support assignments that will lead to the final product for the research project.
You will have an opportunity to discuss with instructor and peers the first draft or work in
progress before submitting the performance product for a grade. Criteria
for each performance
product will be clearly detailed on the assignment.


3. Active Reading Journal



5 points each

You will be given an inquiry assignment related to the readings that requires you to actively
engage with text. You will be prompted to
develop critical thinking and dispositions to be being
a learner
-
centered teacher who understands and implements principles of relevance and inclusion
as you design instruction for a supportive differentiated classroom. Your Active Reading Journal
submissi
on will involve written responses to critical questions.


4. Field Experience and Ask an Expert

10

You are expected to spend a minimum of four (4) hours in a classroom at your level of
authorization and in your content area if you are a middle or high scho
ol level teacher candidate.
This time should be spent in observing student and teacher interactions and talking with the
teacher and other school specialists about meeting the needs of all students and strategies for
developing a supportive differentiated
classroom. You will write a two
-
page reflection on your
experience as well as a two
-
page description of the school and community context. This context
paper is a precursor to the Teacher Work Sample. Details will be described at the second
meeting and are

posted on the course Bb site.



5. Summative Assessment:



60 points

The summative assessment for this course comes in two parts: 1) a research project and 2) the
teaching of a lesson to the class related to the content of your research project.

Education Double Degree

You wil
l prepare a draft of your 7
-
10 page research project for peer review during Weeks 4 and 5
(10 points) and instructor review Week 6 (10 points) with a final draft for evaluation Week 10
(20 points). Students will teach their lessons (20 points) beginning We
ek 6. A schedule of
lessons will be published no later than Week 3.


GRADING SCALE


Grades will be based on points indicated on the scoring guide and assigned according to this
scale:

A = 94
-
100% of possible points

A
-
= 91
-
93% of possible points

B+= 89
-
9
0% of possible points

B = 84
-
88% of possible points

B
-
= 81
-
83% of possible points

C+=79
-
80% of possible points

C = 74
-
78% of possible points


Grading Policy:
Because this is a upper division course, the expectation is that the student rises
to the level
of upper division work. A grade of
Incomplete

may be requested after the 8
th

week
of the course by emailing the instructor if the student has been diligent is completing the weekly
work and has satisfactorily completed at least 75% of the work of the cours
e. Incomplete work
will not be penalized except for missed opportunities for participation. According to OSU policy,
a grade of Incomplete becomes a grade of F after one year. Special arrangements for completing
an course should be arranged in advance with

the instructor. Remember that as a Double Degree
student, you may not advance to student teaching with a grade of Incomplete on a required
course.


Recommended Websites:


APA tutorials:


http://oregonstate.edu
\
~lamleyj
\
Writing%20Course
\
APA.intro
.html

Dartmouth Writing Program online:


http://www.dartmouth.edu/~writing/materials/student/toc.shtml

Oregon Writing Scoring Guide

http://www.ode.state.or.us/tls/english/writing/assessment/scoringguide0304.pdf


Education terms:
http://www.ascd.org/educationne
ws/lexicon/a.html


No Child Left Behind:
http://www.ed.gov/nclb/landing.jhtml


Special Education IDEA:
http://www.ideapractices.org/
law/regulations/index.php


Federal Privacy laws:
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs97/p97527/SEC2_TXT.asp



(Summary)

http://nces.ed.gov/pubs97/p97527/SEC2_SUM.asp


Oregon School Laws
http://www.ode.state.or.us/supportservices/laws/2001edlaws.pdf


NCATE (Nat. Council for Accreditation of Tchr

Ed)
http://www.ncate.org/standard/unit_stnds_ch2.htm#stnd1



Education Double Degree

OTHER RESOURCES


Armstrong, T. (1994).
Multiple intelligences in the classroom
. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Bloland,
Dagney ( 2006).
Ready, willing, and able: Teaching English to gifted, talented, and
exceptionally conscientious adolescents.
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.


Burke, Jim (2004).
School smarts: The four Cs of academic success
. Portsmouth, NH:
Heinemann.


Burke, M
. D., Hagan, S. L., and Grossen, B. (1998). What curricular designs and strategies
accommodate diverse learners?
Teaching Exceptional Children,
31(1), 34
-
38.


Cook
-
Sather, A. (2003). Listening to students about learning differences
.

Teaching Exceptio
nal
Children
, 35(4), 22
-
26.


Chuska . Kenneth R. (1989).
Gifted Learners K
-
12: A practical guide to effective curriculum &
teaching.
Bloomington, IN: National Education Service.


Differentiating Instruction Lessons. ASCD, PD Online. Available:
http://www.ascd.org/pdi/demo/diffinstr/reis.html
.


Dunn, R., Dunn, K., and Price, G. (2001).
Learning style inventory
. Lawrence, KS: Price
Systems.


Fogarty, R. (1997).
Problem
-
based learning
and curriculum for the multiple intelligences
classroom.

Arlington Heights, IL: Skylight Professional Development.


Fraser, B.J. (1991). "Two Decades of Classroom
Environment

Research" In B.J. Fraser and H.J.
Walberg (Eds.)
Educational
Environments
: Eval
uation, Antecedents, and Consequences
. Oxford,
England: Pergamon Press.


Fraser, B.J., G.J. Anderson, and H.J. Walberg. (1991).
Assessment
of
Learning

Environments
:
Manual
for
Learning

Environment

Inventory (LEI) and My Class Inventory (MCI)
. Perth,
West
ern Australia: Curtin University of Technology, Science and Mathematics Education
Center.


Gardner, H. (1993).
Frames of Mind: The theory of multiple intelligences
. New York: Basic
Books.


Gardner, H. (1993).
Multiple intelligences: The theory in
practice
. New York: Basic Books.


Grayson, D. A., & Martin, M. D. (1997).
Generating expectations for student achievement
(GESA): An equitable approach to educational excellence
. Tehachapi, CA: Graymill.


Education Double Degree

Hofferth, S. L., and associates (1998).
Healthy
environments, healthy children.

Ann Arbor, MI:
Institute of Social Research, University of Michigan.


Jonassen, D.H., & Land, S.M. (2000).
Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments.

Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.


Kagan, S., a
nd Kagan, M. (1998).
Multiple intelligences: The complete MI handbook
. San
Clemente, CA: Kagan Cooperative Learning.


Kohn, A. (1996). Beyond discipline: From compliance to community. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

Payne, Ruby K. (1996).
A framework for und
erstanding poverty.
Highlands, TX: Aha! Process.
Inc.


Reis, S. M., Kaplan, S. N., Tomlinson, C. A., Westberg, K. L. Callahan, C. M., and Cooper, C.
R. (1998). Equal does not mean identical.
Educational Leadership

56(3), online. Available:
http://www.
ascd.org/pdi/demo/diffinstr/reis.html


Sizer, T. R. (1999). No two are quite alike.
Educational Leadership

57(1), online. Available:
http://www.ascd.org/pdi/demo/diffinstr/sizer.html
.


Tauber, R.T. (1999). Classroom Management: Sound Theory and Effective Practice. Westport,
CT: Bergin & Garvey.


Tomlinson, C. A. and Strickland, Cindy A. (2005).
Differentiation in practice: A resource guide
for differentiating curriculum grades 9
-
12.

A
lexandria, VA: ASCD.


Tomlinson, Carol Ann (2005) 2
nd
. Ed. How to differentiate instruction in mixed
-
ability
classrooms. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.


Tomlinson, C. A. and Kalbfleisch, M. L. (1998). Teach me, teach my brain: A call for
differentiated classroom
s.
Educational Leadership
, 56(3), online. Available:
http://www.ascd.org/pdi/demo/diffinstr/tomlinson.html
.


VanTassell
-
Baska, J., Patton, J., and Prillaman, D. (1991).
Gifted youth

at risk: A report of a
national study
. Reston, VA: Council for Exceptional Children.


Whitmore, J. (1980).
Giftedness, conflict and underachievement
. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.


Winebrenner, Susan (1992).
Teaching gifted kids in the regular classroom.

Minneapolis, MN:
Free Spirit.


Yatvin, Joanne (2007).
English
-
only teachers in missed
-
language classrooms: A survival guide.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.


Yatvin, Joanne (2004).
A room with a differentiated view: Ho to serve all children as individual
learn
ers.

Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Education Double Degree



Websites


CBS News. (2000).
Secret service studies school shootings

(online). Available:
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2000/03/14/60II/main171898.shtml.

http://www.
adprima.com/managing.htm

http://www.education
-
world.com/a_curr/curr155.shtml.

http://www.teachingheart.net/backtoschool2.html

http://drwilliampmartin.tripod.com/classm.html

http://www.antibullying.net/

http://www.bullyonline.org

http://www.stopbullyingnow.com/


At
-
Risk Students
. Online. North Central Regional Educational Laboratory. Available:
http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/area
s/at0cont.htm.


TCE340 COURSE SCHEDULE OF TOPICS and ACTIVITIES, LINKED TO COURSE
Outcomes: All writing assignments will be posted on the Assignments link on the course Bb
site.

Class
Session

Topic

Assignment

Course
Outcomes
Addressed

Week 1

Day 1


Beginnings

Bring copies of
syllabus and texts to
class.

1, 2


Week 1

Day 2


Considerations and strategies for
the first days of school;

Field experience protocol and
expectations.

For Day 2:
Kronowitz 5 & 6 and
accompanying
writing.

1, 2

Week 2

Day 3


Establishing a respectful and safe
classroom environment for both
teacher and learners

For Day 3:
Kronowitz 7, 8, 9
and accompanying
writing.


1, 2, 5


Week
2

Day 4

Diverse learners and students with
exceptionalities
-

defining terms &
examining issues; e
stablishing
classroom expectations and routines
that facilitate learning.

For Day 4:
Tomlinson 1 and
Kronowitz 10, 11, 12
and accompanying
writing.

1, 2, 4, 5

Week 3

Day 5


Understanding basic elements of
differentiation and the role that
students and
technology play in the
support of classroom activities.

For Day 5:
Tomlinson 2 and
Kronowitz 13, 14, 15
and accompanying
writing.

5, 6

Week 3

Day 6

Understanding the causes of
classroom disruption and
For Day 6:
Kronowitz 16, 17, 18
5, 6, 7

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developing strategies for prevention
and early interve
ntion.

and accompanying
writing.

Week 4

Day 7


Understanding how differentiating
instruction supports positive student
behaviors.

For Day 7:

Tomlinson 3 and
Kronowitz

19, 20
and accompanying
writing. Draft of
research paper
introduction for peer
review.


2, 5, 8, 9


Week 4

Day 8

Planning for effective instruction
that supports a learning
environment that supports
differentiation; planning and
writing a lesson plan

For

Day 8:
Tomlinson 4 and
Kronowitz 21, 22
and accompanying
writing. Draft of
research paper
introduction for
instructor review.

3, 4, 6, 7,

Week 5

Day 9


Understanding the role of resources
and classroom support personnel in
fostering an effective learning

environment; practicing effective
strategies for differentiating
instruction: Cooperative Learning I

For Day 9:
Tomlinson 5 and
Kronowitz 23, 24
and accompanying
writing.


3, 4, 6, 7

Week 5

Day 10

Exploring teaching strategies that
differentiate instruct
ion for all
learners; recognizing the role of
strategic structures and cooperative
learning.

For Day 10:
Tomlinson 6
-
7 and
Kronowitz 25, 26
and accompanying
writing. Draft of
research paper for
peer review.

3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9

Week 6

Day 11


Practicing strat
egies for
differentiation through student
presentations with emphasis on
specific student needs and
exceptionalities.

For Day 11:
Tomlinson 8 and
Kronowitz 27, 28
and accompanying
writing. Draft of
research paper for
instructor review.

3, 4, 6, 7, 8

Week
6

Day 12

Practicing strategies for
differentiation through student
presentations with emphasis on
specific student needs and
exceptionalities.

For Day 12: TBA on
Blackboard and
accompanying
writing

3, 4, 6, 7

Week 7

Day 13


Practicing strategies for
diffe
rentiation through student
presentations with emphasis on
For Day 13: TBA on
Blackboard and
accompanying
3, 4, 6, 7

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specific student needs and
exceptionalities.

writing

Week 7

Day 14

Practicing strategies for
differentiation through student
presentations
with emphasis on
specific student needs and
exceptionalities.

For Day 14: TBA on
Blackboard and
accompanying
writing

3, 4, 6, 7

Week 8

Day 15


Looking forward to transitioning
from student to student teacher to
teacher.

For Day 15:
Kronowitz 1
-
4 and
accom
panying
writing

2, 5

Week 8

Day 16

Understanding the relationship
between beginning and ending a
school year in the life of students
and teachers.

For Day 16:
Kronowitz 39
-
40 and
accompanying
writing

2, 5

Week 9

Day 17


Structuring classroom activities
to
differentiate instruction: responding
to Tomlinson

For Day 17: Be
prepared to discuss
Tomlinson thru
Chpt. 8

3, 4, 6

Week 9

Day 18

Practicing strategies for
differentiation through student
presentations with emphasis on
specific student needs and
excep
tionalities.

For Day 18: Reading
TBA


Peer Review of
Context Statement

3, 4, 6, 7

Week 10

Day 19


Understanding the role of reflective
practice and writing in the life of a
teacher.

For Day 19:
Kronowitz
35,36,37,38 and
accompanying
writing

2, 5, 9



Week 10

Day 20


Understanding the complexity of
classrooms that are inclusive

For Day 20:
Tomlinson 9 and
accompanying
writing.

1, 5, 7

Final

Submitting the Final

All work is due
by12:00 p.m. on
Wednesday of finals
week.